Discussion:
What a load of bankers
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Rosalind Mitchell
2019-09-10 09:20:03 UTC
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My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.

Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.

Anybody know what's going on?
krw
2019-09-10 10:10:48 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.
Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
The EU requires two levels of authorisation to stop these fraudsters.
UK banking pushed it back 18 months recently - but it is all to stop
those pesky fraudsters - after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k
the banks have to do something.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Marmaduke Jinks
2019-09-10 13:17:50 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.
Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
The EU requires two levels of authorisation to stop these fraudsters. UK
banking pushed it back 18 months recently - but it is all to stop those
pesky fraudsters - after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k the banks
have to do something.
--
Although she was telephone scammed. So the telephone was the conduit in the
scamming.

I don't like the idea of it but as you say it's an EU proposal and the Banks
have to go through with it.

MJ
Penny
2019-09-10 13:48:04 UTC
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On Tue, 10 Sep 2019 11:10:48 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.
Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
The EU requires two levels of authorisation to stop these fraudsters.
UK banking pushed it back 18 months recently - but it is all to stop
those pesky fraudsters
I have no problem with it. I don't use my mildly clever phone as a 'smart'
phone, all data is switched off. I don't use any 'banking apps' (I do any
online transactions in the Avast browser). A one-time-password (as they
call it) received by sms on my mobile should be more secure than just
allowing the transaction I'm trying to make without it. Anyone finding it
later could make no use of it.

Some years ago I tried to transfer some money to d#2 while in a room with
her and a couple of noisy grandchildren. Unusually for me, I did have my
phone in my pocket and answered it but could not hear clearly enough who
was calling and why. I later realised it was the bank who had noticed I'd
accessed my account from an unusual IP address and wanted to ensure it was
me who was making the transaction. I suppose they may have figured this out
from whatever they heard going on in the background on that phone call, at
any rate the 2nd attempt at the transfer went through. OTP by SMS seems a
much better option and possibly better than anything online based if people
are doing their banking over public wifi.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2019-09-10 16:30:10 UTC
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Post by Penny
I have no problem with it. I don't use my mildly clever phone as a 'smart'
phone, all data is switched off. I don't use any 'banking apps' (I do any
online transactions in the Avast browser). A one-time-password (as they
call it) received by sms on my mobile should be more secure than just
allowing the transaction I'm trying to make without it. Anyone finding it
later could make no use of it.
MTAAW
Joe Kerr
2019-09-10 23:19:49 UTC
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Post by Penny
Some years ago I tried to transfer some money to d#2 while in a room with
her and a couple of noisy grandchildren. Unusually for me, I did have my
phone in my pocket and answered it but could not hear clearly enough who
was calling and why. I later realised it was the bank who had noticed I'd
accessed my account from an unusual IP address and wanted to ensure it was
me who was making the transaction. I suppose they may have figured this out
from whatever they heard going on in the background on that phone call, at
any rate the 2nd attempt at the transfer went through. OTP by SMS seems a
much better option and possibly better than anything online based if people
are doing their banking over public wifi.
It always amuses me when I have to use the telephone on behalf of my
mother. They must be able to hear me giving her all the answers to the
security questions needed for her to authorise them to speak to me. Of
course, my sister could just claim to be my mother and have no problem.
--
Ric
Rosalind Mitchell
2019-09-10 15:58:15 UTC
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pesky fraudsters - after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k the
banks have to do something.
Who?

R
krw
2019-09-10 21:46:38 UTC
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pesky fraudsters - after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k the
banks have to do something.
Who?
R
Blue Peter at one point, correspondent at Olympic Games not used
subsequently because her skirt was too short or something.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Rosalind Mitchell
2019-09-10 22:08:47 UTC
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Post by krw
pesky fraudsters - after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k the
banks have to do something.
Who?
R
Blue Peter at one point, correspondent at Olympic Games not used
subsequently because her skirt was too short or something.
So the sort who might walk straight into a scam?

R
krw
2019-09-10 22:10:54 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by krw
pesky fraudsters - after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k the
banks have to do something.
Who?
R
Blue Peter at one point, correspondent at Olympic Games not used
subsequently because her skirt was too short or something.
So the sort who might walk straight into a scam?
R
I am not sure that the length of her skirt reflects her mental capacity?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Rosalind Mitchell
2019-09-11 08:56:27 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by krw
pesky fraudsters - after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k the
banks have to do something.
Who?
R
Blue Peter at one point, correspondent at Olympic Games not used
subsequently because her skirt was too short or something.
So the sort who might walk straight into a scam?
R
I am not sure that the length of her skirt reflects her mental capacity?
I was thinking more about presenting Blue Peter. The days of Valerie
Singleton, Christopher Trace and Petra the dog are long gone. The rot
set in with that Noakes chappie.

R
Fenny
2019-09-11 17:11:49 UTC
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On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 09:56:27 +0100, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
I was thinking more about presenting Blue Peter. The days of Valerie
Singleton, Christopher Trace and Petra the dog are long gone. The rot
set in with that Noakes chappie.
John Noakes (and Patch) was a National Hero.
--
Fenny
Jim Easterbrook
2019-09-11 17:28:47 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 09:56:27 +0100, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
I was thinking more about presenting Blue Peter. The days of Valerie
Singleton, Christopher Trace and Petra the dog are long gone. The rot
set in with that Noakes chappie.
John Noakes (and Patch) was a National Hero.
Shep!
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Mike
2019-09-11 17:56:20 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 09:56:27 +0100, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
I was thinking more about presenting Blue Peter. The days of Valerie
Singleton, Christopher Trace and Petra the dog are long gone. The rot
set in with that Noakes chappie.
John Noakes (and Patch) was a National Hero.
Shep!
‘Don’t dooo that!’ (Oh, sorry, wrong thread/newsgroup)
--
Toodle Pip
Rosalind Mitchell
2019-09-11 22:07:54 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 09:56:27 +0100, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
I was thinking more about presenting Blue Peter. The days of Valerie
Singleton, Christopher Trace and Petra the dog are long gone. The rot
set in with that Noakes chappie.
John Noakes (and Patch) was a National Hero.
Shep!
Oh come on! Freda the transgender tortoise.

R
Sid Nuncius
2019-09-12 09:32:48 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 09:56:27 +0100, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
I was thinking more about presenting Blue Peter. The days of Valerie
Singleton, Christopher Trace and Petra the dog are long gone. The rot
set in with that Noakes chappie.
John Noakes (and Patch) was a National Hero.
Shep!
Oh come on! Freda the transgender tortoise.
Blimey! I'd forgotten him/her, but now you've jogged my memory, I can
see them adding the A on her shell. (In black and white, of course.)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Rosalind Mitchell
2019-09-11 22:05:02 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 09:56:27 +0100, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
I was thinking more about presenting Blue Peter. The days of Valerie
Singleton, Christopher Trace and Petra the dog are long gone. The rot
set in with that Noakes chappie.
John Noakes (and Patch) was a National Hero.
Johnny-come-latelies!

R
Fenny
2019-09-12 21:27:31 UTC
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On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 23:05:02 +0100, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 09:56:27 +0100, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
I was thinking more about presenting Blue Peter. The days of Valerie
Singleton, Christopher Trace and Petra the dog are long gone. The rot
set in with that Noakes chappie.
John Noakes (and Patch) was a National Hero.
Johnny-come-latelies!
Shep was the latecommer. Even after Jason the cat and Daniel the Blue
Peter baby!
--
Fenny
Mike
2019-09-13 08:51:15 UTC
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Post by Fenny
On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 23:05:02 +0100, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 09:56:27 +0100, Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
I was thinking more about presenting Blue Peter. The days of Valerie
Singleton, Christopher Trace and Petra the dog are long gone. The rot
set in with that Noakes chappie.
John Noakes (and Patch) was a National Hero.
Johnny-come-latelies!
Shep was the latecommer. Even after Jason the cat and Daniel the Blue
Peter baby!
‘Blue Baby Syndrome’???!
--
Toodle Pip
the Omrud
2019-09-12 10:54:14 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by krw
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by krw
pesky fraudsters - after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k the
banks have to do something.
Who?
R
Blue Peter at one point, correspondent at Olympic Games not used
subsequently because her skirt was too short or something.
So the sort who might walk straight into a scam?
R
I am not sure that the length of her skirt reflects her mental capacity?
I was thinking more about presenting Blue Peter. The days of Valerie
Singleton, Christopher Trace and Petra the dog are long gone. The rot
set in with that Noakes chappie.
I met that Christopher Trace, along with Honey, at a Scout Jamboree in
about 1965. On the programme the next week, my back could be ween
walking away from the camera.
--
David
Rosalind Mitchell
2019-09-12 15:57:07 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by krw
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by krw
pesky fraudsters - after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k the
banks have to do something.
Who?
R
Blue Peter at one point, correspondent at Olympic Games not used
subsequently because her skirt was too short or something.
So the sort who might walk straight into a scam?
R
I am not sure that the length of her skirt reflects her mental capacity?
I was thinking more about presenting Blue Peter. The days of Valerie
Singleton, Christopher Trace and Petra the dog are long gone. The rot
set in with that Noakes chappie.
I met that Christopher Trace, along with Honey, at a Scout Jamboree in
about 1965.  On the programme the next week, my back could be ween
walking away from the camera.
Ooh, dig the pink knickers with lace trim!

R
Sam Plusnet
2019-09-11 20:12:19 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by krw
pesky fraudsters - after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k the
banks have to do something.
Who?
R
Blue Peter at one point, correspondent at Olympic Games not used
subsequently because her skirt was too short or something.
So the sort who might walk straight into a scam?
R
I am not sure that the length of her skirt reflects her mental capacity?
I think it was patent leather shoes which did the reflecting, but I
could be wrong about that.
--
Sam Plusnet
Chris J Dixon
2019-09-12 07:12:18 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by krw
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by krw
pesky fraudsters - after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k the
banks have to do something.
Who?
Blue Peter at one point, correspondent at Olympic Games not used
subsequently because her skirt was too short or something.
So the sort who might walk straight into a scam?
I am not sure that the length of her skirt reflects her mental capacity?
I think it was patent leather shoes which did the reflecting, but I
could be wrong about that.
The wind caught her shortish skirt whilst she was presenting, so
she flashed her knickers to the viewers.



Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Jenny M Benson
2019-09-12 09:28:24 UTC
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after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k the banks have to do
something.
I hadn't heard about the HS incident then, but I have now read about it.
What I want to know is how much money she is going to earn from the
television show she is going to present on account of her being scammed?

Incidentally, if you believe it is your Bank talking to you on the
'phone, what questions could they ask you that would persuade you to
divulge the information needed for such a fraud yet not raise your
suspicions. My Bank already knows my name and address and my account
number and how much money I have - and probably other stuff as well, so
if they ask for any of that information I would be mighty suspicious
immediately.

(But I've always thought HS sounds as if she's about 8 years old and
perhaps it's too much to expect an 8 yr-old to be so savvy.)
--
Jenny M Benson
Kate B
2019-09-12 09:39:25 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k the banks have to do
something.
I hadn't heard about the HS incident then, but I have now read about it.
 What I want to know is how much money she is going to earn from the
television show she is going to present on account of her being scammed?
Incidentally, if you believe it is your Bank talking to you on the
'phone, what questions could they ask you that would persuade you to
divulge the information needed for such a fraud yet not raise your
suspicions.  My Bank already knows my name and address and my account
number and how much money I have - and probably other stuff as well, so
if they ask for any of that information I would be mighty suspicious
immediately.
(But I've always thought HS sounds as if she's about 8 years old and
perhaps it's too much to expect an 8 yr-old to be so savvy.)
I'd ask for their name and department and then ring the bank from
another phone and ask to be put through via the switchboard. This would
be monumentally tedious but would be worth it if it saved £70,000
(chance of having £70,000 in a bank account being a fine thing...)
--
Kate B
London
Vicky Ayech
2019-09-12 10:22:46 UTC
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On Thu, 12 Sep 2019 10:28:24 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k the banks have to do
something.
I hadn't heard about the HS incident then, but I have now read about it.
What I want to know is how much money she is going to earn from the
television show she is going to present on account of her being scammed?
Incidentally, if you believe it is your Bank talking to you on the
'phone, what questions could they ask you that would persuade you to
divulge the information needed for such a fraud yet not raise your
suspicions. My Bank already knows my name and address and my account
number and how much money I have - and probably other stuff as well, so
if they ask for any of that information I would be mighty suspicious
immediately.
But I think they ask those questions when you phone them to see if you
know and that way prove it is actually you.
Post by Jenny M Benson
(But I've always thought HS sounds as if she's about 8 years old and
perhaps it's too much to expect an 8 yr-old to be so savvy.)
Flop
2019-09-12 12:33:41 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Incidentally, if you believe it is your Bank talking to you on the
'phone, what questions could they ask you that would persuade you to
divulge the information needed for such a fraud yet not raise your
suspicions.  My Bank already knows my name and address and my account
number and how much money I have - and probably other stuff as well, so
if they ask for any of that information I would be mighty suspicious
immediately.
If a scammer has got into your account then you have lost already.

In which case, you can assume that they have not so ask the bank for
details of your account:

First DD of the month
Last DD of the month
Date that a credit card leaves your account
Any information about non-current accounts (value; interest rate...)

Most banks have a secure messaging service. I cannot see what would stop
you sending a message, eg "My code word is UMRA". Ask them for this
when they ring.

Times have changed so expect banks to change to more rigorous security
measures instead of their sloppy "What is your postcode/first line of
your address?".
They are now liable to refund scams unless they can prove obvious
negligence.
--
Flop

Truly the Good Lord gave us computers that we might learn patience
Penny
2019-09-12 17:08:12 UTC
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On Thu, 12 Sep 2019 13:33:41 +0100, Flop <***@flop.knot.me.uk> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Flop
If a scammer has got into your account then you have lost already.
In which case, you can assume that they have not so ask the bank for
First DD of the month
Last DD of the month
Date that a credit card leaves your account
At an old-school level, anyone who has intercepted your mail and acquired a
bank statement could answer all those.
Post by Flop
Any information about non-current accounts (value; interest rate...)
They might struggle a bit with non-current accounts though. IME banks never
put info on more than one account in the same envelope.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
carolet
2019-09-13 10:35:07 UTC
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Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Flop
If a scammer has got into your account then you have lost already.
In which case, you can assume that they have not so ask the bank for
First DD of the month
Last DD of the month
Date that a credit card leaves your account
At an old-school level, anyone who has intercepted your mail and acquired a
bank statement could answer all those.
Post by Flop
Any information about non-current accounts (value; interest rate...)
They might struggle a bit with non-current accounts though. IME banks never
put info on more than one account in the same envelope.
I don't think I've ever had statements for different accounts in the
same envelope, but I have had letters around April time that list all my
accounts in a single letter, giving the amount of interest received for
each (if any).
--
CaroleT
Rosalind Mitchell
2019-09-12 15:58:16 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k the banks have to do
something.
I hadn't heard about the HS incident then, but I have now read about it.
 What I want to know is how much money she is going to earn from the
television show she is going to present on account of her being scammed?
Incidentally, if you believe it is your Bank talking to you on the
'phone, what questions could they ask you that would persuade you to
divulge the information needed for such a fraud yet not raise your
suspicions.  My Bank already knows my name and address and my account
number and how much money I have - and probably other stuff as well, so
if they ask for any of that information I would be mighty suspicious
immediately.
(But I've always thought HS sounds as if she's about 8 years old and
perhaps it's too much to expect an 8 yr-old to be so savvy.)
I believe that is the general condition of BP presenters in recent decades.

R
Sid Nuncius
2019-09-12 16:26:06 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Incidentally, if you believe it is your Bank talking to you on the
'phone, what questions could they ask you that would persuade you to
divulge the information needed for such a fraud yet not raise your
suspicions.  My Bank already knows my name and address and my account
number and how much money I have - and probably other stuff as well, so
if they ask for any of that information I would be mighty suspicious
immediately.
I tend to look at Moneybox's website to see what is to be on the
programme. Much of it is of no interest (so to speak) but their items
on fraud and telephone scams are worth listening to. From these I have
learned that the scammers often have lots of details, making their claim
to be from the bank scarily plausible.

Kate's advice is very sound: get a name/department, phone the
main/switchboard number from another phone and ask to be put through.
My bank (FirstDirect) has only phoned me once in 25+ years about a query
on my Visa account. They wanted to ask me some security questions so I
said I'd ring back on another line and they were fine about it.

I would treat any phone call or email from my bank requiring me to take
action as a scam until I'd contacted them in a way I know to be secure
and had confirmed it to be genuine.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Fenny
2019-09-12 21:31:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 12 Sep 2019 10:28:24 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Incidentally, if you believe it is your Bank talking to you on the
'phone, what questions could they ask you that would persuade you to
divulge the information needed for such a fraud yet not raise your
suspicions. My Bank already knows my name and address and my account
number and how much money I have - and probably other stuff as well, so
if they ask for any of that information I would be mighty suspicious
immediately.
I had a phone call the other week saying it was from the Fraud
department of my bank and could I answer some security questions. I
asked how I knew they really were from the Fraud department of my
bank. She told me to ring the number on the back of my bank card and
ask to speak to the Fraud department.

Having heard of scams where the callers keep the line open, I rang
from my mobile, spoke to the bank and was put through to the Fraud
department. They were querying a payment I had tried to make the night
before that hadn't gone through. I was pretty sure that was what it
was about, but I wasn't going to just divulge information without
checking it was a genuine call.
--
Fenny
Nick Odell
2019-09-13 10:19:03 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
after all if Helen Skelton can give away £70k the banks have to do
something.
I hadn't heard about the HS incident then, but I have now read about it.
 What I want to know is how much money she is going to earn from the
television show she is going to present on account of her being scammed?
Incidentally, if you believe it is your Bank talking to you on the
'phone, what questions could they ask you that would persuade you to
divulge the information needed for such a fraud yet not raise your
suspicions.  My Bank already knows my name and address and my account
number and how much money I have - and probably other stuff as well, so
if they ask for any of that information I would be mighty suspicious
immediately.
(But I've always thought HS sounds as if she's about 8 years old and
perhaps it's too much to expect an 8 yr-old to be so savvy.)
I found a message from $MyBank on my voicemail. It came from a mobile
phone and invited me to call the caller back on that mobile number to
discuss exciting things I could do with my money.

I did some research and discovered the number was officially listed to a
manager at $MyBank but - honestly - how is anybody supposed to check
that in the middle of what could have been a conversation? So the new
information didn't stop me writing an anxious letter warning $MyBank
that somebody was masquerading as them - well it must be a scam since no
"serious" bank would ring customers from a mobile and invite a call back
to a mobile number, would they?

A few days later I received in the post a very embarrassed-sounding
apology and (so far) nobody from there has tried to do that with me again.

Nick
Nick
Mike
2019-09-10 10:13:00 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.
Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
Cats and dogs manage to do their business without the use of a mobile
phone.;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Leverton
2019-09-10 15:23:47 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.
Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
If your bank is like mine, they can also issue a small keypad, perhaps a
little larger and thicker than a credit card, which can calculate the
security codes. No mobile phone required. Perhaps you could ask ?
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Vicky Ayech
2019-09-10 16:49:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 10 Sep 2019 15:23:47 +0000 (UTC), Nick Leverton
Post by Nick Leverton
If your bank is like mine, they can also issue a small keypad, perhaps a
little larger and thicker than a credit card, which can calculate the
security codes. No mobile phone required. Perhaps you could ask ?
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
Nationwide has had the keypad thing for years and mine doesn't work
the first 3 times I try. Gives error message. So I asked for a new one
and saw the option tohave an extra large one to view more easily so
asked for that. Been wiating now for about 3 or 4 weeks. COmplained 10
days ago and was promised it in 5. They say sorry very nicely
tocomplaints but then carry on being inefficient. And the logging you
out in mid visit too quickly has speeded up so you have to log in MORE
often. I know they don't want to risk you forgot you were there but
this was stupid today.
Fenny
2019-09-10 18:04:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 10 Sep 2019 15:23:47 +0000 (UTC), Nick Leverton
Post by Nick Leverton
If your bank is like mine, they can also issue a small keypad, perhaps a
little larger and thicker than a credit card, which can calculate the
security codes. No mobile phone required. Perhaps you could ask ?
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
I've been doing online banking with HSBC for more than 20 years and
the little keypad is fab. I keep it attached to the power lead of my
laptop so I always know where it is.

I'd much prefer all banks to provide these than have to use either OTP
or mobile banking apps.
--
Fenny
Kate B
2019-09-10 22:02:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 10 Sep 2019 15:23:47 +0000 (UTC), Nick Leverton
Post by Nick Leverton
If your bank is like mine, they can also issue a small keypad, perhaps a
little larger and thicker than a credit card, which can calculate the
security codes. No mobile phone required. Perhaps you could ask ?
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
I've been doing online banking with HSBC for more than 20 years and
the little keypad is fab. I keep it attached to the power lead of my
laptop so I always know where it is.
I'd much prefer all banks to provide these than have to use either OTP
or mobile banking apps.
I've got an account at Nationwide, not much in it, but it developed from
my first savings account and I have a sentimental attachment to it. They
give you a keypad thingy into which you insert your bank card, but its
clunky LCD screen is almost impossible to read in most lights, I hate it
deeply and never use it if I can possibly avoid it. I have another
account with HSBC, and I had one of those little credit-card sized
keypads which was indeed fab until it died unexpectedly. Since I needed
to get into the account quickly I got the phone app and I have to say I
probably won't go back to the keypad. It's about as secure as it can be,
I'd have thought, though like others I don't actually do any banking on
it, just use it to get into the website.
--
Kate B
London
Rosalind Mitchell
2019-09-10 22:10:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 10 Sep 2019 15:23:47 +0000 (UTC), Nick Leverton
Post by Nick Leverton
If your bank is like mine, they can also issue a small keypad, perhaps a
little larger and thicker than a credit card, which can calculate the
security codes.  No mobile phone required.  Perhaps you could ask ?
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
I've been doing online banking with HSBC for more than 20 years and
the little keypad is fab. I keep it attached to the power lead of my
laptop so I always know where it is.
I'd much prefer all banks to provide these than have to use either OTP
or mobile banking apps.
I've got an account at Nationwide, not much in it, but it developed from
my first savings account and I have a sentimental attachment to it. They
give you a keypad thingy into which you insert your bank card, but its
clunky LCD screen is almost impossible to read in most lights, I hate it
deeply and never use it if I can possibly avoid it. I have another
account with HSBC, and I had one of those little credit-card sized
keypads which was indeed fab until it died unexpectedly. Since I needed
to get into the account quickly I got the phone app and I have to say I
probably won't go back to the keypad. It's about as secure as it can be,
I'd have thought, though like others I don't actually do any banking on
it, just use it to get into the website.
I've got a wee keypad thingy. In fact I may have two. The the thing is,
I have no idea where they are.

R
Mike
2019-09-11 07:32:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Kate B
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 10 Sep 2019 15:23:47 +0000 (UTC), Nick Leverton
Post by Nick Leverton
If your bank is like mine, they can also issue a small keypad, perhaps a
little larger and thicker than a credit card, which can calculate the
security codes.  No mobile phone required.  Perhaps you could ask ?
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
I've been doing online banking with HSBC for more than 20 years and
the little keypad is fab. I keep it attached to the power lead of my
laptop so I always know where it is.
I'd much prefer all banks to provide these than have to use either OTP
or mobile banking apps.
I've got an account at Nationwide, not much in it, but it developed from
my first savings account and I have a sentimental attachment to it. They
give you a keypad thingy into which you insert your bank card, but its
clunky LCD screen is almost impossible to read in most lights, I hate it
deeply and never use it if I can possibly avoid it. I have another
account with HSBC, and I had one of those little credit-card sized
keypads which was indeed fab until it died unexpectedly. Since I needed
to get into the account quickly I got the phone app and I have to say I
probably won't go back to the keypad. It's about as secure as it can be,
I'd have thought, though like others I don't actually do any banking on
it, just use it to get into the website.
I've got a wee keypad thingy. In fact I may have two. The the thing is,
I have no idea where they are.
R
Urine good company I suspect...
--
Toodle Pip
Rosalind Mitchell
2019-09-11 08:58:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Kate B
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 10 Sep 2019 15:23:47 +0000 (UTC), Nick Leverton
Post by Nick Leverton
If your bank is like mine, they can also issue a small keypad, perhaps a
little larger and thicker than a credit card, which can calculate the
security codes.  No mobile phone required.  Perhaps you could ask ?
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
I've been doing online banking with HSBC for more than 20 years and
the little keypad is fab. I keep it attached to the power lead of my
laptop so I always know where it is.
I'd much prefer all banks to provide these than have to use either OTP
or mobile banking apps.
I've got an account at Nationwide, not much in it, but it developed from
my first savings account and I have a sentimental attachment to it. They
give you a keypad thingy into which you insert your bank card, but its
clunky LCD screen is almost impossible to read in most lights, I hate it
deeply and never use it if I can possibly avoid it. I have another
account with HSBC, and I had one of those little credit-card sized
keypads which was indeed fab until it died unexpectedly. Since I needed
to get into the account quickly I got the phone app and I have to say I
probably won't go back to the keypad. It's about as secure as it can be,
I'd have thought, though like others I don't actually do any banking on
it, just use it to get into the website.
I've got a wee keypad thingy. In fact I may have two. The the thing is,
I have no idea where they are.
R
Urine good company I suspect...
No need to take the piss.

R
Vicky Ayech
2019-09-11 07:28:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 10 Sep 2019 15:23:47 +0000 (UTC), Nick Leverton
Post by Nick Leverton
If your bank is like mine, they can also issue a small keypad, perhaps a
little larger and thicker than a credit card, which can calculate the
security codes. No mobile phone required. Perhaps you could ask ?
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
I've been doing online banking with HSBC for more than 20 years and
the little keypad is fab. I keep it attached to the power lead of my
laptop so I always know where it is.
I'd much prefer all banks to provide these than have to use either OTP
or mobile banking apps.
I've got an account at Nationwide, not much in it, but it developed from
my first savings account and I have a sentimental attachment to it. They
give you a keypad thingy into which you insert your bank card, but its
clunky LCD screen is almost impossible to read in most lights, I hate it
See my other post about having the NW keypad with better visibility.
Although it has been about 3 weeks and I am still waiting for it. All
I get is apologies.
Post by Kate B
deeply and never use it if I can possibly avoid it. I have another
account with HSBC, and I had one of those little credit-card sized
Ah I found that harder to use than the NW one but am used to it now.
Post by Kate B
keypads which was indeed fab until it died unexpectedly. Since I needed
to get into the account quickly I got the phone app and I have to say I
probably won't go back to the keypad. It's about as secure as it can be,
I'd have thought, though like others I don't actually do any banking on
it, just use it to get into the website.
Joe Kerr
2019-09-10 23:14:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Leverton
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
Nick
They do. It involves doing your business in your local branch, handily
located on all high streets throughout the country.
--
Ric
krw
2019-09-11 10:34:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Leverton
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
Nick
They do. It involves doing your business in your local branch, handily
located on all high streets throughout the country.
We used to have a Barclays and a Natwest; the former is a pizza place
and the latter remains empty. Crowthorne had a Barclays (still there),
HSBC (well Midland actually) and a useful Lloyds (being of that
persuasion personally) plus a Nationwide. The HSBC and Nationwide are
gone and have been transformed, the Lloyds (unusefully) remains empty.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Vicky Ayech
2019-09-11 10:44:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Leverton
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
Nick
They do. It involves doing your business in your local branch, handily
located on all high streets throughout the country.
We used to have a Barclays and a Natwest; the former is a pizza place
and the latter remains empty. Crowthorne had a Barclays (still there),
HSBC (well Midland actually) and a useful Lloyds (being of that
persuasion personally) plus a Nationwide. The HSBC and Nationwide are
gone and have been transformed, the Lloyds (unusefully) remains empty.
The rot set in in about 1987 when Midland did their first online
banking via Prestel. I took part in that. They really annoyed me a few
months ago, or First Direct did, when they reconfigured the website to
make it good for tablets and mobiles. And less good for PCs. I did
tell them though and as things changed a bit I imagine I was not the
only outraged of XXXXpickaspot
Chris J Dixon
2019-09-11 10:54:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
They really annoyed me a few
months ago, or First Direct did, when they reconfigured the website to
make it good for tablets and mobiles. And less good for PCs. I did
tell them though and as things changed a bit I imagine I was not the
only outraged of XXXXpickaspot
Yes, I don't like the new appearance. Can't quite put my finger
on it, but I think it is that it used to look pretty much like
the printed statement, but now it doesn't.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Nick Leverton
2019-09-11 11:09:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Vicky Ayech
They really annoyed me a few
months ago, or First Direct did, when they reconfigured the website to
make it good for tablets and mobiles. And less good for PCs. I did
tell them though and as things changed a bit I imagine I was not the
only outraged of XXXXpickaspot
Yes, I don't like the new appearance. Can't quite put my finger
on it, but I think it is that it used to look pretty much like
the printed statement, but now it doesn't.
One substantive problem they have introduced with the change is that you
can now only get a few lines of your statement on the screen, since it is
now triple spaced, whereas before you could get several dozen transactions
and easily scroll to scan for the rest, which now makes it a lengthy
and tedious task to find any particular payment you may be looking for.

Or as they put it, "we have made it easier to understand".

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Vicky Ayech
2019-09-11 12:39:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 11:09:15 +0000 (UTC), Nick Leverton
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Vicky Ayech
They really annoyed me a few
months ago, or First Direct did, when they reconfigured the website to
make it good for tablets and mobiles. And less good for PCs. I did
tell them though and as things changed a bit I imagine I was not the
only outraged of XXXXpickaspot
Yes, I don't like the new appearance. Can't quite put my finger
on it, but I think it is that it used to look pretty much like
the printed statement, but now it doesn't.
One substantive problem they have introduced with the change is that you
can now only get a few lines of your statement on the screen, since it is
now triple spaced, whereas before you could get several dozen transactions
and easily scroll to scan for the rest, which now makes it a lengthy
and tedious task to find any particular payment you may be looking for.
Or as they put it, "we have made it easier to understand".
Nick
The BBC did that with the local weatehr. I liked that site but now can
only see a few hours at a time and have to scroll sideways to see
more. I wrote and complained and they are thinking about my complaint.
It has been around 2 months. I use the weather centre now.
Vicky Ayech
2019-09-11 12:38:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Vicky Ayech
They really annoyed me a few
months ago, or First Direct did, when they reconfigured the website to
make it good for tablets and mobiles. And less good for PCs. I did
tell them though and as things changed a bit I imagine I was not the
only outraged of XXXXpickaspot
Yes, I don't like the new appearance. Can't quite put my finger
on it, but I think it is that it used to look pretty much like
the printed statement, but now it doesn't.
Chris
At first, until the changes after complaints, I found it so hard to
read I asked for monthly statements to resume. So am using paper.And
also verious places want a proof of address etc and those are useful.
Chris McMillan
2019-09-12 13:29:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Vicky Ayech
They really annoyed me a few
months ago, or First Direct did, when they reconfigured the website to
make it good for tablets and mobiles. And less good for PCs. I did
tell them though and as things changed a bit I imagine I was not the
only outraged of XXXXpickaspot
Yes, I don't like the new appearance. Can't quite put my finger
on it, but I think it is that it used to look pretty much like
the printed statement, but now it doesn't.
Chris
At first, until the changes after complaints, I found it so hard to
read I asked for monthly statements to resume. So am using paper.And
also verious places want a proof of address etc and those are useful.
I think you need a new pair of specs, Vicky! :). Or a new set of fingers.

Sincerely Chris
Sid Nuncius
2019-09-11 18:04:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Vicky Ayech
They really annoyed me a few
months ago, or First Direct did, when they reconfigured the website to
make it good for tablets and mobiles. And less good for PCs. I did
tell them though and as things changed a bit I imagine I was not the
only outraged of XXXXpickaspot
Yes, I don't like the new appearance. Can't quite put my finger
on it, but I think it is that it used to look pretty much like
the printed statement, but now it doesn't.
<languid wave>
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Marmaduke Jinks
2019-09-11 11:07:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Leverton
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
Nick
They do. It involves doing your business in your local branch, handily
located on all high streets throughout the country.
--
Ric
Although if you have a FlexAccount with them they don't like you paying
cheques in at the counter. I got told off by the Branch Manager for taking
my cheques in. Use the machine she said and wait 24 hours for your cheques
to go through.

MJ
Fenny
2019-09-11 17:15:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 12:07:55 +0100, "Marmaduke Jinks"
Post by Marmaduke Jinks
Although if you have a FlexAccount with them they don't like you paying
cheques in at the counter. I got told off by the Branch Manager for taking
my cheques in. Use the machine she said and wait 24 hours for your cheques
to go through.
Ma banks with Nationwide and there's only one branch in Sheffield, so
she has to wait until she's going into town to pay in cheques.
Whenever she stands in the queue with her crutch, some nice assistant
comes over and offers to pay in at the machine for her while she sits
and waits.
--
Fenny
Penny
2019-09-11 18:30:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 18:15:08 +0100, Fenny <***@removethis.gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 11 Sep 2019 12:07:55 +0100, "Marmaduke Jinks"
Post by Marmaduke Jinks
Although if you have a FlexAccount with them they don't like you paying
cheques in at the counter. I got told off by the Branch Manager for taking
my cheques in. Use the machine she said and wait 24 hours for your cheques
to go through.
Ma banks with Nationwide and there's only one branch in Sheffield, so
she has to wait until she's going into town to pay in cheques.
Whenever she stands in the queue with her crutch, some nice assistant
comes over and offers to pay in at the machine for her while she sits
and waits.
Reading this thread I can now see some (more) advantage to living in the
'largest town'* in the county.

We still have branches of Barclays, NatWest, HSBC, TSB (or is it Lloyds?),
Nationwide, Santander and two or three other building societies as well as
a credit union or two. I think our Post Office is the only one for miles as
well, I know many village ones have closed in the last 10 years.

When I moved here in 2008, there were also 3 Co-op shops of varying size,
there are none now, which seems a shame for the birthplace of Robert Owen.

*Presumably by population, it's very small really.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Anne B
2019-09-29 21:37:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Leverton
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
Nick
They do. It involves doing your business in your local branch, handily
located on all high streets throughout the country.
Which planet are you on?

Anne B
Mike
2019-09-30 07:38:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Leverton
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
Nick
They do. It involves doing your business in your local branch, handily
located on all high streets throughout the country.
Which planet are you on?
Anne B
Would these be the banks who seemed to have changed their names to things
like Paddy Power, Coral, Timpsons, Oxfam or Sue Ryder?
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2019-09-30 08:28:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Leverton
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
Nick
They do. It involves doing your business in your local branch, handily
located on all high streets throughout the country.
Which planet are you on?
Anne B
Would these be the banks who seemed to have changed their names to things
like Paddy Power, Coral, Timpsons, Oxfam or Sue Ryder?
Costa, Starbucks and Giraffe are also to be found.
Mike
2019-09-30 10:50:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Leverton
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
Nick
They do. It involves doing your business in your local branch, handily
located on all high streets throughout the country.
Which planet are you on?
Anne B
Would these be the banks who seemed to have changed their names to things
like Paddy Power, Coral, Timpsons, Oxfam or Sue Ryder?
Costa, Starbucks and Giraffe are also to be found.
That last one has got some neck...
--
Toodle Pip
Flop
2019-09-30 08:47:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Anne B
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Leverton
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
Nick
They do. It involves doing your business in your local branch, handily
located on all high streets throughout the country.
Which planet are you on?
Anne B
Would these be the banks who seemed to have changed their names to things
like Paddy Power, Coral, Timpsons, Oxfam or Sue Ryder?
Well, they are not Lloyds TSB, Barclays, Natwest, HSBC or Nationwide.

You have all these plus your list above.

So you are in no position to complain.
(Unless you banked with Santander which has jumped ship).
--
Flop

Truly the Good Lord gave us computers that we might learn patience
Sid Nuncius
2019-09-30 10:53:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Leverton
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
Nick
They do. It involves doing your business in your local branch, handily
located on all high streets throughout the country.
Which planet are you on?
Planet Irony, I think.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Joe Kerr
2019-09-30 15:10:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Anne B
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Leverton
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
Nick
They do. It involves doing your business in your local branch, handily
located on all high streets throughout the country.
Which planet are you on?
Planet Irony, I think.
Spot on Sid. (Though I do seem to still have a full complement on all my
high streets.)
--
Ric
Mike
2019-09-30 15:47:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Anne B
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Leverton
They must surely make some provision for those who have no desire for
a phone that runs easily hackable or hijackable applications.
Nick
They do. It involves doing your business in your local branch, handily
located on all high streets throughout the country.
Which planet are you on?
Planet Irony, I think.
Spot on Sid. (Though I do seem to still have a full complement on all my
high streets.)
Maybe that is why they shut so many, because so many customers were ‘doing
their business’ on the High Street. ;-)

IGM attendant’s hi-viz jacket and broom.
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2019-09-10 15:38:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.
Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
Yes, its to deter the fraudsters. MoneyBox has covered it. Or stop shopping
on line.

Sincerely Chris
Sid Nuncius
2019-09-10 18:00:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.
Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
I'm finding it incredibly annoying, too, but I don't think there's
anything particularly sinister to it. It seems to me to be a reasonable
way of adding security to computer-based transactions, so that
fraudsters would need access to your phone, its password/PIN plus the
password for your app, too.

That said, I agree that I don't really want any financial stuff
accessible from a device which I carry around with me and which can
therefore be lost/stolen. I have reluctantly installed the FirstDirect
app, but I wish I hadn't had to, no matter how secure they assure me it
is. I never use it for actual financial transactions, just for getting
the necessary codes to do things on my laptop when absolutely necessary.

I find that I ring them up more now, which jolly well serves them right.
😊
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-09-10 18:45:23 UTC
Reply
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In message <ql7ps5$iop$***@dont-email.me>, Rosalind Mitchell
<***@kelvincorkrose.co.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
I think you've got it in the first sentence )-:.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Today, I dare say more people know who starred as /The Vicar of Dibley/ than
know the name of the vicar of their local parish. - Clive Anderson, Radio
Times 15-21 January 2011.
Flop
2019-09-10 20:09:14 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
I think you've got it in the first sentence )-:.
With changes to their responsibility for refunding money taken by fraud,
banks are afraid that, in future, you will be losing their money rather
than them losing your money.

You know the saying:

"Give man a gun and he can rob a bank.

Give a man a bank and he can rob everyone".
--
Flop

Truly the Good Lord gave us computers that we might learn patience
Sam Plusnet
2019-09-10 22:17:48 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.
Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
Yes.
It's a scheme to make things very difficult for anyone who can't get a
decent mobile signal.
Which??? did a rough & ready survey which showed that 4% of people
didn't own a suitable phone, and 13% couldn't receive a usable mobile
signal at home.
I've already told one of my banks that I can't get a signal & thus their
scheme is no use to me, but they still keep sending me letters saying
they must have my mobile number.
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Odell
2019-09-11 15:58:37 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.
Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
Yes.
It's a scheme to make things very difficult for anyone who can't get a
decent mobile signal.
Which??? did a rough & ready survey which showed that 4% of people
didn't own a suitable phone, and 13% couldn't receive a usable mobile
signal at home.
I've already told one of my banks that I can't get a signal & thus their
scheme is no use to me, but they still keep sending me letters saying
they must have my mobile number.
One of the banks who offer alternative two factor identification methods
will no doubt welcome your business should you decide to abandon the one
that won't.

Nick
Sam Plusnet
2019-09-11 20:25:18 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.
Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
Yes.
It's a scheme to make things very difficult for anyone who can't get a
decent mobile signal.
Which??? did a rough & ready survey which showed that 4% of people
didn't own a suitable phone, and 13% couldn't receive a usable mobile
signal at home.
I've already told one of my banks that I can't get a signal & thus
their scheme is no use to me, but they still keep sending me letters
saying they must have my mobile number.
One of the banks who offer alternative two factor identification methods
will no doubt welcome your business should you decide to abandon the one
that won't.
Trouble is, I hang on to old bank accounts because of the incredible
hassle of trying to open a new one where I have to prove to four decimal
places that I am not Osama Bin Laden nor any other naughty person.
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Odell
2019-09-11 21:27:16 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.
Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
Yes.
It's a scheme to make things very difficult for anyone who can't get
a decent mobile signal.
Which??? did a rough & ready survey which showed that 4% of people
didn't own a suitable phone, and 13% couldn't receive a usable mobile
signal at home.
I've already told one of my banks that I can't get a signal & thus
their scheme is no use to me, but they still keep sending me letters
saying they must have my mobile number.
One of the banks who offer alternative two factor identification
methods will no doubt welcome your business should you decide to
abandon the one that won't.
Trouble is, I hang on to old bank accounts because of the incredible
hassle of trying to open a new one where I have to prove to four decimal
places that I am not Osama Bin Laden nor any other naughty person.
Given the remoteness of where you live, I suppose the news that OBL died
in 2011 hasn't quite reached there yet.

Nick
Anne B
2019-09-29 21:29:32 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.
Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
I wrote to my banks to say that I cannot 'update' my phobile number
because I have never given them one in the first place, so I am unable
to comply with the terms of their demand.

One wrote back and another phoned to explain that it's going to be
mandatory, but as I don't have a phobile they can send it as an
automated call to my landline.

I suppose the next step will be to tell them I want it by e-mail.

Anne B
Nick Odell
2019-09-29 23:26:41 UTC
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On Sun, 29 Sep 2019 22:29:32 +0100, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.
Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
I wrote to my banks to say that I cannot 'update' my phobile number
because I have never given them one in the first place, so I am unable
to comply with the terms of their demand.
One wrote back and another phoned to explain that it's going to be
mandatory, but as I don't have a phobile they can send it as an
automated call to my landline.
I suppose the next step will be to tell them I want it by e-mail.
I'll be interested to hear if they agree to that. I thought the whole
idea of two factor authorisation was that one factor was something
physical that you have in your hand - mobile/landline/code generator
etc and not something like email which, if the bad guys have already
stolen your banking credentials, they probably already have subverted.

Nick
Joe Kerr
2019-09-30 15:06:17 UTC
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Post by Anne B
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.
Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
I wrote to my banks to say that I cannot 'update' my phobile number
because I have never given them one in the first place, so I am unable
to comply with the terms of their demand.
One wrote back and another phoned to explain that it's going to be
mandatory, but as I don't have a phobile they can send it as an
automated call to my landline.
I suppose the next step will be to tell them I want it by e-mail.
Anne B
Why not go the whole hog and request a liveried footman?
--
Ric
Sam Plusnet
2019-10-04 20:23:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
My bank has decreed that if I want to log in to my account on my desktop
I must have my mobile handy so I can get the security code and type it
on my desktop.
Now, I'm pretty damned sure that my desktop is a great deal more secure
than my mobile, so I don't believe this is about security. I think this
is about the bank wanting me to use my phone to do my business. I don't
like using my phone to do banking or any other online business but there
is a widespread trend of nudging towards phone apps.
Anybody know what's going on?
I wrote to my banks to say that I cannot 'update' my phobile number
because I have never given them one in the first place, so I am unable
to comply with the terms of their demand.
One wrote back and another phoned to explain that it's going to be
mandatory, but as I don't have a phobile they can send it as an
automated call to my landline.
I suppose the next step will be to tell them I want it by e-mail.
I've been told that email is not an acceptable medium for this porpoise.
--
Sam Plusnet
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