Discussion:
OT: Flavour suggestions, please
(too old to reply)
Jenny M Benson
2020-09-10 12:07:14 UTC
Permalink
Apple & clove or cinnamon.
Rhubarb & ginger.

Gooseberry & what, please?
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Penny
2020-09-10 13:02:30 UTC
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On Thu, 10 Sep 2020 13:07:14 +0100, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Apple & clove or cinnamon.
Rhubarb & ginger.
Gooseberry & what, please?
Elderflower
Cheese
Pork (I've used gluts of frozen gooseberries or plums as a cook-in sauce)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2020-09-10 13:16:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
Elderflower
Cheese
Pork (I've used gluts of frozen gooseberries or plums as a cook-in sauce)
Ooh, thank you! Love elderflower and think that is a jolly good idea.

Hadn't thought of using them in a savoury context, but using them with
pork ... mmmmm! You've made me think of looking for a gooseberry
chutney recipe which hadn't occurred to me before.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
John Ashby
2020-09-10 15:09:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
Elderflower
Cheese
Pork (I've used gluts of frozen gooseberries or plums as a cook-in sauce)
Ooh, thank you!  Love elderflower and think that is a jolly good idea.
Hadn't thought of using them in a savoury context, but using them with
pork ... mmmmm!  You've made me think of looking for a gooseberry
chutney recipe which hadn't occurred to me before.
And mackerel.

john
Penny
2020-09-10 15:22:47 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 10 Sep 2020 16:09:10 +0100, John Ashby <***@yahoo.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
Elderflower
Cheese
Pork (I've used gluts of frozen gooseberries or plums as a cook-in sauce)
Ooh, thank you!  Love elderflower and think that is a jolly good idea.
Hadn't thought of using them in a savoury context, but using them with
pork ... mmmmm!  You've made me think of looking for a gooseberry
chutney recipe which hadn't occurred to me before.
And mackerel.
Yes indeed!
Though I have no facility to catch mackerel here and it's 30 miles to the
coast. Once you've eaten it freshly caught, the aging version found in the
fishmonger (do they still exist?) is just wrong - it's probably the
texture. I did eat some in a bar on the prom in Aberystwyth a few years
back, having checked they were caught the same day - very good.

Gooseberries also make good jam.
You can make gooseberry fool my whipping cooked (unsweetened) gooseberries
with a can of sweetened condensed milk. If you then freeze that, it makes a
pretty good gooseberry ice cream.

My name is Penny and I like gooseberries :) preferably fresh and peeled but
there are usually too many ripe at once to do that with them all.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris J Dixon
2020-09-10 17:48:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
Gooseberries also make good jam.
I remember my surprise, when I made some many years ago, because
of a garden glut, that the result was not green.

Nice jam though. :-)

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Anne B
2020-09-10 21:25:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
Gooseberries also make good jam.
I remember my surprise, when I made some many years ago, because
of a garden glut, that the result was not green.
Nice jam though. :-)
Chris
We got so much gooseberry jam at school that I have never been able to
eat it since. I remember asking the catering staff once, when I was
heartily sick of gooseberry jam, if we had nearly got to the end of the
giant tin it came in, and rejoicing when they said yes, in the hope of a
different kind of jam soon. But they went and opened another huge can of
gooseberry jam so we had gooseberry jam again and again every single day
for a whole term.

I like fresh gooseberries, and I like gooseberry fool. I used to know of
several 'wild' gooseberry bushes but evidently they don't last for ever
because I couldn't find them last time I looked.

Anne B
Sam Plusnet
2020-09-11 20:51:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
Gooseberries also make good jam.
I remember my surprise, when I made some many years ago, because
of a garden glut, that the result was not green.
Nice jam though.  :-)
Chris
We got so much gooseberry jam at school that I have never been able to
eat it since. I remember asking the catering staff once, when I was
heartily sick of gooseberry jam, if we had nearly got to the end of the
giant tin it came in, and rejoicing when they said yes, in the hope of a
different kind of jam soon. But they went and opened another huge can of
gooseberry jam so we had gooseberry jam again and again every single day
for a whole term.
A former co-worker did his National Service in the Army, and said that
for some reason there was never any sugar available to put into the tea.
The only substitute available was Gooseberry jam - but that was
available in massive quantities.
He avoided Gooseberry jam for the rest of his life.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2020-09-10 23:04:07 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 10 Sep 2020 18:48:54 +0100, Chris J Dixon <***@cdixon.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
Gooseberries also make good jam.
I remember my surprise, when I made some many years ago, because
of a garden glut, that the result was not green.
Gooseberry wine tends to be pink too.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Peter
2020-09-10 15:26:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
Elderflower
Cheese
Pork (I've used gluts of frozen gooseberries or plums as a cook-in sauce)
Ooh, thank you!  Love elderflower and think that is a jolly good idea.
Hadn't thought of using them in a savoury context, but using them with
pork ... mmmmm!  You've made me think of looking for a gooseberry
chutney recipe which hadn't occurred to me before.
And mackerel.
john
An excellent suggestion!
Rosemary Miskin
2020-09-10 15:36:21 UTC
Permalink
Gooseberry and white-currant is a delicious combination

Rosemary
Jenny M Benson
2020-09-10 16:24:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Gooseberry and white-currant is a delicious combination
On addition to the gooseberry bushes which I still have, I used to have
the use of a short strip of ground in which I had red, white and
blackcurrant bushes, the former of 2 in particular which cropped
prolifically. One day I went out and they were gone:-(

At the back of the strip was the fence of a yard to another property
belonging to the HA who are my landlords. They were (for no apparent
good reason) replacing all the fences round here. When I complained to
the estate manager he just said they didn't know the bushes were mine.
It apparently never occurred to them to ask anybody. The fact that it
was a considerable financial loss to me was ignored.

I was disheartened and didn't replace the fruit bushes. (I do have
others in pots, but not red or white currants at the moment.) When my
sister was wanting to part with 3 youngish dogwoods, I planted them in
that strip. They have flourished and SHOULD look lovely this winter,
showing off their stems of 3 different colours. However, I know they
won't because I know some HA employees will be round before long,
hacking off everything - including my lovely tall rose - at waist
height. They do it every year. I've asked them 3 times not to do so.
Waste of breath.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Vicky Ayech
2020-09-10 17:06:42 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 10 Sep 2020 17:24:38 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Gooseberry and white-currant is a delicious combination
On addition to the gooseberry bushes which I still have, I used to have
the use of a short strip of ground in which I had red, white and
blackcurrant bushes, the former of 2 in particular which cropped
prolifically. One day I went out and they were gone:-(
At the back of the strip was the fence of a yard to another property
belonging to the HA who are my landlords. They were (for no apparent
good reason) replacing all the fences round here. When I complained to
the estate manager he just said they didn't know the bushes were mine.
It apparently never occurred to them to ask anybody. The fact that it
was a considerable financial loss to me was ignored.
I was disheartened and didn't replace the fruit bushes. (I do have
others in pots, but not red or white currants at the moment.) When my
sister was wanting to part with 3 youngish dogwoods, I planted them in
that strip. They have flourished and SHOULD look lovely this winter,
showing off their stems of 3 different colours. However, I know they
won't because I know some HA employees will be round before long,
hacking off everything - including my lovely tall rose - at waist
height. They do it every year. I've asked them 3 times not to do so.
Waste of breath.
Maybe put a sign up saying they are yours and the cost of losing the
berries?
Nick Odell
2020-09-11 13:52:31 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 10 Sep 2020 17:24:38 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Gooseberry and white-currant is a delicious combination
On addition to the gooseberry bushes which I still have, I used to have
the use of a short strip of ground in which I had red, white and
blackcurrant bushes, the former of 2 in particular which cropped
prolifically. One day I went out and they were gone:-(
At the back of the strip was the fence of a yard to another property
belonging to the HA who are my landlords. They were (for no apparent
good reason) replacing all the fences round here. When I complained to
the estate manager he just said they didn't know the bushes were mine.
It apparently never occurred to them to ask anybody. The fact that it
was a considerable financial loss to me was ignored.
I was disheartened and didn't replace the fruit bushes. (I do have
others in pots, but not red or white currants at the moment.) When my
sister was wanting to part with 3 youngish dogwoods, I planted them in
that strip. They have flourished and SHOULD look lovely this winter,
showing off their stems of 3 different colours. However, I know they
won't because I know some HA employees will be round before long,
hacking off everything - including my lovely tall rose - at waist
height. They do it every year. I've asked them 3 times not to do so.
Waste of breath.
My gooseberry bush isn't really mine: it lies at the bottom of a field
and because it is on the wrong side of a stone wall alongside a public
footpath I don't think it counts as hedgerow in this context. But
nobody else ever picks them so I have been helping myself there for
years. Except this year, of course.

Nick
Tony Smith
2020-09-11 13:32:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Gooseberry and white-currant is a delicious combination
But gooseberry and date less so.
Peter
2020-09-11 13:50:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Gooseberry and white-currant is a delicious combination
But gooseberry and date less so.
Well done!
Kate B
2020-09-10 22:03:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
Elderflower
Cheese
Pork (I've used gluts of frozen gooseberries or plums as a cook-in sauce)
Ooh, thank you!  Love elderflower and think that is a jolly good idea.
Hadn't thought of using them in a savoury context, but using them
with pork ... mmmmm!  You've made me think of looking for a
gooseberry chutney recipe which hadn't occurred to me before.
And mackerel.
john
An excellent suggestion!
A friend gave me some gooseberries earlier on this year and I made a
sauce for some salmon fillets simply pan-fried. I knew about mackerel
and gooseberries and thought it should work with any oily fish. And it
did, it was delicious.
--
Kate B
London
Jane Vernon
2020-09-17 10:28:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Peter
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
Elderflower
Cheese
Pork (I've used gluts of frozen gooseberries or plums as a cook-in sauce)
Ooh, thank you!  Love elderflower and think that is a jolly good idea.
Hadn't thought of using them in a savoury context, but using them
with pork ... mmmmm!  You've made me think of looking for a
gooseberry chutney recipe which hadn't occurred to me before.
And mackerel.
john
An excellent suggestion!
A friend gave me some gooseberries earlier on this year and I made a
sauce for some salmon fillets simply pan-fried. I knew about mackerel
and gooseberries
You would, considering the French for gooseberries! (groseille maquereau)

and thought it should work with any oily fish. And it
Post by Kate B
did, it was delicious.
Good idea, I'd never have thought of it. How did you make the sauce?



(seem to have lost my sig file somehow. Anyway, it's me.)

Steve Hague
2020-09-12 08:03:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Apple & clove or cinnamon.
Rhubarb & ginger.
Gooseberry & what, please?
Isn't it only the hair on a gooseberry that keeps it from being a grape?
Steve
Mike
2020-09-12 09:13:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Jenny M Benson
Apple & clove or cinnamon.
Rhubarb & ginger.
Gooseberry & what, please?
Isn't it only the hair on a gooseberry that keeps it from being a grape?
Steve
And limes are envious little lemons.
--
Toodle Pip
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