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Peter
2020-09-08 08:49:18 UTC
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May one freeze tomatoes? Yes. But what I mean is - after they are
defrosted are they edible?
Mike
2020-09-08 10:04:17 UTC
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Post by Peter
May one freeze tomatoes? Yes. But what I mean is - after they are
defrosted are they edible?
The cannon balls they become may be used in stews and the like but, no good
as salad type as they become mushy on thawing.
HTH ,HAND.
--
Toodle Pip
Peter
2020-09-08 11:01:50 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Peter
May one freeze tomatoes? Yes. But what I mean is - after they are
defrosted are they edible?
The cannon balls they become may be used in stews and the like but, no good
as salad type as they become mushy on thawing.
HTH ,HAND.
Thank you. It was in the domain of saladification that my interest lay.
Joe Kerr
2020-09-08 20:52:19 UTC
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Post by Mike
May one freeze tomatoes?  Yes.  But what I mean is - after they are
defrosted are they edible?
The cannon balls they become may be used in stews and the like but, no good
as salad type as they become mushy on thawing.
HTH ,HAND.
Thank you.  It was in the domain of saladification that my interest lay.
You might get away with it if you have a blast freezer (which I'm sure
you don't) that will freeze them faster than the ice crystals can form
and shred the cell walls. It's how they do strawberries and the like.
--
Ric
Peter
2020-09-08 21:50:19 UTC
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Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Mike
May one freeze tomatoes?  Yes.  But what I mean is - after they are
defrosted are they edible?
The cannon balls they become may be used in stews and the like but, no good
as salad type as they become mushy on thawing.
HTH ,HAND.
Thank you.  It was in the domain of saladification that my interest lay.
You might get away with it if you have a blast freezer (which I'm sure
you don't
I don't even know what one is!
Post by Joe Kerr
) that will freeze them faster than the ice crystals can form
and shred the cell walls. It's how they do strawberries and the like.
Penny
2020-10-26 09:38:32 UTC
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On Tue, 8 Sep 2020 21:52:19 +0100, Joe Kerr <***@cheerful.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Mike
May one freeze tomatoes?  Yes.  But what I mean is - after they are
defrosted are they edible?
The cannon balls they become may be used in stews and the like but, no good
as salad type as they become mushy on thawing.
HTH ,HAND.
Thank you.  It was in the domain of saladification that my interest lay.
You might get away with it if you have a blast freezer (which I'm sure
you don't) that will freeze them faster than the ice crystals can form
and shred the cell walls. It's how they do strawberries and the like.
I seem to have missed this thread...
I used to freeze strawberries spread out on a tray so they didn't stick
together, then bag them up. I mostly used them in jelly - they cooled and
set the warm jelly around them and, while not quite the texture of the
fresh fruit, were a pretty good substitute in the winter.

I suppose you could do something similar with small (skinned) tomatoes in
aspic.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Steve Hague
2020-09-09 08:40:21 UTC
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May one freeze tomatoes?  Yes.  But what I mean is - after they are
defrosted are they edible?
Not really. They're not really food as such when they've been stored in
a fridge for any length of time.
Steve
Sam Plusnet
2020-09-09 19:49:47 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
May one freeze tomatoes?  Yes.  But what I mean is - after they are
defrosted are they edible?
Not really. They're not really food as such when they've been stored in
a fridge for any length of time.
Tomatoes as individual fruit (Oh yes they are!) don't freeze at all
well, but tomato purée etc. should be fine.
--
Sam Plusnet
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-09-10 00:31:17 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Steve Hague
May one freeze tomatoes?  Yes.  But what I mean is - after they are
defrosted are they edible?
Edible in the sense of not being harmful, yes. The freeze-defrost
process will tend to mush them, as with many things. I often wondered if
that might be a _practical_ way of making, say, apple puree - either
less bother than the normal way, or produces better results, or both.
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Steve Hague
Not really. They're not really food as such when they've been stored
in a fridge for any length of time.
We'll have to agree to disagree.
Post by Sam Plusnet
Tomatoes as individual fruit (Oh yes they are!) don't freeze at all
well, but tomato purée etc. should be fine.
Yes, as it's already a mush. (Pizzas have been frozen for ages, after
all, and they include tomato fairly low in the list.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Ask not for whom the bell tolls; let the machine get it
BrritSki
2020-09-10 08:02:09 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Pizzas have been frozen for ages, after
all, and they include tomato fairly low in the list.)
<shudder>
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