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OT: Yeats
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Sid Nuncius
2019-10-03 17:31:28 UTC
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Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today. She found it and
read it out loud; when she'd finished the first stanza we both just
looked at each other thinking "Blimey, that's apposite in the world at
the moment." Here it is, just in case the full text has slipped
somerats' minds as it did mine:

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.

Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert
A shape with lion body and the head of a man,
A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
Reel shadows of the indignant desert birds.
The darkness drops again; but now I know
That twenty centuries of stony sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle,
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?

Just thought I'd cheer you all up a bit.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2019-10-03 19:55:00 UTC
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Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today.  She found it and
read it out loud; when she'd finished the first stanza we both just
looked at each other thinking "Blimey, that's apposite in the world at
the moment."  Here it is, just in case the full text has slipped
Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Cummings shirley ?
John Ashby
2019-10-03 20:31:05 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today.  She found it
and read it out loud; when she'd finished the first stanza we both
just looked at each other thinking "Blimey, that's apposite in the
world at the moment."  Here it is, just in case the full text has
Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Cummings shirley ?
One is quite enough, thank you.

john
Penny
2019-10-03 20:56:32 UTC
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On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 18:31:28 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today. She found it and
read it out loud; when she'd finished the first stanza we both just
looked at each other thinking "Blimey, that's apposite in the world at
the moment." Here it is, just in case the full text has slipped
Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
---8<--- because the rest of it didn't speak to me as those lines do

I've never read any Yeats - in fact I think I've only really heard of him
because I did the artwork for a book jacket for some of his work once.

As you say, very apposite in present times. It seems he wrote it in 1919,
which surprises me a bit but maybe it had been 'brewing' for a few years
before then.
Post by Sid Nuncius
Just thought I'd cheer you all up a bit.
My mind needed stirring today, thanks.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-03 21:32:45 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 18:31:28 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today. She found it and
read it out loud; when she'd finished the first stanza we both just
looked at each other thinking "Blimey, that's apposite in the world at
the moment." Here it is, just in case the full text has slipped
Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
---8<--- because the rest of it didn't speak to me as those lines do
I've never read any Yeats - in fact I think I've only really heard of him
because I did the artwork for a book jacket for some of his work once.
As you say, very apposite in present times. It seems he wrote it in 1919,
which surprises me a bit but maybe it had been 'brewing' for a few years
before then.
Post by Sid Nuncius
Just thought I'd cheer you all up a bit.
My mind needed stirring today, thanks.
Oh! Yeats. Not TS. Well, that shows how well I remember the A Level
stuff.
Mike Ruddock
2019-10-05 07:11:50 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 18:31:28 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today. She found it and
read it out loud; when she'd finished the first stanza we both just
looked at each other thinking "Blimey, that's apposite in the world at
the moment." Here it is, just in case the full text has slipped
Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
---8<--- because the rest of it didn't speak to me as those lines do
I've never read any Yeats - in fact I think I've only really heard of him
because I did the artwork for a book jacket for some of his work once.
As you say, very apposite in present times. It seems he wrote it in 1919,
which surprises me a bit but maybe it had been 'brewing' for a few years
before then.
Post by Sid Nuncius
Just thought I'd cheer you all up a bit.
My mind needed stirring today, thanks.
Oh! Yeats. Not TS. Well, that shows how well I remember the A Level
stuff.
You may be thinking of "The Journey of the Magi" Vicky

Mike Ruddock
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-05 10:35:24 UTC
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On Sat, 5 Oct 2019 08:11:50 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 18:31:28 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today. She found it and
read it out loud; when she'd finished the first stanza we both just
looked at each other thinking "Blimey, that's apposite in the world at
the moment." Here it is, just in case the full text has slipped
Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
---8<--- because the rest of it didn't speak to me as those lines do
I've never read any Yeats - in fact I think I've only really heard of him
because I did the artwork for a book jacket for some of his work once.
As you say, very apposite in present times. It seems he wrote it in 1919,
which surprises me a bit but maybe it had been 'brewing' for a few years
before then.
Post by Sid Nuncius
Just thought I'd cheer you all up a bit.
My mind needed stirring today, thanks.
Oh! Yeats. Not TS. Well, that shows how well I remember the A Level
stuff.
You may be thinking of "The Journey of the Magi" Vicky
Mike Ruddock
Oh yes, thank you. I do sort of remember that and enjoyed reading it
again just now. I know we did the Yeats too. I loved English A Level.
We had very good teachers and a small class of around 6 or 8 and in
the second year we'd do extra practise questions voluntarily because
we liked thinking about them and getting feedback.
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-03 21:31:53 UTC
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On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 18:31:28 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today. She found it and
read it out loud; when she'd finished the first stanza we both just
looked at each other thinking "Blimey, that's apposite in the world at
the moment." Here it is, just in case the full text has slipped
Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert
A shape with lion body and the head of a man,
A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
Reel shadows of the indignant desert birds.
The darkness drops again; but now I know
That twenty centuries of stony sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle,
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?
Just thought I'd cheer you all up a bit.
We did TS for A Level. That and Murder in the Cathedral too.And The
Waste Land. Just what I needed to cheer my day up, thanks :)
Dentist this morning and we booked a replacement of filling, where
there is very little tooth. And if it doesn't hold this time it will
mean root canal and/or extraction. And the dentist hates taking my
teeth out as Alendronate makes it very worrying. They mutter dark
things about necrosis.

And then this evening the amended Tesco order had not amended. All the
original things were in it. I make the order to book the time slot.
Then change to what is really needed the night before. Most of that is
not what nuggering well arrived and the confirmation email I would
have got is nowhere. Not here in agent or in gmail.
And I keep the tesco window open until I get the email. So where is
it? And B was in the room and we discussed some items that I changed
so i did do it yesterday lunch time.

And tomorrow will be worse. MRI. :(
Sid Nuncius
2019-10-04 05:14:19 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
And tomorrow will be worse. MRI. :(
Hope all goes OK. I don't mind them (I've had a few!) but I know that
if you're at all claustrophobic they can be pretty horrid. Fingers
crossed for you - and for the results.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2019-10-04 07:16:31 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
And tomorrow will be worse. MRI. :(
Hope all goes OK.  I don't mind them (I've had a few!) but I know that
if you're at all claustrophobic they can be pretty horrid.  Fingers
crossed for you - and for the results.
<lw>
Mike
2019-10-04 08:11:23 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
And tomorrow will be worse. MRI. :(
Hope all goes OK.  I don't mind them (I've had a few!) but I know that
if you're at all claustrophobic they can be pretty horrid.  Fingers
crossed for you - and for the results.
<lw>
I went 70 years and more without any but have had numerous in this last
year - don’t mind them m’self.
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-04 08:17:08 UTC
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On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 06:14:19 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
And tomorrow will be worse. MRI.
And in my rant of woe I forgot that first thing I was caught in the
traffic around the accident on the A51. A 5 minute journey took 35
minutes and I'd started early as had the dentist later. There were 2
horse boxes on their side and traffic not moving for half my distance.
I didn't realise they were horse boxes until I saw the report later.
Luckily the horses were ok. Two humans were a little hurt but not
badly.

I complained several times that day and B then pointed out at least I
had not been inthe crash and was unhurt :). I recalled my mother used
to say look at people worse off.
Serena Blanchflower
2019-10-04 08:46:10 UTC
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And tomorrow will be worse. MRI.:(
Good luck with that - I hope it goes smoothly and doesn't show up
anything scary.

Bad luck with your Tesco order, it's infuriating when things like that
happen, isn't it :(
--
Best wishes, Serena
Some people's idea of [free speech] is that they are free to say what
they like, but if anyone says anything back, that is an outrage.
(Winston Churchill)
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-04 10:55:19 UTC
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On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 09:46:10 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
And tomorrow will be worse. MRI.:(
Good luck with that - I hope it goes smoothly and doesn't show up
anything scary.
Bad luck with your Tesco order, it's infuriating when things like that
happen, isn't it :(
Thank you for umrats' good wishes. It is not the process with MRI,
unlike the colonoscopy, which was gruesome. It is anticipating the
result that is scary.
Serena Blanchflower
2019-10-04 11:04:18 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Thank you for umrats' good wishes. It is not the process with MRI,
unlike the colonoscopy, which was gruesome. It is anticipating the
result that is scary.
Hope you don't have to wait too long, in limbo, until you get the results.
--
Best wishes, Serena
No one can have experienced to the fullest the true sense of achievement
and satisfaction who has never pursued and successfully caught his tail.
(Rosalind Welcher)
Mike
2019-10-04 15:36:12 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 09:46:10 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
And tomorrow will be worse. MRI.:(
Good luck with that - I hope it goes smoothly and doesn't show up
anything scary.
Bad luck with your Tesco order, it's infuriating when things like that
happen, isn't it :(
Thank you for umrats' good wishes. It is not the process with MRI,
unlike the colonoscopy, which was gruesome. It is anticipating the
result that is scary.
I have my ‘planning session’ next week; this is where I have another CT
scan to map out my prostate relative to my bladder and bowel and will then
have three marks tattooed on my belly for locating and positioning purposes
when I receive my 20 fractions of the radio therapy treatment several weeks
later.
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-04 17:39:52 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 09:46:10 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
And tomorrow will be worse. MRI.:(
Good luck with that - I hope it goes smoothly and doesn't show up
anything scary.
Bad luck with your Tesco order, it's infuriating when things like that
happen, isn't it :(
Thank you for umrats' good wishes. It is not the process with MRI,
unlike the colonoscopy, which was gruesome. It is anticipating the
result that is scary.
I have my ‘planning session’ next week; this is where I have another CT
scan to map out my prostate relative to my bladder and bowel and will then
have three marks tattooed on my belly for locating and positioning purposes
when I receive my 20 fractions of the radio therapy treatment several weeks
later.
I think I had little marks too when I had radiation treatment. They
don't really show later. Just to the department. The actual radiation
was tiring. But not everyone feels that afterwards, so hopefully you
won't. Just need to be ready to rest lots if need be.
Mike
2019-10-04 17:55:42 UTC
Reply
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 09:46:10 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
And tomorrow will be worse. MRI.:(
Good luck with that - I hope it goes smoothly and doesn't show up
anything scary.
Bad luck with your Tesco order, it's infuriating when things like that
happen, isn't it :(
Thank you for umrats' good wishes. It is not the process with MRI,
unlike the colonoscopy, which was gruesome. It is anticipating the
result that is scary.
I have my ‘planning session’ next week; this is where I have another CT
scan to map out my prostate relative to my bladder and bowel and will then
have three marks tattooed on my belly for locating and positioning purposes
when I receive my 20 fractions of the radio therapy treatment several weeks
later.
I think I had little marks too when I had radiation treatment. They
don't really show later. Just to the department. The actual radiation
was tiring. But not everyone feels that afterwards, so hopefully you
won't. Just need to be ready to rest lots if need be.
And there is a need to eat an extra 200 - 300 calories a day;-)
--
Toodle Pip
John Ashby
2019-10-04 18:44:53 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 09:46:10 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
And tomorrow will be worse. MRI.:(
Good luck with that - I hope it goes smoothly and doesn't show up
anything scary.
Bad luck with your Tesco order, it's infuriating when things like that
happen, isn't it :(
Thank you for umrats' good wishes. It is not the process with MRI,
unlike the colonoscopy, which was gruesome. It is anticipating the
result that is scary.
I have my ‘planning session’ next week; this is where I have another CT
scan to map out my prostate relative to my bladder and bowel and will then
have three marks tattooed on my belly for locating and positioning purposes
when I receive my 20 fractions of the radio therapy treatment several weeks
later.
I think I had little marks too when I had radiation treatment. They
don't really show later. Just to the department. The actual radiation
was tiring. But not everyone feels that afterwards, so hopefully you
won't. Just need to be ready to rest lots if need be.
And there is a need to eat an extra 200 - 300 calories a day;-)
Double chocolate ration.

john
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-04 20:40:10 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 09:46:10 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
And tomorrow will be worse. MRI.:(
Good luck with that - I hope it goes smoothly and doesn't show up
anything scary.
Bad luck with your Tesco order, it's infuriating when things like that
happen, isn't it :(
Thank you for umrats' good wishes. It is not the process with MRI,
unlike the colonoscopy, which was gruesome. It is anticipating the
result that is scary.
I have my ?planning session? next week; this is where I have another CT
scan to map out my prostate relative to my bladder and bowel and will then
have three marks tattooed on my belly for locating and positioning purposes
when I receive my 20 fractions of the radio therapy treatment several weeks
later.
I think I had little marks too when I had radiation treatment. They
don't really show later. Just to the department. The actual radiation
was tiring. But not everyone feels that afterwards, so hopefully you
won't. Just need to be ready to rest lots if need be.
And there is a need to eat an extra 200 - 300 calories a day;-)
Double chocolate ration.
john
Unfortunately I don't think Mike can have that. Diabetic. I suppose
it has to be something ...I am not up to date with what diabetics are
advised to eat now. B is not typical since he managed the condition
but with a very odd diet.

My grandfather, also managing with diet, had to not have bread. They
had these wierd Energen Rolls. They were rolls of air more or less.
But he could have cheese and butter and meat. No sweet things. But
fruit, as my gran made stewed apple most days, but with sweetner I
think. Or nothing.Not potatoes. So not sugar and carbs. Fat was ok.
And protein. B has pasta. Bread. Not much though. Chips.
Mike
2019-10-04 21:05:36 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by John Ashby
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 09:46:10 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
And tomorrow will be worse. MRI.:(
Good luck with that - I hope it goes smoothly and doesn't show up
anything scary.
Bad luck with your Tesco order, it's infuriating when things like that
happen, isn't it :(
Thank you for umrats' good wishes. It is not the process with MRI,
unlike the colonoscopy, which was gruesome. It is anticipating the
result that is scary.
I have my ?planning session? next week; this is where I have another CT
scan to map out my prostate relative to my bladder and bowel and will then
have three marks tattooed on my belly for locating and positioning purposes
when I receive my 20 fractions of the radio therapy treatment several weeks
later.
I think I had little marks too when I had radiation treatment. They
don't really show later. Just to the department. The actual radiation
was tiring. But not everyone feels that afterwards, so hopefully you
won't. Just need to be ready to rest lots if need be.
And there is a need to eat an extra 200 - 300 calories a day;-)
Double chocolate ration.
john
Unfortunately I don't think Mike can have that. Diabetic. I suppose
it has to be something ...I am not up to date with what diabetics are
advised to eat now. B is not typical since he managed the condition
but with a very odd diet.
My grandfather, also managing with diet, had to not have bread. They
had these wierd Energen Rolls. They were rolls of air more or less.
But he could have cheese and butter and meat. No sweet things. But
fruit, as my gran made stewed apple most days, but with sweetner I
think. Or nothing.Not potatoes. So not sugar and carbs. Fat was ok.
And protein. B has pasta. Bread. Not much though. Chips.
We have 81% cocoa chocolate and this is *very good* for the system.
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2019-10-04 21:59:03 UTC
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We have 81% cocoa chocolate and this is*very good* for the system.
I am of the opinion that a little of everything (apart from obvious
sugar) is not too bad.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
BrritSki
2019-10-05 06:28:27 UTC
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Post by krw
We have 81% cocoa chocolate and this is*very good*  for the system.
I am of the opinion that a little of everything (apart from obvious
sugar) is not too bad.
Indeed. As the recent new recommendations on red and processed meat has
emphasised. I'll be off to make my Saturday bacon and egg sarnie just as
soon as I've finished my tea :)
Steve Hague
2019-10-05 08:55:57 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by krw
We have 81% cocoa chocolate and this is*very good*  for the system.
I am of the opinion that a little of everything (apart from obvious
sugar) is not too bad.
Indeed. As the recent new recommendations on red and processed meat has
emphasised. I'll be off to make my Saturday bacon and egg sarnie just as
soon as I've finished my tea  :)
You'll be dead within fifty years if you continue to eat like that.
Steve
BrritSki
2019-10-05 10:23:02 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
Post by BrritSki
Post by krw
We have 81% cocoa chocolate and this is*very good*  for the system.
I am of the opinion that a little of everything (apart from obvious
sugar) is not too bad.
Indeed. As the recent new recommendations on red and processed meat
has emphasised. I'll be off to make my Saturday bacon and egg sarnie
just as soon as I've finished my tea  :)
You'll be dead within fifty years if you continue to eat like that.
God, I hope so ;)
Penny
2019-10-05 13:23:12 UTC
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On Sat, 5 Oct 2019 11:23:02 +0100, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Steve Hague
Post by BrritSki
Post by krw
We have 81% cocoa chocolate and this is*very good*  for the system.
I am of the opinion that a little of everything (apart from obvious
sugar) is not too bad.
Indeed. As the recent new recommendations on red and processed meat
has emphasised. I'll be off to make my Saturday bacon and egg sarnie
just as soon as I've finished my tea  :)
You'll be dead within fifty years if you continue to eat like that.
God, I hope so ;)
I'm am reminded of the shocked look on my GPs face when, in response to
something she suggested which I was not going to do, I said, "But I don't
want to live forever."
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
krw
2019-10-05 11:37:27 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
Post by BrritSki
Post by krw
We have 81% cocoa chocolate and this is*very good*  for the system.
I am of the opinion that a little of everything (apart from obvious
sugar) is not too bad.
Indeed. As the recent new recommendations on red and processed meat
has emphasised. I'll be off to make my Saturday bacon and egg sarnie
just as soon as I've finished my tea  :)
You'll be dead within fifty years if you continue to eat like that.
Steve
I think that is highly likely.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Chris J Dixon
2019-10-06 07:46:56 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Steve Hague
You'll be dead within fifty years if you continue to eat like that.
Steve
I think that is highly likely.
A couple of years ago I repainted hall, stairs and landing, after
an interval of about 17 years, thinking to myself, if it lasts as
well, I don't think I will ever be up on a ladder doing it again.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
krw
2019-10-07 10:39:17 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
A couple of years ago I repainted hall, stairs and landing, after
an interval of about 17 years, thinking to myself, if it lasts as
well, I don't think I will ever be up on a ladder doing it again.
Men came to do the kitchen which I hope the wife likes as we are not
doing it again.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Chris J Dixon
2019-10-07 12:27:46 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Chris J Dixon
A couple of years ago I repainted hall, stairs and landing, after
an interval of about 17 years, thinking to myself, if it lasts as
well, I don't think I will ever be up on a ladder doing it again.
Men came to do the kitchen which I hope the wife likes as we are not
doing it again.
It is hard to believe that our "new" kitchen is already 11 years
old. I don't think it will be revisited any time soon.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Penny
2019-10-08 19:41:00 UTC
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On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 13:27:46 +0100, Chris J Dixon <***@cdixon.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by krw
Post by Chris J Dixon
A couple of years ago I repainted hall, stairs and landing, after
an interval of about 17 years, thinking to myself, if it lasts as
well, I don't think I will ever be up on a ladder doing it again.
Men came to do the kitchen which I hope the wife likes as we are not
doing it again.
It is hard to believe that our "new" kitchen is already 11 years
old. I don't think it will be revisited any time soon.
Mine is also 11 years old, I keep intending to tile the walls but it hasn't
happened yet...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-04 20:34:52 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
I have my ?planning session? next week; this is where I have another CT
scan to map out my prostate relative to my bladder and bowel and will then
have three marks tattooed on my belly for locating and positioning purposes
when I receive my 20 fractions of the radio therapy treatment several weeks
later.
I think I had little marks too when I had radiation treatment. They
don't really show later. Just to the department. The actual radiation
was tiring. But not everyone feels that afterwards, so hopefully you
won't. Just need to be ready to rest lots if need be.
And there is a need to eat an extra 200 - 300 calories a day;-)
Really??! Are you sure? They didn't say that to me. But I had a
minimal radiation treatment. It was a trial. ALthough 9 years ago so
things have probably moved on and changed.
Mike
2019-10-04 21:03:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
I have my ?planning session? next week; this is where I have another CT
scan to map out my prostate relative to my bladder and bowel and will then
have three marks tattooed on my belly for locating and positioning purposes
when I receive my 20 fractions of the radio therapy treatment several weeks
later.
I think I had little marks too when I had radiation treatment. They
don't really show later. Just to the department. The actual radiation
was tiring. But not everyone feels that afterwards, so hopefully you
won't. Just need to be ready to rest lots if need be.
And there is a need to eat an extra 200 - 300 calories a day;-)
Really??! Are you sure? They didn't say that to me. But I had a
minimal radiation treatment. It was a trial. ALthough 9 years ago so
things have probably moved on and changed.
I’m told the body replaces the dead cells in 6-8 hours and requires the
calories to make good the losses. It is important not to lose weight during
the 4 x 5 days of treatment.
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2019-10-04 21:06:10 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 09:46:10 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
And tomorrow will be worse. MRI.:(
Good luck with that - I hope it goes smoothly and doesn't show up
anything scary.
Bad luck with your Tesco order, it's infuriating when things like that
happen, isn't it :(
Thank you for umrats' good wishes. It is not the process with MRI,
unlike the colonoscopy, which was gruesome. It is anticipating the
result that is scary.
I have my ‘planning session’ next week; this is where I have another CT
scan to map out my prostate relative to my bladder and bowel and will then
have three marks tattooed on my belly for locating and positioning purposes
when I receive my 20 fractions of the radio therapy treatment several weeks
later.
And he’s had strict instructions from nursie (a real one) on diet and
liquid intake. No one could have taken offence even if they thought she was
over egging everything. Feel sorry for the coffee and tea addicts! Almost
enough of a time frame for those on the longest courses to “give them up
for Lent”.

Sincerely Chris
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-03 22:30:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today. She found it
and read it out loud; when she'd finished the first stanza we both just
looked at each other thinking "Blimey, that's apposite in the world at
the moment." Here it is, just in case the full text has slipped
I'm afraid most of it is beyond me, but two lines:
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
[]
get through to me, though possibly the opposite of what was intended
(possibly not, I'm not sure). It means to me that some people of low
intelligence about a subject have strongly-held opinions (mobs,
basically), whereas those who _do_ understand it can see both sides. I'm
thinking racism, Brexit, most subjects (even the two mob-trigger ones).
Post by Sid Nuncius
Just thought I'd cheer you all up a bit.
(-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The early worm gets the bird.
Sid Nuncius
2019-10-04 05:21:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today.  She found it
and read it out loud; when she'd finished the first stanza we both
just looked at each other thinking "Blimey, that's apposite in the
world at the moment."  Here it is, just in case the full text has
[]
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
[]
get through to me, though possibly the opposite of what was intended
(possibly not, I'm not sure). It means to me that some people of low
intelligence about a subject have strongly-held opinions (mobs,
basically), whereas those who _do_ understand it can see both sides. I'm
thinking racism, Brexit, most subjects (even the two mob-trigger ones).
Yes, those two lines leapt out at me, too. I didn't read them as
speaking of people low intelligence, though, but of those with low
motives seeking to obfuscate, manipulate, gain personal advantage,
conceal personal iniquity/inadequacy etc. etc. There's no shortage of
examples anywhere at the moment.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
John Ashby
2019-10-04 05:53:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today.  She found it
and read it out loud; when she'd finished the first stanza we both
just looked at each other thinking "Blimey, that's apposite in the
world at the moment."  Here it is, just in case the full text has
[]
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
[]
get through to me, though possibly the opposite of what was intended
(possibly not, I'm not sure). It means to me that some people of low
intelligence about a subject have strongly-held opinions (mobs,
basically), whereas those who _do_ understand it can see both sides.
I'm thinking racism, Brexit, most subjects (even the two mob-trigger
ones).
Yes, those two lines leapt out at me, too.  I didn't read them as
speaking of people low intelligence, though, but of those with low
motives seeking to obfuscate, manipulate, gain personal advantage,
conceal personal iniquity/inadequacy etc. etc.  There's no shortage of
examples *anywhere* at the moment. [my emphasis]
Except, of course, in umra.

john
Peter Percival
2019-10-04 17:01:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today.  She found it
and read it out loud; when she'd finished the first stanza we both
just looked at each other thinking "Blimey, that's apposite in the
world at the moment."  Here it is, just in case the full text has
[]
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
[]
get through to me, though possibly the opposite of what was intended
(possibly not, I'm not sure). It means to me that some people of low
intelligence about a subject have strongly-held opinions (mobs,
basically), whereas those who _do_ understand it can see both sides. I'm
thinking racism, Brexit, most subjects (even the two mob-trigger ones).
Yes, but Yeats's best and worst don't necessarily correspond to people
with understanding and people of low intelligence.

Also (changing the subject rather) people of low intelligence shouldn't
be sneered at, and they certainly shouldn't be blamed.
Sid Nuncius
2019-10-04 18:29:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Percival
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
[]
get through to me, though possibly the opposite of what was intended
(possibly not, I'm not sure). It means to me that some people of low
intelligence about a subject have strongly-held opinions (mobs,
basically), whereas those who _do_ understand it can see both sides.
I'm thinking racism, Brexit, most subjects (even the two mob-trigger
ones).
Yes, but Yeats's best and worst don't necessarily correspond to people
with understanding and people of low intelligence.
Also (changing the subject rather) people of low intelligence shouldn't
be sneered at, and they certainly shouldn't be blamed.
<languid wave>
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sam Plusnet
2019-10-04 21:58:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today.  She found it and
read it out loud; when she'd finished the first stanza we both just
looked at each other thinking "Blimey, that's apposite in the world at
the moment."  Here it is, just in case the full text has slipped
Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert
A shape with lion body and the head of a man,
A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
Reel shadows of the indignant desert birds.
The darkness drops again; but now I know
That twenty centuries of stony sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle,
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?
Just thought I'd cheer you all up a bit.
Indeed.
You have reminded me of the suggestion that Evangelists gave support to
Trump, because they think he will usher in the end of times.
--
Sam Plusnet
Steve Hague
2019-10-05 08:59:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Just thought I'd cheer you all up a bit.
Indeed.
You have reminded me of the suggestion that Evangelists gave support to
Trump, because they think he will usher in the end of times.
They could be right.
Steve
Penny
2019-10-05 09:16:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 22:58:57 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today. 
---8<---
Post by Sam Plusnet
Just thought I'd cheer you all up a bit.
Indeed.
You have reminded me of the suggestion that Evangelists gave support to
Trump, because they think he will usher in the end of times.
The Last Trump?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Kate B
2019-10-05 17:42:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today.
---8<---
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Just thought I'd cheer you all up a bit.
Indeed.
You have reminded me of the suggestion that Evangelists gave support to
Trump, because they think he will usher in the end of times.
The Last Trump?
<Gabriel> I didn't mean *that*! </Gabriel>
--
Kate B
London
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-05 22:18:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
The Last Trump?
<Gabriel> I didn't mean *that*! </Gabriel>
LOL!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Only dirty people need wash
BrritSki
2019-10-06 08:08:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today.
---8<---
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Just thought I'd cheer you all up a bit.
Indeed.
You have reminded me of the suggestion that Evangelists gave support to
Trump, because they think he will usher in the end of times.
The Last Trump?
<Gabriel> I didn't mean *that*! </Gabriel>
S/He who smelt it dealt it !
Steve Hague
2019-10-05 09:07:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today.  She found it and
read it out loud; when she'd finished the first stanza we both just
looked at each other thinking "Blimey, that's apposite in the world at
the moment."  Here it is, just in case the full text has slipped
Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert
A shape with lion body and the head of a man,
A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
Reel shadows of the indignant desert birds.
The darkness drops again; but now I know
That twenty centuries of stony sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle,
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?
Just thought I'd cheer you all up a bit.
My favourite Yeats poem is The Song of Wandering Aengus, possibly
because I heard it set to music by Donovan in the late 60s. It's mostly
about regret and determination, and it's superb.
Steve
Kate B
2019-10-05 17:41:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Wofe referred to Yeats's poem The Second Coming today.  She found it and
read it out loud; when she'd finished the first stanza we both just
looked at each other thinking "Blimey, that's apposite in the world at
the moment."  Here it is, just in case the full text has slipped
Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
Surely some revelation is at hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert
A shape with lion body and the head of a man,
A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
Reel shadows of the indignant desert birds.
The darkness drops again; but now I know
That twenty centuries of stony sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle,
And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?
Just thought I'd cheer you all up a bit.
Catching up late to the Byzantine party... the best lack all conviction
etc has become the motto of our times. Watching the Parliament channel I
am often very impressed by the integrity and well-informed engagement of
many MPs in less politically-charged debate, but put them in front of
the Brexit Juggernaut and they are instantly paralysed - all they can
utter is Cummings- or Milne-approved shibboleths.

The other one I have been quoting all the time to myself for several
years now is 'Things fall apart, the centre cannot hold... '

Tread softly, for all our dreams are in tatters now.
--
Kate B
London
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-05 22:28:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <***@mid.individual.net>, Kate B
<***@nospam.demon.co.uk> writes:
[]
Parliament channel I am often very impressed by the integrity and
well-informed engagement of many MPs in less politically-charged
debate, but
Agreed.
put them in front of the Brexit Juggernaut and they are instantly
paralysed - all they can utter is Cummings- or Milne-approved
shibboleths.
There probably _are_ MPs who are reasonable about the subject (by which
I mean balanced, seeing both sides). They tend not to speak in
soundbites (reasonableness doesn't lend itself to such) and thus, sadly,
rarely get coverage (or if they do it's edited unfairly).
The other one I have been quoting all the time to myself for several
years now is 'Things fall apart, the centre cannot hold... '
Tread softly, for all our dreams are in tatters now.
For Brexit, that last applies to both sides )-:. (Partly because both
sides realise that, whatever the output, there will be people, including
some of their friends, who have been made increasingly bitter by the
last 3 years, and they'll have to live with them whatever happens.)
It'll take a _long_ time for the ill-feeling to dissipate; I imagine
people felt similar after the civil war (though fortunately few have
actually been killed this time).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Only dirty people need wash
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