Discussion:
OT: Listing flash memories
(too old to reply)
Mike Ruddock
2018-04-26 14:36:04 UTC
Permalink
Is it possible to make a printed list of the files on an external
memory? I have a number of flash memories and it would be useful if I
could refer to printed lists of their contents instead of embarking on a
long sequence of memory swapping to see what is on each one.
No doubt if I were efficient I would have each flash memory devoted to a
particular type of file, but that isn't the way things are
(dis)organised in the Ruddock household.


Mike Ruddock
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-04-26 15:23:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
Is it possible to make a printed list of the files on an external
memory? I have a number of flash memories and it would be useful if I
I presume you mean memory stick, flash drive, or other such term - a
memory module with a USB plug.
Post by Mike Ruddock
could refer to printed lists of their contents instead of embarking on
a long sequence of memory swapping to see what is on each one.
No doubt if I were efficient I would have each flash memory devoted to
a particular type of file, but that isn't the way things are
(dis)organised in the Ruddock household.
Mike Ruddock
Assuming some sort of Windows:

1. Open a command prompt. (Start, Programs, Accessories - or Start, Run,
type cmd and press enter.)
2. Switch to the "drive" in question - type

E:

(and press enter) if it's drive E:, or otherwise as appropriate.
3. Type

cd \
dir /s > list.txt

(pressing enter after each. The first probably isn't necessary.)
This will generate a file (in the root of the memory stick; it can be
elsewhere but I'm keeping it simple) called list.txt, listing all the
files on the "drive"; you can print or do whatever you wish with that
file.

The DIR[ectory] command can take other parameters; the "/s" means
"including subdirectories", and can be omitted if there aren't any; "/w"
will list only the filenames, not their sizes (so "dir /w /s >
list.txt"); /x will include their short filenames. Typing "dir /?" will
show them all - or "dir /? | more" if it goes off the top of the window.
(Piping it through the "more" command makes it pause once a screenful.)
One of the switches (/o) can change the order (by date, size, name,
including reverse).

DIR has been around since before Windows (though has gained a few
wrinkles). It has often been asked why print-directory-list wasn't put
into Windows, and there are several utilities that will do it; since I
can do it easily enough from a command prompt as described above, I've
never found the need for them.

(You close the command prompt by just clicking its X in the normal way,
or by typing exit.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Easy reading is damned hard writing. -Nathaniel Hawthorne, writer (1804-1864)
Mike Ruddock
2018-04-26 16:19:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike Ruddock
Is it possible to make a printed list of the files on an external
memory? I have a number of flash memories and it would be useful if I
I presume you mean memory stick, flash drive, or other such term - a
memory module with a USB plug.
Post by Mike Ruddock
could refer to printed lists of their contents instead of embarking on
a long sequence of memory swapping to see what is on each one.
No doubt if I were efficient I would have each flash memory devoted to
a particular type of file, but that isn't the way things are
(dis)organised in the Ruddock household.
Mike Ruddock
1. Open a command prompt. (Start, Programs, Accessories - or Start, Run,
type cmd and press enter.)
2. Switch to the "drive" in question - type
(and press enter) if it's drive E:, or otherwise as appropriate.
3. Type
cd \
dir /s > list.txt
(pressing enter after each. The first probably isn't necessary.)
This will generate a file (in the root of the memory stick; it can be
elsewhere but I'm keeping it simple) called list.txt, listing all the
files on the "drive"; you can print or do whatever you wish with that
file.
The DIR[ectory] command can take other parameters; the "/s" means
"including subdirectories", and can be omitted if there aren't any; "/w"
will list only the filenames, not their sizes (so "dir /w /s >
list.txt"); /x will include their short filenames. Typing "dir /?" will
show them all - or "dir /? | more" if it goes off the top of the window.
(Piping it through the "more" command makes it pause once a screenful.)
One of the switches (/o) can change the order (by date, size, name,
including reverse).
DIR has been around since before Windows (though has gained a few
wrinkles). It has often been asked why print-directory-list wasn't put
into Windows, and there are several utilities that will do it; since I
can do it easily enough from a command prompt as described above, I've
never found the need for them.
(You close the command prompt by just clicking its X in the normal way,
or by typing exit.)
Gosh, thanks for that.
I remember the old DIR command from an early version of Basic produced
by Microsoft.

Mike Ruddock
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-04-26 19:43:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike Ruddock
Is it possible to make a printed list of the files on an external
memory? I have a number of flash memories and it would be useful if I
[]
[]
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
cd \
dir /s > list.txt
[]
Post by Mike Ruddock
Gosh, thanks for that.
I remember the old DIR command from an early version of Basic produced
by Microsoft.
Mike Ruddock
You're welcome - glad to help! Most of the old DOS commands still work.
DIR can be used from any directory (folder), of course.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Well I wish you'd just tell me, rather than trying to engage my enthusiasm,
because I haven't got one. (Marvin; first series, fit the fifth.)
Fred
2018-04-27 07:42:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
Is it possible to make a printed list of the files on an external
memory? I have a number of flash memories and it would be useful if I
could refer to printed lists of their contents instead of embarking on a
long sequence of memory swapping to see what is on each one.
No doubt if I were efficient I would have each flash memory devoted to a
particular type of file, but that isn't the way things are
(dis)organised in the Ruddock household.
Mike Ruddock
I've always thought that the SF films where the data is on a crystal the size of a pea are ridiculous. No indication of the contents and the thing is too small for any meaningful labelling. And yet they always had the right one first time - I couldn't find the right one when I had labelled floppy discs!

Fred
Mike
2018-04-27 07:53:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fred
Post by Mike Ruddock
Is it possible to make a printed list of the files on an external
memory? I have a number of flash memories and it would be useful if I
could refer to printed lists of their contents instead of embarking on a
long sequence of memory swapping to see what is on each one.
No doubt if I were efficient I would have each flash memory devoted to a
particular type of file, but that isn't the way things are
(dis)organised in the Ruddock household.
Mike Ruddock
I've always thought that the SF films where the data is on a crystal the
size of a pea are ridiculous. No indication of the contents and the thing
is too small for any meaningful labelling. And yet they always had the
right one first time - I couldn't find the right one when I had labelled floppy discs!
Fred
ITYWFT the label is attached to the end of the crystal’s suspension of
disbelief chain;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky
2018-04-27 08:34:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fred
Post by Mike Ruddock
Is it possible to make a printed list of the files on an external
memory? I have a number of flash memories and it would be useful if I
could refer to printed lists of their contents instead of embarking on a
long sequence of memory swapping to see what is on each one.
No doubt if I were efficient I would have each flash memory devoted to a
particular type of file, but that isn't the way things are
(dis)organised in the Ruddock household.
Mike Ruddock
I've always thought that the SF films where the data is on a crystal the
size of a pea are ridiculous. No indication of the contents and the thing
is too small for any meaningful labelling. And yet they always had the
right one first time - I couldn't find the right one when I had labelled floppy discs!
Fred
ITYWFT the label is attached to the end of the crystal’s suspension of
disbelief chain;-)))
We really still need BUMRA. I vote Mike gets an extra ration of
chocolate from the bunker, or a free pint of Scruff Gin, or both.
--
Vicky
Mike
2018-04-27 10:13:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky
Post by Fred
Post by Mike Ruddock
Is it possible to make a printed list of the files on an external
memory? I have a number of flash memories and it would be useful if I
could refer to printed lists of their contents instead of embarking on a
long sequence of memory swapping to see what is on each one.
No doubt if I were efficient I would have each flash memory devoted to a
particular type of file, but that isn't the way things are
(dis)organised in the Ruddock household.
Mike Ruddock
I've always thought that the SF films where the data is on a crystal the
size of a pea are ridiculous. No indication of the contents and the thing
is too small for any meaningful labelling. And yet they always had the
right one first time - I couldn't find the right one when I had labelled floppy discs!
Fred
ITYWFT the label is attached to the end of the crystal’s suspension of
disbelief chain;-)))
We really still need BUMRA. I vote Mike gets an extra ration of
chocolate from the bunker, or a free pint of Scruff Gin, or both.
Oh! Golly gosh! TA muchly, the choccy will be fine thanks.;-)
--
Toodle Pip
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