Discussion:
OT: - FFS!
(too old to reply)
Jenny M Benson
2019-08-05 19:03:44 UTC
Permalink
To-day is one of the 2 days in my 5 to 2 diet. So I want to sit quietly
and watch TV and try not to feel hungry. Let's see ... there's Nadia
cooking on BBC 2. There's Ainsley cooking on ITV. And there's someone
Unwrapping food on Channel 4.

Like I said - FFS!
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Mike
2019-08-05 19:49:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
To-day is one of the 2 days in my 5 to 2 diet. So I want to sit quietly
and watch TV and try not to feel hungry. Let's see ... there's Nadia
cooking on BBC 2. There's Ainsley cooking on ITV. And there's someone
Unwrapping food on Channel 4.
Like I said - FFS!
You may as well go along to the choccy bun...... Oh! Is it something I
said?
--
Toodle Pip
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2019-08-05 19:53:10 UTC
Permalink
There is an exhibition on Roman food in the Ashmolean which I hope to get to.
BrritSki
2019-08-09 10:05:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
There is an exhibition on Roman food in the Ashmolean which I hope to get to.
Be quick before it goes off !

I'll get my garum...
Sam Plusnet
2019-08-09 13:49:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
There is an exhibition on Roman food in the Ashmolean which I hope to get to.
Be quick before it goes off !
I'll get my garum...
'Ere! None of your sauce!
--
Sam Plusnet
Fenny
2019-08-05 22:22:38 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 5 Aug 2019 20:03:44 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
To-day is one of the 2 days in my 5 to 2 diet. So I want to sit quietly
and watch TV and try not to feel hungry. Let's see ... there's Nadia
cooking on BBC 2. There's Ainsley cooking on ITV. And there's someone
Unwrapping food on Channel 4.
Like I said - FFS!
I thought daytime telly was all about buying old houses, buying old
junk and cooking so much you forget what you bought.
--
Fenny
Mike
2019-08-06 16:29:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
On Mon, 5 Aug 2019 20:03:44 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
To-day is one of the 2 days in my 5 to 2 diet. So I want to sit quietly
and watch TV and try not to feel hungry. Let's see ... there's Nadia
cooking on BBC 2. There's Ainsley cooking on ITV. And there's someone
Unwrapping food on Channel 4.
Like I said - FFS!
I thought daytime telly was all about buying old houses, buying old
junk and cooking so much you forget what you bought.
No, no, no Fenny, it is all about selling advertising time but using
cra.... err.... programmes in between them to hold them in place. Whaddya
mean, the adverts are even worse than the filling???
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2019-08-06 16:46:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Fenny
On Mon, 5 Aug 2019 20:03:44 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
To-day is one of the 2 days in my 5 to 2 diet. So I want to sit quietly
and watch TV and try not to feel hungry. Let's see ... there's Nadia
cooking on BBC 2. There's Ainsley cooking on ITV. And there's someone
Unwrapping food on Channel 4.
Like I said - FFS!
I thought daytime telly was all about buying old houses, buying old
junk and cooking so much you forget what you bought.
No, no, no Fenny, it is all about selling advertising time but using
cra.... err.... programmes in between them to hold them in place. Whaddya
mean, the adverts are even worse than the filling???
We were watching a programme on Coca Cola recently; advertised as a 90
minute programme, zapping the advert breaks, we saw the whole programme in
under an hour.
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-08-06 18:41:36 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 06 Aug 2019 16:46:57 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
We were watching a programme on Coca Cola recently; advertised as a 90
minute programme, zapping the advert breaks, we saw the whole programme in
under an hour.
Sounds about right, the 60 minute progs run around 45 mins, less if you
zoom through the intro too (I've got very good at that).
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-08-06 19:46:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
We were watching a programme on Coca Cola recently; advertised as a 90
minute programme, zapping the advert breaks, we saw the whole programme in
under an hour.
Sounds about right, the 60 minute progs run around 45 mins, less if you
zoom through the intro too (I've got very good at that).
Yes, I find the 3-4 minute intros tedious and annoying as well as being
redundant from my point of view.
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2019-08-07 19:45:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
We were watching a programme on Coca Cola recently; advertised as a 90
minute programme, zapping the advert breaks, we saw the whole programme in
under an hour.
Sounds about right, the 60 minute progs run around 45 mins, less if you
zoom through the intro too (I've got very good at that).
Yes, I find the 3-4 minute intros tedious and annoying as well as being
redundant from my point of view.
Particularly if there is a series of programmes which you have recorded,
and each one starts with the identical, lengthy, dramatised, preamble.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2019-08-07 19:48:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
We were watching a programme on Coca Cola recently; advertised as a 90
minute programme, zapping the advert breaks, we saw the whole programme in
under an hour.
Sounds about right, the 60 minute progs run around 45 mins, less if you
zoom through the intro too (I've got very good at that).
Yes, I find the 3-4 minute intros tedious and annoying as well as being
redundant from my point of view.
Particularly if there is a series of programmes which you have recorded,
and each one starts with the identical, lengthy, dramatised, preamble.
Absolutely Yup!
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-08-07 20:59:04 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 7 Aug 2019 20:45:50 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
We were watching a programme on Coca Cola recently; advertised as a 90
minute programme, zapping the advert breaks, we saw the whole programme in
under an hour.
Sounds about right, the 60 minute progs run around 45 mins, less if you
zoom through the intro too (I've got very good at that).
Yes, I find the 3-4 minute intros tedious and annoying as well as being
redundant from my point of view.
Particularly if there is a series of programmes which you have recorded,
and each one starts with the identical, lengthy, dramatised, preamble.
I find those easier to deal with than the ones which start 'cold' with the
circumstances which drive the whole episode then slip into the 2 minute
intro.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-08-08 15:27:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
We were watching a programme on Coca Cola recently; advertised as a 90
minute programme, zapping the advert breaks, we saw the whole programme in
under an hour.
Sounds about right, the 60 minute progs run around 45 mins, less if you
zoom through the intro too (I've got very good at that).
Yes, I find the 3-4 minute intros tedious and annoying as well as being
redundant from my point of view.
Particularly if there is a series of programmes which you have recorded,
and each one starts with the identical, lengthy, dramatised, preamble.
I find those easier to deal with than the ones which start 'cold' with the
circumstances which drive the whole episode then slip into the 2 minute
intro.
That’s double sneaky innit? Anyone would think they want us to watch
everything including the adverts - can’t think why.

I suspect that all programmes have to fit the 30, 60 or 90 minute slots for
scheduling purposes; taking about 20 minutes, a ‘feature’ can be augmented
with intro and repetition to be 24 minutes and thus allows for 2 x 3 minute
ad breaks -no problem!
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-08-08 22:24:08 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 08 Aug 2019 15:27:56 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Particularly if there is a series of programmes which you have recorded,
and each one starts with the identical, lengthy, dramatised, preamble.
I find those easier to deal with than the ones which start 'cold' with the
circumstances which drive the whole episode then slip into the 2 minute
intro.
That’s double sneaky innit? Anyone would think they want us to watch
everything including the adverts - can’t think why.
I suspect that all programmes have to fit the 30, 60 or 90 minute slots for
scheduling purposes; taking about 20 minutes, a ‘feature’ can be augmented
with intro and repetition to be 24 minutes and thus allows for 2 x 3 minute
ad breaks -no problem!
On our trip to Tasmania way back in 1989 (when Neighbours was still
broadcast by the BBC here and ran for 20 minutes) I was horrified to find
they had two ad breaks - the 2nd was between the end of the programme and
the credits which seemed particularly daft to me.*

Mined ewe, they also dropped it for cricket and other sport.

*I had special dispensation to watch TV on the little set in my brother's
study, he was in the habit of cutting the plug off the big TV in the lounge
(room) in November, replacing it at some point in February.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2019-08-09 08:09:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
the big TV in the lounge
(room)
Obviously it's consistent, as we say dining room, sitting room and so
on, but given the Aussies' fondness for abbreviaton, I'm always
surprised when I see or hear "lounge room."
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Mike
2019-08-09 08:15:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
the big TV in the lounge
(room)
Obviously it's consistent, as we say dining room, sitting room and so
on, but given the Aussies' fondness for abbreviaton, I'm always
surprised when I see or hear "lounge room."
It is one of those rooms one may ‘retire’ to innit?
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-08-09 10:30:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
the big TV in the lounge
(room)
Obviously it's consistent, as we say dining room, sitting room and so
on, but given the Aussies' fondness for abbreviaton, I'm always
surprised when I see or hear "lounge room."
Maybe it has a slightly different function to what we call a "lounge": a
room where you lounge, rather than whatever _we_ do in a lounge.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Anyone can do any amount of work provided it isn't the work he is supposed to
be doing at the moment. -Robert Benchley, humorist, drama critic, and actor
(1889-1945)
SODAM
2019-08-09 12:28:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Obviously it's consistent, as we say dining room, sitting room and so
on, but given the Aussies' fondness for abbreviaton, I'm always
surprised when I see or hear "lounge room."
Maybe it has a slightly different function to what we call a "lounge": a
room where you lounge, rather than whatever _we_ do in a lounge.
I think Australians may term a sofa ‘a lounge’. My Australian friend did
when I visited her. [1]

That would make sense of a “lounge room” - a room where you keep the sofa.

[1] Just because she used that terminology, it doesn’t mean it is current
in the whole population.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-08-09 13:09:12 UTC
Permalink
In message
Post by SODAM
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
Obviously it's consistent, as we say dining room, sitting room and so
on, but given the Aussies' fondness for abbreviaton, I'm always
surprised when I see or hear "lounge room."
Maybe it has a slightly different function to what we call a "lounge": a
room where you lounge, rather than whatever _we_ do in a lounge.
I think Australians may term a sofa ‘a lounge’. My Australian friend did
when I visited her. [1]
That would make sense of a “lounge room” - a room where you keep the sofa.
[1] Just because she used that terminology, it doesn’t mean it is current
in the whole population.
I _think_ I have heard that Oz usage too - lounge for the piece of
furniture.

In which case it could come from a different root: not so much as
something to lounge on, but from French chaise longue - long chair. In
British English (!), that phrase generally refers to a chair that is
stretched back to front - normal with, but long - on which you more or
less lie; like a bed, really, but with a (lowish) chair back at one end
that you lean over langurously. Used at orgies in "I Clavdivs". It
sounds plausible that the phrase may have gone into Oz English for a
chair stretched sideways, with the "chaise" bit being dropped and
"longue" becoming "lounge".

Or it may not! But I agree, I think I have heard that usage. For what we
called a settee (-:.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I'm too lazy to have a bigger ego. - James May, RT 2016/1/23-29
Jenny M Benson
2019-08-09 15:40:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Or it may not! But I agree, I think I have heard that usage. For what we
called a settee (-:.
No doubt some of us say "settee" and others say "sofa" and I know one of
them is considered (1) non-U, but I can never remember which, so it's
probably safest to use "couch"!

(1) By those who consider whether anything is U or non-U.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Jane Vernon
2019-08-10 06:39:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Or it may not! But I agree, I think I have heard that usage. For what
we called a settee (-:.
No doubt some of us say "settee" and others say "sofa" and I know one of
them is considered (1) non-U, but I can never remember which, so it's
probably safest to use "couch"!
(1) By those who consider whether anything is U or non-U.
For future ref, both settee and couch are non-U. Sofa is the only
acceptable U word, unless the furniture is actually a chaise-longue.
--
Jane
The Potter in the Purple socks - to reply, please remove PURPLE
BTME

http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm - Umrats' recipes
Jenny M Benson
2019-08-10 08:33:57 UTC
Permalink
For future ref, both settee and couch are non-U.  Sofa is the only
acceptable U word, unless the furniture is actually a chaise-longue.
Thank you!
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-08-10 11:41:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
For future ref, both settee and couch are non-U.  Sofa is the only
acceptable U word, unless the furniture is actually a chaise-longue.
Thank you!
How about "lounge" (the Oz word) - or is anything Oz non-U by default?
And "settle" (which I _think_ is a similar piece of furniture, or word
for the same)?

"Settee" sounds as if it might have Indian roots.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"I'm very peachable, if people know how to peach" - Sir David Attenborough (on
being asked if he was tired of being described as impeachable), on Desert
Island Discs, 2012-1-29.
Mike
2019-08-10 11:44:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
For future ref, both settee and couch are non-U.  Sofa is the only
acceptable U word, unless the furniture is actually a chaise-longue.
Thank you!
How about "lounge" (the Oz word) - or is anything Oz non-U by default?
And "settle" (which I _think_ is a similar piece of furniture, or word
for the same)?
"Settee" sounds as if it might have Indian roots.
I suppose it would have to settle - if it has put down roots;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Serena Blanchflower
2019-08-10 13:28:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
 For future ref, both settee and couch are non-U.  Sofa is the only
acceptable U word, unless the furniture is actually a chaise-longue.
Thank you!
How about "lounge" (the Oz word) - or is anything Oz non-U by default?
And "settle" (which I _think_ is a similar piece of furniture, or word
for the same)?
Lounge is definitely non-U. Is it definitely Ozzie? I think it's got
fairly long usage in this country.

Settle is slightly different, as a settle is, in effect, a wooden sofa,
in that it's a wooden bench with a back and arms. I don't think that's
specifically U or non-U, not least because I don't think there are many
alternative terms for a settle.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"Settee" sounds as if it might have Indian roots.
I think you may be thinking of "suttee", which is a very different
beast. I think "settee" is probably derived from "settle".
--
Best wishes, Serena
My doctor told me to keep in shape. Well, this is my shape and I'm
keeping it (anon)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-08-10 13:37:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
 For future ref, both settee and couch are non-U.  Sofa is the only
acceptable U word, unless the furniture is actually a chaise-longue.
Thank you!
How about "lounge" (the Oz word) - or is anything Oz non-U by
default? And "settle" (which I _think_ is a similar piece of
furniture, or word for the same)?
Lounge is definitely non-U. Is it definitely Ozzie? I think it's got
fairly long usage in this country.
I meant (see earlier in this thread - it wasn't me that suggested it was
Oz) its use for the item of furniture, not the room. Although I _think_
I've encountered it, I wouldn't say it was common (for the item) here.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Settle is slightly different, as a settle is, in effect, a wooden sofa,
in that it's a wooden bench with a back and arms. I don't think that's
specifically U or non-U, not least because I don't think there are many
alternative terms for a settle.
Right/OK.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"Settee" sounds as if it might have Indian roots.
I think you may be thinking of "suttee", which is a very different
beast. I think "settee" is probably derived from "settle".
I did wonder - about both of those points - as I was writing it. Going
from settle to settee to indicate the addition of upholstery is an
interesting posit.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

They are public servants, so we will threat them rather as Flashman treats
servants. - Stephen Fry on some people's attitudo to the BBC, in Radio Times,
3-9 July 2010
Serena Blanchflower
2019-08-10 14:28:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
 For future ref, both settee and couch are non-U.  Sofa is the only
acceptable U word, unless the furniture is actually a chaise-longue.
Thank you!
How about "lounge" (the Oz word) - or is anything Oz non-U by
default?  And "settle" (which I _think_ is a similar piece of
furniture, or word  for the same)?
Lounge is definitely non-U.  Is it definitely Ozzie?  I think it's got
fairly long usage in this country.
I meant (see earlier in this thread - it wasn't me that suggested it was
Oz) its use for the item of furniture, not the room. Although I _think_
I've encountered it, I wouldn't say it was common (for the item) here.
Ah, you meant "lounge" as a synonym for a sofa, rather than the room
(which is the usage I was referring to). In a sense, Ozzie meanings
which haven't become popular in this country are neither U nor non-U, as
they wouldn't have crossed the radar of the likes of Nancy Mitford, who
defined the rules.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Q. Why did the chicken cross the Mobius strip?
A. To get to the same side.
krw
2019-08-10 14:36:08 UTC
Permalink
as they wouldn't have crossed the radar of the likes of Nancy Mitford,
who defined the rules.
I always thought that; the terms were actually invented by Alan Ross
according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U_and_non-U_English
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Serena Blanchflower
2019-08-10 15:13:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
as they wouldn't have crossed the radar of the likes of Nancy Mitford,
who defined the rules.
I always thought that; the terms were actually invented by Alan Ross
according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U_and_non-U_English
Thanks. That's interesting; as a professor of linguistics, Alan Ross
may well not even have counted as being amongst the "likes of Nancy
Mitford" ;)
--
Best wishes, Serena
I changed my iPod's name to Titanic. It's syncing now.
Sam Plusnet
2019-08-10 18:24:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
 For future ref, both settee and couch are non-U.  Sofa is the
only acceptable U word, unless the furniture is actually a
chaise-longue.
Thank you!
How about "lounge" (the Oz word) - or is anything Oz non-U by
default?  And "settle" (which I _think_ is a similar piece of
furniture, or word  for the same)?
Lounge is definitely non-U.  Is it definitely Ozzie?  I think it's
got fairly long usage in this country.
I meant (see earlier in this thread - it wasn't me that suggested it
was Oz) its use for the item of furniture, not the room. Although I
_think_ I've encountered it, I wouldn't say it was common (for the
item) here.
Ah, you meant "lounge" as a synonym for a sofa, rather than the room
(which is the usage I was referring to).  In a sense, Ozzie meanings
which haven't become popular in this country are neither U nor non-U, as
they wouldn't have crossed the radar of the likes of Nancy Mitford, who
defined the rules.
In American fiction I have come across the use of "lounge" where I would
expect "lounger" (referring to pool-side furniture). At first I assumed
it was a typo, but it seems to crop up quite often[1].

[1] But then typos seem to be the norm today.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike Headon
2019-08-11 08:35:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jenny M Benson
 For future ref, both settee and couch are non-U.  Sofa is the
only acceptable U word, unless the furniture is actually a
chaise-longue.
Thank you!
How about "lounge" (the Oz word) - or is anything Oz non-U by
default?  And "settle" (which I _think_ is a similar piece of
furniture, or word  for the same)?
Lounge is definitely non-U.  Is it definitely Ozzie?  I think it's
got fairly long usage in this country.
I meant (see earlier in this thread - it wasn't me that suggested it
was Oz) its use for the item of furniture, not the room. Although I
_think_ I've encountered it, I wouldn't say it was common (for the
item) here.
Ah, you meant "lounge" as a synonym for a sofa, rather than the room
(which is the usage I was referring to).  In a sense, Ozzie meanings
which haven't become popular in this country are neither U nor non-U,
as they wouldn't have crossed the radar of the likes of Nancy Mitford,
who defined the rules.
In American fiction I have come across the use of "lounge" where I would
expect "lounger" (referring to pool-side furniture).  At first I assumed
it was a typo, but it seems to crop up quite often[1].
[1] But then typos seem to be the norm today.
I have heard some Americans refer to a "chaise-lounge"!
--
Mike Headon
R69S R850R
IIIc IIIg FT FTn FT2 EOS450D
e-mail: mike dot headon at enn tee ell world dot com

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
krw
2019-08-10 13:52:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Lounge is definitely non-U.
Isn't the concept of U and non-U somewhat dated these days?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Serena Blanchflower
2019-08-10 14:24:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Lounge is definitely non-U.
Isn't the concept of U and non-U somewhat dated these days?
Very.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I am not in this world to live up to other people's expectations, nor do
I feel that the world must live up to mine (Fritz Perl)
BrritSki
2019-08-10 15:27:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Lounge is definitely non-U.
Isn't the concept of U and non-U somewhat dated these days?
Very.
Non-U then ?
Vicky Ayech
2019-08-10 09:06:27 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 10 Aug 2019 07:39:58 +0100, Jane Vernon
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Or it may not! But I agree, I think I have heard that usage. For what
we called a settee (-:.
No doubt some of us say "settee" and others say "sofa" and I know one of
them is considered (1) non-U, but I can never remember which, so it's
probably safest to use "couch"!
(1) By those who consider whether anything is U or non-U.
For future ref, both settee and couch are non-U. Sofa is the only
acceptable U word, unless the furniture is actually a chaise-longue.
SNIFF> Well, unfair, Lynda is not as Mrs Bouquet as Susan. But we had
a chaise longue! When we moved into our dream house we got a leather
chesterfield made, and a rocking chair with leather ties on the back
and the back and seat in material that matched the Chaise Longue. Oh
the ties were on that. Actually it was a knole I think, but similar to
chaise longue.
https://www.darlingsofchelsea.co.uk/duresta-hornblower-3-seater-sofa?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI2L_Wr_n34wIVwbHtCh0Fpwu4EAQYASABEgLZ3_D_BwE
Vicky Ayech
2019-08-10 09:10:07 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 10 Aug 2019 10:06:27 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 10 Aug 2019 07:39:58 +0100, Jane Vernon
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Or it may not! But I agree, I think I have heard that usage. For what
we called a settee (-:.
No doubt some of us say "settee" and others say "sofa" and I know one of
them is considered (1) non-U, but I can never remember which, so it's
probably safest to use "couch"!
(1) By those who consider whether anything is U or non-U.
For future ref, both settee and couch are non-U. Sofa is the only
acceptable U word, unless the furniture is actually a chaise-longue.
SNIFF> Well, unfair, Lynda is not as Mrs Bouquet as Susan. But we had
a chaise longue! When we moved into our dream house we got a leather
chesterfield made, and a rocking chair with leather ties on the back
and the back and seat in material that matched the Chaise Longue. Oh
the ties were on that. Actually it was a knole I think, but similar to
chaise longue.
https://www.darlingsofchelsea.co.uk/duresta-hornblower-3-seater-sofa?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI2L_Wr_n34wIVwbHtCh0Fpwu4EAQYASABEgLZ3_D_BwE
You could let the sides down, so with one side down it was sort of a
chaise longue. That is a very irritating term to type and I've done it
several times now.

That room was best, with a very nice tree of life carpet, also made
for the size of room, 20 ft long room. With beams. The room remained
best only for a few years, and we had a dining room too and a room
built at the back that had beds and a wardrobe in it and a shower room
next to it, that I used to have lodgers to pay the mortgage that had
gone up from 12 to 16% between contract and completion. #grundiesRus
Penny
2019-08-09 16:04:48 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 9 Aug 2019 09:09:45 +0100, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
the big TV in the lounge
(room)
Obviously it's consistent, as we say dining room, sitting room and so
on, but given the Aussies' fondness for abbreviaton, I'm always
surprised when I see or hear "lounge room."
I'm not sure what brother called it TBH - we grew up in a house with a
dining room, sitting room and lounge - but it's certainly the local term.
In that house it doubled as a dining room, they had a rumpus room too.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
krw
2019-08-09 16:11:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
the big TV in the lounge
(room)
Obviously it's consistent, as we say dining room, sitting room and so
on, but given the Aussies' fondness for abbreviaton, I'm always
surprised when I see or hear "lounge room."
I'm not sure what brother called it TBH - we grew up in a house with a
dining room, sitting room and lounge - but it's certainly the local term.
In that house it doubled as a dining room, they had a rumpus room too.
We have a living room, a front room and a dining room here. No-one is
normally allowed in the front room.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Mike
2019-08-09 16:47:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
the big TV in the lounge
(room)
Obviously it's consistent, as we say dining room, sitting room and so
on, but given the Aussies' fondness for abbreviaton, I'm always
surprised when I see or hear "lounge room."
I'm not sure what brother called it TBH - we grew up in a house with a
dining room, sitting room and lounge - but it's certainly the local term.
In that house it doubled as a dining room, they had a rumpus room too.
We have a living room, a front room and a dining room here. No-one is
normally allowed in the front room.
How can the servants be expected to keep it clean KRW?
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-08-09 22:36:10 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 9 Aug 2019 17:11:47 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by krw
We have a living room, a front room and a dining room here. No-one is
normally allowed in the front room.
My first inlaws had a room called The Parlour, it was at the back of the
house so couldn't be called a front room. It was only used on special
occasions and housed a sofa and a bar in the shape of the prow of a boat
which always made me think of Pop Larkin in The Darling Buds of May.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2019-08-06 19:00:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
We were watching a programme on Coca Cola recently; advertised as a 90
minute programme, zapping the advert breaks, we saw the whole programme in
under an hour.
I bet it would have been less if you could have skipped all the "coming
up after the break" and "so far we have seen", etc.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Joe Kerr
2019-08-07 13:30:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
We were watching a programme on Coca Cola recently;
Given the state of most TV these days I'd have to be on something a lot
stronger than Coca Cola to watch it!
--
Ric
Mike
2019-08-07 14:49:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Mike
We were watching a programme on Coca Cola recently;
Given the state of most TV these days I'd have to be on something a lot
stronger than Coca Cola to watch it!
;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
Jenny M Benson
2019-08-06 18:57:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Fenny
On Mon, 5 Aug 2019 20:03:44 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
To-day is one of the 2 days in my 5 to 2 diet. So I want to sit quietly
and watch TV and try not to feel hungry. Let's see ... there's Nadia
cooking on BBC 2. There's Ainsley cooking on ITV. And there's someone
Unwrapping food on Channel 4.
Like I said - FFS!
I thought daytime telly was all about buying old houses, buying old
junk and cooking so much you forget what you bought.
No, no, no Fenny, it is all about selling advertising time but using
cra.... err.... programmes in between them to hold them in place. Whaddya
mean, the adverts are even worse than the filling???
Wouldn't have been so bad if this was daytime telly, because that sort
of programming is the reason why I hardly ever watch any, but this 8 pm,
when I think one is entitled to expect not-crap and definitely a bit of
variation between the channels.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
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