Discussion:
Spoilers Thursday 22.4
(too old to reply)
Vicky Ayech
2021-04-22 20:28:37 UTC
Permalink
Oi! SWs!

I didn't want jazzer and Tracy to hithc up. I thought he deserved
better. Now they are making her an improved version and good for him!
Bah! And the Chris and Alice story is developing believably too!
Ah. Writers, Caroline Harrington & Nick Warburton. Must be CH.
Jazzer working with pigs and Neil is better. I hope that goes ok.
I liked the stuff about Chelsea and school too! A touch of virus
reality.

I know that this is hard for Chris to deal with and he is worried and
needs to protect Martha but I somehow feel he is using this to get
into control and bullying mode with Alice. He was obviously shocked
she wanted to go, shocked at what she said, but all through his voice
and tone were hectoring.
Nick Odell
2021-04-22 22:47:43 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 22 Apr 2021 21:28:37 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
Oi! SWs!
I didn't want jazzer and Tracy to hithc up. I thought he deserved
better. Now they are making her an improved version and good for him!
Bah! And the Chris and Alice story is developing believably too!
Ah. Writers, Caroline Harrington & Nick Warburton. Must be CH.
Jazzer working with pigs and Neil is better. I hope that goes ok.
I liked the stuff about Chelsea and school too! A touch of virus
reality.
I know that this is hard for Chris to deal with and he is worried and
needs to protect Martha but I somehow feel he is using this to get
into control and bullying mode with Alice. He was obviously shocked
she wanted to go, shocked at what she said, but all through his voice
and tone were hectoring.
Whadaya mean "Must be CH"? This has "On Mardle Fen" written all over
it!

Nick
Mike McMillan
2021-04-23 07:31:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Oi! SWs!
I didn't want jazzer and Tracy to hithc up. I thought he deserved
better. Now they are making her an improved version and good for him!
Bah! And the Chris and Alice story is developing believably too!
Ah. Writers, Caroline Harrington & Nick Warburton. Must be CH.
Jazzer working with pigs and Neil is better. I hope that goes ok.
I liked the stuff about Chelsea and school too! A touch of virus
reality.
I know that this is hard for Chris to deal with and he is worried and
needs to protect Martha but I somehow feel he is using this to get
into control and bullying mode with Alice. He was obviously shocked
she wanted to go, shocked at what she said, but all through his voice
and tone were hectoring.
If things carry on in the same style on Monday - they are losing at least
one listener in Earley...
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-04-23 23:01:43 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 23 Apr 2021 at 07:31:07, Mike McMillan
<***@ntlworld.com> wrote (my responses usually follow points
raised):
[]
Post by Mike McMillan
If things carry on in the same style on Monday - they are losing at least
one listener in Earley...
Earley to bed?

(IGMC: you must have heard many permutations. Probably including ones
about Earley Reading.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Just seen a Dyslexic Yorkshireman wearing a cat flap!
Chris
2021-04-24 10:03:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
Oi! SWs!
I didn't want jazzer and Tracy to hithc up. I thought he deserved
better. Now they are making her an improved version and good for him!
Bah! And the Chris and Alice story is developing believably too!
Ah. Writers, Caroline Harrington & Nick Warburton. Must be CH.
Jazzer working with pigs and Neil is better. I hope that goes ok.
I liked the stuff about Chelsea and school too! A touch of virus
reality.
I know that this is hard for Chris to deal with and he is worried and
needs to protect Martha but I somehow feel he is using this to get
into control and bullying mode with Alice. He was obviously shocked
she wanted to go, shocked at what she said, but all through his voice
and tone were hectoring.
If things carry on in the same style on Monday - they are losing at least
one listener in Earley...
I don’t imagine a lot of men will be fully comfortable with the plot. Not
only an active alchi, but they can go down several routes now. Postnatal
depression for another is believable and I can’t think who might have had
this actively covered in TA in recent decades. Possibly Susan from all her
going on about Chrisduffer’s birth.

Time for Alan to get back to work for a start .........

Sincerely Chris
krw
2021-04-24 16:15:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris
Time for Alan to get back to work for a start .........
That would require an episode on a Sunday and no plans exist.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-04-24 18:02:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Chris
Time for Alan to get back to work for a start .........
That would require an episode on a Sunday and no plans exist.
Contrary to many jokes, vicars don't just work on Sundays! In fact I
suspect when it comes to pastoral activities, they do more than 6/7 of
it on other days.

(I'm pretty sure I've heard Alan in the last few weeks, though not who
he was talking to.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Thay have a saying for it: /Geiz ist geil/, which roughly translates as, "It's
sexy to be stingly". - Joe Fattorini, RT insert 2016/9/10-16
carolet
2021-04-24 22:39:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
Post by Chris
Time for Alan to get back to work for a start .........
That would require an episode on a Sunday and no plans exist.
Contrary to many jokes, vicars don't just work on Sundays! In fact I
suspect when it comes to pastoral activities, they do more than 6/7 of
it on other days.
(I'm pretty sure I've heard Alan in the last few weeks, though not who
he was talking to.)
We heard him a few times in March. He was talking to Chris initially and
then Alice too. I don't recall him speaking to anyone else, but he may
have done.
--
CaroleT
Vicky Ayech
2021-04-25 08:32:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by carolet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
Post by Chris
Time for Alan to get back to work for a start .........
That would require an episode on a Sunday and no plans exist.
Contrary to many jokes, vicars don't just work on Sundays! In fact I
suspect when it comes to pastoral activities, they do more than 6/7 of
it on other days.
(I'm pretty sure I've heard Alan in the last few weeks, though not who
he was talking to.)
We heard him a few times in March. He was talking to Chris initially and
then Alice too. I don't recall him speaking to anyone else, but he may
have done.
He would presumably be the right person tohelp the couple. Oh no!
Don't let Shula on to it!
Mike McMillan
2021-04-25 08:03:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
Post by Chris
Time for Alan to get back to work for a start .........
That would require an episode on a Sunday and no plans exist.
Contrary to many jokes, vicars don't just work on Sundays! In fact I
suspect when it comes to pastoral activities, they do more than 6/7 of
it on other days.
(I'm pretty sure I've heard Alan in the last few weeks, though not who
he was talking to.)
He’s been in a number of scenes with ‘ duffer’ and heard speaking to
t’Saint on pastoral matters.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Mike McMillan
2021-04-25 08:01:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Chris
Time for Alan to get back to work for a start .........
That would require an episode on a Sunday and no plans exist.
Fed-up confirmed that there is no date set yet for return to ‘the old
days’.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Serena Blanchflower
2021-04-23 15:50:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Oi! SWs!
I didn't want jazzer and Tracy to hithc up. I thought he deserved
better. Now they are making her an improved version and good for him!
Bah! And the Chris and Alice story is developing believably too!
Ah. Writers, Caroline Harrington & Nick Warburton. Must be CH.
Jazzer working with pigs and Neil is better. I hope that goes ok.
I liked the stuff about Chelsea and school too! A touch of virus
reality.
I'm enjoying the Jazzer and Tracy storyline, not only is it (much
needed) light relief but it should be a good thing in the long term.
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know that this is hard for Chris to deal with and he is worried and
needs to protect Martha but I somehow feel he is using this to get
into control and bullying mode with Alice. He was obviously shocked
she wanted to go, shocked at what she said, but all through his voice
and tone were hectoring.
I agree that Chris isn't handling it well but it has sounded all too
horribly realistic to me. They've developed a classic, and very toxic,
co-dependent relationship, with Chris becoming more and more
controlling, as Alice becomes more and more out of control :(

As an aside, it's been suggested on Twitter that it sounds as if Martha
is deaf. There have been a couple of occasions when it's been commented
on that she hasn't reacted to noisy stimuli. Apparently, this is one of
the likely (and less serious) effects of fetal alcohol syndrome.
--
Best wishes, Serena
A day without laughter is a day wasted. (Charlie Chaplin)
Mike McMillan
2021-04-23 16:25:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
Oi! SWs!
I didn't want jazzer and Tracy to hithc up. I thought he deserved
better. Now they are making her an improved version and good for him!
Bah! And the Chris and Alice story is developing believably too!
Ah. Writers, Caroline Harrington & Nick Warburton. Must be CH.
Jazzer working with pigs and Neil is better. I hope that goes ok.
I liked the stuff about Chelsea and school too! A touch of virus
reality.
I'm enjoying the Jazzer and Tracy storyline, not only is it (much
needed) light relief but it should be a good thing in the long term.
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know that this is hard for Chris to deal with and he is worried and
needs to protect Martha but I somehow feel he is using this to get
into control and bullying mode with Alice. He was obviously shocked
she wanted to go, shocked at what she said, but all through his voice
and tone were hectoring.
I agree that Chris isn't handling it well but it has sounded all too
horribly realistic to me. They've developed a classic, and very toxic,
co-dependent relationship, with Chris becoming more and more
controlling, as Alice becomes more and more out of control :(
As an aside, it's been suggested on Twitter that it sounds as if Martha
is deaf. There have been a couple of occasions when it's been commented
on that she hasn't reacted to noisy stimuli. Apparently, this is one of
the likely (and less serious) effects of fetal alcohol syndrome.
But, but, but ... when either of them raised their voice, Martha becomes
unsettled, so, unless she detects ‘the bad vibes’ how come she starts to
cry or become restless?
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Serena Blanchflower
2021-04-23 16:32:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
Oi! SWs!
I didn't want jazzer and Tracy to hithc up. I thought he deserved
better. Now they are making her an improved version and good for him!
Bah! And the Chris and Alice story is developing believably too!
Ah. Writers, Caroline Harrington & Nick Warburton. Must be CH.
Jazzer working with pigs and Neil is better. I hope that goes ok.
I liked the stuff about Chelsea and school too! A touch of virus
reality.
I'm enjoying the Jazzer and Tracy storyline, not only is it (much
needed) light relief but it should be a good thing in the long term.
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know that this is hard for Chris to deal with and he is worried and
needs to protect Martha but I somehow feel he is using this to get
into control and bullying mode with Alice. He was obviously shocked
she wanted to go, shocked at what she said, but all through his voice
and tone were hectoring.
I agree that Chris isn't handling it well but it has sounded all too
horribly realistic to me. They've developed a classic, and very toxic,
co-dependent relationship, with Chris becoming more and more
controlling, as Alice becomes more and more out of control :(
As an aside, it's been suggested on Twitter that it sounds as if Martha
is deaf. There have been a couple of occasions when it's been commented
on that she hasn't reacted to noisy stimuli. Apparently, this is one of
the likely (and less serious) effects of fetal alcohol syndrome.
But, but, but ... when either of them raised their voice, Martha becomes
unsettled, so, unless she detects ‘the bad vibes’ how come she starts to
cry or become restless?
If she's awake, she could be picking up on visual clues or, if they're
holding her, she could feel the tension.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Q. What will they do if the Forth Bridge collapses?
A. Build a fifth bridge.
Vicky Ayech
2021-04-23 17:05:30 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 23 Apr 2021 16:50:54 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
Oi! SWs!
I didn't want jazzer and Tracy to hithc up. I thought he deserved
better. Now they are making her an improved version and good for him!
Bah! And the Chris and Alice story is developing believably too!
Ah. Writers, Caroline Harrington & Nick Warburton. Must be CH.
Jazzer working with pigs and Neil is better. I hope that goes ok.
I liked the stuff about Chelsea and school too! A touch of virus
reality.
I'm enjoying the Jazzer and Tracy storyline, not only is it (much
needed) light relief but it should be a good thing in the long term.
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know that this is hard for Chris to deal with and he is worried and
needs to protect Martha but I somehow feel he is using this to get
into control and bullying mode with Alice. He was obviously shocked
she wanted to go, shocked at what she said, but all through his voice
and tone were hectoring.
I agree that Chris isn't handling it well but it has sounded all too
horribly realistic to me. They've developed a classic, and very toxic,
co-dependent relationship, with Chris becoming more and more
controlling, as Alice becomes more and more out of control :(
As an aside, it's been suggested on Twitter that it sounds as if Martha
is deaf. There have been a couple of occasions when it's been commented
on that she hasn't reacted to noisy stimuli. Apparently, this is one of
the likely (and less serious) effects of fetal alcohol syndrome.
That could be another opportunity for a long term story line about
being deaf. If they stay in Ambridge, unlike Vicky and child. Sign
language, what kind of schooling is best, a hearing aid dog.
Serena Blanchflower
2021-04-23 17:28:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 23 Apr 2021 16:50:54 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
Oi! SWs!
I didn't want jazzer and Tracy to hithc up. I thought he deserved
better. Now they are making her an improved version and good for him!
Bah! And the Chris and Alice story is developing believably too!
Ah. Writers, Caroline Harrington & Nick Warburton. Must be CH.
Jazzer working with pigs and Neil is better. I hope that goes ok.
I liked the stuff about Chelsea and school too! A touch of virus
reality.
I'm enjoying the Jazzer and Tracy storyline, not only is it (much
needed) light relief but it should be a good thing in the long term.
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know that this is hard for Chris to deal with and he is worried and
needs to protect Martha but I somehow feel he is using this to get
into control and bullying mode with Alice. He was obviously shocked
she wanted to go, shocked at what she said, but all through his voice
and tone were hectoring.
I agree that Chris isn't handling it well but it has sounded all too
horribly realistic to me. They've developed a classic, and very toxic,
co-dependent relationship, with Chris becoming more and more
controlling, as Alice becomes more and more out of control :(
As an aside, it's been suggested on Twitter that it sounds as if Martha
is deaf. There have been a couple of occasions when it's been commented
on that she hasn't reacted to noisy stimuli. Apparently, this is one of
the likely (and less serious) effects of fetal alcohol syndrome.
That could be another opportunity for a long term story line about
being deaf. If they stay in Ambridge, unlike Vicky and child. Sign
language, what kind of schooling is best, a hearing aid dog.
Yes, that could be a story line which could work well.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Q. How do Vikings send secret messages?
A. They use Norse code.
Penny
2021-04-23 21:19:20 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 23 Apr 2021 18:28:45 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 23 Apr 2021 16:50:54 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
As an aside, it's been suggested on Twitter that it sounds as if Martha
is deaf. There have been a couple of occasions when it's been commented
on that she hasn't reacted to noisy stimuli. Apparently, this is one of
the likely (and less serious) effects of fetal alcohol syndrome.
That could be another opportunity for a long term story line about
being deaf. If they stay in Ambridge, unlike Vicky and child. Sign
language, what kind of schooling is best, a hearing aid dog.
Yes, that could be a story line which could work well.
I agree it would make a good story - but on radio...?

Which reminds me, there was a deaf couple with a newborn in the maternity
unit when d#1 was born. They were told their baby could hear. I spent some
time trying to figure out the ramifications of this. Learning how to care
for a new baby and fit around them in your new life together is boodly hard
for most people anyway. I imagine, if the baby is deaf, the larger problems
that presents would come later and quite slowly. If both parents are deaf I
think it would magnify the basic anxiety immensely before even thinking
about how to keep the new person alive.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-04-23 23:06:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Fri, 23 Apr 2021 18:28:45 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 23 Apr 2021 16:50:54 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
As an aside, it's been suggested on Twitter that it sounds as if Martha
is deaf. There have been a couple of occasions when it's been commented
on that she hasn't reacted to noisy stimuli. Apparently, this is one of
the likely (and less serious) effects of fetal alcohol syndrome.
That could be another opportunity for a long term story line about
being deaf. If they stay in Ambridge, unlike Vicky and child. Sign
language, what kind of schooling is best, a hearing aid dog.
Yes, that could be a story line which could work well.
I agree it would make a good story - but on radio...?
You _are_ talking about a corporation that managed ventriloquism on
radio, for I think some years ...

I agree, it could be a good story. And PSB too.
[]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Just seen a Dyslexic Yorkshireman wearing a cat flap!
Vicky Ayech
2021-04-24 08:29:19 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 00:06:04 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
PSB too. ?
[]
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-04-24 10:44:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 00:06:04 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
PSB too. ?
[]
Sorry, "public service broadcasting" - coverage of deafness aspects
would "educate" (like the coercive control story, the foetal alcohol and
general drunkenness story, and Bethany [though that was "sent to
Birmingham"]).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I don't see the requirement to upset people. ... There's enough to make fun of
without offending. - Ronnie Corbett, in Radio Times 6-12 August 2011.
Mike McMillan
2021-04-24 12:15:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 00:06:04 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
PSB too. ?
[]
Sorry, "public service broadcasting" - coverage of deafness aspects
would "educate" (like the coercive control story, the foetal alcohol and
general drunkenness story, and Bethany [though that was "sent to
Birmingham"]).
Though hearing impaired may think that they have been sent to Coventry.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Vicky Ayech
2021-04-24 08:28:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Fri, 23 Apr 2021 18:28:45 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 23 Apr 2021 16:50:54 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
As an aside, it's been suggested on Twitter that it sounds as if Martha
is deaf. There have been a couple of occasions when it's been commented
on that she hasn't reacted to noisy stimuli. Apparently, this is one of
the likely (and less serious) effects of fetal alcohol syndrome.
That could be another opportunity for a long term story line about
being deaf. If they stay in Ambridge, unlike Vicky and child. Sign
language, what kind of schooling is best, a hearing aid dog.
Yes, that could be a story line which could work well.
I agree it would make a good story - but on radio...?
Which reminds me, there was a deaf couple with a newborn in the maternity
unit when d#1 was born. They were told their baby could hear. I spent some
time trying to figure out the ramifications of this. Learning how to care
for a new baby and fit around them in your new life together is boodly hard
for most people anyway. I imagine, if the baby is deaf, the larger problems
that presents would come later and quite slowly. If both parents are deaf I
think it would magnify the basic anxiety immensely before even thinking
about how to keep the new person alive.
If they could check that early in hospital surely they would have
noticed then if Martha is deaf? I've just realised profoundly
deaf/completely deaf people can't hear the radio. Tv is ok as you get
subtitles, although not with some programmes. All 4 are very good with
subtitles but UKTV not so much. As second daughter is a manager of
channels there I have had words.

But radio has always been very important for me. Is it more to my
generation as there was not really tv or it was just beginning when i
was young? The deaf can have all forms of text. So books are fine,
but no plays onradio, no current affairs there, no quiz programmes
etc. That is a huge chunk of our culture they can't access.
Serena Blanchflower
2021-04-24 09:50:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
On Fri, 23 Apr 2021 18:28:45 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 23 Apr 2021 16:50:54 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
As an aside, it's been suggested on Twitter that it sounds as if Martha
is deaf. There have been a couple of occasions when it's been commented
on that she hasn't reacted to noisy stimuli. Apparently, this is one of
the likely (and less serious) effects of fetal alcohol syndrome.
That could be another opportunity for a long term story line about
being deaf. If they stay in Ambridge, unlike Vicky and child. Sign
language, what kind of schooling is best, a hearing aid dog.
Yes, that could be a story line which could work well.
I agree it would make a good story - but on radio...?
Which reminds me, there was a deaf couple with a newborn in the maternity
unit when d#1 was born. They were told their baby could hear. I spent some
time trying to figure out the ramifications of this. Learning how to care
for a new baby and fit around them in your new life together is boodly hard
for most people anyway. I imagine, if the baby is deaf, the larger problems
that presents would come later and quite slowly. If both parents are deaf I
think it would magnify the basic anxiety immensely before even thinking
about how to keep the new person alive.
If they could check that early in hospital surely they would have
noticed then if Martha is deaf?
That question has been asked on Twitter, as well. I do remember though,
a few years ago, when a friend's grandchild was born. There was a
crisis shortly after birth and it was realised, some time later, that a
lot of the routine tests which are normally done at birth were
forgotten, as they were concentrating on keeping the child alive. It's
possible that something similar could have happened with Martha, given
how premature she was.
--
Best wishes, Serena
No society can legitimately call itself civilised if a sick person is
denied medical aid because of lack of means. (Aneurin Bevan)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-04-24 10:37:28 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 at 09:28:37, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
wrote (my responses usually follow points raised):
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
If they could check that early in hospital surely they would have
noticed then if Martha is deaf? I've just realised profoundly
deaf/completely deaf people can't hear the radio. Tv is ok as you get
subtitles, although not with some programmes. All 4 are very good with
subtitles but UKTV not so much. As second daughter is a manager of
channels there I have had words.
[]
Do the porn channels* have them (-:? [Might be a bit monotonous!]

My blind friend has from time to time complained - in jest - that those
don't have AD [audio description] (-:

*670-699 on FreeView - I had to search, I thought they were much lower
down - shows I don't watch them! I suppose they've moved them up there
so fewer people encounter them by mistake, e. g. when scrolling through.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I don't see the requirement to upset people. ... There's enough to make fun of
without offending. - Ronnie Corbett, in Radio Times 6-12 August 2011.
Penny
2021-04-24 12:42:15 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 09:28:37 +0100, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
Which reminds me, there was a deaf couple with a newborn in the maternity
unit when d#1 was born. They were told their baby could hear. [ ]
If they could check that early in hospital surely they would have
noticed then if Martha is deaf?
As both parents were deaf, I imagine they went to whatever lengths were
necessary and available to let then know as soon as possible. I wasn't a
regular test in 1979 and I doubt it is now. Also, it may be easier to
decide if a baby can definitely hear than to be certain they can't.

The first time I witnessed a test for hearing on a small child (sat on
mother's lap, she must have been under one year old), I thought it looked
more like a test of peripheral vision.

That particular test certainly doesn't catch all hearing problems. An 8
year-old was moved to our little village school on the advice of the speech
therapist (whose own children had attended the school). The 30+-per-class
school in town thought he wasn't very bright. He came on in leaps and
bounds once it was realised he was deaf and got some hearing aids and other
support. I suppose he may have suffered some illness which caused the
problem after the early test.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
John Ashby
2021-04-24 12:52:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
Which reminds me, there was a deaf couple with a newborn in the maternity
unit when d#1 was born. They were told their baby could hear. [ ]
If they could check that early in hospital surely they would have
noticed then if Martha is deaf?
As both parents were deaf, I imagine they went to whatever lengths were
necessary and available to let then know as soon as possible. I wasn't a
regular test in 1979 and I doubt it is now. Also, it may be easier to
decide if a baby can definitely hear than to be certain they can't.
The first time I witnessed a test for hearing on a small child (sat on
mother's lap, she must have been under one year old), I thought it looked
more like a test of peripheral vision.
Not so much now, see
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/baby/newborn-screening/hearing-test/

john
Serena Blanchflower
2021-04-24 13:54:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
Which reminds me, there was a deaf couple with a newborn in the maternity
unit when d#1 was born. They were told their baby could hear.  [ ]
If they could check that early in hospital surely they would have
noticed then if Martha is deaf?
As both parents were deaf, I imagine they went to whatever lengths were
necessary and available to let then know as soon as possible. I wasn't a
regular test in 1979 and I doubt it is now. Also, it may be easier to
decide if a baby can definitely hear than to be certain they can't.
The first time I witnessed a test for hearing on a small child (sat on
mother's lap, she must have been under one year old), I thought it looked
more like a test of peripheral vision.
Not so much now, see
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/baby/newborn-screening/hearing-test/
I see, from that, that although it's frequently done before the child is
discharged from hospital, it isn't always. It's sometimes done in the
child's first few weeks or, at least, before the child's three months old.
--
Best wishes, Serena
The older you get, the tougher it is to lose weight because by then,
your body and your fat are really good friends (anon)
Vicky Ayech
2021-04-24 16:44:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
Which reminds me, there was a deaf couple with a newborn in the maternity
unit when d#1 was born. They were told their baby could hear. [ ]
If they could check that early in hospital surely they would have
noticed then if Martha is deaf?
As both parents were deaf, I imagine they went to whatever lengths were
necessary and available to let then know as soon as possible. I wasn't a
regular test in 1979 and I doubt it is now. Also, it may be easier to
decide if a baby can definitely hear than to be certain they can't.
The first time I witnessed a test for hearing on a small child (sat on
mother's lap, she must have been under one year old), I thought it looked
more like a test of peripheral vision.
That particular test certainly doesn't catch all hearing problems. An 8
year-old was moved to our little village school on the advice of the speech
therapist (whose own children had attended the school). The 30+-per-class
school in town thought he wasn't very bright. He came on in leaps and
bounds once it was realised he was deaf and got some hearing aids and other
support. I suppose he may have suffered some illness which caused the
problem after the early test.
B was hospitalised in an isolation hospital as a child, aged about 8.
He had either scarlet fever or diptheria. I forget which. Hehas
partial hearing loss, 40%, because of that. He actually hears some
sounds better than I do. it's me that turns the tv up louder and I
have to use hearing aids now. He learned to lipread over the years and
manages well one to one. In groups it is harder for him to follow
conversations, as it is for me too now.
Mike McMillan
2021-04-25 07:58:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
Which reminds me, there was a deaf couple with a newborn in the maternity
unit when d#1 was born. They were told their baby could hear. [ ]
If they could check that early in hospital surely they would have
noticed then if Martha is deaf?
As both parents were deaf, I imagine they went to whatever lengths were
necessary and available to let then know as soon as possible. I wasn't a
regular test in 1979 and I doubt it is now. Also, it may be easier to
decide if a baby can definitely hear than to be certain they can't.
The first time I witnessed a test for hearing on a small child (sat on
mother's lap, she must have been under one year old), I thought it looked
more like a test of peripheral vision.
That particular test certainly doesn't catch all hearing problems. An 8
year-old was moved to our little village school on the advice of the speech
therapist (whose own children had attended the school). The 30+-per-class
school in town thought he wasn't very bright. He came on in leaps and
bounds once it was realised he was deaf and got some hearing aids and other
support. I suppose he may have suffered some illness which caused the
problem after the early test.
A very basic test that I have witnessed for a pre-12 month test is to tap a
fork on a china plate behind the child’s head (out of sight of course) and
wait for a reaction from the infant.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
steve hague
2021-04-27 07:22:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
A very basic test that I have witnessed for a pre-12 month test is to tap a
fork on a china plate behind the child’s head (out of sight of course) and
wait for a reaction from the infant.
We were informed that our second son was deaf when he failed to respond
to the tests when he was a toddler. We found he could hear a bag of
crisps being opened when in another room. He was just being awkward.
BrritSki
2021-04-27 07:52:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Mike McMillan
A very basic test that I have witnessed for a pre-12 month test is to tap a
fork on a china plate behind the child’s head (out of sight of course) and
wait for a reaction from the infant.
We were informed that our second son was deaf when he failed to respond
to the tests when he was a toddler. We found he could hear a bag of
crisps being opened when in another room. He was just being awkward.
ROFL
Mike McMillan
2021-04-27 08:04:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Mike McMillan
A very basic test that I have witnessed for a pre-12 month test is to tap a
fork on a china plate behind the child’s head (out of sight of course) and
wait for a reaction from the infant.
We were informed that our second son was deaf when he failed to respond
to the tests when he was a toddler. We found he could hear a bag of
crisps being opened when in another room. He was just being awkward.
ROFL
Our Siamese X cats could hear a pair of kitchen scissors being opened and
closed from another room ... they associated those scissors with us
cutting up raw liver to put in their dish. We only had to pick up the
scissors within their eyeshot for them to go mad - walking around on hind
legs and wailing loudly - it wasn’t necessary to even have the presence of
raw liver for this to occur...
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
steve hague
2021-04-27 09:03:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by steve hague
Post by Mike McMillan
A very basic test that I have witnessed for a pre-12 month test is to tap a
fork on a china plate behind the child’s head (out of sight of course) and
wait for a reaction from the infant.
We were informed that our second son was deaf when he failed to respond
to the tests when he was a toddler. We found he could hear a bag of
crisps being opened when in another room. He was just being awkward.
ROFL
Our Siamese X cats could hear a pair of kitchen scissors being opened and
closed from another room ... they associated those scissors with us
cutting up raw liver to put in their dish. We only had to pick up the
scissors within their eyeshot for them to go mad - walking around on hind
legs and wailing loudly - it wasn’t necessary to even have the presence of
raw liver for this to occur...
We've had Siamese too. They're like that.
Vicky Ayech
2021-04-27 10:20:08 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 27 Apr 2021 10:03:05 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by steve hague
Post by Mike McMillan
A very basic test that I have witnessed for a pre-12 month test is to tap a
fork on a china plate behind the child’s head (out of sight of course)
and
wait for a reaction from the infant.
We were informed that our second son was deaf when he failed to respond
to the tests when he was a toddler. We found he could hear a bag of
crisps being opened when in another room. He was just being awkward.
ROFL
Our Siamese X cats could hear a pair of kitchen scissors being opened and
closed from another room ... they associated those scissors with us
cutting up raw liver to put in their dish. We only had to pick up the
scissors within their eyeshot for them to go mad - walking around on hind
legs and wailing loudly - it wasn’t necessary to even have the presence of
raw liver for this to occur...
We've had Siamese too. They're like that.
Harryet doesn't wait for any scissor openings. She begins to walk back
and forth in front of the tv around 8.30pm. Then by 8.45 she gets
vocal. SUPPER TIME! But Molly, our ex Shepherd/Podenko cross, (with
labrador genes) could hear a banana being peeled if upstairs and the
banana in the kitchen. She did like bananas. Ok, she liked all food.
Human food, cat food, road kill..strangers burgers, babies
carelessly-held biscuits..any food.
Vicky Ayech
2021-04-27 10:22:19 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 27 Apr 2021 11:20:08 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 27 Apr 2021 10:03:05 +0100, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by steve hague
Post by Mike McMillan
A very basic test that I have witnessed for a pre-12 month test is to tap a
fork on a china plate behind the child’s head (out of sight of course)
and
wait for a reaction from the infant.
We were informed that our second son was deaf when he failed to respond
to the tests when he was a toddler. We found he could hear a bag of
crisps being opened when in another room. He was just being awkward.
ROFL
Our Siamese X cats could hear a pair of kitchen scissors being opened and
closed from another room ... they associated those scissors with us
cutting up raw liver to put in their dish. We only had to pick up the
scissors within their eyeshot for them to go mad - walking around on hind
legs and wailing loudly - it wasn’t necessary to even have the presence of
raw liver for this to occur...
We've had Siamese too. They're like that.
Harryet doesn't wait for any scissor openings. She begins to walk back
and forth in front of the tv around 8.30pm. Then by 8.45 she gets
vocal. SUPPER TIME! But Molly, our ex Shepherd/Podenko cross, (with
labrador genes) could hear a banana being peeled if upstairs and the
banana in the kitchen. She did like bananas. Ok, she liked all food.
Human food, cat food, road kill..strangers burgers, babies
carelessly-held biscuits..any food.
strangers' babies'
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-04-27 12:35:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Mike McMillan
A very basic test that I have witnessed for a pre-12 month test is to tap a
fork on a china plate behind the child’s head (out of sight of course) and
wait for a reaction from the infant.
We were informed that our second son was deaf when he failed to respond
to the tests when he was a toddler. We found he could hear a bag of
crisps being opened when in another room. He was just being awkward.
You remind me of this image: https://bit.ly/3nrufQA (don't worry about
the bit.ly, I just wanted to hide the filename). Not babies/toddlers,
but made me smile. (Not mine - probably saved from Twitter; I've just
tried to find the original.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Eve had an Apple, Adam had a Wang...
Chris
2021-04-24 12:32:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Fri, 23 Apr 2021 18:28:45 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 23 Apr 2021 16:50:54 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
As an aside, it's been suggested on Twitter that it sounds as if Martha
is deaf. There have been a couple of occasions when it's been commented
on that she hasn't reacted to noisy stimuli. Apparently, this is one of
the likely (and less serious) effects of fetal alcohol syndrome.
That could be another opportunity for a long term story line about
being deaf. If they stay in Ambridge, unlike Vicky and child. Sign
language, what kind of schooling is best, a hearing aid dog.
Yes, that could be a story line which could work well.
I agree it would make a good story - but on radio...?
Which reminds me, there was a deaf couple with a newborn in the maternity
unit when d#1 was born. They were told their baby could hear. I spent some
time trying to figure out the ramifications of this. Learning how to care
for a new baby and fit around them in your new life together is boodly hard
for most people anyway. I imagine, if the baby is deaf, the larger problems
that presents would come later and quite slowly. If both parents are deaf I
think it would magnify the basic anxiety immensely before even thinking
about how to keep the new person alive.
There are baby monitors which are specific to parents with hearing loss as
there are clock alarms or even alarms in pouches under a pillow. Baby
signing which many parents use these days is a very simple sign language.
Not many people overall have no hearing whatsoever but quite a lot have
implants as hearing aids are no good.

On the group I inhabit there are a fair number of babies only weeks or
months old having hearing aids and a number of adults were deaf in
childhood and a small number never heard a thing without hearing aids or
whatever.

Sincerely Chris
Mike McMillan
2021-04-23 17:45:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 23 Apr 2021 16:50:54 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
Oi! SWs!
I didn't want jazzer and Tracy to hithc up. I thought he deserved
better. Now they are making her an improved version and good for him!
Bah! And the Chris and Alice story is developing believably too!
Ah. Writers, Caroline Harrington & Nick Warburton. Must be CH.
Jazzer working with pigs and Neil is better. I hope that goes ok.
I liked the stuff about Chelsea and school too! A touch of virus
reality.
I'm enjoying the Jazzer and Tracy storyline, not only is it (much
needed) light relief but it should be a good thing in the long term.
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know that this is hard for Chris to deal with and he is worried and
needs to protect Martha but I somehow feel he is using this to get
into control and bullying mode with Alice. He was obviously shocked
she wanted to go, shocked at what she said, but all through his voice
and tone were hectoring.
I agree that Chris isn't handling it well but it has sounded all too
horribly realistic to me. They've developed a classic, and very toxic,
co-dependent relationship, with Chris becoming more and more
controlling, as Alice becomes more and more out of control :(
As an aside, it's been suggested on Twitter that it sounds as if Martha
is deaf. There have been a couple of occasions when it's been commented
on that she hasn't reacted to noisy stimuli. Apparently, this is one of
the likely (and less serious) effects of fetal alcohol syndrome.
That could be another opportunity for a long term story line about
being deaf. If they stay in Ambridge, unlike Vicky and child. Sign
language, what kind of schooling is best, a hearing aid dog.
Do hearing aid dogs come with a pack of Duracells???
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Chris
2021-04-24 12:19:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 23 Apr 2021 16:50:54 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
Oi! SWs!
I didn't want jazzer and Tracy to hithc up. I thought he deserved
better. Now they are making her an improved version and good for him!
Bah! And the Chris and Alice story is developing believably too!
Ah. Writers, Caroline Harrington & Nick Warburton. Must be CH.
Jazzer working with pigs and Neil is better. I hope that goes ok.
I liked the stuff about Chelsea and school too! A touch of virus
reality.
I'm enjoying the Jazzer and Tracy storyline, not only is it (much
needed) light relief but it should be a good thing in the long term.
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know that this is hard for Chris to deal with and he is worried and
needs to protect Martha but I somehow feel he is using this to get
into control and bullying mode with Alice. He was obviously shocked
she wanted to go, shocked at what she said, but all through his voice
and tone were hectoring.
I agree that Chris isn't handling it well but it has sounded all too
horribly realistic to me. They've developed a classic, and very toxic,
co-dependent relationship, with Chris becoming more and more
controlling, as Alice becomes more and more out of control :(
As an aside, it's been suggested on Twitter that it sounds as if Martha
is deaf. There have been a couple of occasions when it's been commented
on that she hasn't reacted to noisy stimuli. Apparently, this is one of
the likely (and less serious) effects of fetal alcohol syndrome.
That could be another opportunity for a long term story line about
being deaf. If they stay in Ambridge, unlike Vicky and child. Sign
language, what kind of schooling is best, a hearing aid dog.
You might want to rephrase that Vicky, this is umra after all.

Sincerely Chris
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