Discussion:
good and bad supermarket deliveries
(too old to reply)
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-21 11:14:09 UTC
Permalink
https://www.gransnet.com/forums/other_subjects/1256991-Online-grocery-shopping?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Mon%2021%20January%20-%20Gransnet%20Daily%20Newsletter&utm_content=Mon%2021%20January%20-%20Gransnet%20Daily%20Newsletter+CID_d35300fab92e668ea431709b2d18a2d7&utm_source=newsletters&utm_term=Has%20anyone%20else%20sent%20the%20whole%20lot%20back

I've never sent the whole lot back. I usually need the order. I get
Tescos and Morrisons alternate weeks as some htings not available at
some. I do complain at the drop of a hat and get refunds. £9 of veg
this week as delivered Thursday 8.pm and all dated Saturday. And they
left the veg. They usually do. I don't complain if not wrong things or
bad things. I Tried Sainsburys but they deliver from the small one
next door and haven't got half the stuff.
What about umrats? The stories here on this website are bad. I have
noticed dirty crates.
Nick Odell
2019-01-21 11:29:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.gransnet.com/forums/other_subjects/1256991-Online-grocery-shopping?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Mon%2021%20January%20-%20Gransnet%20Daily%20Newsletter&utm_content=Mon%2021%20January%20-%20Gransnet%20Daily%20Newsletter+CID_d35300fab92e668ea431709b2d18a2d7&utm_source=newsletters&utm_term=Has%20anyone%20else%20sent%20the%20whole%20lot%20back
I've never sent the whole lot back. I usually need the order. I get
Tescos and Morrisons alternate weeks as some htings not available at
some. I do complain at the drop of a hat and get refunds. £9 of veg
this week as delivered Thursday 8.pm and all dated Saturday. And they
left the veg. They usually do. I don't complain if not wrong things or
bad things. I Tried Sainsburys but they deliver from the small one
next door and haven't got half the stuff.
What about umrats? The stories here on this website are bad. I have
noticed dirty crates.
URLTL:DC

I wonder how long it will be before grocery delivery services follow
this example and start banning customers who make, in their view,
excessive returns?

https://tinyurl.com/yc8nojcv

(Other news sources for this story are available)

Nick
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-21 12:10:15 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 21 Jan 2019 11:29:28 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.gransnet.com/forums/other_subjects/1256991-Online-grocery-shopping?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Mon%2021%20January%20-%20Gransnet%20Daily%20Newsletter&utm_content=Mon%2021%20January%20-%20Gransnet%20Daily%20Newsletter+CID_d35300fab92e668ea431709b2d18a2d7&utm_source=newsletters&utm_term=Has%20anyone%20else%20sent%20the%20whole%20lot%20back
I've never sent the whole lot back. I usually need the order. I get
Tescos and Morrisons alternate weeks as some htings not available at
some. I do complain at the drop of a hat and get refunds. £9 of veg
this week as delivered Thursday 8.pm and all dated Saturday. And they
left the veg. They usually do. I don't complain if not wrong things or
bad things. I Tried Sainsburys but they deliver from the small one
next door and haven't got half the stuff.
What about umrats? The stories here on this website are bad. I have
noticed dirty crates.
URLTL:DC
I wonder how long it will be before grocery delivery services follow
this example and start banning customers who make, in their view,
excessive returns?
https://tinyurl.com/yc8nojcv
(Other news sources for this story are available)
Nick
+Apparently this happens with market place sellers. They get people
who complain, Amazon issues the refund and the market place seller
says send back item. Customer sends back empty box. Or threatens bad
review unless refund. There is not way to remove refund. But
apparently direct from Amazon there is. And if you buy direct from
Amazon you review the product, not the seller. With market place you
review the seller. B is saying if you send an empty box back to
Amaxon they call the police but small sellers in market place won't
bother.
Serena Blanchflower
2019-01-21 12:11:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.gransnet.com/forums/other_subjects/1256991-Online-grocery-shopping?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Mon%2021%20January%20-%20Gransnet%20Daily%20Newsletter&utm_content=Mon%2021%20January%20-%20Gransnet%20Daily%20Newsletter+CID_d35300fab92e668ea431709b2d18a2d7&utm_source=newsletters&utm_term=Has%20anyone%20else%20sent%20the%20whole%20lot%20back
I've never sent the whole lot back. I usually need the order. I get
Tescos and Morrisons alternate weeks as some htings not available at
some. I do complain at the drop of a hat and get refunds. £9 of veg
this week as delivered Thursday 8.pm and all dated Saturday. And they
left the veg. They usually do. I don't complain if not wrong things or
bad things. I Tried Sainsburys but they deliver from the small one
next door and haven't got half the stuff.
What about umrats? The stories here on this website are bad. I have
noticed dirty crates.
I mainly get Tesco orders, with some Ocado and, occasionally a Sainsbury
order and I rarely have any major problems.

I was lucky that Tesco started deliveries at just about the time that
getting myself to, and around, the supermarket was becoming a major
challenge, so I've been getting regular supermarket deliveries for as
long as they've been available.

They're generally pretty good about highlighting anything with short use
by dates and I have the option to refuse them but IME, they're generally
fine. When there have been problems, they're generally very good about
offering refunds and, in the days before season tickets, refunding the
delivery charges as well.

I've never yet been even tempted to refuse the whole order.
--
Best wishes, Serena
The true measure of any society can be found in how it treats its most
vulnerable members (Gandhi)
Penny
2019-01-21 12:39:17 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 21 Jan 2019 12:11:40 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
They're generally pretty good about highlighting anything with short use
by dates and I have the option to refuse them but IME, they're generally
fine. When there have been problems, they're generally very good about
offering refunds and, in the days before season tickets, refunding the
delivery charges as well.
My only experience of online grocery ordering/delivery has been from
staying with daughters. I was fairly impressed by the Ocado listing of
short-dated and replaced items on the delivery note.

D#1 came seriously unstuck with her order last time I was there.
She is in the habit of building an order over several days and will add
stuff which pops up as reduced (because it is short-dated) in the knowledge
that the reduced stuff will not make it to her order but will be replaced
with later-dated items for the same price.

Apparently if you add everything in view, regardless of whether you want it
or not, more items will appear. Then all you have to do it remove those
items you don't actually want and get bargain prices on the rest before
'completing' the order.

Unfortunately, small children intervened and she never got around to
removing stuff so I arrived to a house in panic - far more meat than we
could possibly eat or house or freeze, two bunches of unnecessary flowers
and some chocolates.

Some friends got lucky, we ate royally and the chocolates were nice.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2019-01-21 20:54:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
My only experience of online grocery ordering/delivery has been from
staying with daughters. I was fairly impressed by the Ocado listing of
short-dated and replaced items on the delivery note.
Ocado are good, but they have stopped supplying a delivery note so if
they are any shortages or substitutions, you won't find out until you
unpack the stuff (the driver can't tell you).

That information _is_ available if you go online and check during the
interval between your order being made up, and it arriving at your
doorstep. That isn't always very convenient.
--
Sam Plusnet
Fenny
2019-01-22 18:47:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
My only experience of online grocery ordering/delivery has been from
staying with daughters. I was fairly impressed by the Ocado listing of
short-dated and replaced items on the delivery note.
Ocado are good, but they have stopped supplying a delivery note so if
they are any shortages or substitutions, you won't find out until you
unpack the stuff (the driver can't tell you).
That information _is_ available if you go online and check during the
interval between your order being made up, and it arriving at your
doorstep. That isn't always very convenient.
Morrisons have stopped sending a printed delivery note. If you want
it, you can print it off yourself! Ma was not impressed and has
requested one sent with her order. As she says, if you're old /
disabled, you're not always able to stand around checking stuff. And
if the driver has gone before you realise they've brought something
you don't want, they won't want to come back again.

But then, the Morrison's drivers don't read and/or follow the delivery
instructions that accompany the order. Ma's standing instructions
include how to get into the building and that they should knock and
come into the flat. Most don't know any of this.
--
Fenny
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-22 21:22:57 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 22 Jan 2019 18:47:10 +0000, Fenny
Post by Fenny
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
My only experience of online grocery ordering/delivery has been from
staying with daughters. I was fairly impressed by the Ocado listing of
short-dated and replaced items on the delivery note.
Ocado are good, but they have stopped supplying a delivery note so if
they are any shortages or substitutions, you won't find out until you
unpack the stuff (the driver can't tell you).
That information _is_ available if you go online and check during the
interval between your order being made up, and it arriving at your
doorstep. That isn't always very convenient.
Morrisons have stopped sending a printed delivery note. If you want
it, you can print it off yourself! Ma was not impressed and has
requested one sent with her order. As she says, if you're old /
disabled, you're not always able to stand around checking stuff. And
if the driver has gone before you realise they've brought something
you don't want, they won't want to come back again.
But then, the Morrison's drivers don't read and/or follow the delivery
instructions that accompany the order. Ma's standing instructions
include how to get into the building and that they should knock and
come into the flat. Most don't know any of this.
This annoys me with Morrisons too but they send a pdf in an email of
the delivery note. I look at that before they come and complain to the
driver if it is not right. I doin't like not havinga hard copy. It is
easier to check from a paper one. But I am not about to print it off.
krw
2019-01-23 11:17:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I doin't like not havinga hard copy. It is
easier to check from a paper one.
Transfer to your ipad and check it off there?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-23 22:32:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
I doin't like not havinga hard copy. It is
easier to check from a paper one.
Transfer to your ipad and check it off there?
On the ipad is worse than the PC. Oh you mean hold the ipad and ..what
is this checkitoff of which you speak?
Mike
2019-01-24 08:14:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
I doin't like not havinga hard copy. It is
easier to check from a paper one.
Transfer to your ipad and check it off there?
On the ipad is worse than the PC. Oh you mean hold the ipad and ..what
is this checkitoff of which you speak?
Russian Author?
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-21 13:12:40 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 21 Jan 2019 12:11:40 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I was lucky that Tesco started deliveries at just about the time that
getting myself to, and around, the supermarket was becoming a major
challenge, so I've been getting regular supermarket deliveries for as
long as they've been available.
I wanted online shopping, choose online and get it delivered, when
using Prestel. I had friends among Demon Internet staff, a few at the
top of the food chain, and asked when we'd be able to order online. I
was told it was never going to happen. Too difficult.
Sid Nuncius
2019-01-22 09:33:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I mainly get Tesco orders, with some Ocado and, occasionally a Sainsbury
order and I rarely have any major problems.
I was lucky that Tesco started deliveries at just about the time that
getting myself to, and around, the supermarket was becoming a major
challenge, so I've been getting regular supermarket deliveries for as
long as they've been available.
They're generally pretty good about highlighting anything with short use
by dates and I have the option to refuse them but IME, they're generally
fine.  When there have been problems, they're generally very good about
offering refunds and, in the days before season tickets, refunding the
delivery charges as well.
I've never yet been even tempted to refuse the whole order.
I've had similar experiences with Sainsbury's. They're generally good
and nowadays I get an email on the morning of the delivery informing me
of any substitutions or short-dated items, so I can think in advance
about what I want to accept.

The standard is a little variable. Problems are always met with a
refund; it's nice not to have any agro about it, but as I always say to
them, what I need is food I can eat, not a refund. The other problem is
that since they moved their delivery source to a different, smaller
supermarket, not everything we need or want is available. Generally,
though, I'm pretty happy with Sainsbury's.[1]


[1]I have almost recovered from the time they brought my Christmas
delivery and on the bill was a bland note that the turkey I'd ordered
wasn't available. The driver said, in a broad West Indian accent,
"What, they didn't send you no turkey? Man, that is *rude*!", and then
advised me that Tesco did excellent turkeys. This made me smile, but
failed to rescue our Christmas dinner.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
John Ashby
2019-01-22 10:59:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I mainly get Tesco orders, with some Ocado and, occasionally a
Sainsbury order and I rarely have any major problems.
I was lucky that Tesco started deliveries at just about the time that
getting myself to, and around, the supermarket was becoming a major
challenge, so I've been getting regular supermarket deliveries for as
long as they've been available.
They're generally pretty good about highlighting anything with short
use by dates and I have the option to refuse them but IME, they're
generally fine.  When there have been problems, they're generally very
good about offering refunds and, in the days before season tickets,
refunding the delivery charges as well.
I've never yet been even tempted to refuse the whole order.
I've had similar experiences with Sainsbury's.  They're generally good
and nowadays I get an email on the morning of the delivery informing me
of any substitutions or short-dated items, so I can think in advance
about what I want to accept.
The standard is a little variable.  Problems are always met with a
refund; it's nice not to have any agro about it, but as I always say to
them, what I need is food I can eat, not a refund.  The other problem is
that since they moved their delivery source to a different, smaller
supermarket, not everything we need or want is available.  Generally,
though, I'm pretty happy with Sainsbury's.[1]
[1]I have almost recovered from the time they brought my Christmas
delivery and on the bill was a bland note that the turkey I'd ordered
wasn't available.  The driver said, in a broad West Indian accent,
"What, they didn't send you no turkey?  Man, that is *rude*!", and then
advised me that Tesco did excellent turkeys.  This made me smile, but
failed to rescue our Christmas dinner.
YAMargotLeadbetterAICM5GameOfPassTheBalloon

john
BrritSki
2019-01-22 12:11:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1]I have almost recovered from the time they brought my Christmas
delivery and on the bill was a bland note that the turkey I'd ordered
wasn't available.  The driver said, in a broad West Indian accent,
"What, they didn't send you no turkey?  Man, that is *rude*!", and
then advised me that Tesco did excellent turkeys.  This made me smile,
but failed to rescue our Christmas dinner.
YAMargotLeadbetterAICM5GameOfPassTheBalloon
Tom Good: "You shouldn't have eaten the balloon in the first place!"
Nick Odell
2019-01-22 15:26:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by John Ashby
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1]I have almost recovered from the time they brought my Christmas
delivery and on the bill was a bland note that the turkey I'd ordered
wasn't available.  The driver said, in a broad West Indian accent,
"What, they didn't send you no turkey?  Man, that is *rude*!", and
then advised me that Tesco did excellent turkeys.  This made me
smile, but failed to rescue our Christmas dinner.
YAMargotLeadbetterAICM5GameOfPassTheBalloon
Tom Good: "You shouldn't have eaten the balloon in the first place!"
C^N>M ....or something like that.


Nick
Fenny
2019-01-22 18:59:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1]I have almost recovered from the time they brought my Christmas
delivery and on the bill was a bland note that the turkey I'd ordered
wasn't available.  The driver said, in a broad West Indian accent,
"What, they didn't send you no turkey?  Man, that is *rude*!", and then
advised me that Tesco did excellent turkeys.  This made me smile, but
failed to rescue our Christmas dinner.
YAMargotLeadbetterAICM5GameOfPassTheBalloon
Political chicken pox
--
Fenny
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-21 14:57:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.gransnet.com/forums/other_subjects/1256991-Online-grocery-sh
opping?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Mon%2021%20January%20-%20Gransnet%2
0Daily%20Newsletter&utm_content=Mon%2021%20January%20-%20Gransnet%20Dail
y%20Newsletter+CID_d35300fab92e668ea431709b2d18a2d7&utm_source=newslette
rs&utm_term=Has%20anyone%20else%20sent%20the%20whole%20lot%20back
I've never sent the whole lot back. I usually need the order. I get
Tescos and Morrisons alternate weeks as some htings not available at
some. I do complain at the drop of a hat and get refunds. £9 of veg
this week as delivered Thursday 8.pm and all dated Saturday. And they
left the veg. They usually do. I don't complain if not wrong things or
bad things. I Tried Sainsburys but they deliver from the small one
next door and haven't got half the stuff.
What about umrats? The stories here on this website are bad. I have
noticed dirty crates.
Reading through the gransnet thread, and those here (and similar in the
past), I have come to the following conclusions:

1. No chain is universally good or bad; there were delighted and "never
again" posts about, I think, all of Tesco, Sainsbury, Ocado, Morrison,
and Waitrose in the thread. (There were I think only positives about
Iceland, but their range isn't sufficient to be an alternative). I
surmise that the differences are down to the individuals involved -
drivers, pickers, and whoever else is involved. Probably, in a given
area, you are likely to get the same individual dealing with your order,
either the picker or driver or both.

1a. Even policy differences between chains are not universal: for
example, I think I saw the same chain described both as "won't come
beyond the door" and "brought the stuff into the kitchen" (and I think
even helped put away).

2. _Mostly_, the drivers aren't to blame, though there are exceptions.

3. Complaints _mostly_ are dealt with by throwing money [though
occasionally in the form of vouchers )-:], rather than any chance of
anything actually changing (though this is often promised). This is the
norm for all British companies (and agencies) these days, not just in
this sphere, sadly. [I'd often _prefer_ genuine indication that things
would be fixed, to monetary compensation - but have more or less given
up even asking for such.]

I haven't tried home delivery yet. I like to pick things myself (though
buy very little fresh anyway - but like to see what's new), but also it
gets me out, rather less than once a week; home delivery could see me
not emerging for months!

JPG
===


How about a three-way referendum, allowing second choices?
--
Are petitions unfair? See 255soft.uk (YOUR VOTE COUNTS)! [Pass it on.]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

No, I haven't changed my mind - I'm perfectly happy with the one I have, thank
you.
Penny
2019-01-21 15:31:53 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 21 Jan 2019 14:57:15 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I haven't tried home delivery yet. I like to pick things myself (though
buy very little fresh anyway - but like to see what's new), but also it
gets me out, rather less than once a week; home delivery could see me
not emerging for months!
These are my reasons for not getting food delivered too, although I do buy
things fresh I tend to batch cook and freeze. There are always better
things to do than shopping and cooking - even if I don't get around to
actually doing them very often.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sid Nuncius
2019-01-22 09:38:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Mon, 21 Jan 2019 14:57:15 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I haven't tried home delivery yet. I like to pick things myself (though
buy very little fresh anyway - but like to see what's new), but also it
gets me out, rather less than once a week; home delivery could see me
not emerging for months!
These are my reasons for not getting food delivered too, although I do buy
things fresh I tend to batch cook and freeze. There are always better
things to do than shopping and cooking - even if I don't get around to
actually doing them very often.
I find a roughly three-weekly delivery keeps us stocked up with
bulky/heavy items and things I can't get locally. I tend to shop
locally every few days in between for fresh fruit/veg/milk/fish/meat
etc. and other bits and pieces. I agree it's far better to choose your
own fresh produce, but doing all the shopping myself would be nigh-on
impossible for me. Deliveries are a godsend in that respect.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
SODAM
2019-01-21 18:50:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.gransnet.com/forums/other_subjects/1256991-Online-grocery-sh
opping?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Mon%2021%20January%20-%20Gransnet%2
0Daily%20Newsletter&utm_content=Mon%2021%20January%20-%20Gransnet%20Dail
y%20Newsletter+CID_d35300fab92e668ea431709b2d18a2d7&utm_source=newslette
rs&utm_term=Has%20anyone%20else%20sent%20the%20whole%20lot%20back
I've never sent the whole lot back. I usually need the order. I get
Tescos and Morrisons alternate weeks as some htings not available at
some. I do complain at the drop of a hat and get refunds. £9 of veg
this week as delivered Thursday 8.pm and all dated Saturday. And they
left the veg. They usually do. I don't complain if not wrong things or
bad things. I Tried Sainsburys but they deliver from the small one
next door and haven't got half the stuff.
What about umrats? The stories here on this website are bad. I have
noticed dirty crates.
Reading through the gransnet thread, and those here (and similar in the
1. No chain is universally good or bad; there were delighted and "never
again" posts about, I think, all of Tesco, Sainsbury, Ocado, Morrison,
and Waitrose in the thread. (There were I think only positives about
Iceland, but their range isn't sufficient to be an alternative). I
surmise that the differences are down to the individuals involved -
drivers, pickers, and whoever else is involved. Probably, in a given
area, you are likely to get the same individual dealing with your order,
either the picker or driver or both.
1a. Even policy differences between chains are not universal: for
example, I think I saw the same chain described both as "won't come
beyond the door" and "brought the stuff into the kitchen" (and I think
even helped put away).
2. _Mostly_, the drivers aren't to blame, though there are exceptions.
3. Complaints _mostly_ are dealt with by throwing money [though
occasionally in the form of vouchers )-:], rather than any chance of
anything actually changing (though this is often promised). This is the
norm for all British companies (and agencies) these days, not just in
this sphere, sadly. [I'd often _prefer_ genuine indication that things
would be fixed, to monetary compensation - but have more or less given
up even asking for such.]
I haven't tried home delivery yet. I like to pick things myself (though
buy very little fresh anyway - but like to see what's new), but also it
gets me out, rather less than once a week; home delivery could see me
not emerging for months!
Sadly, Iceland here closed on the last day of 2018. They left because of a
large increase in rent. So now the landlord has an empty shop. Is that
sensible business practice?

It was my favourite supermarket, both because of its ethics and the fact
that I could choose my shopping and they would then deliver it free,
usually the same day. If the weather was bad, I could order online.
Delivery never late, never substituted, never wrong. Nearest one now 20
miles away <sigh>.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-21 19:08:21 UTC
Permalink
In message
<399747057.569783681.521141.kemp_m-***@news.eternal-september.or
g>, SODAM <***@talktalk.net> writes:
[SNIP]
Post by SODAM
Sadly, Iceland here closed on the last day of 2018. They left because of a
large increase in rent. So now the landlord has an empty shop. Is that
sensible business practice?
It was my favourite supermarket, both because of its ethics and the fact
that I could choose my shopping and they would then deliver it free,
usually the same day. If the weather was bad, I could order online.
Delivery never late, never substituted, never wrong. Nearest one now 20
miles away <sigh>.
OK, you can't choose your shopping any more, but presumably you can
still order online? Or do they have a maximum delivery range?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

pu gnikcab yb naem uoy tahw siht sI
SODAM
2019-01-21 19:23:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In message
[SNIP]
Post by SODAM
Sadly, Iceland here closed on the last day of 2018. They left because of a
large increase in rent. So now the landlord has an empty shop. Is that
sensible business practice?
It was my favourite supermarket, both because of its ethics and the fact
that I could choose my shopping and they would then deliver it free,
usually the same day. If the weather was bad, I could order online.
Delivery never late, never substituted, never wrong. Nearest one now 20
miles away <sigh>.
OK, you can't choose your shopping any more, but presumably you can
still order online? Or do they have a maximum delivery range?
Sadly, I’m now outside their range for delivery, as are all the townsfolk.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Penny
2019-01-22 09:16:56 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 21 Jan 2019 18:50:01 +0000, SODAM <***@talktalk.net> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by SODAM
Sadly, Iceland here closed on the last day of 2018. They left because of a
large increase in rent. So now the landlord has an empty shop. Is that
sensible business practice?
It was my favourite supermarket, both because of its ethics and the fact
that I could choose my shopping and they would then deliver it free,
usually the same day. If the weather was bad, I could order online.
Delivery never late, never substituted, never wrong. Nearest one now 20
miles away <sigh>.
Somerfield (or were they Gateway then?) would deliver if you had at least
£25 worth of goods in your basket. This was invaluable when I was ill in
the late '90s. My 13 year old could go into town (she often walked the 3
miles, buses were infrequent), select the shopping and it would be
delivered later in the day.

It reminded me of shopping in the village Co-op when I was little. My
mother would bicycle to the shops with me in the seat on the back, we'd
visit the three separate shops, grocer, butcher and greengrocers then go
home and wait for a boy on a bicycle who delivered a cardboard box with all
the purchases and the account book in it.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-22 15:41:23 UTC
Permalink
In message <***@4ax.com>, Penny
<***@labyrinth.freeuk.com> writes:
[]
Post by Penny
It reminded me of shopping in the village Co-op when I was little. My
mother would bicycle to the shops with me in the seat on the back, we'd
visit the three separate shops, grocer, butcher and greengrocers then go
home and wait for a boy on a bicycle who delivered a cardboard box with all
the purchases and the account book in it.
I don't think my memory actually goes as far as a boy on a bicycle, but
I think I remember my mum ordering groceries - this would have been in
the '60s. Our telephone number was Eaglescliffe 2201.

Another novelty at that time - not sure if we ordered from it, or just
passed it when we did go to town (which I think would have been Yarm) -
was "Sparks daylight bakery". I _think_ they were so named because their
factory was fitted with fluorescent lighting, still something of a
novelty then (in that area, anyway).

JPG
---


--
Are petitions unfair? See 255soft.uk [Only 271 so far )-: - suggestions?]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

(please reply to group - they also serve who only look and lurk)
(William Allen, 1999 - after Milton, of course)
LFS
2019-01-22 17:00:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
It reminded me of shopping in the village Co-op when I was little. My
mother would bicycle to the shops with me in the seat on the back, we'd
visit the three separate shops, grocer, butcher and greengrocers then go
home and wait for a boy on a bicycle who delivered a cardboard box with all
the purchases and the account book in it.
My paternal grandmother had her groceries delivered to her London flat
in the 1950s. Mum disapproved and thought this was very decadent: I
think she liked shopping in the new Tesco near us. But when we moved to
Sheffield in 1965 we lived a long way from a supermarket and up a very
steep hill. Mum got fed up with waiting for Dad to take her shopping in
the car on a Saturday. There was a small grocers at the foot of the hill
who delivered so she started ordering from them but I think she always
felt guilty about it. Recently I was going through some of her papers
and found a bill from the grocer - you could get a great deal of food
for a fiver in 1965.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Fenny
2019-01-22 19:01:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Recently I was going through some of her papers
and found a bill from the grocer - you could get a great deal of food
for a fiver in 1965.
She spent a *fiver* on food? Was she feeding an army?
--
Fenny
steveski
2019-01-22 19:21:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
Recently I was going through some of her papers and found a bill from
the grocer - you could get a great deal of food for a fiver in 1965.
She spent a *fiver* on food? Was she feeding an army?
Luxury! (cont. p. 94)
--
Steveski
Jenny M Benson
2019-01-22 22:23:49 UTC
Permalink
you could get a great deal of food for a fiver in 1965.
Probably my earliest money-related memory is of going into the Bank
(Martin's, Charing Cross, Birkenhead) with my Mum who was drawing out
her housekeeping money. I forget (she did tell me once) how much she
needed to keep a family of 5, but the cashier asked her if she'd like
the money in pound- or ten-shilling-notes. "Oh, ten-shilling-notes" she
said, "pound notes are too difficult to get changed."

I also remember a time when a loaf of bread cost some
pennies-and-three-farthings.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-22 22:34:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
you could get a great deal of food for a fiver in 1965.
Probably my earliest money-related memory is of going into the Bank
(Martin's, Charing Cross, Birkenhead) with my Mum who was drawing out
her housekeeping money. I forget (she did tell me once) how much she
Mine, getting a threepenny bit to spend at the corner shop in the '60s.
I can't remember whether daily or weekly though, or even if regularly at
all.
Post by Jenny M Benson
needed to keep a family of 5, but the cashier asked her if she'd like
the money in pound- or ten-shilling-notes. "Oh, ten-shilling-notes"
she said, "pound notes are too difficult to get changed."
I also remember a time when a loaf of bread cost some
pennies-and-three-farthings.
Ah, slightly before me - I think the farthing went out the year I was
born. I remember the price of a Mars bar _falling_, though (I think it
was when VAT came in, replacing some other taxes - early '70s?).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Address the chair!" "There isn't a chair, there's only a rock!" "Well, call
it a chair!" "Why not call it a rock?" (First series, fit the sixth.)
steveski
2019-01-23 01:34:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
you could get a great deal of food for a fiver in 1965.
Probably my earliest money-related memory is of going into the Bank
(Martin's, Charing Cross, Birkenhead) with my Mum who was drawing out
her housekeeping money. I forget (she did tell me once) how much she
Mine, getting a threepenny bit to spend at the corner shop in the '60s.
I can't remember whether daily or weekly though, or even if regularly at
all.
Post by Jenny M Benson
needed to keep a family of 5, but the cashier asked her if she'd like
the money in pound- or ten-shilling-notes. "Oh, ten-shilling-notes" she
said, "pound notes are too difficult to get changed."
I also remember a time when a loaf of bread cost some
pennies-and-three-farthings.
Ah, slightly before me - I think the farthing went out the year I was
born. I remember the price of a Mars bar _falling_, though (I think it
was when VAT came in, replacing some other taxes - early '70s?).
But Black Jacks and Fruit Salad were still four for a penny long after
farthings died.
--
Steveski
Mike
2019-01-23 08:48:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
you could get a great deal of food for a fiver in 1965.
Probably my earliest money-related memory is of going into the Bank
(Martin's, Charing Cross, Birkenhead) with my Mum who was drawing out
her housekeeping money. I forget (she did tell me once) how much she
Mine, getting a threepenny bit to spend at the corner shop in the '60s.
I can't remember whether daily or weekly though, or even if regularly at
all.
Post by Jenny M Benson
needed to keep a family of 5, but the cashier asked her if she'd like
the money in pound- or ten-shilling-notes. "Oh, ten-shilling-notes" she
said, "pound notes are too difficult to get changed."
I also remember a time when a loaf of bread cost some
pennies-and-three-farthings.
Ah, slightly before me - I think the farthing went out the year I was
born. I remember the price of a Mars bar _falling_, though (I think it
was when VAT came in, replacing some other taxes - early '70s?).
But Black Jacks and Fruit Salad were still four for a penny long after
farthings died.
But I still remember handing over a farthing for just the one!
--
Toodle Pip
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2019-01-23 08:55:24 UTC
Permalink
So do I.
Mike
2019-01-23 08:58:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
So do I.
Err,.... do you?!
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-23 11:51:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
So do I.
Err,.... do you?!

(certificate A perhaps. 46 seconds in [though view from start; whole
clip is only just over a minute].)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"The people here are more educated and intelligent. Even stupid people in
Britain are smarter than Americans." Madonna, in RT 30 June-6July 2001 (page
32)
Mike
2019-01-23 13:22:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
So do I.
Err,.... do you?!
http://youtu.be/ISnsZ51LPiM
(certificate A perhaps. 46 seconds in [though view from start; whole
clip is only just over a minute].)
My point was Tony had snipped everything - mined dew, having looked at the
clip you referred to Jpeg, I am not much wiser as to what Tony was
referring to anyway!
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-01-23 16:35:30 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 23 Jan 2019 13:22:57 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
So do I.
Err,.... do you?!
http://youtu.be/ISnsZ51LPiM
(certificate A perhaps. 46 seconds in [though view from start; whole
clip is only just over a minute].)
My point was Tony had snipped everything - mined dew, having looked at the
clip you referred to Jpeg, I am not much wiser as to what Tony was
referring to anyway!
I think Tony was responding to you
"But I still remember handing over a farthing for just the one!"
but it's always hard to tell with no quote.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-01-23 16:45:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
So do I.
Err,.... do you?!
http://youtu.be/ISnsZ51LPiM
(certificate A perhaps. 46 seconds in [though view from start; whole
clip is only just over a minute].)
My point was Tony had snipped everything - mined dew, having looked at the
clip you referred to Jpeg, I am not much wiser as to what Tony was
referring to anyway!
I think Tony was responding to you
"But I still remember handing over a farthing for just the one!"
but it's always hard to tell with no quote.
Thank you Penny, but now, I’m even more intrigued about the relevance of
the clip linked to the url Jpeg mentioned!
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-23 17:17:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
So do I.
Err,.... do you?!
http://youtu.be/ISnsZ51LPiM
(certificate A perhaps. 46 seconds in [though view from start; whole
clip is only just over a minute].)
My point was Tony had snipped everything - mined dew, having looked at the
clip you referred to Jpeg, I am not much wiser as to what Tony was
referring to anyway!
I think Tony was responding to you
"But I still remember handing over a farthing for just the one!"
but it's always hard to tell with no quote.
Thank you Penny, but now, I’m even more intrigued about the relevance of
the clip linked to the url Jpeg mentioned!
When somebody says "so do I", in a way that portends significance, I
always think of that clip.
[]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Thay have a saying for it: /Geiz ist geil/, which roughly translates as, "It's
sexy to be stingly". - Joe Fattorini, RT insert 2016/9/10-16
Mike
2019-01-23 18:25:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
So do I.
Err,.... do you?!
http://youtu.be/ISnsZ51LPiM
(certificate A perhaps. 46 seconds in [though view from start; whole
clip is only just over a minute].)
My point was Tony had snipped everything - mined dew, having looked at the
clip you referred to Jpeg, I am not much wiser as to what Tony was
referring to anyway!
I think Tony was responding to you
"But I still remember handing over a farthing for just the one!"
but it's always hard to tell with no quote.
Thank you Penny, but now, I’m even more intrigued about the relevance of
the clip linked to the url Jpeg mentioned!
When somebody says "so do I", in a way that portends significance, I
always think of that clip.
[]
Oh, Oak a.
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2019-01-23 09:14:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
you could get a great deal of food for a fiver in 1965.
Probably my earliest money-related memory is of going into the Bank
(Martin's, Charing Cross, Birkenhead) with my Mum who was drawing out
her housekeeping money. I forget (she did tell me once) how much she
Mine, getting a threepenny bit to spend at the corner shop in the '60s.
I can't remember whether daily or weekly though, or even if regularly at
all.
Post by Jenny M Benson
needed to keep a family of 5, but the cashier asked her if she'd like
the money in pound- or ten-shilling-notes. "Oh, ten-shilling-notes" she
said, "pound notes are too difficult to get changed."
I also remember a time when a loaf of bread cost some
pennies-and-three-farthings.
Ah, slightly before me - I think the farthing went out the year I was
born. I remember the price of a Mars bar _falling_, though (I think it
was when VAT came in, replacing some other taxes - early '70s?).
But Black Jacks and Fruit Salad were still four for a penny long after
farthings died.
And chewing gum a penny a packet from the machine outside the sweetshop
- every fourth packet free. Memories of walking home from school and
checking the rejected coin slot and whether the previous user had turned
the wheel a second time for the free packet. Oh: only me then?

Nick
Jenny M Benson
2019-01-23 09:55:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
And chewing gum a penny a packet from the machine outside the sweetshop
- every fourth packet free. Memories of walking home from school and
checking the rejected coin slot and whether the previous user had turned
the wheel a second time for the free packet. Oh: only me then?
We weren't allowed chewing gum, but always pressed Button B in every
'phone kiosk we passed. Just occasionally someone would have neglected
to do that and we'd be rewarded.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Sam Plusnet
2019-01-23 21:51:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Nick Odell
And chewing gum a penny a packet from the machine outside the
sweetshop - every fourth packet free. Memories of walking home from
school and checking the rejected coin slot and whether the previous
user had turned the wheel a second time for the free packet. Oh: only
me then?
We weren't allowed chewing gum, but always pressed Button B in every
'phone kiosk we passed.  Just occasionally someone would have neglected
to do that and we'd be rewarded.
Wofe was never "allowed"[1] any sweets from those machines.
According to her mother, the bubblegum gave you diphtheria and the
chewing gum cholera.
(Or was it t'other way around?)
Each type had its own, very specific, hazard, apparently.

[1] By the age of five, Wofe had grave doubts about her mother's judgement.
--
Sam Plusnet
LFS
2019-01-25 05:08:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Nick Odell
And chewing gum a penny a packet from the machine outside the
sweetshop - every fourth packet free. Memories of walking home from
school and checking the rejected coin slot and whether the previous
user had turned the wheel a second time for the free packet. Oh: only
me then?
We weren't allowed chewing gum, but always pressed Button B in every
'phone kiosk we passed.  Just occasionally someone would have
neglected to do that and we'd be rewarded.
Wofe was never "allowed"[1] any sweets from those machines.
According to her mother, the bubblegum gave you diphtheria and the
chewing gum cholera.
(Or was it t'other way around?)
Each type had its own, very specific, hazard, apparently.
[1] By the age of five, Wofe had grave doubts about her mother's judgement.
I was only allowed wrapped sweets, although the hazards of the unwrapped
sort were never specified in detail. I remember daring to buy a quarter
of aniseed balls and hiding them under my bed.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
SODAM
2019-01-23 10:35:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
you could get a great deal of food for a fiver in 1965.
Probably my earliest money-related memory is of going into the Bank
(Martin's, Charing Cross, Birkenhead) with my Mum who was drawing out
her housekeeping money. I forget (she did tell me once) how much she
Mine, getting a threepenny bit to spend at the corner shop in the '60s.
I can't remember whether daily or weekly though, or even if regularly at
all.
Post by Jenny M Benson
needed to keep a family of 5, but the cashier asked her if she'd like
the money in pound- or ten-shilling-notes. "Oh, ten-shilling-notes" she
said, "pound notes are too difficult to get changed."
I also remember a time when a loaf of bread cost some
pennies-and-three-farthings.
Ah, slightly before me - I think the farthing went out the year I was
born. I remember the price of a Mars bar _falling_, though (I think it
was when VAT came in, replacing some other taxes - early '70s?).
But Black Jacks and Fruit Salad were still four for a penny long after
farthings died.
And chewing gum a penny a packet from the machine outside the sweetshop
- every fourth packet free. Memories of walking home from school and
checking the rejected coin slot and whether the previous user had turned
the wheel a second time for the free packet. Oh: only me then?
Nick
YANAOU, Nick. ;-)
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-23 22:31:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Post by Nick Odell
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
you could get a great deal of food for a fiver in 1965.
Probably my earliest money-related memory is of going into the Bank
(Martin's, Charing Cross, Birkenhead) with my Mum who was drawing out
her housekeeping money. I forget (she did tell me once) how much she
Mine, getting a threepenny bit to spend at the corner shop in the '60s.
I can't remember whether daily or weekly though, or even if regularly at
all.
Post by Jenny M Benson
needed to keep a family of 5, but the cashier asked her if she'd like
the money in pound- or ten-shilling-notes. "Oh, ten-shilling-notes" she
said, "pound notes are too difficult to get changed."
I also remember a time when a loaf of bread cost some
pennies-and-three-farthings.
Ah, slightly before me - I think the farthing went out the year I was
born. I remember the price of a Mars bar _falling_, though (I think it
was when VAT came in, replacing some other taxes - early '70s?).
But Black Jacks and Fruit Salad were still four for a penny long after
farthings died.
And chewing gum a penny a packet from the machine outside the sweetshop
- every fourth packet free. Memories of walking home from school and
checking the rejected coin slot and whether the previous user had turned
the wheel a second time for the free packet. Oh: only me then?
Nick
YANAOU, Nick. ;-)
It's ringing a very faint bell. Were the packets small, 4 pellets of
gum in hard coats? An the whole thing hard because out in the cold?
Were there bubblegum machines at the same time or later? And
gobstoppers. Bubblegums might be more than one and gifts?
Also hard though.
Sam Plusnet
2019-01-23 21:43:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
But Black Jacks and Fruit Salad were still four for a penny long after
farthings died.
You should have visited us.
They were one farthing each or five for a penny.
(Mind you, I suspect that I may be your elder[1])
--
Sam Plusnet
[1] But not, I fear, better.
steveski
2019-01-23 22:12:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
But Black Jacks and Fruit Salad were still four for a penny long after
farthings died.
You should have visited us.
They were one farthing each or five for a penny. (Mind you, I suspect
that I may be your elder)
Rubbish haiku nomination?
--
Steveski
Sam Plusnet
2019-01-24 02:28:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
But Black Jacks and Fruit Salad were still four for a penny long after
farthings died.
You should have visited us.
They were one farthing each or five for a penny. (Mind you, I suspect
that I may be your elder)
Rubbish haiku nomination?
It's a gift, but antibiotics don't seem to work.
--
Sam Plusnet
Sid Nuncius
2019-01-25 10:15:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
But Black Jacks and Fruit Salad were still four for a penny long after
farthings died.
You should have visited us.
They were one farthing each or five for a penny. (Mind you, I suspect
that I may be your elder)
Rubbish haiku nomination?
It's a gift, but antibiotics don't seem to work.
Antibiotics
Takes up a whole haiku line;
A tricky subject.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike Ruddock
2019-01-25 10:39:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
But Black Jacks and Fruit Salad were still four for a penny long after
farthings died.
You should have visited us.
They were one farthing each or five for a penny. (Mind you, I suspect
that I may be your elder)
Rubbish haiku nomination?
It's a gift, but antibiotics don't seem to work.
Antibiotics
Takes up a whole haiku line;
A tricky subject.
Well done . . . but doesn't umra pride itself on rubbish haikus?

Mike Ruddock
Sid Nuncius
2019-01-25 11:00:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
But Black Jacks and Fruit Salad were still four for a penny long after
farthings died.
You should have visited us.
They were one farthing each or five for a penny. (Mind you, I suspect
that I may be your elder)
Rubbish haiku nomination?
It's a gift, but antibiotics don't seem to work.
Antibiotics
Takes up a whole haiku line;
A tricky subject.
Well done . . . but doesn't umra pride itself on rubbish haikus?
Oh, indeed. Sam's RH was a mqgnificent effort.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Nick Odell
2019-01-25 11:08:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
But Black Jacks and Fruit Salad were still four for a penny long after
farthings died.
You should have visited us.
They were one farthing each or five for a penny. (Mind you, I suspect
that I may be your elder)
Rubbish haiku nomination?
It's a gift, but antibiotics don't seem to work.
Antibiotics
Takes up a whole haiku line;
A tricky subject.
Well done . . . but doesn't umra pride itself on rubbish haikus?
Sid's just taken the Rubbish Haiku into another dimension: it was a
Rubbish Rubbish Haiku.

Nick
Jenny M Benson
2019-01-25 13:51:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by steveski
Rubbish haiku nomination?
It's a gift, but antibiotics don't seem to work.
Antibiotics
Takes up a whole haiku line;
A tricky subject.
Jolly well done, BTM!
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Serena Blanchflower
2019-01-22 19:33:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
It reminded me of shopping in the village Co-op when I was little. My
mother would bicycle to the shops with me in the seat on the back, we'd
visit the three separate shops, grocer, butcher and greengrocers then go
home and wait for a boy on a bicycle who delivered a cardboard box with all
the purchases and the account book in it.
In the village where I grew up, we didn't have any shops nearby but we
had a whole range of mobile shops which visited each week. There was a
butcher, a baker, no candlestick maker but there was a greengrocer and,
sometimes, a fishmonger.

The butcher's shop was still functioning and visiting the village, IIRC,
a couple of times a week, when my mother died in 1999. The chap who, by
then, owned it had been a young chap working for one of the local
butchers when we first knew him but then, when the butcher's shop
closed, he bought the van and kept going. By the time Mum died, I think
he was pretty close to retirement.

As well as selling meat, he acted as a bank and was always willing to
cash cheques for his customers. As well as being a very useful service,
this cut down the amount of cash he was carrying and, therefore, the
risk of robbery. He also always carried a stash of marrow bones and
would give one to each of the dogs on his round, so they all considered
him a friend and not an intruder.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Women will never be equal to men until they can walk down the street
with a bald head and a beer gut, and still think they look sexy.
Sam Plusnet
2019-01-22 21:08:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
In the village where I grew up, we didn't have any shops nearby but we
had a whole range of mobile shops which visited each week.  There was a
butcher, a baker, no candlestick maker but there was a greengrocer and,
sometimes, a fishmonger.
Our was a fairly large village.
It had two butchers, no baker, two largish Co-ops (branches of different
societies) two newsagents, two small grocers/sweetshops, a shoe shop,
toyshop, chemists, three fish & chip shops, one combined florist &
fishmonger(sic), a drapers/haberdashery, electrical shop (TV, Radio etc.)...
I've probably forgotten a couple more, but I shall ignore the pubs and
cinema.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2019-01-22 22:00:26 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 22 Jan 2019 21:08:45 +0000, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Serena Blanchflower
In the village where I grew up, we didn't have any shops nearby but we
had a whole range of mobile shops which visited each week.  There was a
butcher, a baker, no candlestick maker but there was a greengrocer and,
sometimes, a fishmonger.
Our was a fairly large village.
It had two butchers, no baker, two largish Co-ops (branches of different
societies) two newsagents, two small grocers/sweetshops, a shoe shop,
toyshop, chemists, three fish & chip shops, one combined florist &
fishmonger(sic), a drapers/haberdashery, electrical shop (TV, Radio etc.)...
I've probably forgotten a couple more, but I shall ignore the pubs and
cinema.
That sounds more like a moderate sized town than a village!
I worry about the lack of bakers though.

Mined ewe, the village I grew up in had most of those things plus two
bakers, two hairdressers and a barber (no cinema - but Watford had four of
them).
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2019-01-23 22:00:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Our was a fairly large village.
It had two butchers, no baker, two largish Co-ops (branches of different
societies) two newsagents, two small grocers/sweetshops, a shoe shop,
toyshop, chemists, three fish & chip shops, one combined florist &
fishmonger(sic), a drapers/haberdashery, electrical shop (TV, Radio etc.)...
I've probably forgotten a couple more, but I shall ignore the pubs and
cinema.
That sounds more like a moderate sized town than a village!
I worry about the lack of bakers though.
Around 5,000 or so.
The lack of a baker didn't occur to me since what you experience is your
version of normal.
Post by Penny
Mined ewe, the village I grew up in had most of those things plus two
bakers, two hairdressers and a barber (no cinema - but Watford had four of
them).
Drat. Insert two barbers into my list. I'm sure there were at least as
many hairdressers but they weren't part of my experience.
--
Sam Plusnet
Fenny
2019-01-23 22:55:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Drat. Insert two barbers into my list. I'm sure there were at least as
many hairdressers but they weren't part of my experience.
Ma used to have her hair done on a Friday afternoon. We, walking home
from school, would stop in at the hairdressers, where she was usually
under a drier. She'd send us next door to the "sweet shop" (actually
a greengrocer that sold sweets) to get Milky Ways for us and a Mars
Bar for her. Then she'd give us the front door key and we'd walk home
and watch telly until she got in.

I would have been about 6 or 7 and my brother 9ish at this point.
These days, you'd be arrested for not collecting your kids from school
and leaving them in the house unattended.
--
Fenny
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-23 23:10:34 UTC
Permalink
In message <***@4ax.com>, Fenny
<***@removethis.gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by Fenny
under a drier. She'd send us next door to the "sweet shop" (actually
a greengrocer that sold sweets) to get Milky Ways for us and a Mars
Bar for her. Then she'd give us the front door key and we'd walk home
and watch telly until she got in.
I would have been about 6 or 7 and my brother 9ish at this point.
These days, you'd be arrested for not collecting your kids from school
and leaving them in the house unattended.
Would you, actually? I know it's often portrayed that way, but is it
actually so?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If you help someone when they're in trouble, they will remember you when
they're in trouble again.
Penny
2019-01-23 23:11:32 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 23 Jan 2019 22:55:08 +0000, Fenny <***@removethis.gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Fenny
These days, you'd be arrested for not collecting your kids from school
and leaving them in the house unattended.
I think I was probably 10 or 11 the first time I came home to an empty
house - I had been told this would happen that day. There was a note on the
kitchen table telling me to make a small pot of tea - we had a row of
different sized teapots on the windowsill.

I'm not sure I'd ever been asked to do this before, the Aga kettle was
heavy, as was the hotplate cover, but I went ahead and did it as requested,
made and ate a jam sandwich (usual fare on arrival home) then went off to
do something else.

When my mother came home she asked why I hadn't drunk the tea. I said I
didn't know it was for me.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-23 23:37:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Fenny
These days, you'd be arrested for not collecting your kids from school
and leaving them in the house unattended.
I think I was probably 10 or 11 the first time I came home to an empty
house - I had been told this would happen that day. There was a note on the
(I think I might have been 18-20! At least, before coming home to a home
unchanged since I'd left it that morning.)
Post by Penny
kitchen table telling me to make a small pot of tea - we had a row of
different sized teapots on the windowsill.
I love that story: "make a small pot of tea" meaning use the small pot!
[My brother has some tiny - about an inch cube - salt and pepper
shakers, so if someone ever says "could I have a little salt", he can
hand them it with a grin.]
Post by Penny
I'm not sure I'd ever been asked to do this before, the Aga kettle was
heavy, as was the hotplate cover, but I went ahead and did it as requested,
made and ate a jam sandwich (usual fare on arrival home) then went off to
do something else.
So not only "home alone", but handling hot and heavy things. Which of
course you did quite safely.
Post by Penny
When my mother came home she asked why I hadn't drunk the tea. I said I
didn't know it was for me.
I would have had the same reaction to that note!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If you help someone when they're in trouble, they will remember you when
they're in trouble again.
Sam Plusnet
2019-01-24 02:35:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
Post by Sam Plusnet
Drat. Insert two barbers into my list. I'm sure there were at least as
many hairdressers but they weren't part of my experience.
Ma used to have her hair done on a Friday afternoon. We, walking home
from school, would stop in at the hairdressers, where she was usually
under a drier. She'd send us next door to the "sweet shop" (actually
a greengrocer that sold sweets) to get Milky Ways for us and a Mars
Bar for her. Then she'd give us the front door key and we'd walk home
and watch telly until she got in.
I would have been about 6 or 7 and my brother 9ish at this point.
These days, you'd be arrested for not collecting your kids from school
and leaving them in the house unattended.
Was that visit to the hairdressers _every_ Friday?

A few of my schoolmates had their hair cut every week, following their
father's example.
All the barbers I knew as a child had learned their skills in the Armed
Forces - and it showed.
--
Sam Plusnet
Chris J Dixon
2019-01-24 07:54:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Was that visit to the hairdressers _every_ Friday?
A few of my schoolmates had their hair cut every week, following their
father's example.
All the barbers I knew as a child had learned their skills in the Armed
Forces - and it showed.
It occurs to me that the shorter the haircut, the quicker it
begins to look long.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
carolet
2019-01-24 12:16:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Drat.  Insert two barbers into my list.  I'm sure there were at least as
many hairdressers but they weren't part of my experience.
Ma used to have her hair done on a Friday afternoon.  We, walking home
from school, would stop in at the hairdressers, where she was usually
under a drier.  She'd send us next door to the "sweet shop" (actually
a greengrocer that sold sweets) to get Milky Ways for us and a Mars
Bar for her.  Then she'd give us the front door key and we'd walk home
and watch telly until she got in.
I would have been about 6 or 7 and my brother 9ish at this point.
These days, you'd be arrested for not collecting your kids from school
and leaving them in the house unattended.
Was that visit to the hairdressers _every_ Friday?
A few of my schoolmates had their hair cut every week, following their
father's example.
All the barbers I knew as a child had learned their skills in the Armed
Forces - and it showed.
My ma went to the hairdresser once a week for as long as I knew her.
Over the years the hairdresser changed and the day of the week changed.
I think that she sometimes made appointments at strange hairdressers
when we were away on holiday. She really didn't like going more than a
week between appointments. She didn't go for a haircut, of course, but a
wash and set, and that was the only time her hair was washed, so I'm not
surprised that she was loathe to leave it longer. Every few weeks was a
big occasion, because she had a cut and a perm, rather than the usual.

The story above reminded me of the occasions that my sister and I went
to the hairdresser with her, when we were young, though I don't think
that we wandered in and out on our own like that.

I am like my mum in many ways, but not in this respect. I hate going to
the hairdressers.
--
CaroleT
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-24 14:28:34 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by carolet
Post by Sam Plusnet
A few of my schoolmates had their hair cut every week, following
their father's example.
All the barbers I knew as a child had learned their skills in the
Armed Forces - and it showed.
AFAICR, I used to have mine done once or twice a term - might have been
every few weeks, but certainly not every week. And (though those who
know me now would be surprised!) I _liked_ it short: and this was the
seventies, when this was definitely not the fashion. (Think of Kevin
Keegan.) I think I mainly liked it short as it's curly, and I found it
easier to manage when short: it tended to tangle otherwise. (I also like
to feel the brush on my scalp.)
Post by carolet
My ma went to the hairdresser once a week for as long as I knew her.
Over the years the hairdresser changed and the day of the week changed.
I think that she sometimes made appointments at strange hairdressers
when we were away on holiday. She really didn't like going more than a
week between appointments. She didn't go for a haircut, of course, but
a wash and set, and that was the only time her hair was washed, so I'm
not surprised that she was loathe to leave it longer. Every few weeks
was a big occasion, because she had a cut and a perm, rather than the usual.
The story above reminded me of the occasions that my sister and I went
to the hairdresser with her, when we were young, though I don't think
that we wandered in and out on our own like that.
I am like my mum in many ways, but not in this respect. I hate going to
the hairdressers.
There was _some_ point while we were in Germany when my mum even wore a
wig when she had been unable to get to the hairdressers (I don't
remember how often she went). Knowing her as I came to later in life,
this surprises me, as - although she was always smartly turned out - I
wouldn't have thought she'd have been bothered by such things. But I
suppose her character changed through life: maybe she was more
susceptible to fashion than I thought. I think that was in the era when
hair was quite solid - I certainly remember the spray glue. (She was
certainly a looker when young so must have spent time on her hair then
[as it was dead straight] - OK, all boys probably think that about their
Mum; see http://255soft.uk/temp/ the Mollys [and the 2001 for later].)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The desire to remain private and/or anonymous used to be a core British value,
but in recent times it has been treated with suspicion - an unfortunate by-
product of the widespread desire for fame. - Chris Middleton,
Computing 6 September 2011
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-24 17:56:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by carolet
My ma went to the hairdresser once a week for as long as I knew her.
Over the years the hairdresser changed and the day of the week changed.
I think that she sometimes made appointments at strange hairdressers
when we were away on holiday. She really didn't like going more than a
week between appointments. She didn't go for a haircut, of course, but a
wash and set, and that was the only time her hair was washed, so I'm not
surprised that she was loathe to leave it longer. Every few weeks was a
big occasion, because she had a cut and a perm, rather than the usual.
The story above reminded me of the occasions that my sister and I went
to the hairdresser with her, when we were young, though I don't think
that we wandered in and out on our own like that.
I am like my mum in many ways, but not in this respect. I hate going to
the hairdressers.
My mother had her hair washed and set at the hairdresser too for years
and then there was a visiting one who came home to do her hair. I hate
having my hair cut or done and always have. Always used to cry after a
hair cut, as an adult :) Only very rarely had a hairdresser who did it
how I liked it. Ernest for some months in Finchley in around 1983 and
then he went back to S Africa and one in Spain who I found just before
we left and I only had one cut. Actually some have done one good cut
but then never again. I swim daily now and prefer the economy cut.
Very short until it is long enough to annoy and then repeat.
Definitely not weekly visits.
Fenny
2019-01-24 22:15:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Was that visit to the hairdressers _every_ Friday?
Shampoo and set. It only got cut every couple of months.
--
Fenny
Mike
2019-01-24 08:15:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
Post by Sam Plusnet
Drat. Insert two barbers into my list. I'm sure there were at least as
many hairdressers but they weren't part of my experience.
Ma used to have her hair done on a Friday afternoon. We, walking home
from school, would stop in at the hairdressers, where she was usually
under a drier. She'd send us next door to the "sweet shop" (actually
a greengrocer that sold sweets) to get Milky Ways for us and a Mars
Bar for her. Then she'd give us the front door key and we'd walk home
and watch telly until she got in.
I would have been about 6 or 7 and my brother 9ish at this point.
These days, you'd be arrested for not collecting your kids from school
and leaving them in the house unattended.
But at least your ‘sweets’ did not spoil your appetite for tea ;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-22 21:26:20 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 22 Jan 2019 19:33:26 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
In the village where I grew up, we didn't have any shops nearby but we
had a whole range of mobile shops which visited each week. There was a
butcher, a baker, no candlestick maker but there was a greengrocer and,
sometimes, a fishmonger.
The butcher's shop was still functioning and visiting the village, IIRC,
a couple of times a week, when my mother died in 1999. The chap who, by
then, owned it had been a young chap working for one of the local
butchers when we first knew him but then, when the butcher's shop
closed, he bought the van and kept going. By the time Mum died, I think
he was pretty close to retirement.
As well as selling meat, he acted as a bank and was always willing to
cash cheques for his customers. As well as being a very useful service,
this cut down the amount of cash he was carrying and, therefore, the
risk of robbery. He also always carried a stash of marrow bones and
would give one to each of the dogs on his round, so they all considered
him a friend and not an intruder.
We only had the milkman but he sold bread, potatoes, chicken, milk of
course, yoghurts, OJ and I can't recall other stuff but for a mother
at home with two toddlers, who might be ill, and no dad around, the
milkman was like a visiting shop. Saved the emergency phone call to
mum, who was 20 minutes drive away. This was when Capt Ex was at sea.
When home, two thirds of the time, we had two adults in the house.
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