Discussion:
OT: MS Word 2010 Help
(too old to reply)
Jenny M Benson
2019-08-06 10:39:06 UTC
Permalink
Eventually, with great difficulty because the Help text was inadequate
and the illustrations didn't resemble what was on my screen, I managed
to automagically insert the filename into the header of a document. But
what I really wanted to do was insert the full path and filename. I
couldn't see that option. Is it no longer an option or am I just not
seeing it? (Quite possible - cataract surgery in about 4 months,
hopefully!)
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Steve Hague
2019-08-06 11:32:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Eventually, with great difficulty because the Help text was inadequate
and the illustrations didn't resemble what was on my screen, I managed
to automagically insert the filename into the header of a document.  But
what I really wanted to do was insert the full path and filename.  I
couldn't see that option.  Is it no longer an option or am I just not
seeing it?  (Quite possible - cataract surgery in about 4 months,
hopefully!)
This is no help with MS Word, but cataract surgery is amazing. I had
both eyes done a couple of years ago. They give you several doses of eye
drops, which take effect over an hour or so. The surgery itself involved
no pain whatsoever, although the brightness of the lighting the surgeon
needed to use was uncomfortable. Within a few days my eyesight was
better than it had been for about ten years.
Steve
Mike
2019-08-06 12:27:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Jenny M Benson
Eventually, with great difficulty because the Help text was inadequate
and the illustrations didn't resemble what was on my screen, I managed
to automagically insert the filename into the header of a document.  But
what I really wanted to do was insert the full path and filename.  I
couldn't see that option.  Is it no longer an option or am I just not
seeing it?  (Quite possible - cataract surgery in about 4 months,
hopefully!)
This is no help with MS Word, but cataract surgery is amazing. I had
both eyes done a couple of years ago. They give you several doses of eye
drops, which take effect over an hour or so. The surgery itself involved
no pain whatsoever, although the brightness of the lighting the surgeon
needed to use was uncomfortable. Within a few days my eyesight was
better than it had been for about ten years.
Steve
Amazing difference to my acuity and colour rendition when I had mine done
(right eye only - totally blind in left eye), but I am pleased to say mine
was done under general anesthesia and I did not experience any of the
surgery as it happened ;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Flop
2019-08-06 13:47:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Eventually, with great difficulty because the Help text was inadequate
and the illustrations didn't resemble what was on my screen, I managed
to automagically insert the filename into the header of a document.  But
what I really wanted to do was insert the full path and filename.  I
couldn't see that option.  Is it no longer an option or am I just not
seeing it?  (Quite possible - cataract surgery in about 4 months,
hopefully!)
You may need just the last bit...

Insert tab.
Header & header group.
Click on the drop down arrow beneath the word header
Click on:-
Edit header
Once in the header click on the Insert tab.
Text group.
Click on the drop down arrow to the right of:-
Quick Parts
Click on:-
Field
The Field window should pop up.
In the:-
Categories:
- drop down field (towards top left hand corner) make sure that:-
(All)
- is selected.
In the:-
Field names:
- scroll list click on:-
Filename
Now, towards the top right hand side there is a box called:-
Add path to filename
- box. Make sure that there is a tick (check) in this box.
Click on:-
OK
You should now have the full path and file name inserted in the header.
--
Flop

Truly the Good Lord gave us computers that we might learn patience
Jenny M Benson
2019-08-06 15:38:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flop
Post by Jenny M Benson
Eventually, with great difficulty because the Help text was inadequate
and the illustrations didn't resemble what was on my screen, I managed
to automagically insert the filename into the header of a document.
But what I really wanted to do was insert the full path and filename.
I couldn't see that option.  Is it no longer an option or am I just
not seeing it?  (Quite possible - cataract surgery in about 4 months,
hopefully!)
You may need just the last bit...
Actually, I needed it all because when I went back to edit it I'd
forgotten how I got there in the first place! Many thanks!

What a palaver, for something that must be used so frequently and used
to be so quick and simple, IIRC. It proved a useful exercise, because
not being sure exactly where or how I'd saved the document I needed, I'd
fed Cortana a couple of key words and accepted her offering. Having
added the path to the filename I discovered I'd opened a copy of the
document which had been backed up to BT Cloud, not the original.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
SODAM
2019-08-06 18:20:02 UTC
Permalink
Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
Is it no longer an option or am I just not
Post by Jenny M Benson
seeing it? (Quite possible - cataract surgery in about 4 months,
hopefully!)
Had my second cataract op yesterday, which was very successful. Seeing well
already. One marvels at the skill of the surgeons and the ingenuity of the
inventors of the sophisticated equipment that they use. How grateful I am
for our National Health Service!
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-08-07 00:22:37 UTC
Permalink
In message
Post by Jenny M Benson
Is it no longer an option or am I just not
Post by Jenny M Benson
seeing it? (Quite possible - cataract surgery in about 4 months,
hopefully!)
Had my second cataract op yesterday, which was very successful. Seeing well
Excellent news! Glad to hear it.
Post by Jenny M Benson
already. One marvels at the skill of the surgeons and the ingenuity of the
inventors of the sophisticated equipment that they use. How grateful I am
for our National Health Service!
(Hope it's still there when _I_ need that op.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

After all is said and done, usually more is said.
Chris McMillan
2019-08-07 08:01:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Is it no longer an option or am I just not
Post by Jenny M Benson
seeing it? (Quite possible - cataract surgery in about 4 months,
hopefully!)
Had my second cataract op yesterday, which was very successful. Seeing well
already. One marvels at the skill of the surgeons and the ingenuity of the
inventors of the sophisticated equipment that they use. How grateful I am
for our National Health Service!
Well done, SODAM!

Best Chris
Mike
2019-08-07 08:20:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Is it no longer an option or am I just not
Post by Jenny M Benson
seeing it? (Quite possible - cataract surgery in about 4 months,
hopefully!)
Had my second cataract op yesterday, which was very successful. Seeing well
already. One marvels at the skill of the surgeons and the ingenuity of the
inventors of the sophisticated equipment that they use. How grateful I am
for our National Health Service!
Well done, SODAM!
Best Chris
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of Egyptian
digs.

On the subject of the NHS, I have nothing but praise for it, my recent
investigations and now treatment for cancer of the prostate have been and
still are second to none! Start radiotherapy in Octoberish time.
--
Toodle Pip
SODAM
2019-08-07 15:19:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of Egyptian
digs.
On the subject of the NHS, I have nothing but praise for it, my recent
investigations and now treatment for cancer of the prostate have been and
still are second to none! Start radiotherapy in Octoberish time.
How do the archaeologists know the needles were used for cataract surgery?

Best of luck with your treatment, Toodles.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Mike
2019-08-07 15:45:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of Egyptian
digs.
On the subject of the NHS, I have nothing but praise for it, my recent
investigations and now treatment for cancer of the prostate have been and
still are second to none! Start radiotherapy in Octoberish time.
How do the archaeologists know the needles were used for cataract surgery?
Best of luck with your treatment, Toodles.
They found the needles which were curved in shape and worked out that the
Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000 years
before our NHS came along.

Thanks for the good wishes Sodam; I am a full 28 days into my Bicalutamide
tablets taken daily and, as yet have not noticed any side effects. Mine
dew, Chris McT may be more informedabout any bad tempered moods if I have
them yet - that is, if they are any worse than my usual awkward
bad-tempered cussidness!
--
Toodle Pip
Jim Easterbrook
2019-08-07 15:53:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of
Egyptian digs.
How do the archaeologists know the needles were used for cataract surgery?
They found the needles which were curved in shape and worked out that
the Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000
years before our NHS came along.
Some surgeons are quite resistant to new techniques.

What was Cleopatra's needle used for?
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Mike
2019-08-07 15:58:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of
Egyptian digs.
How do the archaeologists know the needles were used for cataract surgery?
They found the needles which were curved in shape and worked out that
the Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000
years before our NHS came along.
Some surgeons are quite resistant to new techniques.
What was Cleopatra's needle used for?
Never saw the point in that one m’self.
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2019-08-09 09:58:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of
Egyptian digs.
How do the archaeologists know the needles were used for cataract surgery?
They found the needles which were curved in shape and worked out that
the Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000
years before our NHS came along.
Some surgeons are quite resistant to new techniques.
What was Cleopatra's needle used for?
Her mummy needed it.
Mike
2019-08-09 10:15:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of
Egyptian digs.
How do the archaeologists know the needles were used for cataract surgery?
They found the needles which were curved in shape and worked out that
the Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000
years before our NHS came along.
Some surgeons are quite resistant to new techniques.
What was Cleopatra's needle used for?
Her mummy needed it.
I thought that was the baker...
--
Toodle Pip
SODAM
2019-08-09 12:20:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of
Egyptian digs.
How do the archaeologists know the needles were used for cataract surgery?
They found the needles which were curved in shape and worked out that
the Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000
years before our NHS came along.
Some surgeons are quite resistant to new techniques.
What was Cleopatra's needle used for?
Her mummy needed it.
My mummy had a curved needle in her work box but called it a “carpet
needle”. I would never believe that the Ancient Egyptians did cataract surgery.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
BrritSki
2019-08-09 12:32:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of
Egyptian digs.
How do the archaeologists know the needles were used for cataract surgery?
They found the needles which were curved in shape and worked out that
the Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000
years before our NHS came along.
Some surgeons are quite resistant to new techniques.
What was Cleopatra's needle used for?
Her mummy needed it.
My mummy had a curved needle in her work box but called it a “carpet
needle”. I would never believe that the Ancient Egyptians did cataract surgery.
It's well known that there are several cataracts on the Nile.
Paul Herber
2019-08-09 12:39:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of
Egyptian digs.
How do the archaeologists know the needles were used for cataract surgery?
They found the needles which were curved in shape and worked out that
the Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000
years before our NHS came along.
Some surgeons are quite resistant to new techniques.
What was Cleopatra's needle used for?
Her mummy needed it.
My mummy had a curved needle in her work box but called it a “carpet
needle”. I would never believe that the Ancient Egyptians did cataract surgery.
It's well known that there are several cataracts on the Nile.
Are they on blind bends?
--
Regards, Paul Herber
http://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Mike
2019-08-09 13:22:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Herber
Post by BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of
Egyptian digs.
How do the archaeologists know the needles were used for cataract surgery?
They found the needles which were curved in shape and worked out that
the Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000
years before our NHS came along.
Some surgeons are quite resistant to new techniques.
What was Cleopatra's needle used for?
Her mummy needed it.
My mummy had a curved needle in her work box but called it a “carpet
needle”. I would never believe that the Ancient Egyptians did cataract surgery.
It's well known that there are several cataracts on the Nile.
Are they on blind bends?
Or on the eyeots.
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2019-08-09 13:21:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of
Egyptian digs.
How do the archaeologists know the needles were used for cataract surgery?
They found the needles which were curved in shape and worked out that
the Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000
years before our NHS came along.
Some surgeons are quite resistant to new techniques.
What was Cleopatra's needle used for?
Her mummy needed it.
My mummy had a curved needle in her work box but called it a “carpet
needle”. I would never believe that the Ancient Egyptians did cataract surgery.
Please see:

http://cdn.intechopen.com/pdfs/42710/InTech-The_history_of_cataract_surgery.pdf
--
Toodle Pip
Rosemary Miskin
2019-08-09 16:33:00 UTC
Permalink
mummy had a curved needle in her work box but called it a “carpet needle”. 
I've got a couple -I call them upholstery needles, as that's
what I use them for. Much easier than uding straught ones.

Rosemary
Penny
2019-08-09 22:38:19 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 9 Aug 2019 09:33:00 -0700 (PDT), Rosemary Miskin
Post by Rosemary Miskin
mummy had a curved needle in her work box but called it a “carpet needle”. 
I've got a couple -I call them upholstery needles, as that's
That's what I call mine too. Suturing needles are also curved but very much
smaller.
Post by Rosemary Miskin
what I use them for. Much easier than uding straught ones.
Maybe we should call them distraught ones ;)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sid Nuncius
2019-08-09 18:47:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of
Egyptian digs.
How do the archaeologists know the needles were used for cataract surgery?
They found the needles which were curved in shape and worked out that
the Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000
years before our NHS came along.
Some surgeons are quite resistant to new techniques.
What was Cleopatra's needle used for?
Her mummy needed it.
Yeah, but she was a pain in the asp.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2019-08-10 07:24:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of
Egyptian digs.
How do the archaeologists know the needles were used for cataract surgery?
They found the needles which were curved in shape and worked out that
the Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000
years before our NHS came along.
Some surgeons are quite resistant to new techniques.
What was Cleopatra's needle used for?
Her mummy needed it.
Yeah, but she was a pain in the asp.
Really ? I hadn't kept abreast of the situation.
Mike
2019-08-10 11:42:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of
Egyptian digs.
How do the archaeologists know the needles were used for cataract surgery?
They found the needles which were curved in shape and worked out that
the Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000
years before our NHS came along.
Some surgeons are quite resistant to new techniques.
What was Cleopatra's needle used for?
Her mummy needed it.
Yeah, but she was a pain in the asp.
Really ? I hadn't kept abreast of the situation.
It is that dirty windscreen of yours - I think you need to use your
windscreen vipers.
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-08-10 12:23:19 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
the Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000
years before our NHS came along.
Some surgeons are quite resistant to new techniques.
What was Cleopatra's needle used for?
Her mummy needed it.
Yeah, but she was a pain in the asp.
Really ? I hadn't kept abreast of the situation.
It is that dirty windscreen of yours - I think you need to use your
windscreen vipers.
Any mention of Cleopatra always makes me think of the Carry On version,
starring the then-gorgeous Amanda Barrie, as a very dippy Cleo. IMO
probably one of the top Carry Ons (along with Khyber) - and of course
includes the famous "infamy!" line.

I think it was shot on the same sets as the huge-budget one with Burton
and Taylor, before they were dismantled; normal for the CarryOns, which
always saved a bob when they could.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I don't see the requirement to upset people. ... There's enough to make fun of
without offending. - Ronnie Corbett, in Radio Times 6-12 August 2011.
Mike
2019-08-10 12:27:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
the Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000
years before our NHS came along.
Some surgeons are quite resistant to new techniques.
What was Cleopatra's needle used for?
Her mummy needed it.
Yeah, but she was a pain in the asp.
Really ? I hadn't kept abreast of the situation.
It is that dirty windscreen of yours - I think you need to use your
windscreen vipers.
Any mention of Cleopatra always makes me think of the Carry On version,
starring the then-gorgeous Amanda Barrie, as a very dippy Cleo. IMO
probably one of the top Carry Ons (along with Khyber) - and of course
includes the famous "infamy!" line.
I think it was shot on the same sets as the huge-budget one with Burton
and Taylor, before they were dismantled; normal for the CarryOns, which
always saved a bob when they could.
That line spoken by Kenneth Williams often features in programmes, even to
this day.
--
Toodle Pip
Jim Easterbrook
2019-08-10 12:33:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I think it was shot on the same sets as the huge-budget one with Burton
and Taylor, before they were dismantled; normal for the CarryOns, which
always saved a bob when they could.
Not just Carry Ons, it's commonplace in Hollywood. A quick web search
will find numerous examples.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Mike
2019-08-10 12:40:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I think it was shot on the same sets as the huge-budget one with Burton
and Taylor, before they were dismantled; normal for the CarryOns, which
always saved a bob when they could.
Not just Carry Ons, it's commonplace in Hollywood. A quick web search
will find numerous examples.
Sounds like a possible theme for a round in ISIHAC to me.
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2019-08-10 12:43:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I think it was shot on the same sets as the huge-budget one with Burton
and Taylor, before they were dismantled; normal for the CarryOns, which
always saved a bob when they could.
Not just Carry Ons, it's commonplace in Hollywood. A quick web search
will find numerous examples.
Sounds like a possible theme for a round in ISIHAC to me.
I heard an interview with Barry Cryer (sp?) on R4 yesterday in which he
explained much of ISIHAC’s success was due to its’ sillyness and that we
all need to be silly sometimes.
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-08-10 13:25:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Mike
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I think it was shot on the same sets as the huge-budget one with Burton
and Taylor, before they were dismantled; normal for the CarryOns, which
always saved a bob when they could.
Not just Carry Ons, it's commonplace in Hollywood. A quick web search
will find numerous examples.
Yes, but these were British! Pinewood, it might have been. And the Carry
Ons were well-known for saving money. (I was going to say infamous, but
that implies criticism; IMO they did it without adversely affecting the
result.)
Post by Mike
Post by Mike
Sounds like a possible theme for a round in ISIHAC to me.
I heard an interview with Barry Cryer (sp?) on R4 yesterday in which he
explained much of ISIHAC’s success was due to its’ sillyness and that we
all need to be silly sometimes.
From my quotes file:
As we journey through life, discarding baggage along the way, we should
keep an iron grip, to the very end, on the capacity for silliness. It
preserves the soul from desiccation. - Humphrey Lyttelton quoted by
Barry Cryer in Radio Times 10-16 November 2012

So it was Humph's sentiment originally (though probably even older, if
anything older than Humph isn't an impossible concept within the
parameters of ISIHAC).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

They are public servants, so we will threat them rather as Flashman treats
servants. - Stephen Fry on some people's attitudo to the BBC, in Radio Times,
3-9 July 2010
Mike
2019-08-10 14:42:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by Mike
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I think it was shot on the same sets as the huge-budget one with Burton
and Taylor, before they were dismantled; normal for the CarryOns, which
always saved a bob when they could.
Not just Carry Ons, it's commonplace in Hollywood. A quick web search
will find numerous examples.
Yes, but these were British! Pinewood, it might have been. And the Carry
Ons were well-known for saving money. (I was going to say infamous, but
that implies criticism; IMO they did it without adversely affecting the
result.)
Post by Mike
Post by Mike
Sounds like a possible theme for a round in ISIHAC to me.
I heard an interview with Barry Cryer (sp?) on R4 yesterday in which he
explained much of ISIHAC’s success was due to its’ sillyness and that we
all need to be silly sometimes.
As we journey through life, discarding baggage along the way, we should
keep an iron grip, to the very end, on the capacity for silliness. It
preserves the soul from desiccation. - Humphrey Lyttelton quoted by
Barry Cryer in Radio Times 10-16 November 2012
So it was Humph's sentiment originally (though probably even older, if
anything older than Humph isn't an impossible concept within the
parameters of ISIHAC).
OFOTSOA;

Perhaps, something like:

Film set: Turin car factory roof, lots of costumes consisting of very long
KKK type headgear, title ‘Blowing the doors of the Turin Shroud’. I’m quite
sure the massed ranks of UMRA can do far better, meanwhile ....

I’ll get my Derby hat and Caine.
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2019-08-10 14:54:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by Mike
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I think it was shot on the same sets as the huge-budget one with Burton
and Taylor, before they were dismantled; normal for the CarryOns, which
always saved a bob when they could.
Not just Carry Ons, it's commonplace in Hollywood. A quick web search
will find numerous examples.
Yes, but these were British! Pinewood, it might have been. And the Carry
Ons were well-known for saving money. (I was going to say infamous, but
that implies criticism; IMO they did it without adversely affecting the
result.)
Post by Mike
Post by Mike
Sounds like a possible theme for a round in ISIHAC to me.
I heard an interview with Barry Cryer (sp?) on R4 yesterday in which he
explained much of ISIHAC’s success was due to its’ sillyness and that we
all need to be silly sometimes.
As we journey through life, discarding baggage along the way, we should
keep an iron grip, to the very end, on the capacity for silliness. It
preserves the soul from desiccation. - Humphrey Lyttelton quoted by
Barry Cryer in Radio Times 10-16 November 2012
So it was Humph's sentiment originally (though probably even older, if
anything older than Humph isn't an impossible concept within the
parameters of ISIHAC).
OFOTSOA;
Film set: Turin car factory roof, lots of costumes consisting of very long
KKK type headgear, title ‘Blowing the doors of the Turin Shroud’. I’m quite
sure the massed ranks of UMRA can do far better, meanwhile ....
I’ll get my Derby hat and Caine.
Of course, I meant ‘Blowing the bloody doors...’
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-08-07 21:56:33 UTC
Permalink
In message <3mC2F.633257$***@fx40.am4>, Mike
<***@ntlworld.com> writes:
[]
Post by Mike
Thanks for the good wishes Sodam; I am a full 28 days into my Bicalutamide
tablets taken daily and, as yet have not noticed any side effects. Mine
dew, Chris McT may be more informedabout any bad tempered moods if I have
them yet - that is, if they are any worse than my usual awkward
bad-tempered cussidness!
Your cussidness may occasionally be awkward, but is never bad-tempered.
I usually visualise your tweets as coming with a twinkle in your eye.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

A dishwasher is rubbish at making treacle sponge. - Marjorie in UMRA, 2017-1-15
Mike
2019-08-08 07:21:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
Thanks for the good wishes Sodam; I am a full 28 days into my Bicalutamide
tablets taken daily and, as yet have not noticed any side effects. Mine
dew, Chris McT may be more informedabout any bad tempered moods if I have
them yet - that is, if they are any worse than my usual awkward
bad-tempered cussidness!
Your cussidness may occasionally be awkward, but is never bad-tempered.
I usually visualise your tweets as coming with a twinkle in your eye.
I’m sorry ‘bout that! I’m not aware that I have tweeted lately! Must ask
the doctor if he will prescribe some treatment for that. (Not a tweeter or
facebook user)
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-08-08 07:27:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
Thanks for the good wishes Sodam; I am a full 28 days into my Bicalutamide
tablets taken daily and, as yet have not noticed any side effects. Mine
dew, Chris McT may be more informedabout any bad tempered moods if I have
them yet - that is, if they are any worse than my usual awkward
bad-tempered cussidness!
Your cussidness may occasionally be awkward, but is never bad-tempered.
I usually visualise your tweets as coming with a twinkle in your eye.
I’m sorry ‘bout that! I’m not aware that I have tweeted lately! Must ask
the doctor if he will prescribe some treatment for that. (Not a tweeter or
facebook user)
Sorry, I meant posts. These new-fangled things ... (I took to tweeting
in the vain hope it'd help my doomed petition [it didn't], but I stayed)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

You've made a happy man very old. - Stephen Fry, on QI, 2014-10-18
?
Chris McMillan
2019-08-08 11:57:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Needles used in cataract surgery have been found amongst relics of Egyptian
digs.
On the subject of the NHS, I have nothing but praise for it, my recent
investigations and now treatment for cancer of the prostate have been and
still are second to none! Start radiotherapy in Octoberish time.
How do the archaeologists know the needles were used for cataract surgery?
Best of luck with your treatment, Toodles.
They found the needles which were curved in shape and worked out that the
Egyptians had been using them for cataract surgery more than 2,000 years
before our NHS came along.
Thanks for the good wishes Sodam; I am a full 28 days into my Bicalutamide
tablets taken daily and, as yet have not noticed any side effects. Mine
dew, Chris McT may be more informedabout any bad tempered moods if I have
them yet - that is, if they are any worse than my usual awkward
bad-tempered cussidness!
I’ve tokd him, I’m sending off to anyone who wants him should he become
cussed? :)

Best Chris
Tony Bryer
2019-08-12 09:33:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Had my second cataract op yesterday, which was very successful. Seeing well
already. One marvels at the skill of the surgeons and the ingenuity of the
inventors of the sophisticated equipment that they use. How grateful I am
for our National Health Service!
Yes, definitely something to marvel at. My dad had a cataract op c.1968: eye
bandaged for days, two weeks in hospital and then having to wear very dark
glasses for several weeks (a non-driver, he observed what a great thing
yellow lines were since they demarcated the kerb line). Just extraordinary
that today it's just a day surgery procedure.
--
Tony B, OzRat, Melbourne
Mike
2019-08-12 11:02:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Bryer
Post by SODAM
Had my second cataract op yesterday, which was very successful. Seeing well
already. One marvels at the skill of the surgeons and the ingenuity of the
inventors of the sophisticated equipment that they use. How grateful I am
for our National Health Service!
Yes, definitely something to marvel at. My dad had a cataract op c.1968: eye
bandaged for days, two weeks in hospital and then having to wear very dark
glasses for several weeks (a non-driver, he observed what a great thing
yellow lines were since they demarcated the kerb line). Just extraordinary
that today it's just a day surgery procedure.
Yeap, vast strides have been made - so much so, it is a ‘routine’ procedure
and makes such a huge and dramatic difference; usually the loss of sight
has been so gradual that this sudden change emphasises the difference.
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2019-08-12 11:10:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Tony Bryer
Post by SODAM
Had my second cataract op yesterday, which was very successful. Seeing well
already. One marvels at the skill of the surgeons and the ingenuity of the
inventors of the sophisticated equipment that they use. How grateful I am
for our National Health Service!
Yes, definitely something to marvel at. My dad had a cataract op c.1968: eye
bandaged for days, two weeks in hospital and then having to wear very dark
glasses for several weeks (a non-driver, he observed what a great thing
yellow lines were since they demarcated the kerb line). Just extraordinary
that today it's just a day surgery procedure.
Yeap, vast strides have been made - so much so, it is a ‘routine’ procedure
and makes such a huge and dramatic difference; usually the loss of sight
has been so gradual that this sudden change emphasises the difference.
I don’t know if I have ever mentioned it but, my correction post surgery
would have been so slight that the surgeon reckoned that the risk of
possible infection from fitting an Intra-Ocular Lens was greater than the
benefit from any slight *correction. The IOL normally incorporates a UV
filter to replace the natural one that was removed; I am now more sensitive
to UV than before my op and certain blues seem to glow a little - I wear UV
filtered sunglasses when outside.

I was highly myopic before the op and the removal of the lens more or less
corrected for this.
--
Toodle Pip
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