Discussion:
AIAOU in saying up for ERNIE?
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Mike
2019-06-02 14:27:30 UTC
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If I can, I stay awake on the mid-night for the announcements on the ERNIE
website to check which if any of our bond numbers has fruited something for
us. I expect I’m the only UMRAT to do this....?
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-06-02 14:55:27 UTC
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On Sun, 02 Jun 2019 14:27:30 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
If I can, I stay awake on the mid-night for the announcements on the ERNIE
website to check which if any of our bond numbers has fruited something for
us. I expect I’m the only UMRAT to do this....?
I never do, there aren't available for a couple of days after the turn of
the month. Most months I have checked before anything arrives on my doormat
though.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-02 16:02:01 UTC
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Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
If I can, I stay awake on the mid-night for the announcements on the ERNIE
website to check which if any of our bond numbers has fruited something for
us. I expect I’m the only UMRAT to do this....?
I never do, there aren't available for a couple of days after the turn of
the month. Most months I have checked before anything arrives on my doormat
though.
No I don't. I got rid of mine. I didn't win for ages and got grumpy.
Penny
2019-06-02 18:04:23 UTC
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Apparently I scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
there aren't available
I swear my fingers are deaf - that's not what I told them to write at all.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Marmaduke Jinks
2019-06-02 22:29:48 UTC
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Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
If I can, I stay awake on the mid-night for the announcements on the ERNIE
website to check which if any of our bond numbers has fruited something for
us. I expect I'm the only UMRAT to do this....?
I never do, there aren't available for a couple of days after the turn of
the month. Most months I have checked before anything arrives on my doormat
though.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
I think you have to wait until the evening of the second working day of the
month. That is, the 4th June.

Although I think they were earlier last month - by a day.

MJ
LFS
2019-06-02 16:48:19 UTC
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Post by Mike
If I can, I stay awake on the mid-night for the announcements on the ERNIE
website to check which if any of our bond numbers has fruited something for
us. I expect I’m the only UMRAT to do this....?
I check on the morning of the day the numbers are announced: now I have
the app on my phone it is much easier.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Mike
2019-06-02 16:53:24 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Mike
If I can, I stay awake on the mid-night for the announcements on the ERNIE
website to check which if any of our bond numbers has fruited something for
us. I expect I’m the only UMRAT to do this....?
I check on the morning of the day the numbers are announced: now I have
the app on my phone it is much easier.
It is indeed, but not so easy waiting those ‘extra’ hours as you do;-)))
Mine dew, I’m not bothered by birthday or Christmas day events at all.
--
Toodle Pip
Paul Herber
2019-06-02 20:07:02 UTC
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Post by Mike
If I can, I stay awake on the mid-night for the announcements on the ERNIE
website to check which if any of our bond numbers has fruited something for
us. I expect I’m the only UMRAT to do this....?
Not something I'd stay awake for. But then, it's not the fastest website in the west.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
http://www.paulherber.co.uk/
carolet
2019-06-04 13:10:27 UTC
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Post by Paul Herber
Post by Mike
If I can, I stay awake on the mid-night for the announcements on the ERNIE
website to check which if any of our bond numbers has fruited something for
us. I expect I’m the only UMRAT to do this....?
Not something I'd stay awake for. But then, it's not the fastest website in the west.
That tickled old Carolet
--
CaroleT
Nick Odell
2019-06-02 20:38:58 UTC
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Post by Mike
If I can, I stay awake on the mid-night for the announcements on the ERNIE
website to check which if any of our bond numbers has fruited something for
us. I expect I’m the only UMRAT to do this....?
Well, I don't do it. My gut instinct - and let's face it, who needs
statistical experts when one may rely on ones gut instinct - is that the
number of bonds I hold make it pretty likely that I will win something
some months but the number and distribution of the prizes on offer make
it pretty unlikely that my prize will be The Big One.

So I don't wait up for the results: I don't even log into my nsandi
account when I receive the email. I just wait for my monthly bank
statement to turn up. Mind you: I might break my routine if the expected
balance on my account appeared an order of magnitude too high when
taking cash out of the hole in the wall

Nick
Anne B
2019-06-02 21:07:21 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
If I can, I stay awake on the mid-night for the announcements on the ERNIE
website to check which if any of our bond numbers has fruited
something for
us. I expect I’m the only UMRAT to do this....?
Well, I don't do it. My gut instinct - and let's face it, who needs
statistical experts when one may rely on ones gut instinct - is that the
number of bonds I hold make it pretty likely that I will win something
some months but the number and distribution of the prizes on offer make
it pretty unlikely that my prize will be The Big One.
So I don't wait up for the results: I don't even log into my nsandi
account when I receive the email. I just wait for my monthly bank
statement to turn up. Mind you: I might break my routine if the expected
balance on my account appeared an order of magnitude too high when
taking cash out of the hole in the wall
Nick
I wouldn't wait up for them. I get the e-mail when I have won something,
but I don't usually check how much as it's almost always £25. There was
£100 once, but only once, many moons ago.

Anne B
Penny
2019-06-02 21:53:02 UTC
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On Sun, 2 Jun 2019 22:07:21 +0100, Anne B <***@btinternet.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Anne B
Post by Nick Odell
So I don't wait up for the results: I don't even log into my nsandi
account when I receive the email. I just wait for my monthly bank
statement to turn up. Mind you: I might break my routine if the expected
balance on my account appeared an order of magnitude too high when
taking cash out of the hole in the wall
Nick
I wouldn't wait up for them. I get the e-mail when I have won something,
but I don't usually check how much as it's almost always £25. There was
£100 once, but only once, many moons ago.
Email? Why don't I get emails?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-06-03 07:30:05 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Anne B
Post by Nick Odell
So I don't wait up for the results: I don't even log into my nsandi
account when I receive the email. I just wait for my monthly bank
statement to turn up. Mind you: I might break my routine if the expected
balance on my account appeared an order of magnitude too high when
taking cash out of the hole in the wall
Nick
I wouldn't wait up for them. I get the e-mail when I have won something,
but I don't usually check how much as it's almost always £25. There was
£100 once, but only once, many moons ago.
Email? Why don't I get emails?
Have you gone ‘paperless’?
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-06-03 08:35:49 UTC
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On Mon, 03 Jun 2019 07:30:05 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Email? Why don't I get emails?
Have you gone ‘paperless’?
No, I like bits of paper, they work when the power is out (unlike my
computer which suffered from a toast-related problem this morning).
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-06-03 08:51:53 UTC
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Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Email? Why don't I get emails?
Have you gone ‘paperless’?
No, I like bits of paper, they work when the power is out (unlike my
computer which suffered from a toast-related problem this morning).
Oh dear! Related to cooked slices of bread or did the ‘puter fry?
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-06-03 10:24:10 UTC
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On Mon, 03 Jun 2019 08:51:53 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
No, I like bits of paper, they work when the power is out (unlike my
computer which suffered from a toast-related problem this morning).
Oh dear! Related to cooked slices of bread or did the ‘puter fry?
I managed to short-out the toaster while putting my usual two slices of
frozen bread in, sandwiched together - my preferred breakfast sandwich,
crisp on outside, soft in middle. It took me three tries, tripping out the
power each time, before I took a close look into the toaster and managed to
tweak the pop-up bar back into its proper place.

It's done well that toaster, it must be getting on for 20 years old - glad
I got it working :)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Leverton
2019-06-03 10:31:04 UTC
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Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Penny
No, I like bits of paper, they work when the power is out (unlike my
computer which suffered from a toast-related problem this morning).
Oh dear! Related to cooked slices of bread or did the ‘puter fry?
I managed to short-out the toaster while putting my usual two slices of
frozen bread in, sandwiched together - my preferred breakfast sandwich,
crisp on outside, soft in middle. It took me three tries, tripping out the
power each time, before I took a close look into the toaster and managed to
tweak the pop-up bar back into its proper place.
It's done well that toaster, it must be getting on for 20 years old - glad
I got it working :)
Glad to hear that at least your computer isn't now toast :)

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Nick Odell
2019-06-03 17:11:50 UTC
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Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
No, I like bits of paper, they work when the power is out (unlike my
computer which suffered from a toast-related problem this morning).
Oh dear! Related to cooked slices of bread or did the ‘puter fry?
I managed to short-out the toaster while putting my usual two slices of
frozen bread in, sandwiched together - my preferred breakfast sandwich,
crisp on outside, soft in middle. It took me three tries, tripping out the
power each time, before I took a close look into the toaster and managed to
tweak the pop-up bar back into its proper place.
It's done well that toaster, it must be getting on for 20 years old - glad
I got it working :)
I was having problems with my not-so-old toaster. I couldn't trust it to
"pop" when it was done and I couldn't trust me not to wander off
absentmindedly and forget that I should be watching it. We had several
smoke incidents through my distraction and that was without leaving the
kitchen.

So, having decided that if I couldn't make it work safely I wasn't going
to let it work unsafely, I gave it the drastic
keyboard/cd-player/microwave kill-or-cure therapy of umra passim: I
plunged it into water and washing-up liquid and used a toothbrush to
scrub clean everything I could see. After a good soak to soften those
bits I couldn't see I took it outside, set the hosepipe to "jet" and
blasted it inside and out with clean water.

Then I put it in a nice warm place and left it to dry out for a week and
- hurrah! - it's working again now

FAQs:
Why didn't I take it to bits?
Because I'd taken it to bits and cleaned it the sensible way several
times before without success.

How did I make toast for the week of toaster convalescence?
I used my stovetop Argentine toaster or the little toaster that is way
more than twenty years old that has never caused any bother in its life.

Why don't I use the LTTIWMTTYOTHNCABIIL all the time?
The newer toaster was a gift and -ahem- needs to be seen to be in use.

Nick
Penny
2019-06-03 20:43:27 UTC
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On Mon, 3 Jun 2019 18:11:50 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
It's done well that toaster, it must be getting on for 20 years old - glad
I got it working :)
I was having problems with my not-so-old toaster. I couldn't trust it to
"pop" when it was done and I couldn't trust me not to wander off
absentmindedly and forget that I should be watching it. We had several
smoke incidents through my distraction and that was without leaving the
kitchen.
I have had similar problems with the aging toaster over the years. It
didn't stop popping up but seemed to have a dodgy timer and could not be
relied upon to toast consistently. So I retired it for a couple of years
when a similar looking model showed up in the middle of Lidl, very cheap.

After that one died (2 years), I dug the old one out, cleaned it up (in
normal fashion) and when it starts burning toast I turn the dial up as far
as it will go, then back again and it behaves well for a while. Next time
it burns, I give it a thorough clean.
Post by Nick Odell
So, having decided that if I couldn't make it work safely I wasn't going
to let it work unsafely, I gave it the drastic
keyboard/cd-player/microwave kill-or-cure therapy of umra passim: I
plunged it into water and washing-up liquid and used a toothbrush to
scrub clean everything I could see. After a good soak to soften those
bits I couldn't see I took it outside, set the hosepipe to "jet" and
blasted it inside and out with clean water.
Then I put it in a nice warm place and left it to dry out for a week and
- hurrah! - it's working again now
That does sound a bit drastic but I'll bear it in mind. My usual cleaning
regime involves a stiff, long handled, short-bristled paint brush and much
shaking out in the yard. The worst part of the design of this otherwise
good toaster is the crumb tray. Removing it without leaving large 'crumbs'
behind is impossible. I think it's these chunks of oft-heated bread which
cause the over-cooking.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-06-04 07:28:53 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Penny
On Mon, 3 Jun 2019 18:11:50 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
It's done well that toaster, it must be getting on for 20 years old - glad
I got it working :)
I was having problems with my not-so-old toaster. I couldn't trust it to
"pop" when it was done and I couldn't trust me not to wander off
absentmindedly and forget that I should be watching it. We had several
smoke incidents through my distraction and that was without leaving the
kitchen.
I have had similar problems with the aging toaster over the years. It
didn't stop popping up but seemed to have a dodgy timer and could not be
relied upon to toast consistently. So I retired it for a couple of years
when a similar looking model showed up in the middle of Lidl, very cheap.
After that one died (2 years), I dug the old one out, cleaned it up (in
normal fashion) and when it starts burning toast I turn the dial up as far
as it will go, then back again and it behaves well for a while. Next time
it burns, I give it a thorough clean.
Post by Nick Odell
So, having decided that if I couldn't make it work safely I wasn't going
to let it work unsafely, I gave it the drastic
keyboard/cd-player/microwave kill-or-cure therapy of umra passim: I
plunged it into water and washing-up liquid and used a toothbrush to
scrub clean everything I could see. After a good soak to soften those
bits I couldn't see I took it outside, set the hosepipe to "jet" and
blasted it inside and out with clean water.
Then I put it in a nice warm place and left it to dry out for a week and
- hurrah! - it's working again now
That does sound a bit drastic but I'll bear it in mind. My usual cleaning
regime involves a stiff, long handled, short-bristled paint brush and much
shaking out in the yard. The worst part of the design of this otherwise
good toaster is the crumb tray. Removing it without leaving large 'crumbs'
behind is impossible. I think it's these chunks of oft-heated bread which
cause the over-cooking.
Well, we had toast with baked beans this morning (just to comply with the
thread twist), but, to get back on topic, I slept earlier, woke after
midnight and interrogated ERNIE; £75 between us. I will leave this as an
exercise for Umratic minds to decide whether waking and checking was a
worthwhile event.
--
Toodle Pip
LFS
2019-06-04 08:02:08 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Penny
On Mon, 3 Jun 2019 18:11:50 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
It's done well that toaster, it must be getting on for 20 years old - glad
I got it working :)
I was having problems with my not-so-old toaster. I couldn't trust it to
"pop" when it was done and I couldn't trust me not to wander off
absentmindedly and forget that I should be watching it. We had several
smoke incidents through my distraction and that was without leaving the
kitchen.
I have had similar problems with the aging toaster over the years. It
didn't stop popping up but seemed to have a dodgy timer and could not be
relied upon to toast consistently. So I retired it for a couple of years
when a similar looking model showed up in the middle of Lidl, very cheap.
After that one died (2 years), I dug the old one out, cleaned it up (in
normal fashion) and when it starts burning toast I turn the dial up as far
as it will go, then back again and it behaves well for a while. Next time
it burns, I give it a thorough clean.
Post by Nick Odell
So, having decided that if I couldn't make it work safely I wasn't going
to let it work unsafely, I gave it the drastic
keyboard/cd-player/microwave kill-or-cure therapy of umra passim: I
plunged it into water and washing-up liquid and used a toothbrush to
scrub clean everything I could see. After a good soak to soften those
bits I couldn't see I took it outside, set the hosepipe to "jet" and
blasted it inside and out with clean water.
Then I put it in a nice warm place and left it to dry out for a week and
- hurrah! - it's working again now
That does sound a bit drastic but I'll bear it in mind. My usual cleaning
regime involves a stiff, long handled, short-bristled paint brush and much
shaking out in the yard. The worst part of the design of this otherwise
good toaster is the crumb tray. Removing it without leaving large 'crumbs'
behind is impossible. I think it's these chunks of oft-heated bread which
cause the over-cooking.
Well, we had toast with baked beans this morning (just to comply with the
thread twist), but, to get back on topic, I slept earlier, woke after
midnight and interrogated ERNIE; £75 between us. I will leave this as an
exercise for Umratic minds to decide whether waking and checking was a
worthwhile event.
I forgot to check when I woke up at 4 am but have just done so. £125
here, giving me something over 2% for the year so far. Husband got
nothing this month, though.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
BrritSki
2019-06-04 08:06:29 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Mike
Well, we had toast with baked beans this morning (just to comply with the
thread twist),  but, to get back on topic, I slept earlier, woke after
midnight and interrogated ERNIE; £75 between us. I will leave this as an
exercise for Umratic minds to decide whether waking and checking was a
worthwhile event.
I forgot to check when I woke up at 4 am but have just done so. £125
here, giving me something over 2% for the year so far. Husband got
nothing this month, though.
YALysistrataAICM5drachma
LFS
2019-06-04 08:11:31 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by LFS
Post by Mike
Well, we had toast with baked beans this morning (just to comply with the
thread twist),  but, to get back on topic, I slept earlier, woke after
midnight and interrogated ERNIE; £75 between us. I will leave this as an
exercise for Umratic minds to decide whether waking and checking was a
worthwhile event.
I forgot to check when I woke up at 4 am but have just done so. £125
here, giving me something over 2% for the year so far. Husband got
nothing this month, though.
YALysistrataAICM5drachma
<chortle>
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
BrritSki
2019-06-04 12:59:58 UTC
Reply
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Post by LFS
Post by BrritSki
Post by LFS
Post by Mike
Well, we had toast with baked beans this morning (just to comply with the
thread twist),  but, to get back on topic, I slept earlier, woke after
midnight and interrogated ERNIE; £75 between us. I will leave this as an
exercise for Umratic minds to decide whether waking and checking was a
worthwhile event.
I forgot to check when I woke up at 4 am but have just done so. £125
here, giving me something over 2% for the year so far. Husband got
nothing this month, though.
YALysistrataAICM5drachma
<chortle>
We're going to see an AMDram production of it later this month in
Bedford. Sounds like fun and if I like the company I might even see if I
can perform with them [1].

Their casting notes are interesting:

<https://bedforddramacompany.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Lysistrata-Characters-Additional-Information.pdf>
[2]

Phylurgus or Peisander sound spot on for me, but not the Spartan Ambassador.



[1] "get some small parts with them" deemed inappropriate in this post :)
[2] Safe to click on Vicky ;)
Min
2019-06-04 17:44:29 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
We're going to see an AMDram production of it later this month in
Bedford.
Nope, not bitter *at all*!
--
Min
Jenny M Benson
2019-06-04 08:57:23 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by LFS
I forgot to check when I woke up at 4 am but have just done so. £125
here, giving me something over 2% for the year so far. Husband got
nothing this month, though.
YALysistrataAICM5drachma
Big :=)
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Min
2019-06-04 17:42:14 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by LFS
Husband got
nothing this month, though.
YALysistrataAICM5drachma
You are *so* behind the times, Brritski! It should be
YAChi-RaqAICM5dollars...and no, I'm not bitter at all that I've been banging on about doing Lysistrata for the last 8 years and people are only listening now Spike Lee's done it....
--
Min
BrritSki
2019-06-05 06:47:46 UTC
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Post by Min
Post by BrritSki
Post by LFS
Husband got
nothing this month, though.
YALysistrataAICM5drachma
You are *so* behind the times, Brritski! It should be
YAChi-RaqAICM5dollars...and no, I'm not bitter at all that I've been banging on about doing Lysistrata for the last 8 years and people are only listening now Spike Lee's done it....
The version I'm seeing is from a 1972 translation by Germaine Greer that
was first produced in 1999 and possibly even earlier !
Min
2019-06-04 17:46:48 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
YALysistrataAICM5drachma
Post by LFS
Husband got
nothing this month, though.
YALysistrataAICM5drachma
You are *so* behind the times, Brritski! It should be
YAChi-RaqAICM5dollars...and no, I'm not bitter at all
that I've been banging on about doing Lysistrata for
the last 8 years and people are only listening now
Spike Lee's done it....
--
Min
Min
2019-06-04 19:16:52 UTC
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Permalink
The above two posts were in a sensible order
until I had to delete and reformat the latter
because Google Groups does not present lines
in an Umrat Friendly Format.
--
Min
Sam Plusnet
2019-06-04 20:17:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by LFS
Post by Mike
Well, we had toast with baked beans this morning (just to comply with the
thread twist),  but, to get back on topic, I slept earlier, woke after
midnight and interrogated ERNIE; £75 between us. I will leave this as an
exercise for Umratic minds to decide whether waking and checking was a
worthwhile event.
I forgot to check when I woke up at 4 am but have just done so. £125
here, giving me something over 2% for the year so far. Husband got
nothing this month, though.
YALysistrataAICM5drachma
Shirley someone called Lizzie Strata should be an excellent layer?
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2019-06-05 07:31:27 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by BrritSki
Post by LFS
Post by Mike
Well, we had toast with baked beans this morning (just to comply with the
thread twist),  but, to get back on topic, I slept earlier, woke after
midnight and interrogated ERNIE; £75 between us. I will leave this as an
exercise for Umratic minds to decide whether waking and checking was a
worthwhile event.
I forgot to check when I woke up at 4 am but have just done so. £125
here, giving me something over 2% for the year so far. Husband got
nothing this month, though.
YALysistrataAICM5drachma
Shirley someone called Lizzie Strata should be an excellent layer?
ITYM an eggsellent layer don’t you - or are you apprenticed to Brritski?
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2019-06-04 14:54:18 UTC
Reply
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Post by Mike
Post by Penny
On Mon, 3 Jun 2019 18:11:50 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
It's done well that toaster, it must be getting on for 20 years old - glad
I got it working :)
I was having problems with my not-so-old toaster. I couldn't trust it to
"pop" when it was done and I couldn't trust me not to wander off
absentmindedly and forget that I should be watching it. We had several
smoke incidents through my distraction and that was without leaving the
kitchen.
I have had similar problems with the aging toaster over the years. It
didn't stop popping up but seemed to have a dodgy timer and could not be
relied upon to toast consistently. So I retired it for a couple of years
when a similar looking model showed up in the middle of Lidl, very cheap.
After that one died (2 years), I dug the old one out, cleaned it up (in
normal fashion) and when it starts burning toast I turn the dial up as far
as it will go, then back again and it behaves well for a while. Next time
it burns, I give it a thorough clean.
Post by Nick Odell
So, having decided that if I couldn't make it work safely I wasn't going
to let it work unsafely, I gave it the drastic
keyboard/cd-player/microwave kill-or-cure therapy of umra passim: I
plunged it into water and washing-up liquid and used a toothbrush to
scrub clean everything I could see. After a good soak to soften those
bits I couldn't see I took it outside, set the hosepipe to "jet" and
blasted it inside and out with clean water.
Then I put it in a nice warm place and left it to dry out for a week and
- hurrah! - it's working again now
That does sound a bit drastic but I'll bear it in mind. My usual cleaning
regime involves a stiff, long handled, short-bristled paint brush and much
shaking out in the yard. The worst part of the design of this otherwise
good toaster is the crumb tray. Removing it without leaving large 'crumbs'
behind is impossible. I think it's these chunks of oft-heated bread which
cause the over-cooking.
Well, we had toast with baked beans this morning (just to comply with the
thread twist), but, to get back on topic, I slept earlier, woke after
midnight and interrogated ERNIE; £75 between us. I will leave this as an
exercise for Umratic minds to decide whether waking and checking was a
worthwhile event.
I now think I have earned the accolade of ‘Being Alone on UMRA’ as norat
has come forward with contra indications!
--
Toodle Pip
Anne B
2019-06-06 14:59:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
On Mon, 3 Jun 2019 18:11:50 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
It's done well that toaster, it must be getting on for 20 years old - glad
I got it working :)
I was having problems with my not-so-old toaster. I couldn't trust it to
"pop" when it was done and I couldn't trust me not to wander off
absentmindedly and forget that I should be watching it. We had several
smoke incidents through my distraction and that was without leaving the
kitchen.
I have had similar problems with the aging toaster over the years. It
didn't stop popping up but seemed to have a dodgy timer and could not be
relied upon to toast consistently. So I retired it for a couple of years
when a similar looking model showed up in the middle of Lidl, very cheap.
After that one died (2 years), I dug the old one out, cleaned it up (in
normal fashion) and when it starts burning toast I turn the dial up as far
as it will go, then back again and it behaves well for a while. Next time
it burns, I give it a thorough clean.
Post by Nick Odell
So, having decided that if I couldn't make it work safely I wasn't going
to let it work unsafely, I gave it the drastic
keyboard/cd-player/microwave kill-or-cure therapy of umra passim: I
plunged it into water and washing-up liquid and used a toothbrush to
scrub clean everything I could see. After a good soak to soften those
bits I couldn't see I took it outside, set the hosepipe to "jet" and
blasted it inside and out with clean water.
Then I put it in a nice warm place and left it to dry out for a week and
- hurrah! - it's working again now
That does sound a bit drastic but I'll bear it in mind. My usual cleaning
regime involves a stiff, long handled, short-bristled paint brush and much
shaking out in the yard. The worst part of the design of this otherwise
good toaster is the crumb tray. Removing it without leaving large 'crumbs'
behind is impossible. I think it's these chunks of oft-heated bread which
cause the over-cooking.
Well, we had toast with baked beans this morning (just to comply with the
thread twist), but, to get back on topic, I slept earlier, woke after
midnight and interrogated ERNIE; £75 between us. I will leave this as an
exercise for Umratic minds to decide whether waking and checking was a
worthwhile event.
Quite glad, having read all this, that I have never owned a toaster.
Anywhere I have ever seen one seems always to be surrounded by crumbs of
burnt toast.

Anne B
krw
2019-06-07 10:24:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Just to say that some minion of Ernie has emailed and this month is a
bit brighter!
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Mike
2019-06-07 10:38:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Just to say that some minion of Ernie has emailed and this month is a
bit brighter!
Good to hear KRW!
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2019-06-07 10:44:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Just to say that some minion of Ernie has emailed and this month is a
bit brighter!
:)

Sincerely Chris
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-07 11:05:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Just to say that some minion of Ernie has emailed and this month is a
bit brighter!
Well I sold my bonds as didn't get any cheques for a couple of years,
so you are getting my ones.
Mike
2019-06-07 11:10:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by krw
Just to say that some minion of Ernie has emailed and this month is a
bit brighter!
Well I sold my bonds as didn't get any cheques for a couple of years,
so you are getting my ones.
I am not getting your cheques! *My* ‘winnings’ are paid straight into my
account. ;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2019-06-03 23:40:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
No, I like bits of paper, they work when the power is out (unlike my
computer which suffered from a toast-related problem this morning).
Oh dear! Related to cooked slices of bread or did the ‘puter fry?
I managed to short-out the toaster while putting my usual two slices of
frozen bread in, sandwiched together - my preferred breakfast sandwich,
crisp on outside, soft in middle. It took me three tries, tripping out the
power each time, before I took a close look into the toaster and managed to
tweak the pop-up bar back into its proper place.
It's done well that toaster, it must be getting on for 20 years old - glad
I got it working :)
AIAOU in that we have never owned a toaster?
WIWAL I sometimes used a toasting-fork over the living-room fire, and
since that time we use the grill on the (gas) cooker.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2019-06-04 07:36:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 4 Jun 2019 00:40:42 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
AIAOU in that we have never owned a toaster?
WIWAL I sometimes used a toasting-fork over the living-room fire, and
since that time we use the grill on the (gas) cooker.
I'd never seen a toaster as a child until we stayed with relatives one
holiday. They had an electric device which sat on the breakfast table, it
could deal with three slices of bread at a time (I think) held nearly
vertically and toasted one side at a time, then you had to turn the slice
round. Everyone at the table could tell when the bread started to burn.

We had an Aga at home and made toast on the hot plate, held in a circular
wire cage with a handle. When we moved into a house with an electric
cooker, making toast under the grill meant bending down to check it - a
backward step, I think. It wasn't until I moved in with the husgod that I
lived in a house with a toaster.

The advantage of a pop-up toaster, you don't need to watch it and can make
the tea and stack the dishwasher while it does its work.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
LFS
2019-06-04 08:07:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
AIAOU in that we have never owned a toaster?
WIWAL I sometimes used a toasting-fork over the living-room fire, and
since that time we use the grill on the (gas) cooker.
I'd never seen a toaster as a child until we stayed with relatives one
holiday. They had an electric device which sat on the breakfast table, it
could deal with three slices of bread at a time (I think) held nearly
vertically and toasted one side at a time, then you had to turn the slice
round. Everyone at the table could tell when the bread started to burn.
We had an Aga at home and made toast on the hot plate, held in a circular
wire cage with a handle. When we moved into a house with an electric
cooker, making toast under the grill meant bending down to check it - a
backward step, I think. It wasn't until I moved in with the husgod that I
lived in a house with a toaster.
The advantage of a pop-up toaster, you don't need to watch it and can make
the tea and stack the dishwasher while it does its work.
When I was growing up we made toast under the grill on the gas cooker
but we didn't often eat it. No-one had toast for breakfast. Husband was
disappointed that we received no toasters as wedding presents and bought
one immediately. I think we are now on our fourth in almost 49 years.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Fenny
2019-06-07 19:06:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
When I was growing up we made toast under the grill on the gas cooker
but we didn't often eat it. No-one had toast for breakfast. Husband was
disappointed that we received no toasters as wedding presents and bought
one immediately. I think we are now on our fourth in almost 49 years.
We made toast under the electric grill and ate it in large quantities,
with variously butter, marmalade, honey and chocolate spread [1]. At
the weekend, we even had things on it [2] - as we did for tea
sometimes during the week.

[1] Chocolate spread was a special treat and only allowed if we'd run
out of all the other things.
[2] Scrambled egg, beans, cheese, mushrooms or - the rest of the
family - poached egg.
--
Fenny
John Ashby
2019-06-04 16:53:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
AIAOU in that we have never owned a toaster?
WIWAL I sometimes used a toasting-fork over the living-room fire, and
since that time we use the grill on the (gas) cooker.
I'd never seen a toaster as a child until we stayed with relatives one
holiday. They had an electric device which sat on the breakfast table, it
could deal with three slices of bread at a time (I think) held nearly
vertically and toasted one side at a time, then you had to turn the slice
round. Everyone at the table could tell when the bread started to burn.
We had an Aga at home and made toast on the hot plate, held in a circular
wire cage with a handle. When we moved into a house with an electric
cooker, making toast under the grill meant bending down to check it - a
backward step, I think. It wasn't until I moved in with the husgod that I
lived in a house with a toaster.
The advantage of a pop-up toaster, you don't need to watch it and can make
the tea and stack the dishwasher while it does its work.
"I'm excited about my new cooker with the eye-level grill. This means
that without my having to bend down the hot fat can squirt straight in
my eye."

Flanders and Swann, Design for Living

john
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-04 16:57:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
th
"I'm excited about my new cooker with the eye-level grill. This means
that without my having to bend down the hot fat can squirt straight in
my eye."
Flanders and Swann, Design for Living
john
I've not had an eye level grill, or a waist level one, for years and I
miss them. We never grill stuff now. The so-called grill in the top of
the oven is pants, as were the two before it. Likewise in the
microwave.
Mike
2019-06-04 17:23:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Ashby
th
"I'm excited about my new cooker with the eye-level grill. This means
that without my having to bend down the hot fat can squirt straight in
my eye."
Flanders and Swann, Design for Living
john
I've not had an eye level grill, or a waist level one, for years and I
miss them. We never grill stuff now. The so-called grill in the top of
the oven is pants, as were the two before it. Likewise in the
microwave.
Our Neff combination microwave oven has a very respectable grill in it but
can only operate if the door is shut.
--
Toodle Pip
LFS
2019-06-04 18:23:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Ashby
th
"I'm excited about my new cooker with the eye-level grill. This means
that without my having to bend down the hot fat can squirt straight in
my eye."
Flanders and Swann, Design for Living
john
I've not had an eye level grill, or a waist level one, for years and I
miss them. We never grill stuff now. The so-called grill in the top of
the oven is pants, as were the two before it. Likewise in the
microwave.
Our Neff combination microwave oven has a very respectable grill in it but
can only operate if the door is shut.
We have a built in Neff Circotherm double oven and I've got used to
having to operate the grill with the door closed but it's slightly too
high for my eye level. And our new fridge is so tall that I can't reach
the top shelf without standing on something. I'm 5 ft 5 but that seems
to be short these days.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Jim Easterbrook
2019-06-04 19:20:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
And our new fridge is so tall that I can't reach
the top shelf without standing on something. I'm 5 ft 5 but that seems
to be short these days.
Smaller fridges are available. And use less energy.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
LFS
2019-06-05 08:58:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by LFS
And our new fridge is so tall that I can't reach
the top shelf without standing on something. I'm 5 ft 5 but that seems
to be short these days.
Smaller fridges are available. And use less energy.
Indeed, but wouldn't suit our specific requirements. I would have been
very happy with a fridge-freezer identical to the one which died but the
same configuration is no longer available in the same dimensions as the
old one so we had to go bigger. I think it is more energy efficient than
the old one.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Chris McMillan
2019-06-05 08:03:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Ashby
th
"I'm excited about my new cooker with the eye-level grill. This means
that without my having to bend down the hot fat can squirt straight in
my eye."
Flanders and Swann, Design for Living
john
I've not had an eye level grill, or a waist level one, for years and I
miss them. We never grill stuff now. The so-called grill in the top of
the oven is pants, as were the two before it. Likewise in the
microwave.
Our Neff combination microwave oven has a very respectable grill in it but
can only operate if the door is shut.
We have a built in Neff Circotherm double oven and I've got used to
having to operate the grill with the door closed but it's slightly too
high for my eye level. And our new fridge is so tall that I can't reach
the top shelf without standing on something. I'm 5 ft 5 but that seems
to be short these days.
Wouldn’t do for me then at under five foot.

Sincerely Chris
SODAM
2019-06-05 12:14:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I've not had an eye level grill, or a waist level one, for years and I
miss them. We never grill stuff now. The so-called grill in the top of
the oven is pants, as were the two before it. Likewise in the
microwave.
Had you thought of a halogen oven, Vicky? They sit on the counter top.

I bought one quite cheaply on eBay about four or five years ago. Since
then, I hardly use the big electric oven. I do bacon, sausages and suchlike
in it because I don’t like the “grill” that comes with the main oven. It
gives the result that a proper grill would and doesn’t leave them floppy,
as a microwave does. Huge saving on electricity, too.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Penny
2019-06-05 12:44:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 5 Jun 2019 13:14:20 +0100, SODAM <***@talktalk.net> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by SODAM
Post by Vicky Ayech
I've not had an eye level grill, or a waist level one, for years and I
miss them. We never grill stuff now. The so-called grill in the top of
the oven is pants, as were the two before it. Likewise in the
microwave.
Had you thought of a halogen oven, Vicky? They sit on the counter top.
I bought one quite cheaply on eBay about four or five years ago. Since
then, I hardly use the big electric oven. I do bacon, sausages and suchlike
in it because I don’t like the “grill” that comes with the main oven. It
gives the result that a proper grill would and doesn’t leave them floppy,
as a microwave does. Huge saving on electricity, too.
This sounds good. I like my double electric oven, set at a sensible height
above two deep drawers, but hardly ever grill stuff because of the mess it
makes of the oven and the fact it sets off the smoke alarm in the hall.

However, I have used a halogen heater and find the light gives me migraine.
I fear a halogen oven would present the same problem.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-05 16:38:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Post by Vicky Ayech
I've not had an eye level grill, or a waist level one, for years and I
miss them. We never grill stuff now. The so-called grill in the top of
the oven is pants, as were the two before it. Likewise in the
microwave.
Had you thought of a halogen oven, Vicky? They sit on the counter top.
I bought one quite cheaply on eBay about four or five years ago. Since
then, I hardly use the big electric oven. I do bacon, sausages and suchlike
in it because I don’t like the “grill” that comes with the main oven. It
gives the result that a proper grill would and doesn’t leave them floppy,
as a microwave does. Huge saving on electricity, too.
Thank you for the suggestion. I'm not looking for a new oven right now
but will bear it in mind.
Mike
2019-06-04 17:21:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
AIAOU in that we have never owned a toaster?
WIWAL I sometimes used a toasting-fork over the living-room fire, and
since that time we use the grill on the (gas) cooker.
I'd never seen a toaster as a child until we stayed with relatives one
holiday. They had an electric device which sat on the breakfast table, it
could deal with three slices of bread at a time (I think) held nearly
vertically and toasted one side at a time, then you had to turn the slice
round. Everyone at the table could tell when the bread started to burn.
We had an Aga at home and made toast on the hot plate, held in a circular
wire cage with a handle. When we moved into a house with an electric
cooker, making toast under the grill meant bending down to check it - a
backward step, I think. It wasn't until I moved in with the husgod that I
lived in a house with a toaster.
The advantage of a pop-up toaster, you don't need to watch it and can make
the tea and stack the dishwasher while it does its work.
"I'm excited about my new cooker with the eye-level grill. This means
that without my having to bend down the hot fat can squirt straight in
my eye."
Flanders and Swann, Design for Living
john
But there again, a trouser press is only of any use if you live in
Corby....
--
Toodle Pip
Chris J Dixon
2019-06-05 07:56:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
I'd never seen a toaster as a child until we stayed with relatives one
holiday. They had an electric device which sat on the breakfast table, it
could deal with three slices of bread at a time (I think) held nearly
vertically and toasted one side at a time, then you had to turn the slice
round. Everyone at the table could tell when the bread started to burn.
Our old manual toaster was similar, but only one slice each side.

It was supposed to turn them semi-automatically. As you hinged
the side down, the bottom edge of the door nudged the bottom of
the slice, initiating a slide towards the top of the door,
presenting the un toasted side to be lifted as you hinged it back
up again.

Bread dynamics did not always follow this theory.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Mike
2019-06-05 08:15:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
I'd never seen a toaster as a child until we stayed with relatives one
holiday. They had an electric device which sat on the breakfast table, it
could deal with three slices of bread at a time (I think) held nearly
vertically and toasted one side at a time, then you had to turn the slice
round. Everyone at the table could tell when the bread started to burn.
Our old manual toaster was similar, but only one slice each side.
It was supposed to turn them semi-automatically. As you hinged
the side down, the bottom edge of the door nudged the bottom of
the slice, initiating a slide towards the top of the door,
presenting the un toasted side to be lifted as you hinged it back
up again.
Bread dynamics did not always follow this theory.
Chris
Dough!
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-05 08:45:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
I'd never seen a toaster as a child until we stayed with relatives one
holiday. They had an electric device which sat on the breakfast table, it
could deal with three slices of bread at a time (I think) held nearly
vertically and toasted one side at a time, then you had to turn the slice
round. Everyone at the table could tell when the bread started to burn.
Our old manual toaster was similar, but only one slice each side.
It was supposed to turn them semi-automatically. As you hinged
the side down, the bottom edge of the door nudged the bottom of
the slice, initiating a slide towards the top of the door,
presenting the un toasted side to be lifted as you hinged it back
up again.
Bread dynamics did not always follow this theory.
Chris
I had whoosh with this since the post it was replaying to so asked for
granny notes to assist. I was told, with hands as gestures, a
triangular device with centrat heating element and two sodes where
bread is held, which open as doors. They fold over central
heater,toast one side, and the open and in some way, still not clear,
reverse and toast other side. Just in case anyone else was similarly
challenged :)
Penny
2019-06-05 09:23:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 05 Jun 2019 09:45:43 +0100, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
I'd never seen a toaster as a child until we stayed with relatives one
holiday. They had an electric device which sat on the breakfast table, it
could deal with three slices of bread at a time (I think) held nearly
vertically and toasted one side at a time, then you had to turn the slice
round. Everyone at the table could tell when the bread started to burn.
Our old manual toaster was similar, but only one slice each side.
It was supposed to turn them semi-automatically. As you hinged
the side down, the bottom edge of the door nudged the bottom of
the slice, initiating a slide towards the top of the door,
presenting the un toasted side to be lifted as you hinged it back
up again.
Bread dynamics did not always follow this theory.
Chris
I had whoosh with this since the post it was replaying to so asked for
granny notes to assist. I was told, with hands as gestures, a
triangular device with centrat heating element and two sodes where
bread is held, which open as doors. They fold over central
heater,toast one side, and the open and in some way, still not clear,
reverse and toast other side. Just in case anyone else was similarly
challenged :)
I thought Chris described it rather well. The rolling belt toasters in
hotel breakfast rooms do a better job of turning slices over but with no
control when you realise the belt is moving too slowly.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-05 10:05:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
I thought Chris described it rather well. The rolling belt toasters in
hotel breakfast rooms do a better job of turning slices over but with no
control when you realise the belt is moving too slowly.
I have seen those. They are a bit too slow. Queues can build up.
Chris McMillan
2019-06-05 10:26:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
I'd never seen a toaster as a child until we stayed with relatives one
holiday. They had an electric device which sat on the breakfast table, it
could deal with three slices of bread at a time (I think) held nearly
vertically and toasted one side at a time, then you had to turn the slice
round. Everyone at the table could tell when the bread started to burn.
Our old manual toaster was similar, but only one slice each side.
It was supposed to turn them semi-automatically. As you hinged
the side down, the bottom edge of the door nudged the bottom of
the slice, initiating a slide towards the top of the door,
presenting the un toasted side to be lifted as you hinged it back
up again.
Bread dynamics did not always follow this theory.
Chris
I had whoosh with this since the post it was replaying to so asked for
granny notes to assist. I was told, with hands as gestures, a
triangular device with centrat heating element and two sodes where
bread is held, which open as doors. They fold over central
heater,toast one side, and the open and in some way, still not clear,
reverse and toast other side. Just in case anyone else was similarly
challenged :)
I thought Chris described it rather well. The rolling belt toasters in
hotel breakfast rooms do a better job of turning slices over but with no
control when you realise the belt is moving too slowly.
And those are too high for me: I live in fear of putting my wrists on the
bar lifting out the toast.

Sincerely Chris
Jenny M Benson
2019-06-04 09:02:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
WIWAL I sometimes used a toasting-fork over the living-room fire, and
since that time we use the grill on the (gas) cooker.
That's the way the BEST toast is made.

When I was quite small we used, quite often, to have Hot Buttered Toast
for week-end tea. I thought this was something quite different to
ordinary toast on which one spread butter until Mum explained that it
was simply ordinary toast, buttered & kept hot by being put on top of
the grill or in front of the fire!
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Penny
2019-06-04 18:22:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 4 Jun 2019 10:02:17 +0100, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
When I was quite small we used, quite often, to have Hot Buttered Toast
for week-end tea. I thought this was something quite different to
ordinary toast on which one spread butter
It is. Our Aga-cooked toast was always cold when we buttered it so the
butter didn't sink in. I rather like cold buttered toast and sometimes make
myself a slice.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2019-06-04 20:26:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
When I was quite small we used, quite often, to have Hot Buttered Toast
for week-end tea. I thought this was something quite different to
ordinary toast on which one spread butter
It is. Our Aga-cooked toast was always cold when we buttered it so the
butter didn't sink in. I rather like cold buttered toast and sometimes make
myself a slice.
I put the bread under the (eye-level) grill and have the butter (well,
Flora) ready at hand. The moment it clears the grill it's buttered and
eaten immediately. I dislike cold toast.

Wofe thinks that's silly, but then she has her own quirks (which
naturally she considers to be normal sensible behaviour).
--
Sam Plusnet
LFS
2019-06-05 09:02:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
On Tue, 4 Jun 2019 10:02:17 +0100, Jenny M Benson
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
When I was quite small we used, quite often, to have Hot Buttered Toast
for week-end tea.  I thought this was something quite different to
ordinary toast on which one spread butter
It is. Our Aga-cooked toast was always cold when we buttered it so the
butter didn't sink in. I rather like cold buttered toast and sometimes make
myself a slice.
I put the bread under the (eye-level) grill and have the butter (well,
Flora) ready at hand.  The moment it clears the grill it's buttered and
eaten immediately.  I dislike cold toast.
Wofe thinks that's silly, but then she has her own quirks (which
naturally she considers to be normal sensible behaviour).
I cannot bear cold toast. I once astonished my breakfasting companions
in a hotel by sending back cold toast. The obliging waiter actually ran
from the kitchen with hot replacements.

This was a different occasion from the one when I sent the tea back
because it was too weak.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Penny
2019-06-05 09:27:42 UTC
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On Wed, 5 Jun 2019 10:02:10 +0100, LFS <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by LFS
I cannot bear cold toast. I once astonished my breakfasting companions
in a hotel by sending back cold toast. The obliging waiter actually ran
from the kitchen with hot replacements.
Hotel toast, delivered in crammed toast racks, was always rearranged
immediately by members of my family so no two slices were close together
which causes them to become tough and inedible. They need room to cool if
they are to remain crisp.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris J Dixon
2019-06-05 10:01:30 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Penny
Hotel toast, delivered in crammed toast racks, was always rearranged
immediately by members of my family so no two slices were close together
which causes them to become tough and inedible. They need room to cool if
they are to remain crisp.
Crisp breakfast foods reminds me of my student days when the
landlady produced bacon which was generally cooked to the degree
that it was impossible to impale it on a fork, each attempt
simply dividing it into smaller pieces. The only feasible
technique was to glue the bits together with egg to perch them on
the fork.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Anne B
2019-06-06 15:11:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
Hotel toast, delivered in crammed toast racks, was always rearranged
immediately by members of my family so no two slices were close together
which causes them to become tough and inedible. They need room to cool if
they are to remain crisp.
Crisp breakfast foods reminds me of my student days when the
landlady produced bacon which was generally cooked to the degree
that it was impossible to impale it on a fork, each attempt
simply dividing it into smaller pieces. The only feasible
technique was to glue the bits together with egg to perch them on
the fork.
Chris
I only like bacon when it's so crisp that it snaps. Not when the fat is
still soft and slithery like egg white.

Anne B
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-06 16:08:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 6 Jun 2019 16:11:10 +0100, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
Hotel toast, delivered in crammed toast racks, was always rearranged
immediately by members of my family so no two slices were close together
which causes them to become tough and inedible. They need room to cool if
they are to remain crisp.
Crisp breakfast foods reminds me of my student days when the
landlady produced bacon which was generally cooked to the degree
that it was impossible to impale it on a fork, each attempt
simply dividing it into smaller pieces. The only feasible
technique was to glue the bits together with egg to perch them on
the fork.
Chris
I only like bacon when it's so crisp that it snaps. Not when the fat is
still soft and slithery like egg white.
Anne B
MTAAW. That or else American bacon.
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-05 10:03:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
On Tue, 4 Jun 2019 10:02:17 +0100, Jenny M Benson
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
When I was quite small we used, quite often, to have Hot Buttered Toast
for week-end tea.  I thought this was something quite different to
ordinary toast on which one spread butter
It is. Our Aga-cooked toast was always cold when we buttered it so the
butter didn't sink in. I rather like cold buttered toast and sometimes make
myself a slice.
I put the bread under the (eye-level) grill and have the butter (well,
Flora) ready at hand.  The moment it clears the grill it's buttered and
eaten immediately.  I dislike cold toast.
Wofe thinks that's silly, but then she has her own quirks (which
naturally she considers to be normal sensible behaviour).
I cannot bear cold toast. I once astonished my breakfasting companions
in a hotel by sending back cold toast. The obliging waiter actually ran
from the kitchen with hot replacements.
This was a different occasion from the one when I sent the tea back
because it was too weak.
I agree with the toast should be hot party. I don't like cold toast.
But I like weak tea as I drink it without milk. I ask for an extra pot
of hot water if I have a pot of tea. I like my tea hot too, like the
toast.
Jenny M Benson
2019-06-05 13:27:34 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
But I like weak tea as I drink it without milk. I ask for an extra pot
of hot water if I have a pot of tea. I like my tea hot too, like the
toast.
Likewise. But why do we have to (nearly always) ask for a pot of hot
water. It should always be provided along with the tea, IMHO.

I heartily recommend

http://www.tipsnleaves.com/

to Umratic tea drinkers.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Nick Odell
2019-06-05 15:39:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I like my tea hot too, like the
toast.
...which sounds like something Mae West could have said.

Nick
Mike
2019-06-05 15:59:11 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Vicky Ayech
I like my tea hot too, like the
toast.
...which sounds like something Mae West could have said.
Nick
Is she ‘Toast’ now or just very ‘Crusty’?
--
Toodle Pip
Anne B
2019-06-06 15:09:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
On Tue, 4 Jun 2019 10:02:17 +0100, Jenny M Benson
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
When I was quite small we used, quite often, to have Hot Buttered Toast
for week-end tea. I thought this was something quite different to
ordinary toast on which one spread butter
It is. Our Aga-cooked toast was always cold when we buttered it so the
butter didn't sink in. I rather like cold buttered toast and
sometimes make
myself a slice.
I put the bread under the (eye-level) grill and have the butter (well,
Flora) ready at hand. The moment it clears the grill it's buttered
and eaten immediately. I dislike cold toast.
Wofe thinks that's silly, but then she has her own quirks (which
naturally she considers to be normal sensible behaviour).
I cannot bear cold toast. I once astonished my breakfasting companions
in a hotel by sending back cold toast. The obliging waiter actually ran
from the kitchen with hot replacements.
Reminds me of a tale told to me by the restaurant manager in a posh-ish
hotel in the North-West Highlands. They had just hired some Filipina
girls because they couldn't find enough staff locally. The restaurant
manager had come in just as they breakfast room was due to open. Rather
to his surprise there was already an appetising aroma of fresh toast. It
transpired that the Filipina girls, being unfamiliar with the desirable
qualities of toast, had set to and made all the toast for all the
breakfasts in advance so they wouldn't have to keep the breakfast guests
waiting while the bread was toasted.

Anne B
Nick Odell
2019-06-06 16:09:56 UTC
Reply
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Post by Anne B
Post by LFS
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
On Tue, 4 Jun 2019 10:02:17 +0100, Jenny M Benson
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
When I was quite small we used, quite often, to have Hot Buttered Toast
for week-end tea.  I thought this was something quite different to
ordinary toast on which one spread butter
It is. Our Aga-cooked toast was always cold when we buttered it so the
butter didn't sink in. I rather like cold buttered toast and sometimes make
myself a slice.
I put the bread under the (eye-level) grill and have the butter (well,
Flora) ready at hand.  The moment it clears the grill it's buttered
and eaten immediately.  I dislike cold toast.
Wofe thinks that's silly, but then she has her own quirks (which
naturally she considers to be normal sensible behaviour).
I cannot bear cold toast. I once astonished my breakfasting companions
in a hotel by sending back cold toast. The obliging waiter actually ran
from the kitchen with hot replacements.
Reminds me of a tale told to me by the restaurant manager in a posh-ish
hotel in the North-West Highlands. They had just hired some Filipina
girls because they couldn't find enough staff locally. The restaurant
manager had come in just as they breakfast room was due to open. Rather
to his surprise there was already an appetising aroma of fresh toast. It
transpired that the Filipina girls, being unfamiliar with the desirable
qualities of toast, had set to and made all the toast for all the
breakfasts in advance so they wouldn't have to keep the breakfast guests
waiting while the bread was toasted.
As I'm sure you've discovered elsewhere, that's a perfectly acceptable
way to prepare toast in some parts of the world but unfortunately not in
this part of the world. I've never been to the Philippines and couldn't
tell you if it's normal over there.

Nick
Fenny
2019-06-07 19:11:19 UTC
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Post by LFS
I cannot bear cold toast. I once astonished my breakfasting companions
in a hotel by sending back cold toast. The obliging waiter actually ran
from the kitchen with hot replacements.
I don't mind my toast cold, but I do mind it undercooked. I have sent
toast back in hotels for not being toasted sufficiently. I prefer mine
dark brown, verging on burnt. I generally ask when ordering for it to
be "on the over done side of well done", or "preferably burnt"
--
Fenny
Chris McMillan
2019-06-05 08:03:33 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
When I was quite small we used, quite often, to have Hot Buttered Toast
for week-end tea. I thought this was something quite different to
ordinary toast on which one spread butter
It is. Our Aga-cooked toast was always cold when we buttered it so the
butter didn't sink in. I rather like cold buttered toast and sometimes make
myself a slice.
Food of the gods! cold buttered toast and the only way to eat shop bought
white bread. I really don’t like hot toast at all. Never have done.

Sincerely Chris
Anne B
2019-06-06 15:01:15 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
No, I like bits of paper, they work when the power is out (unlike my
computer which suffered from a toast-related problem this morning).
Oh dear! Related to cooked slices of bread or did the ‘puter fry?
I managed to short-out the toaster while putting my usual two slices of
frozen bread in, sandwiched together - my preferred breakfast sandwich,
crisp on outside, soft in middle. It took me three tries, tripping out the
power each time, before I took a close look into the toaster and managed to
tweak the pop-up bar back into its proper place.
It's done well that toaster, it must be getting on for 20 years old - glad
I got it working :)
AIAOU in that we have never owned a toaster?
WIWAL I sometimes used a toasting-fork over the living-room fire, and
since that time we use the grill on the (gas) cooker.
YANAOU. Still own two toasting forks.

Anne B
Anne B
2019-06-06 14:56:20 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Anne B
Post by Nick Odell
So I don't wait up for the results: I don't even log into my nsandi
account when I receive the email. I just wait for my monthly bank
statement to turn up. Mind you: I might break my routine if the expected
balance on my account appeared an order of magnitude too high when
taking cash out of the hole in the wall
Nick
I wouldn't wait up for them. I get the e-mail when I have won something,
but I don't usually check how much as it's almost always £25. There was
£100 once, but only once, many moons ago.
Email? Why don't I get emails?
I think you have to sign up to get prizes paid into your bank account
and then you can also get e-mails notifying you when they have paid
something in. That's what I did, anyway, now that there aren't any banks
anywhere convenient so it's difficult to pay in cheques.

Anne B
krw
2019-06-07 10:27:52 UTC
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Post by Anne B
so it's difficult to pay in cheques.
The last cheque I received is in the bin. Took some pictures of it and
sent them to the bank and they put the money in my account.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
carolet
2019-06-11 07:47:37 UTC
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Post by Anne B
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Anne B
Post by Nick Odell
So I don't wait up for the results: I don't even log into my nsandi
account when I receive the email. I just wait for my monthly bank
statement to turn up. Mind you: I might break my routine if the expected
balance on my account appeared an order of magnitude too high when
taking cash out of the hole in the wall
Nick
I wouldn't wait up for them. I get the e-mail when I have won something,
but I don't usually check how much as it's almost always £25. There was
£100 once, but only once, many moons ago.
Email? Why don't I get emails?
I think you have to sign up to get prizes paid into your bank account
and then you can also get e-mails notifying you when they have paid
something in. That's what I did, anyway, now that there aren't any banks
anywhere convenient so it's difficult to pay in cheques.
Anne B
I have told them to buy new premium bonds with my winnings.

They started suggesting that people go paperfree some time ago and I
considered it. As they were not sending me cheques, only notifications
of wins, I could see no reason why the notifications couldn't be sent by
email, without me having to tell them details of my bank account. They
were not having that though. Eventually I gave in and gave them my bank
details and they make absolutely no use of them. Winnings still buy
extra bonds and I am notified by email.
--
CaroleT
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