Discussion:
OT: Perils of Growing old Part 2
(too old to reply)
Mike Ruddock
2021-09-10 10:00:31 UTC
Permalink
I was very surprised to hear on the radio this morning that the Mercury
Prize, which I had supposed was strictly for popular music (is it named
after Freddy?) had been awarded to one of my favourite modern composers,
Arvo Part. I discovered later that it was to someone quite other.
I really must get these hearing aids adjusted.
Mike Ruddoc
Nick Odell
2021-09-10 10:10:36 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 10 Sep 2021 11:00:31 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I was very surprised to hear on the radio this morning that the Mercury
Prize, which I had supposed was strictly for popular music (is it named
after Freddy?) had been awarded to one of my favourite modern composers,
Arvo Part. I discovered later that it was to someone quite other.
I really must get these hearing aids adjusted.
Mike Ruddoc
My surprise was of a different hue. Given that the name Arlo is
Anglo-Saxon and masculine in origin I was quite surprised to discover
that the prize-winner wasn't. Put that down to my own prejudices, if
you like, but were they unreasonable prejudices?

I must admit to not having heard of them before but that's because I'm
not listening to much new music nowadays.

Nick
Mike McMillan
2021-09-10 11:19:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 10 Sep 2021 11:00:31 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I was very surprised to hear on the radio this morning that the Mercury
Prize, which I had supposed was strictly for popular music (is it named
after Freddy?) had been awarded to one of my favourite modern composers,
Arvo Part. I discovered later that it was to someone quite other.
I really must get these hearing aids adjusted.
Mike Ruddoc
My surprise was of a different hue. Given that the name Arlo is
Anglo-Saxon and masculine in origin I was quite surprised to discover
that the prize-winner wasn't. Put that down to my own prejudices, if
you like, but were they unreasonable prejudices?
I must admit to not having heard of them before but that's because I'm
not listening to much new music nowadays.
Nick
There was me thinking it was a recreation area to compete with the likes of
Centre Parcs.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Penny
2021-09-10 16:24:23 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 10 Sep 2021 11:00:31 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I really must get these hearing aids adjusted.
Mike Ruddoc
Maybe they've slipped out, along with your k ;)

My typing has got worse over the years (it was never* good). I tend to miss
the last letter or two off the end of words as well. I think my fingers are
deaf.

*eep! I missed the first letter of that one :(
--
Penny
Happiness comes in through doors you didn't even know you'd left open.
Mike McMillan
2021-09-10 16:43:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 10 Sep 2021 11:00:31 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I really must get these hearing aids adjusted.
Mike Ruddoc
Maybe they've slipped out, along with your k ;)
My typing has got worse over the years (it was never* good). I tend to miss
the last letter or two off the end of words as well. I think my fingers are
deaf.
*eep! I missed the first letter of that one :(
Wel I’ Nugger.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Chris
2021-09-10 16:42:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
I was very surprised to hear on the radio this morning that the Mercury
Prize, which I had supposed was strictly for popular music (is it named
after Freddy?) had been awarded to one of my favourite modern composers,
Arvo Part. I discovered later that it was to someone quite other.
I really must get these hearing aids adjusted.
Mike Ruddoc
You are not alone, Mike. And my hearing aids can’t be updated till next
year: I was told hearing checks are every three years

Sincerely Chris
Vicky Ayech
2021-09-10 17:05:09 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 10 Sep 2021 16:42:24 -0000 (UTC), Chris
Post by Mike Ruddock
I was very surprised to hear on the radio this morning that the Mercury
Prize, which I had supposed was strictly for popular music (is it named
after Freddy?) had been awarded to one of my favourite modern composers,
Arvo Part. I discovered later that it was to someone quite other.
I really must get these hearing aids adjusted.
Mike Ruddoc
You are not alone, Mike. And my hearing aids can’t be updated till next
year: I was told hearing checks are every three years
Sincerely Chris
I think it used to be every 2 years. I can't recall how long it is for
me but last time I felt things had changed I htink so asked.
Jenny M Benson
2021-09-10 20:35:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris
You are not alone, Mike. And my hearing aids can’t be updated till next
year: I was told hearing checks are every three years
My daughter has Meniere's which is causing her hearing to fail. The
Audiology people have just made an appointment with her - for a
telephone consultation. We thought that was hilarious!
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
krw
2021-09-10 22:41:08 UTC
Permalink
You are not alone, Mike.  And my hearing aids can’t be updated till next
year: I was told hearing checks are every three years
My daughter has Meniere's which is causing her hearing to fail.  The
Audiology people have just made an appointment with her - for a
telephone consultation.  We thought that was hilarious!
I have to see my physiotherapist on line. Last time I had the operation
they insisted on weekly visits so they could measure the angles to see
my hand was improving. No idea how they complete the records now.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Mike McMillan
2021-09-11 08:07:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
You are not alone, Mike.  And my hearing aids can’t be updated till next
year: I was told hearing checks are every three years
My daughter has Meniere's which is causing her hearing to fail.  The
Audiology people have just made an appointment with her - for a
telephone consultation.  We thought that was hilarious!
I have to see my physiotherapist on line. Last time I had the operation
they insisted on weekly visits so they could measure the angles to see
my hand was improving. No idea how they complete the records now.
I have my ‘Two Years On’ follow-up appointment with the Oncology Dept. on
Wednesday; this is by tefeloan, but, they should have the results of last
week’s PSA blood extraction in front of them by then. I think I prefer a
phone consultation like this to having to troll down there, sit in a busy
waiting room then follow a nurse or assistant who guides me to a
consultation room where I wait for a 2 minute consultation, then troll home
again; the whole procedure takes well over two hours by this method too!

Toodle err… Pee.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Penny
2021-09-11 14:39:36 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 11 Sep 2021 08:07:03 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
I have my ‘Two Years On’ follow-up appointment with the Oncology Dept. on
Wednesday; this is by tefeloan, but, they should have the results of last
week’s PSA blood extraction in front of them by then. I think I prefer a
phone consultation like this to having to troll down there, sit in a busy
waiting room then follow a nurse or assistant who guides me to a
consultation room where I wait for a 2 minute consultation, then troll home
again; the whole procedure takes well over two hours by this method too!
There are definite up sides to some aspects of the handling of medical
problems since this plague fell upon us and doubtless some changes will be
retained because they work better for everyone. Why it has taken quite so
long to realise herding lots of sick people into one badly ventilated room
is generally unhealthy, I don't know, but it is one of the reasons I have
avoided GP appointments when possible, for years.

My problem is, I never know if the thing I've been vaguely worrying about -
for which I might have made a non-urgent, longer consultation appointment
BC (before Covid) - should be regarded as 'urgent' or in need of referral.

My local surgery is now woefully short of actual doctors - all those I
actually liked and trusted retired before it started and it seems they have
failed to recruit any new ones.
The admin and nursing staff are mostly wonderful but I understand the nurse
practitioner I saw when I was ill recently, retired before I got better (I
don't think that was my fault).

For urgent appointments you have to be awake and lucid before 9am and spend
£1 or so in a phone queue. Call later and they will have run out of
call-back slots so you have to do it all again tomorrow. Gods help those
who are too ill to make a phone call.

I suppose I should try the NHS online thing again. I was put off, last time
I tried it - I had something new and painful going with one of my legs.
After answering a few questions I was told there was something wrong with
my heart and I should see my GP...
--
Penny
Happiness comes in through doors you didn't even know you'd left open.
Serena Blanchflower
2021-09-11 17:15:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Sat, 11 Sep 2021 08:07:03 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
I have my ‘Two Years On’ follow-up appointment with the Oncology Dept. on
Wednesday; this is by tefeloan, but, they should have the results of last
week’s PSA blood extraction in front of them by then. I think I prefer a
phone consultation like this to having to troll down there, sit in a busy
waiting room then follow a nurse or assistant who guides me to a
consultation room where I wait for a 2 minute consultation, then troll home
again; the whole procedure takes well over two hours by this method too!
There are definite up sides to some aspects of the handling of medical
problems since this plague fell upon us and doubtless some changes will be
retained because they work better for everyone. Why it has taken quite so
long to realise herding lots of sick people into one badly ventilated room
is generally unhealthy, I don't know, but it is one of the reasons I have
avoided GP appointments when possible, for years.
I agree that there are definitely some advantages to the new processes
although, inevitably, they're still learning how best to use the new
options.

A few weeks ago, I had a problem which could have been serious
(although, thankfully, it proved not to be). I filled in an eConsult
form on the surgery's website; this promised that a doctor would get
back to me by the end of the following day. About an hour later I had a
phone call from one of the doctors and, following a very thorough and
helpful phone consultation, having decided it needed a physical
examination, he arranged a home visit for me on the next working day.
The GP who came out to me was equally good and arranged the necessary
fast-tracked referral.
Post by Penny
My problem is, I never know if the thing I've been vaguely worrying about -
for which I might have made a non-urgent, longer consultation appointment
BC (before Covid) - should be regarded as 'urgent' or in need of referral.
That's one benefit of the eConsult system, if your surgery offers it.
Having filled it in and explained what the problem is, they will triage
it and get back to you accordingly. You don't have to work out for
yourself how urgent, or othewise, it is.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Weeds are flowers, too, once you get to know them. (A.A. Milne)
Vicky Ayech
2021-09-11 17:46:56 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 11 Sep 2021 18:15:37 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
On Sat, 11 Sep 2021 08:07:03 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
I have my ‘Two Years On’ follow-up appointment with the Oncology Dept. on
Wednesday; this is by tefeloan, but, they should have the results of last
week’s PSA blood extraction in front of them by then. I think I prefer a
phone consultation like this to having to troll down there, sit in a busy
waiting room then follow a nurse or assistant who guides me to a
consultation room where I wait for a 2 minute consultation, then troll home
again; the whole procedure takes well over two hours by this method too!
There are definite up sides to some aspects of the handling of medical
problems since this plague fell upon us and doubtless some changes will be
retained because they work better for everyone. Why it has taken quite so
long to realise herding lots of sick people into one badly ventilated room
is generally unhealthy, I don't know, but it is one of the reasons I have
avoided GP appointments when possible, for years.
I agree that there are definitely some advantages to the new processes
although, inevitably, they're still learning how best to use the new
options.
A few weeks ago, I had a problem which could have been serious
(although, thankfully, it proved not to be). I filled in an eConsult
form on the surgery's website; this promised that a doctor would get
back to me by the end of the following day. About an hour later I had a
phone call from one of the doctors and, following a very thorough and
helpful phone consultation, having decided it needed a physical
examination, he arranged a home visit for me on the next working day.
The GP who came out to me was equally good and arranged the necessary
fast-tracked referral.
Wow! I wish we had eConsult here. We have to phone and get through in
certain hours and book a phone call from a GP. Ok I did manage that a
couple of weeks ago and then the GP said come in as theyneeded to
examine me, and then I had to have blood tests, which meant ringing
again and telling reception I need a GP to call to give the results.
Phoning the surgery often means re-dialling for ages. The GP I
actually saw was not any of our names ones or any I'd seen before. He
was apparently an A&E Dr and working at my surgery. He was very good
though. Not seen any of the regular Drs for nearly 2 years now. I have
wondered if they work from home, just doing calls.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
My problem is, I never know if the thing I've been vaguely worrying about -
for which I might have made a non-urgent, longer consultation appointment
BC (before Covid) - should be regarded as 'urgent' or in need of referral.
That's one benefit of the eConsult system, if your surgery offers it.
Having filled it in and explained what the problem is, they will triage
it and get back to you accordingly. You don't have to work out for
yourself how urgent, or othewise, it is.
Jane Vernon
2021-09-12 08:59:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
On Sat, 11 Sep 2021 08:07:03 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
I have my ‘Two Years On’ follow-up appointment with the Oncology Dept. on
Wednesday; this is by tefeloan, but, they should have the results of last
week’s PSA blood extraction in front of them by then. I think I prefer a
phone consultation like this to having to troll down there, sit in a busy
waiting room then follow a nurse or assistant who guides me to a
consultation room where I wait for a 2 minute consultation, then troll home
again; the whole procedure takes well over two hours by this method too!
There are definite up sides to some aspects of the handling of medical
problems since this plague fell upon us and doubtless some changes will be
retained because they work better for everyone. Why it has taken quite so
long to realise herding lots of sick people into one badly ventilated room
is generally unhealthy, I don't know, but it is one of the reasons I have
avoided GP appointments when possible, for years.
I agree that there are definitely some advantages to the new processes
although, inevitably, they're still learning how best to use the new
options.
A few weeks ago, I had a problem which could have been serious
(although, thankfully, it proved not to be).  I filled in an eConsult
form on the surgery's website; this promised that a doctor would get
back to me by the end of the following day.  About an hour later I had a
phone call from one of the doctors and, following a very thorough and
helpful phone consultation, having decided it needed a physical
examination, he arranged a home visit for me on the next working day.
The GP who came out to me was equally good and arranged the necessary
fast-tracked referral.
Post by Penny
My problem is, I never know if the thing I've been vaguely worrying about -
for which I might have made a non-urgent, longer consultation appointment
BC (before Covid) - should be regarded as 'urgent' or in need of referral.
That's one benefit of the eConsult system, if your surgery offers it.
Having filled it in and explained what the problem is, they will triage
it and get back to you accordingly.  You don't have to work out for
yourself how urgent, or othewise, it is.
Yes, ours has the eConsult system and in general it's been just as good
as Serena's experience. Once I had an appointment and twice a phone
consultation which resulted in prescriptions.

Our surgery has been short of GPs since before it became the fashion.
One GP was told he had to leave because his hearing had become too bad
for him to function as a GP. I felt sorry for him but it seemed the
right thing to do.
Nick Odell
2021-09-12 11:06:26 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 12 Sep 2021 09:59:28 +0100, Jane Vernon
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
On Sat, 11 Sep 2021 08:07:03 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
I have my ‘Two Years On’ follow-up appointment with the Oncology
Dept. on
Wednesday; this is by tefeloan, but, they should have the results of last
week’s PSA blood extraction in front of them by then. I think I prefer a
phone consultation like this to having to troll down there, sit in a busy
waiting room then follow a nurse or assistant who guides me to a
consultation room where I wait for a 2 minute consultation, then troll home
again; the whole procedure takes well over two hours by this method too!
There are definite up sides to some aspects of the handling of medical
problems since this plague fell upon us and doubtless some changes will be
retained because they work better for everyone. Why it has taken quite so
long to realise herding lots of sick people into one badly ventilated room
is generally unhealthy, I don't know, but it is one of the reasons I have
avoided GP appointments when possible, for years.
I agree that there are definitely some advantages to the new processes
although, inevitably, they're still learning how best to use the new
options.
A few weeks ago, I had a problem which could have been serious
(although, thankfully, it proved not to be).  I filled in an eConsult
form on the surgery's website; this promised that a doctor would get
back to me by the end of the following day.  About an hour later I had a
phone call from one of the doctors and, following a very thorough and
helpful phone consultation, having decided it needed a physical
examination, he arranged a home visit for me on the next working day.
The GP who came out to me was equally good and arranged the necessary
fast-tracked referral.
Post by Penny
My problem is, I never know if the thing I've been vaguely worrying about -
for which I might have made a non-urgent, longer consultation appointment
BC (before Covid) - should be regarded as 'urgent' or in need of referral.
That's one benefit of the eConsult system, if your surgery offers it.
Having filled it in and explained what the problem is, they will triage
it and get back to you accordingly.  You don't have to work out for
yourself how urgent, or othewise, it is.
Yes, ours has the eConsult system and in general it's been just as good
as Serena's experience. Once I had an appointment and twice a phone
consultation which resulted in prescriptions.
Our surgery has been short of GPs since before it became the fashion.
One GP was told he had to leave because his hearing had become too bad
for him to function as a GP. I felt sorry for him but it seemed the
right thing to do.
I have spectacularly failed at getting eConsult to work for me. On the
couple of occasions that I have tried, I have answered everything
truthfully then reached a page where none of the alternatives apply. I
suspect that if I lied when I reached that point or even went back a
few screens and lied back there, I could probably make it all the way
through but when a doctor is supposed to be relying on the given
information it doesn't seem to me The Right Thing To Do.

Nick
Penny
2021-09-12 12:57:35 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 11 Sep 2021 18:15:37 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
There are definite up sides to some aspects of the handling of medical
problems since this plague fell upon us and doubtless some changes will be
retained because they work better for everyone. Why it has taken quite so
long to realise herding lots of sick people into one badly ventilated room
is generally unhealthy, I don't know, but it is one of the reasons I have
avoided GP appointments when possible, for years.
I agree that there are definitely some advantages to the new processes
although, inevitably, they're still learning how best to use the new
options.
A few weeks ago, I had a problem which could have been serious
(although, thankfully, it proved not to be). I filled in an eConsult
form on the surgery's website; this promised that a doctor would get
back to me by the end of the following day. About an hour later I had a
phone call from one of the doctors and, following a very thorough and
helpful phone consultation, having decided it needed a physical
examination, he arranged a home visit for me on the next working day.
The GP who came out to me was equally good and arranged the necessary
fast-tracked referral.
Post by Penny
My problem is, I never know if the thing I've been vaguely worrying about -
for which I might have made a non-urgent, longer consultation appointment
BC (before Covid) - should be regarded as 'urgent' or in need of referral.
That's one benefit of the eConsult system, if your surgery offers it.
Having filled it in and explained what the problem is, they will triage
it and get back to you accordingly. You don't have to work out for
yourself how urgent, or othewise, it is.
That sounds brilliant, we don't have it here.
All I can do online is order my repeat meds.
--
Penny
Happiness comes in through doors you didn't even know you'd left open.
Sam Plusnet
2021-09-11 18:50:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
My local surgery is now woefully short of actual doctors - all those I
actually liked and trusted retired before it started and it seems they
have failed to recruit any new ones.
There seems to be a lot of it about.
When Wofe & I first went to this surgery, we both saw a young doctor who
had only been there a short while.
She is now the senior partner in the practice, and they have had trouble
recruiting for quite a while now.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2021-09-12 13:05:19 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 11 Sep 2021 19:50:49 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
My local surgery is now woefully short of actual doctors - all those I
actually liked and trusted retired before it started and it seems they
have failed to recruit any new ones.
There seems to be a lot of it about.
When Wofe & I first went to this surgery, we both saw a young doctor who
had only been there a short while.
She is now the senior partner in the practice, and they have had trouble
recruiting for quite a while now.
Rural practices seem to be suffering more than others, which I suppose is
understandable.
--
Penny
Happiness comes in through doors you didn't even know you'd left open.
Sam Plusnet
2021-09-12 19:09:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
My local surgery is now woefully short of actual doctors - all those I
actually liked and trusted retired before it started and it seems they
have failed to recruit any new ones.
There seems to be a lot of it about.
When Wofe & I first went to this surgery, we both saw a young doctor who
had only been there a short while.
She is now the senior partner in the practice, and they have had trouble
recruiting for quite a while now.
Rural practices seem to be suffering more than others, which I suppose is
understandable.
We do live at the unfashionable end of the galaxy/valley.
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Leverton
2021-09-13 08:40:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
My local surgery is now woefully short of actual doctors - all those I
actually liked and trusted retired before it started and it seems they
have failed to recruit any new ones.
There seems to be a lot of it about.
When Wofe & I first went to this surgery, we both saw a young doctor who
had only been there a short while.
She is now the senior partner in the practice, and they have had trouble
recruiting for quite a while now.
Rural practices seem to be suffering more than others, which I suppose is
understandable.
We do live at the unfashionable end of the galaxy/valley.
I hope you'll be spared demolition for bypass construction, whether
hyperspace or otherwise.

Nick
--
We will be restoring normality as soon as we are sure what is normal anyway.
- Douglas Adams
Mike McMillan
2021-09-13 12:24:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
My local surgery is now woefully short of actual doctors - all those I
actually liked and trusted retired before it started and it seems they
have failed to recruit any new ones.
There seems to be a lot of it about.
When Wofe & I first went to this surgery, we both saw a young doctor who
had only been there a short while.
She is now the senior partner in the practice, and they have had trouble
recruiting for quite a while now.
Rural practices seem to be suffering more than others, which I suppose is
understandable.
We do live at the unfashionable end of the galaxy/valley.
I hope you'll be spared demolition for bypass construction, whether
hyperspace or otherwise.
Nick
Just hold on to your towel…. Just in case.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
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