Discussion:
Totally OT: Whist
(too old to reply)
Mike Ruddock
2018-04-04 16:45:05 UTC
Permalink
I am beginning to re-read the Hornblower books, taking them in the order
of Hornblower's age, and so beginning with Mr Midshipman Hornblower. I
am prepared to be totally baffled by the naval jargon.

In the very first story (H. and the Even Chance) there is an item which
causes me bafflement about whist. H is playing whist in a pub and one of
the others is the senior midshipman on his ship who is described as a
mediocre player of whist. He is so designated because when he has an ace
he leads it and if he holds a singleton and four trumps will lead out
his singleton

Well now . . . I was always taught (by my mother-in-law, who was an
excellent Bridge player) that it was a sin not to lead an ace. "If you
don't lead the ace your partner will assume one of the opposition holds
it" And as for leading the singleton, how else are you to get the best
out of your trumps?

Any whist players among us who can put me right about this?

Mike Ruddock
Mike
2018-04-04 17:00:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
I am beginning to re-read the Hornblower books, taking them in the order
of Hornblower's age, and so beginning with Mr Midshipman Hornblower. I
am prepared to be totally baffled by the naval jargon.
In the very first story (H. and the Even Chance) there is an item which
causes me bafflement about whist. H is playing whist in a pub and one of
the others is the senior midshipman on his ship who is described as a
mediocre player of whist. He is so designated because when he has an ace
he leads it and if he holds a singleton and four trumps will lead out
his singleton
Well now . . . I was always taught (by my mother-in-law, who was an
excellent Bridge player) that it was a sin not to lead an ace. "If you
don't lead the ace your partner will assume one of the opposition holds
it" And as for leading the singleton, how else are you to get the best
out of your trumps?
Any whist players among us who can put me right about this?
Mike Ruddock
Getting the best out of your trump is probably something every American
would dearly like to know....
--
Toodle Pip
Fenny
2018-04-04 17:03:06 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 4 Apr 2018 17:45:05 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I am beginning to re-read the Hornblower books, taking them in the order
of Hornblower's age, and so beginning with Mr Midshipman Hornblower. I
am prepared to be totally baffled by the naval jargon.
In the very first story (H. and the Even Chance) there is an item which
causes me bafflement about whist. H is playing whist in a pub and one of
the others is the senior midshipman on his ship who is described as a
mediocre player of whist. He is so designated because when he has an ace
he leads it and if he holds a singleton and four trumps will lead out
his singleton
Well now . . . I was always taught (by my mother-in-law, who was an
excellent Bridge player) that it was a sin not to lead an ace. "If you
don't lead the ace your partner will assume one of the opposition holds
it" And as for leading the singleton, how else are you to get the best
out of your trumps?
Any whist players among us who can put me right about this?
It's a long time since I've played either whist or bridge and I claim
no expertise in either. However, if you have 4 trumps and it's your
lead, start with the ace and pull out everyone else's trumps. Then
they will have to start throwing away other cards. Once they've done
that, your singleton may be of high enough value to win a trick
somewhere down the line.
--
Fenny
Btms
2018-04-04 17:49:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 4 Apr 2018 17:45:05 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I am beginning to re-read the Hornblower books, taking them in the order
of Hornblower's age, and so beginning with Mr Midshipman Hornblower. I
am prepared to be totally baffled by the naval jargon.
In the very first story (H. and the Even Chance) there is an item which
causes me bafflement about whist. H is playing whist in a pub and one of
the others is the senior midshipman on his ship who is described as a
mediocre player of whist. He is so designated because when he has an ace
he leads it and if he holds a singleton and four trumps will lead out
his singleton
Well now . . . I was always taught (by my mother-in-law, who was an
excellent Bridge player) that it was a sin not to lead an ace. "If you
don't lead the ace your partner will assume one of the opposition holds
it" And as for leading the singleton, how else are you to get the best
out of your trumps?
Any whist players among us who can put me right about this?
It's a long time since I've played either whist or bridge and I claim
no expertise in either. However, if you have 4 trumps and it's your
lead, start with the ace and pull out everyone else's trumps. Then
they will have to start throwing away other cards. Once they've done
that, your singleton may be of high enough value to win a trick
somewhere down the line.
I am not much of a card player but mil liked whist. I was advised: “first
player plays high, second player plays low”. This sounds sort of congruent
with Fenny’s bridge knowledge. And now I understand the thinking.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Vicky
2018-04-04 20:43:24 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 04 Apr 2018 18:03:06 +0100, Fenny
Post by Fenny
On Wed, 4 Apr 2018 17:45:05 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I am beginning to re-read the Hornblower books, taking them in the order
of Hornblower's age, and so beginning with Mr Midshipman Hornblower. I
am prepared to be totally baffled by the naval jargon.
In the very first story (H. and the Even Chance) there is an item which
causes me bafflement about whist. H is playing whist in a pub and one of
the others is the senior midshipman on his ship who is described as a
mediocre player of whist. He is so designated because when he has an ace
he leads it and if he holds a singleton and four trumps will lead out
his singleton
Well now . . . I was always taught (by my mother-in-law, who was an
excellent Bridge player) that it was a sin not to lead an ace. "If you
don't lead the ace your partner will assume one of the opposition holds
it" And as for leading the singleton, how else are you to get the best
out of your trumps?
Any whist players among us who can put me right about this?
It's a long time since I've played either whist or bridge and I claim
no expertise in either. However, if you have 4 trumps and it's your
lead, start with the ace and pull out everyone else's trumps. Then
they will have to start throwing away other cards. Once they've done
that, your singleton may be of high enough value to win a trick
somewhere down the line.
Well, assuming the singleton ace is not the trump suite, everyone
else will throw low cards in that suite, so as not to waste the higher
ones, and if you then lose the lead will try and make their king,
queen etc, and you can then trump the hand. Even if you just have low
trumps they can make good.
--
Vicky
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