Discussion:
Speeling
(too old to reply)
Sally Thompson
2020-07-30 06:11:46 UTC
Permalink
I really had to think about what this meant, on a Facebook group!

"Does anyone know what these white things are on the underside of this hide
ranger leaf? The hide ranger outside is absolutely covered in them"
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
John Ashby
2020-07-30 06:46:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
I really had to think about what this meant, on a Facebook group!
"Does anyone know what these white things are on the underside of this hide
ranger leaf? The hide ranger outside is absolutely covered in them"
Who was that masked plant?

Hi Ho silverleaf!

john
Mike
2020-07-30 07:17:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
I really had to think about what this meant, on a Facebook group!
"Does anyone know what these white things are on the underside of this hide
ranger leaf? The hide ranger outside is absolutely covered in them"
Whilst you are about it, could you weigh a pie?
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-07-30 09:37:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Sally Thompson
I really had to think about what this meant, on a Facebook group!
"Does anyone know what these white things are on the underside of this hide
ranger leaf? The hide ranger outside is absolutely covered in them"
I'm reminded of
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Gisli_Palsson2/publication/323959019/figure/fig3/AS:***@1521791876946/Polish-version-of-a-
Soviet-map-1957-from-Davies-and-Kent-The-Red-Atlas_W640.jpg
, which is a marvellous map of south-east England made for Polish airmen
- according to when I first encountered it it was for the ones flying
for us during the war, though the above filename suggests it is from the
cold war era. Anyway, it has phonetic - in Polish - versions of the
placenames, and - to me, anyway - it's great fun trying to figure out
what they are. Hide ranger has nothing on Dzylynem, and Dzejl'yk-sendz
(that's an L with a bar on it - pronounced W) took me days to crack.
Post by Mike
Whilst you are about it, could you weigh a pie?
Ah, one of my favourite mondegreens!




(Gillingham. I won't spoil it by giving you the other one [it's quite a
small place, in Essex]. If anyone would like the pronunciation crib I've
drawn up, just ask.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"I'm very peachable, if people know how to peach" - Sir David Attenborough (on
being asked if he was tired of being described as impeachable), on Desert
Island Discs, 2012-1-29.
Penny
2020-07-30 10:50:02 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 30 Jul 2020 10:37:11 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I'm reminded of
Soviet-map-1957-from-Davies-and-Kent-The-Red-Atlas_W640.jpg
, which is a marvellous map of south-east England made for Polish airmen
- according to when I first encountered it it was for the ones flying
for us during the war, though the above filename suggests it is from the
cold war era. Anyway, it has phonetic - in Polish - versions of the
placenames, and - to me, anyway - it's great fun trying to figure out
what they are.
It is fun, I find myself adopting the accent of my (social-climbing)
Grandmother for many of the names, though Saufend-on-sji remains my
favourite.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Hide ranger has nothing on Dzylynem, and Dzejl'yk-sendz
(that's an L with a bar on it - pronounced W) took me days to crack.
(Gillingham. I won't spoil it by giving you the other one [it's quite a
small place, in Essex].
I've never heard it called anything other than Dzejl'yk, however you
pronounce it.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Clive Arthur
2020-07-30 11:02:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Soviet-map-1957-from-Davies-and-Kent-The-Red-Atlas_W640.jpg
, which is a marvellous map of south-east England made for Polish airmen
- according to when I first encountered it it was for the ones flying
for us during the war, though the above filename suggests it is from the
cold war era. Anyway, it has phonetic - in Polish - versions of the
placenames, and - to me, anyway - it's great fun trying to figure out
what they are. Hide ranger has nothing on Dzylynem, and Dzejl'yk-sendz
(that's an L with a bar on it - pronounced W) took me days to crack.
OT, but I use to walk past a Polish Club on my way to school, it's still
there. I used to imagine the meetings they'd have, discussing the
relative merits of Cherry Blossom versus Kiwi, Brasso versus Duraglit.
--
Cheers
Clive
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-07-30 14:43:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Soviet-map-1957-from-Davies-and-Kent-The-Red-Atlas_W640.jpg
, which is a marvellous map of south-east England made for Polish
airmen - according to when I first encountered it it was for the ones
flying for us during the war, though the above filename suggests it
is from the cold war era. Anyway, it has phonetic - in Polish -
versions of the placenames, and - to me, anyway - it's great fun
trying to figure out what they are. Hide ranger has nothing on
Dzylynem, and Dzejl'yk-sendz (that's an L with a bar on it -
pronounced W) took me days to crack.
OT, but I use to walk past a Polish Club on my way to school, it's
still there. I used to imagine the meetings they'd have, discussing
the relative merits of Cherry Blossom versus Kiwi, Brasso versus
Duraglit.
LOL!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

No, I haven't changed my mind - I'm perfectly happy with the one I have, thank
you.
Chris McMillan
2020-07-31 11:14:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Soviet-map-1957-from-Davies-and-Kent-The-Red-Atlas_W640.jpg
, which is a marvellous map of south-east England made for Polish
airmen - according to when I first encountered it it was for the ones
flying for us during the war, though the above filename suggests it
is from the cold war era. Anyway, it has phonetic - in Polish -
versions of the placenames, and - to me, anyway - it's great fun
trying to figure out what they are. Hide ranger has nothing on
Dzylynem, and Dzejl'yk-sendz (that's an L with a bar on it -
pronounced W) took me days to crack.
OT, but I use to walk past a Polish Club on my way to school, it's
still there. I used to imagine the meetings they'd have, discussing
the relative merits of Cherry Blossom versus Kiwi, Brasso versus
Duraglit.
LOL!
That would have been me but I went to school with someone who also lived in
Reading whose parents had escaped Poland. I would have wondered if I had
spelt the shoe cleaner correctly.

Sincerely Chris
Chris McMillan
2020-07-30 18:13:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Soviet-map-1957-from-Davies-and-Kent-The-Red-Atlas_W640.jpg
, which is a marvellous map of south-east England made for Polish airmen
- according to when I first encountered it it was for the ones flying
for us during the war, though the above filename suggests it is from the
cold war era. Anyway, it has phonetic - in Polish - versions of the
placenames, and - to me, anyway - it's great fun trying to figure out
what they are. Hide ranger has nothing on Dzylynem, and Dzejl'yk-sendz
(that's an L with a bar on it - pronounced W) took me days to crack.
OT, but I use to walk past a Polish Club on my way to school, it's still
there. I used to imagine the meetings they'd have, discussing the
relative merits of Cherry Blossom versus Kiwi, Brasso versus Duraglit.
These days they belt out the local UK live muzak and keep the locals awake
all night, and the police are well known faces. Wunderkind rented a flat
three doors away from a local Polish club once upon a time.

Local rats may know where I mean.

Sincerely Chris
Anne B
2020-07-30 19:15:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by Sally Thompson
I really had to think about what this meant, on a Facebook group!
"Does anyone know what these white things are on the underside of this hide
ranger leaf? The hide ranger outside is absolutely covered in them"
I'm reminded of
Soviet-map-1957-from-Davies-and-Kent-The-Red-Atlas_W640.jpg
, which is a marvellous map of south-east England made for Polish airmen
- according to when I first encountered it it was for the ones flying
for us during the war, though the above filename suggests it is from the
cold war era. Anyway, it has phonetic - in Polish - versions of the
placenames, and - to me, anyway - it's great fun trying to figure out
what they are. Hide ranger has nothing on Dzylynem, and Dzejl'yk-sendz
(that's an L with a bar on it - pronounced W) took me days to crack.
Post by Mike
Whilst you are about it, could you weigh a pie?
Ah, one of my favourite mondegreens!
(Gillingham. I won't spoil it by giving you the other one [it's quite a
small place, in Essex]. If anyone would like the pronunciation crib I've
drawn up, just ask.)
https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5666969

Anne B
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-07-31 03:14:10 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 30 Jul 2020 at 20:15:07, Anne B <***@btinternet.com>
wrote:
[]
Post by Anne B
https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/5666969
Anne B
You got it!

It's not always the long ones that are the hardest; Luys and Hajw took
me a while!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

once described by Eccentrica Golumbits as the best bang since the big one ...
(first series, fit the second)
Penny
2020-07-30 08:24:04 UTC
Permalink
On 30 Jul 2020 06:11:46 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
I really had to think about what this meant, on a Facebook group!
"Does anyone know what these white things are on the underside of this hide
ranger leaf? The hide ranger outside is absolutely covered in them"
I've seen someone trying to sell a Chester draws - as a pose to one from
Shrewsbury perhaps...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2020-07-30 09:20:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
I've seen someone trying to sell a Chester draws - as a pose to one from
Shrewsbury perhaps...
I don't know if that was the very first eggcorn I ever saw or heard, but
I saw it about 50-odd years ago and have never forgotten it.

In a similar vein, when I was very young I used to hear people using a
certain word and I think maybe I used it myself sometimes. Then after a
few years I was reading a book in which was written "as a matter of
fact" and I realised what the "word" was and why it meant what it did.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-07-30 09:49:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I've seen someone trying to sell a Chester draws - as a pose to one from
Shrewsbury perhaps...
I don't know if that was the very first eggcorn I ever saw or heard,
but I saw it about 50-odd years ago and have never forgotten it.
Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
Post by Jenny M Benson
In a similar vein, when I was very young I used to hear people using a
certain word and I think maybe I used it myself sometimes. Then after
a few years I was reading a book in which was written "as a matter of
fact" and I realised what the "word" was and why it meant what it did.
Something like matrofact then? Yes, our legato language can be very hard
(especially for foreigners and machines)! There was a word I always
pronounced in my mind "mizzled" (to rhyme with grizzled), when I saw it
in print; I knew what it meant - puzzled of confused - but hadn't
figured out its pronunciation and origin. I think I was also familiar
with the normal pronunciation, and understood that too: I'd just never
connected the two - it wasn't until I read it out on some occasion, and
my mother (I think it was) said what was that word you just said, or
something like that. The subsequent conversation was very much a
lightbulb moment! I think I was at least into my teens, if not adult.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"I'm very peachable, if people know how to peach" - Sir David Attenborough (on
being asked if he was tired of being described as impeachable), on Desert
Island Discs, 2012-1-29.
Steve Hague
2020-07-30 10:27:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I've seen someone trying to sell a Chester draws - as a pose to one from
Shrewsbury perhaps...
I don't know if that was the very first eggcorn I ever saw or heard,
but I saw it about 50-odd years ago and have never forgotten it.
Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
Post by Jenny M Benson
In a similar vein, when I was very young I used to hear people using a
certain word and I think maybe I used it myself sometimes.  Then after
a few years I was reading a book in which was written "as a matter of
fact" and I realised what the "word" was and why it meant what it did.
Something like matrofact then? Yes, our legato language can be very hard
(especially for foreigners and machines)! There was a word I always
pronounced in my mind "mizzled" (to rhyme with grizzled), when I saw it
in print; I knew what it meant - puzzled of confused - but hadn't
figured out its pronunciation and origin. I think I was also familiar
with the normal pronunciation, and understood that too: I'd just never
connected the two - it wasn't until I read it out on some occasion, and
my mother (I think it was) said what was that word you just said, or
something like that. The subsequent conversation was very much a
lightbulb moment! I think I was at least into my teens, if not adult.
Mizzle is a word used hereabouts to describe the weather. If it's a bit
mizzly, there's not actually a monsoon going on, but you might want to
stay indoors if you want to stay dry.
Steve
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-07-30 10:43:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
On Thu, 30 Jul 2020 at 10:20:57, Jenny M Benson
[]
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Jenny M Benson
In a similar vein, when I was very young I used to hear people using
a certain word and I think maybe I used it myself sometimes.  Then
after a few years I was reading a book in which was written "as a
matter of fact" and I realised what the "word" was and why it meant
what it did.
Something like matrofact then? Yes, our legato language can be very
hard (especially for foreigners and machines)! There was a word I
always pronounced in my mind "mizzled" (to rhyme with grizzled), when
I saw it in print; I knew what it meant - puzzled of confused - but
hadn't figured out its pronunciation and origin. I think I was also
familiar with the normal pronunciation, and understood that too: I'd
just never connected the two - it wasn't until I read it out on some
occasion, and my mother (I think it was) said what was that word you
just said, or something like that. The subsequent conversation was
very much a lightbulb moment! I think I was at least into my teens, if not adult.
Mizzle is a word used hereabouts to describe the weather. If it's a bit
mizzly, there's not actually a monsoon going on, but you might want to
stay indoors if you want to stay dry.
Steve
Oh, I know mizzle - bit like fret. But the word I was talking about was
misled!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"The wish of the lazy to allow unsupervised access [to the internet] to their
children should not reduce all adults browsing to the level of suitability for
a
five-year-old." Yaman Akdeniz, quoted in Inter//face (The Times, 1999-2-10):
p12
Steve Hague
2020-07-30 10:46:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Mizzle is a word used hereabouts to describe the weather. If it's a bit
mizzly, there's not actually a monsoon going on, but you might want to
stay indoors if you want to stay dry.
Steve
A variation on the theme is mizzy- muzzy. Foggy with some rain in the air.
Steve
Mike
2020-07-30 11:09:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I've seen someone trying to sell a Chester draws - as a pose to one from
Shrewsbury perhaps...
I don't know if that was the very first eggcorn I ever saw or heard,
but I saw it about 50-odd years ago and have never forgotten it.
Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
Post by Jenny M Benson
In a similar vein, when I was very young I used to hear people using a
certain word and I think maybe I used it myself sometimes.  Then after
a few years I was reading a book in which was written "as a matter of
fact" and I realised what the "word" was and why it meant what it did.
Something like matrofact then? Yes, our legato language can be very hard
(especially for foreigners and machines)! There was a word I always
pronounced in my mind "mizzled" (to rhyme with grizzled), when I saw it
in print; I knew what it meant - puzzled of confused - but hadn't
figured out its pronunciation and origin. I think I was also familiar
with the normal pronunciation, and understood that too: I'd just never
connected the two - it wasn't until I read it out on some occasion, and
my mother (I think it was) said what was that word you just said, or
something like that. The subsequent conversation was very much a
lightbulb moment! I think I was at least into my teens, if not adult.
Mizzle is a word used hereabouts to describe the weather. If it's a bit
mizzly, there's not actually a monsoon going on, but you might want to
stay indoors if you want to stay dry.
Steve
I thought it meant ‘misty drizzle’.
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2020-07-30 10:59:04 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 30 Jul 2020 10:49:51 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I've seen someone trying to sell a Chester draws - as a pose to one from
Shrewsbury perhaps...
I don't know if that was the very first eggcorn I ever saw or heard,
but I saw it about 50-odd years ago and have never forgotten it.
Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
A mispronunciation of acorn, presumably.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
In a similar vein, when I was very young I used to hear people using a
certain word and I think maybe I used it myself sometimes. Then after
a few years I was reading a book in which was written "as a matter of
fact" and I realised what the "word" was and why it meant what it did.
Something like matrofact then? Yes, our legato language can be very hard
(especially for foreigners and machines)! There was a word I always
pronounced in my mind "mizzled" (to rhyme with grizzled), when I saw it
in print; I knew what it meant - puzzled of confused - but hadn't
figured out its pronunciation and origin. I think I was also familiar
with the normal pronunciation, and understood that too: I'd just never
connected the two - it wasn't until I read it out on some occasion, and
my mother (I think it was) said what was that word you just said, or
something like that. The subsequent conversation was very much a
lightbulb moment! I think I was at least into my teens, if not adult.
I can't recall which programme it was, possibly Monty Python, there was a
lengthy sketch about a lawyer/barister, who'd done a correspondence course.
On his first day in court he talked about his client being 'mizzled' and
having an 'aleebee'.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-07-30 14:52:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Thu, 30 Jul 2020 10:49:51 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
[]
Post by Penny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Something like matrofact then? Yes, our legato language can be very hard
(especially for foreigners and machines)! There was a word I always
pronounced in my mind "mizzled" (to rhyme with grizzled), when I saw it
[]
Post by Penny
I can't recall which programme it was, possibly Monty Python, there was a
lengthy sketch about a lawyer/barister, who'd done a correspondence course.
On his first day in court he talked about his client being 'mizzled' and
having an 'aleebee'.
Not the Nine O'clock News of blessed memory - this is the sketch:
(Griff can't keep a straight
face at one point, I think where he's saying the accused is "gwilty").
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

No, I haven't changed my mind - I'm perfectly happy with the one I have, thank
you.
John Ashby
2020-07-30 19:24:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Thu, 30 Jul 2020 10:49:51 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I've seen someone trying to sell a Chester draws - as a pose to one from
Shrewsbury perhaps...
I don't know if that was the very first eggcorn I ever saw or heard,
but I saw it about 50-odd years ago and have never forgotten it.
Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
A mispronunciation of acorn, presumably.
Walking on Stiperstones the other day the eighteen-year-old came across
a large (8cm long) bristly caterpillar which was identified as from an
oak egger moth. So called, it appears, not from laying its eggs on oak
trees (of which Stiperstones was quite devoid) but from the resemblance
of its cocoon to an oak egg or acorn.

In the spirit of this thread, same eighteen-year-old has had to be
admonished by me for pronouncing the cocktail as a Jimlet and confusing
his waitress (pretentious, lui?)

john
Jenny M Benson
2020-07-30 19:07:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
An eggcorn is a mis-pronunciation (and/or spelling) of a common word or
phrase, such as "from the gecko" (for "from the get-go"). I gather
they're seen a lot on Facebook. I mentioned here a while ago that Dave
Gorman did a very funny show about them. A mondegreen, I'd say, is
specifically a mis-heard song lyric and I don't think any particular one
is very widespread or not known to be wrong.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-07-31 03:20:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
An eggcorn is a mis-pronunciation (and/or spelling) of a common word or
phrase, such as "from the gecko" (for "from the get-go"). I gather
they're seen a lot on Facebook. I mentioned here a while ago that Dave
Gorman did a very funny show about them. A mondegreen, I'd say, is
specifically a mis-heard song lyric and I don't think any particular
one is very widespread or not known to be wrong.
Oh, I suspect there are a lot, and some of them _are_ widely not known
to be wrong. Probably mostly in hymns and the like, but here's one:
"when I called you last night from Tesco's" - which is what I genuinely
thought the Abba lyric said; plus Good King Wences, who last looked out
...
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

once described by Eccentrica Golumbits as the best bang since the big one ...
(first series, fit the second)
Penny
2020-07-31 08:47:09 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 31 Jul 2020 04:20:24 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
An eggcorn is a mis-pronunciation (and/or spelling) of a common word or
phrase, such as "from the gecko" (for "from the get-go"). I gather
they're seen a lot on Facebook. I mentioned here a while ago that Dave
Gorman did a very funny show about them. A mondegreen, I'd say, is
specifically a mis-heard song lyric and I don't think any particular
one is very widespread or not known to be wrong.
Oh, I suspect there are a lot, and some of them _are_ widely not known
"when I called you last night from Tesco's" - which is what I genuinely
thought the Abba lyric said; plus Good King Wences, who last looked out
...
I think several misheard lyrics became well known from the Maxell tape
adverts in the '80s. 'Me ears are alight' springs to mind


Peter Kay has a great routine with misheard lyrics


And apparently Hendrix sometimes actually sang ''scuse me while I kiss this
guy'.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Flop
2020-07-31 09:25:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
 Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
An eggcorn is a mis-pronunciation (and/or spelling) of a common word
or phrase, such as "from the gecko" (for "from the get-go").  I gather
they're seen a lot on Facebook.  I mentioned here a while ago that
Dave Gorman did a very funny show about them. A mondegreen, I'd say,
is specifically a mis-heard song lyric and I don't think any
particular one is very widespread or not known to be wrong.
Oh, I suspect there are a lot, and some of them _are_ widely not known
"when I called you last night from Tesco's" - which is what I genuinely
thought the Abba lyric said; plus Good King Wences, who last looked out ...
I think that one of my favourites is the book:

Gladly the Cross-Eyed Bear (Matthew Hope Mysteries (Paperback))
by Ed McBain
--
Flop

Truly the Good Lord gave us computers that we might learn patience
Penny
2020-07-31 10:17:57 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 31 Jul 2020 10:25:53 +0100, Flop <***@flop.knot.me.uk> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Flop
Gladly the Cross-Eyed Bear (Matthew Hope Mysteries (Paperback))
by Ed McBain
I think Gladly the Cross-Eyed Bear featured in The Perishers comic strip.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Steve Hague
2020-07-31 11:00:04 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 30 Jul 2020 at 20:07:31, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
 Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
An eggcorn is a mis-pronunciation (and/or spelling) of a common word
or phrase, such as "from the gecko" (for "from the get-go").  I
gather they're seen a lot on Facebook.  I mentioned here a while ago
that Dave Gorman did a very funny show about them. A mondegreen, I'd
say, is specifically a mis-heard song lyric and I don't think any
particular one is very widespread or not known to be wrong.
Oh, I suspect there are a lot, and some of them _are_ widely not known
"when I called you last night from Tesco's" - which is what I
genuinely thought the Abba lyric said; plus Good King Wences, who last
looked out ...
 Gladly the Cross-Eyed Bear (Matthew Hope Mysteries (Paperback))
by Ed McBain
Then there were the shepherds who washed their socks by night.
Steve
Clive Arthur
2020-07-31 12:42:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
On Thu, 30 Jul 2020 at 20:07:31, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
 Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember
it. (Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one,
so remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
An eggcorn is a mis-pronunciation (and/or spelling) of a common word
or phrase, such as "from the gecko" (for "from the get-go").  I
gather they're seen a lot on Facebook.  I mentioned here a while ago
that Dave Gorman did a very funny show about them. A mondegreen, I'd
say, is specifically a mis-heard song lyric and I don't think any
particular one is very widespread or not known to be wrong.
Oh, I suspect there are a lot, and some of them _are_ widely not
known to be wrong. Probably mostly in hymns and the like, but here's
one: "when I called you last night from Tesco's" - which is what I
genuinely thought the Abba lyric said; plus Good King Wences, who
last looked out ...
  Gladly the Cross-Eyed Bear (Matthew Hope Mysteries (Paperback))
by Ed McBain
Then there were the shepherds who washed their socks by night.
Steve
And why did Orientar have three kings anyway?
--
Cheers
Clive
Mike
2020-07-31 12:58:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Steve Hague
On Thu, 30 Jul 2020 at 20:07:31, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
 Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember
it. (Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one,
so remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
An eggcorn is a mis-pronunciation (and/or spelling) of a common word
or phrase, such as "from the gecko" (for "from the get-go").  I
gather they're seen a lot on Facebook.  I mentioned here a while ago
that Dave Gorman did a very funny show about them. A mondegreen, I'd
say, is specifically a mis-heard song lyric and I don't think any
particular one is very widespread or not known to be wrong.
Oh, I suspect there are a lot, and some of them _are_ widely not
known to be wrong. Probably mostly in hymns and the like, but here's
one: "when I called you last night from Tesco's" - which is what I
genuinely thought the Abba lyric said; plus Good King Wences, who
last looked out ...
  Gladly the Cross-Eyed Bear (Matthew Hope Mysteries (Paperback))
by Ed McBain
Then there were the shepherds who washed their socks by night.
Steve
And why did Orientar have three kings anyway?
Well, one ran the taxi rank, another sold cars and the third had the
dealership for Lambretta.
--
Toodle Pip
Steve Hague
2020-07-31 10:57:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
An eggcorn is a mis-pronunciation (and/or spelling) of a common word or
phrase, such as "from the gecko" (for "from the get-go").  I gather
they're seen a lot on Facebook.  I mentioned here a while ago that Dave
Gorman did a very funny show about them. A mondegreen, I'd say, is
specifically a mis-heard song lyric and I don't think any particular one
is very widespread or not known to be wrong.
Gecko is still a word that fills me with dread. When I was a younger and
less wise man, I had strange pet keeping habits. I bought a pair of
Tokays, largish geckoes on the basis that they are very beautiful
creatures. What I didn't know, but was soon to find out is that they
have the most powerful bite known to man, and are not the best tempered
of animals. I was bitten much later by a Savannah Monitor, a lizard many
times bigger than a Tokay, and it didn't hurt nearly as much. The
monitor was of a much gentler disposition though, and probably didn't
really mean it.
Steve
Mike
2020-07-31 12:54:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
An eggcorn is a mis-pronunciation (and/or spelling) of a common word or
phrase, such as "from the gecko" (for "from the get-go").  I gather
they're seen a lot on Facebook.  I mentioned here a while ago that Dave
Gorman did a very funny show about them. A mondegreen, I'd say, is
specifically a mis-heard song lyric and I don't think any particular one
is very widespread or not known to be wrong.
Gecko is still a word that fills me with dread. When I was a younger and
less wise man, I had strange pet keeping habits. I bought a pair of
Tokays, largish geckoes on the basis that they are very beautiful
creatures. What I didn't know, but was soon to find out is that they
have the most powerful bite known to man, and are not the best tempered
of animals. I was bitten much later by a Savannah Monitor, a lizard many
times bigger than a Tokay, and it didn't hurt nearly as much. The
monitor was of a much gentler disposition though, and probably didn't
really mean it.
Steve
I don’t think ‘our’ monitor bites, do you Sid?
--
Toodle Pip
Clive Arthur
2020-07-31 12:39:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
An eggcorn is a mis-pronunciation (and/or spelling) of a common word or
phrase, such as "from the gecko" (for "from the get-go").  I gather
they're seen a lot on Facebook.  I mentioned here a while ago that Dave
Gorman did a very funny show about them. A mondegreen, I'd say, is
specifically a mis-heard song lyric and I don't think any particular one
is very widespread or not known to be wrong.
You're a mind of information.
--
Cheers
Clive
Jenny M Benson
2020-07-30 19:10:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
Eggcorns, by the way, are involved in the reproduction of oak trees.
(Apols if you'd already realised that.)
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Kate B
2020-07-31 16:20:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I've seen someone trying to sell a Chester draws - as a pose to one from
Shrewsbury perhaps...
I don't know if that was the very first eggcorn I ever saw or heard,
but I saw it about 50-odd years ago and have never forgotten it.
Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
<snippety>

I believe strictly speaking 'mondegreen' is reserved for misheard
lyrics. Here is a delightful article comparing eggcorns, mondegreens and
malapropisms.
http://asktheleagueofnerds.com/eggcorns/
--
Kate B
London
Mike
2020-07-31 17:04:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I've seen someone trying to sell a Chester draws - as a pose to one from
Shrewsbury perhaps...
I don't know if that was the very first eggcorn I ever saw or heard,
but I saw it about 50-odd years ago and have never forgotten it.
Ah, eggcorn: a new word for me! Unfortunately, I won't remember it.
(Cognate with mondegreen, but I know the etymology of that one, so
remember it; do you know the origin of eggcorn?)
<snippety>
I believe strictly speaking 'mondegreen' is reserved for misheard
lyrics. Here is a delightful article comparing eggcorns, mondegreens and
malapropisms.
http://asktheleagueofnerds.com/eggcorns/
Marry Banilow sang about ‘Called her Rover’ in Coca Cabana.
--
Toodle Pip
Clive Arthur
2020-07-30 10:52:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
I really had to think about what this meant, on a Facebook group!
"Does anyone know what these white things are on the underside of this hide
ranger leaf? The hide ranger outside is absolutely covered in them"
Best show us a photo taken with a why dangle lens.
--
Cheers
Clive
Penny
2020-07-30 11:00:29 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 30 Jul 2020 11:52:28 +0100, Clive Arthur <***@nowaytoday.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Sally Thompson
I really had to think about what this meant, on a Facebook group!
"Does anyone know what these white things are on the underside of this hide
ranger leaf? The hide ranger outside is absolutely covered in them"
Best show us a photo taken with a why dangle lens.
ITYM why dangle lends.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
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