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Rosalind Mitchell
2020-01-27 19:47:45 UTC
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On the day Radio 4 starts a rather intriguing Afternoon Drama series,
Dykes, Ambridge gets its first lesbian. And not before time either, it's
long overdue. I had hopes for Helen years ago and Lily more recently,
but it seems it's somebody just passing through.

Oh well. Even the Ambridge male gay scene has never progressed beyond
the token Adam and Ian. But one can but hope (as I continue to do in
real life).
Serena Blanchflower
2020-01-27 19:57:30 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
On the day Radio 4 starts a rather intriguing Afternoon Drama series,
Dykes, Ambridge gets its first lesbian. And not before time either, it's
long overdue. I had hopes for Helen years ago and Lily more recently,
but it seems it's somebody just passing through.
Not quite the first as Helen's brief, Anna Tregorran, has that honour
although, like Fiona, she was just passing through.
--
Best wishes, Serena
A man who trusts nobody is apt to be the kind of man nobody trusts
(Harold MacMillan)
carolet
2020-01-27 22:57:44 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
On the day Radio 4 starts a rather intriguing Afternoon Drama series,
Dykes, Ambridge gets its first lesbian. And not before time either,
it's long overdue. I had hopes for Helen years ago and Lily more
recently, but it seems it's somebody just passing through.
Not quite the first as Helen's brief, Anna Tregorran, has that honour
although, like Fiona, she was just passing through.
After hearing her talk about her holiday last night, I rather expected
to hear that her travelling companion was Anna Tregorran.
--
CaroleT
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-28 06:56:52 UTC
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Post by carolet
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
On the day Radio 4 starts a rather intriguing Afternoon Drama series,
Dykes, Ambridge gets its first lesbian. And not before time either,
it's long overdue. I had hopes for Helen years ago and Lily more
recently, but it seems it's somebody just passing through.
Not quite the first as Helen's brief, Anna Tregorran, has that honour
although, like Fiona, she was just passing through.
After hearing her talk about her holiday last night, I rather expected
to hear that her travelling companion was Anna Tregorran.
It's like buses. You wait for ages and then two come along at once.
BrritSki
2020-01-28 08:51:40 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by carolet
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
On the day Radio 4 starts a rather intriguing Afternoon Drama series,
Dykes, Ambridge gets its first lesbian. And not before time either,
it's long overdue. I had hopes for Helen years ago and Lily more
recently, but it seems it's somebody just passing through.
Not quite the first as Helen's brief, Anna Tregorran, has that honour
although, like Fiona, she was just passing through.
After hearing her talk about her holiday last night, I rather expected
to hear that her travelling companion was Anna Tregorran.
It's like buses. You wait for ages and then two come along at once.
Lucky girls...
Sally Thompson
2020-01-27 21:06:21 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
On the day Radio 4 starts a rather intriguing Afternoon Drama series,
Dykes, Ambridge gets its first lesbian. And not before time either, it's
long overdue. I had hopes for Helen years ago and Lily more recently,
but it seems it's somebody just passing through.
Oh well. Even the Ambridge male gay scene has never progressed beyond
the token Adam and Ian. But one can but hope (as I continue to do in
real life).
Carole Tregorran's daughter (Helen's lawyer) is lesbian.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-27 21:33:46 UTC
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On 27 Jan 2020 21:06:21 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
On the day Radio 4 starts a rather intriguing Afternoon Drama series,
Dykes, Ambridge gets its first lesbian. And not before time either, it's
long overdue. I had hopes for Helen years ago and Lily more recently,
but it seems it's somebody just passing through.
Oh well. Even the Ambridge male gay scene has never progressed beyond
the token Adam and Ian. But one can but hope (as I continue to do in
real life).
Carole Tregorran's daughter (Helen's lawyer) is lesbian.
I don't think it will be a problem for Jim. I think it might take his
mind off Harold etc.
Serena Blanchflower
2020-01-28 19:49:07 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On 27 Jan 2020 21:06:21 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
On the day Radio 4 starts a rather intriguing Afternoon Drama series,
Dykes, Ambridge gets its first lesbian. And not before time either, it's
long overdue. I had hopes for Helen years ago and Lily more recently,
but it seems it's somebody just passing through.
Oh well. Even the Ambridge male gay scene has never progressed beyond
the token Adam and Ian. But one can but hope (as I continue to do in
real life).
Carole Tregorran's daughter (Helen's lawyer) is lesbian.
I don't think it will be a problem for Jim. I think it might take his
mind off Harold etc.
That was my thought, as well. It's quite likely that, at the moment,
he's worrying about her being (apparently) on her own and convincing
himself that her inability to form a relationship is down to him. He
may find the reality is comforting.
--
Best wishes, Serena
You can't be brave if you've only had wonderful things happen to you
(Mary Tyler Moore)
Clive Arthur
2020-01-29 09:21:13 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On 27 Jan 2020 21:06:21 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
On the day Radio 4 starts a rather intriguing Afternoon Drama series,
Dykes, Ambridge gets its first lesbian. And not before time either, it's
long overdue. I had hopes for Helen years ago and Lily more recently,
but it seems it's somebody just passing through.
Oh well. Even the Ambridge male gay scene has never progressed beyond
the token Adam and Ian. But one can but hope (as I continue to do in
real life).
Carole Tregorran's daughter (Helen's lawyer) is lesbian.
I don't think it will be a problem for Jim. I think it might take his
mind off Harold etc.
That was my thought, as well.  It's quite likely that, at the moment,
he's worrying about her being (apparently) on her own and convincing
himself that her inability to form a relationship is down to him.  He
may find the reality is comforting.
"My father made me a lesbian!"

"If I gave him the wool, would he make me one too?"


[First seen using 'homosexual' and 'mother' on the gents' toilet wall in
the Butler, Chatham Street, Reading, next to the 'full bottle in front
of me' joke.]
--
Cheers
Clive
steveski
2020-01-30 00:44:13 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Vicky Ayech
On 27 Jan 2020 21:06:21 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
On the day Radio 4 starts a rather intriguing Afternoon Drama series,
Dykes, Ambridge gets its first lesbian. And not before time either,
it's long overdue. I had hopes for Helen years ago and Lily more
recently,
but it seems it's somebody just passing through.
Oh well. Even the Ambridge male gay scene has never progressed
beyond the token Adam and Ian. But one can but hope (as I continue
to do in real life).
Carole Tregorran's daughter (Helen's lawyer) is lesbian.
I don't think it will be a problem for Jim. I think it might take his
mind off Harold etc.
That was my thought, as well.  It's quite likely that, at the moment,
he's worrying about her being (apparently) on her own and convincing
himself that her inability to form a relationship is down to him.  He
may find the reality is comforting.
"My father made me a lesbian!"
"If I gave him the wool, would he make me one too?"
[First seen using 'homosexual' and 'mother' on the gents' toilet wall in
the Butler, Chatham Street, Reading, next to the 'full bottle in front
of me' joke.]
From Nigel Rees' book on graffiti, I believe.

--
Steveski
Steve Hague
2020-01-30 11:25:45 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
On the day Radio 4 starts a rather intriguing Afternoon Drama series,
Dykes, Ambridge gets its first lesbian. And not before time either, it's
long overdue. I had hopes for Helen years ago and Lily more recently,
but it seems it's somebody just passing through.
Oh well. Even the Ambridge male gay scene has never progressed beyond
the token Adam and Ian. But one can but hope (as I continue to do in
real life).
Surprising when you think of which team the Beetle and the Sock Puppet
batted for. Perhaps they didn't want to be seen to be pushing an agenda.
Wasn't the Cat and Fiddle run by two gay men before it's demise?
Steve
John Ashby
2020-01-30 11:30:28 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
On the day Radio 4 starts a rather intriguing Afternoon Drama series,
Dykes, Ambridge gets its first lesbian. And not before time either,
it's long overdue. I had hopes for Helen years ago and Lily more
recently, but it seems it's somebody just passing through.
Oh well. Even the Ambridge male gay scene has never progressed beyond
the token Adam and Ian. But one can but hope (as I continue to do in
real life).
Surprising when you think of which team the Beetle and the Sock Puppet
batted for. Perhaps they didn't want to be seen to be pushing an agenda.
Wasn't the Cat and Fiddle run by two gay men before it's demise?
Steve
Yes, which gave Sid his cover for homophobia (as opposed to Sid the
Sexist who is in Another Place)

john
Penny
2020-01-30 12:33:12 UTC
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On Thu, 30 Jan 2020 11:25:45 +0000, Steve Hague <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
Surprising when you think of which team the Beetle and the Sock Puppet
batted for. Perhaps they didn't want to be seen to be pushing an agenda.
Wasn't the Cat and Fiddle run by two gay men before it's demise?
Gosh I'd forgotten that. I didn't care about the sexuality of the gay
couple who took over our village pub but they were not very nice people,
IMHO ill-suited to running a village pub. Fortunately when they did a
runner, taking the fruit machine* with them (the younger partner was an
addict) the pub continued to function with somebody new.

*they were caught and prosecuted because of that. The brewery didn't bother
to pursue them for their debts but the fruit machine company tracked them
down.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
BrritSki
2020-01-30 13:54:30 UTC
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Post by Penny
*they were caught and prosecuted because of that. The brewery didn't bother
to pursue them for their debts but the fruit machine company tracked them
down.
Which reminds me of when I was training for my Private Pilot's Licence
in the summer of '65 at Thruxton.

There was a film crew that came in to film a Double Diamond ad using a
venerable Dakota and sky divers. The crew one the jackpot on the 1 arm
bandit which was full of our sixpences, so someone carried it out of the
bar, loaded it onto an aircraft [1], took off and then heaved it
overboard 1000ft above the airfield. We recovered our money.

[1] The equally venerable Jackaroo, which was a widened Tiger Moth
biplane with a covered 4-seat cabin. Not authorised for aerobatics so we
did those and spinning in a regular Tiger Moth.
The stalling speed of this beast was under 30 kts iirc, so it was quite
easy to have a negative ground speed in a strong wind, and once I was
able to land one on the spot with no forward or backward movement.

<http://all-aero.com/index.php/contactus/46-planes-i-j-k/5285-jackaroo-aircraft-thruxton-jackaroo->
Nick Odell
2020-01-30 19:23:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 30 Jan 2020 13:54:30 +0000, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
*they were caught and prosecuted because of that. The brewery didn't bother
to pursue them for their debts but the fruit machine company tracked them
down.
Which reminds me of when I was training for my Private Pilot's Licence
in the summer of '65 at Thruxton.
There was a film crew that came in to film a Double Diamond ad using a
venerable Dakota and sky divers. The crew one the jackpot on the 1 arm
bandit which was full of our sixpences, so someone carried it out of the
bar, loaded it onto an aircraft [1], took off and then heaved it
overboard 1000ft above the airfield. We recovered our money.
[1] The equally venerable Jackaroo, which was a widened Tiger Moth
biplane with a covered 4-seat cabin. Not authorised for aerobatics so we
did those and spinning in a regular Tiger Moth.
The stalling speed of this beast was under 30 kts iirc, so it was quite
easy to have a negative ground speed in a strong wind, and once I was
able to land one on the spot with no forward or backward movement.
<http://all-aero.com/index.php/contactus/46-planes-i-j-k/5285-jackaroo-aircraft-thruxton-jackaroo->
Brilliant!

There are a few folk in ye shedde who reminisce from time to time
about doing stuff with aircraft in the fifties and sixties. You ought
to pop in and take a look. All very nonchalant about the most
hair-raising things. I think my favourite (so far) is of one chap, an
aircraft fitter, who mended the damaged landing-gear of a helicopter
hovering six feet above the deck of an aircraft carrier in a raging
storm. They all survived though none of the alternatives to that
action would have been survivable by the helicopter crew but the
fitter was put on a charge for flouting safety regulations. Those were
the days, eh?

Nick
BrritSki
2020-01-31 09:04:41 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 30 Jan 2020 13:54:30 +0000, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
*they were caught and prosecuted because of that. The brewery didn't bother
to pursue them for their debts but the fruit machine company tracked them
down.
Which reminds me of when I was training for my Private Pilot's Licence
in the summer of '65 at Thruxton.
There was a film crew that came in to film a Double Diamond ad using a
venerable Dakota and sky divers. The crew one the jackpot on the 1 arm
bandit which was full of our sixpences, so someone carried it out of the
bar, loaded it onto an aircraft [1], took off and then heaved it
overboard 1000ft above the airfield. We recovered our money.
[1] The equally venerable Jackaroo, which was a widened Tiger Moth
biplane with a covered 4-seat cabin. Not authorised for aerobatics so we
did those and spinning in a regular Tiger Moth.
The stalling speed of this beast was under 30 kts iirc, so it was quite
easy to have a negative ground speed in a strong wind, and once I was
able to land one on the spot with no forward or backward movement.
<http://all-aero.com/index.php/contactus/46-planes-i-j-k/5285-jackaroo-aircraft-thruxton-jackaroo->
Brilliant!
There are a few folk in ye shedde who reminisce from time to time
about doing stuff with aircraft in the fifties and sixties. You ought
to pop in and take a look. All very nonchalant about the most
hair-raising things. I think my favourite (so far) is of one chap, an
aircraft fitter, who mended the damaged landing-gear of a helicopter
hovering six feet above the deck of an aircraft carrier in a raging
storm. They all survived though none of the alternatives to that
action would have been survivable by the helicopter crew but the
fitter was put on a charge for flouting safety regulations. Those were
the days, eh?
I think I'll steer clear of the shedde, but you can repeat the story
there if you want.

Another one was when I was doing jet training in the RAF and my
instructor decided to send me off solo rather than on the planned sortie
with him. As my hour was coming to an end I realised that I'd been
hearing my instructor's call sign quite a lot and he was passing fuel
states. Then there was a general call to all aircraft to either land
immediately or divert to another airfield.
I landed and parked and asked the ground crew what was up. Instructor
and Malaysian student had been doing circuits and bumps and were only
able to get 2 wheels down, so he was circling to burn off the excess
fuel before doing a wheels up landing (safer than landing on 2 wheels as
it would cartwheel).
We then all watched as he brought it in, held it about 4" off the ground
until it stalled and scraped along the concrete in a shower of sparks.
While it was still moving the canopy opened and the 2 pilots were on the
wing and jumped off as it came to a stop and whisked off to the medics
by a helicopter.
Aircraft written off but both pilots completely unscathed. In the bar
afterwards we all heard that the student was completely unphased by the
whole thing, he just wanted to eject so he could join Martin-Baker's
Ejection Tie Club :)

Part of our training was to use an ejector seat on a ground rig
(basically a seat attached to a 40' high pair of rails). You were put in
exactly the right position, straps tight, well back in seat with kidney
pad properly adjusted and then pulled the lever down over your head.
Even with only a one third charge it was an almighty kick up the
backside and I certainly wouldn't want to do it for real with a full
charge and no time to adjust everything perfectly. No wonder that so
many ejectees have back problems, but far better than the alternative !
Nick Odell
2020-02-01 01:01:02 UTC
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On Fri, 31 Jan 2020 09:04:41 +0000, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 30 Jan 2020 13:54:30 +0000, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
*they were caught and prosecuted because of that. The brewery didn't bother
to pursue them for their debts but the fruit machine company tracked them
down.
Which reminds me of when I was training for my Private Pilot's Licence
in the summer of '65 at Thruxton.
There was a film crew that came in to film a Double Diamond ad using a
venerable Dakota and sky divers. The crew one the jackpot on the 1 arm
bandit which was full of our sixpences, so someone carried it out of the
bar, loaded it onto an aircraft [1], took off and then heaved it
overboard 1000ft above the airfield. We recovered our money.
[1] The equally venerable Jackaroo, which was a widened Tiger Moth
biplane with a covered 4-seat cabin. Not authorised for aerobatics so we
did those and spinning in a regular Tiger Moth.
The stalling speed of this beast was under 30 kts iirc, so it was quite
easy to have a negative ground speed in a strong wind, and once I was
able to land one on the spot with no forward or backward movement.
<http://all-aero.com/index.php/contactus/46-planes-i-j-k/5285-jackaroo-aircraft-thruxton-jackaroo->
Brilliant!
There are a few folk in ye shedde who reminisce from time to time
about doing stuff with aircraft in the fifties and sixties. You ought
to pop in and take a look. All very nonchalant about the most
hair-raising things. I think my favourite (so far) is of one chap, an
aircraft fitter, who mended the damaged landing-gear of a helicopter
hovering six feet above the deck of an aircraft carrier in a raging
storm. They all survived though none of the alternatives to that
action would have been survivable by the helicopter crew but the
fitter was put on a charge for flouting safety regulations. Those were
the days, eh?
I think I'll steer clear of the shedde, but you can repeat the story
there if you want.
Another one was when I was doing jet training in the RAF and my
instructor decided to send me off solo rather than on the planned sortie
with him. As my hour was coming to an end I realised that I'd been
hearing my instructor's call sign quite a lot and he was passing fuel
states. Then there was a general call to all aircraft to either land
immediately or divert to another airfield.
I landed and parked and asked the ground crew what was up. Instructor
and Malaysian student had been doing circuits and bumps and were only
able to get 2 wheels down, so he was circling to burn off the excess
fuel before doing a wheels up landing (safer than landing on 2 wheels as
it would cartwheel).
We then all watched as he brought it in, held it about 4" off the ground
until it stalled and scraped along the concrete in a shower of sparks.
While it was still moving the canopy opened and the 2 pilots were on the
wing and jumped off as it came to a stop and whisked off to the medics
by a helicopter.
Aircraft written off but both pilots completely unscathed. In the bar
afterwards we all heard that the student was completely unphased by the
whole thing, he just wanted to eject so he could join Martin-Baker's
Ejection Tie Club :)
Part of our training was to use an ejector seat on a ground rig
(basically a seat attached to a 40' high pair of rails). You were put in
exactly the right position, straps tight, well back in seat with kidney
pad properly adjusted and then pulled the lever down over your head.
Even with only a one third charge it was an almighty kick up the
backside and I certainly wouldn't want to do it for real with a full
charge and no time to adjust everything perfectly. No wonder that so
many ejectees have back problems, but far better than the alternative !
Yes, that's the sort of thing. You'd love it over there: you really
would :)

My son's almost completed his commercial certification and apart from
my leafing through a book that he has with a title something like
"1001 stupid ways to kill yourself in an aeroplane" he hasn't passed
on any first-hand anecdotes like yours. A situation I'm extremely
grateful for. Or do you suppose he's keeping something from me?

Nick

Penny
2020-01-30 23:45:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 30 Jan 2020 13:54:30 +0000, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Which reminds me of when I was training for my Private Pilot's Licence
in the summer of '65 at Thruxton.
There was a film crew that came in to film a Double Diamond ad using a
venerable Dakota and sky divers. The crew one the jackpot on the 1 arm
bandit which was full of our sixpences, so someone carried it out of the
bar, loaded it onto an aircraft [1], took off and then heaved it
overboard 1000ft above the airfield. We recovered our money.
Which reminds me of the time I worked as a cleaner in a village pub. I was
given extra hours when there was a wedding party at 'the big house' and the
marquee crew were boarded in said pub. The crew spent their evenings in the
bar, the gaffer often winning on the fruit machine. His bedroom had a
steeply sloping floor and when cleaning his room I recovered a lot of
sixpences which had rolled under the bed. Not such a good haul as yours,
I'm sure but a good tip for a 17 year-old.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
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