Discussion:
I'm a bit confused
(too old to reply)
Vicky Ayech
2020-06-04 09:50:08 UTC
Permalink
If the business secretary had Corona and yesterday was in parliament
for an hour and the voting lobby queue and also a cabinet meeting,
don't all those MPs he came into contact with have to isolate now for
2 weeks? and their families? Doesn't take a lot of tracking and
tracing to see who needs to go home and stay there. I suppose the test
has not been returned yet for him, but do the rest just circulate
until the results come?
Mike
2020-06-04 10:10:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
If the business secretary had Corona and yesterday was in parliament
for an hour and the voting lobby queue and also a cabinet meeting,
don't all those MPs he came into contact with have to isolate now for
2 weeks? and their families? Doesn't take a lot of tracking and
tracing to see who needs to go home and stay there. I suppose the test
has not been returned yet for him, but do the rest just circulate
until the results come?
No, no, no, no, no Vicky, these requirements are for us to observe - not
them;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
Serena Blanchflower
2020-06-04 10:58:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
If the business secretary had Corona and yesterday was in parliament
for an hour and the voting lobby queue and also a cabinet meeting,
don't all those MPs he came into contact with have to isolate now for
2 weeks? and their families? Doesn't take a lot of tracking and
tracing to see who needs to go home and stay there. I suppose the test
has not been returned yet for him, but do the rest just circulate
until the results come?
They remain on the loose, until/unless his test results come back,
confirming that he does have Covid-19. In theory, it's only those
parliamentarians who were within 2m of the Business Sec, for 15mins or
more who will need to go into purdah after that but that could add up to
a significant number.

I can't help hoping though that this includes a certain Jacob Rees-Mogg.
Even without that though, it may make even some loyalists question the
sanity of pushing MPs back to Westminster, rather than most of them
working from home.
--
Happy hibernating and stay well,
best wishes, Serena
No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted. (Aesop)
Jenny M Benson
2020-06-04 11:33:28 UTC
Permalink
In theory, it's only those parliamentarians who were within 2m of the
Business Sec, for 15mins or more who will need to go into purdah
Does it takes 15 minutes for the virus to jump from one person to
another? What's it doing in those 15 minutes - just hanging in the air?
If so, then social distancing isn't going to help much if someone
steps into that air after the infected person moves away from it.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Vicky Ayech
2020-06-04 12:04:33 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 4 Jun 2020 12:33:28 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
In theory, it's only those parliamentarians who were within 2m of the
Business Sec, for 15mins or more who will need to go into purdah
Does it takes 15 minutes for the virus to jump from one person to
another? What's it doing in those 15 minutes - just hanging in the air?
If so, then social distancing isn't going to help much if someone
steps into that air after the infected person moves away from it.
There is an alley leading to the nearest park. If someone has been
smoking they can get to the other end and I can smell smoke as I enter
the alley. Would germs be the same? I've often wondered.
Clive Arthur
2020-06-04 16:46:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 4 Jun 2020 12:33:28 +0100, Jenny M Benson
<snip>
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Jenny M Benson
Does it takes 15 minutes for the virus to jump from one person to
another? What's it doing in those 15 minutes - just hanging in the air?
If so, then social distancing isn't going to help much if someone
steps into that air after the infected person moves away from it.
There is an alley leading to the nearest park. If someone has been
smoking they can get to the other end and I can smell smoke as I enter
the alley. Would germs be the same? I've often wondered.
I wonder about asymptomatic carriers vaping. We've all seen the plumes
of vapour.
--
Cheers
Clive
Nick Odell
2020-06-05 19:05:51 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 4 Jun 2020 17:46:12 +0100, Clive Arthur
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 4 Jun 2020 12:33:28 +0100, Jenny M Benson
<snip>
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Jenny M Benson
Does it takes 15 minutes for the virus to jump from one person to
another? What's it doing in those 15 minutes - just hanging in the air?
If so, then social distancing isn't going to help much if someone
steps into that air after the infected person moves away from it.
There is an alley leading to the nearest park. If someone has been
smoking they can get to the other end and I can smell smoke as I enter
the alley. Would germs be the same? I've often wondered.
I wonder about asymptomatic carriers vaping. We've all seen the plumes
of vapour.
From what I have read (ie not very much and not with the eye of a real
infectologist) the concerns about airborne transmission are about the
virus being bound up in aerosols of breathy moisture. They talk about
the chance of it being passed onto someone else as being about 3% at
2m, 13% at 1m IIRC and -erme- very low at beyond 2m (so obviously the
inverse square law was a bit tricky to calculate there). No adjusting
for wind speed and direction AFAICS.

Also, from what I have read, they are ignoring the travel of the virus
when it is not bound up in an aerosol and some have said they do not
know how infectious it may or may not be when on its own. Now, given
that virus particles are an order of magnitude smaller than smoke
particles and we know how far detectable smoke particles can float on
the air, I personally would be rather pleased if someone could come up
with something a bit more definite about how infectious those bits
actually are.

Nick
Penny
2020-06-05 23:30:58 UTC
Permalink
I'm a bit confused about asymptomatic people with Covid-19.
Presumably they are only aware of them because they have been routinely
tested on account of the job they do and I suppose some may go on to have
symptoms later..

Assuming they remain asymptomatic, how long do they carry the virus? I know
you get asymptomatic carriers of other diseases - like the original Typhoid
Mary who infected a great many people. Is that only a 'thing' with
bacterial infections and genetic problems? Has anyone figured out with any
certainty how long someone with Covid is infectious for?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2020-06-06 15:07:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
I'm a bit confused about asymptomatic people with Covid-19.
Presumably they are only aware of them because they have been routinely
tested on account of the job they do and I suppose some may go on to have
symptoms later..
Assuming they remain asymptomatic, how long do they carry the virus? I know
you get asymptomatic carriers of other diseases - like the original Typhoid
Mary who infected a great many people. Is that only a 'thing' with
bacterial infections and genetic problems? Has anyone figured out with any
certainty how long someone with Covid is infectious for?
A friend of ours in a care home was proven asymptomatic picked up when all
residents and staff were tested for the first time. She needed to be
isolated for three weeks. I wouldn’t know this had Jean not been capable of
using a phone unaided as we don’t know her family.

Sincerely Chris
krw
2020-06-06 15:18:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
I'm a bit confused about asymptomatic people with Covid-19.
Presumably they are only aware of them because they have been routinely
tested on account of the job they do and I suppose some may go on to have
symptoms later..
Assuming they remain asymptomatic, how long do they carry the virus? I know
you get asymptomatic carriers of other diseases - like the original Typhoid
Mary who infected a great many people. Is that only a 'thing' with
bacterial infections and genetic problems? Has anyone figured out with any
certainty how long someone with Covid is infectious for?
A friend of ours in a care home was proven asymptomatic picked up when all
residents and staff were tested for the first time. She needed to be
isolated for three weeks. I wouldn’t know this had Jean not been capable of
using a phone unaided as we don’t know her family.
Sincerely Chris
A friend's mother (the mother is 96 btw) tested positive with no
symptoms, then had minor symptoms and has now recovered and has tested
negative.

Friend who is using mother's money to fund £8000/month care home plus
mother who really does not want to be here might have preferred another
outcome.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
John Ashby
2020-06-06 16:46:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
I'm a bit confused about asymptomatic people with Covid-19.
Presumably they are only aware of them because they have been routinely
tested on account of the job they do and I suppose some may go on to have
symptoms later..
Assuming they remain asymptomatic, how long do they carry the virus? I know
you get asymptomatic carriers of other diseases - like the original Typhoid
Mary who infected a great many people. Is that only a 'thing' with
bacterial infections and genetic problems? Has anyone figured out with any
certainty how long someone with Covid is infectious for?
A friend of ours in a care home was proven asymptomatic picked up when all
residents and staff were tested for the first time.  She needed to be
isolated for three weeks. I wouldn’t know this had Jean not been capable of
using a phone unaided as we don’t know her family.
Sincerely Chris
A friend's mother (the mother is 96 btw) tested positive with no
symptoms, then had minor symptoms and has now recovered and has tested
negative.
Friend who is using mother's money to fund £8000/month care home plus
mother who really does not want to be here might have preferred another
outcome.
YADominicCummingsAICM5IrateBrritskiMessages

(Ooops)

john
Chris McMillan
2020-06-08 10:03:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
I'm a bit confused about asymptomatic people with Covid-19.
Presumably they are only aware of them because they have been routinely
tested on account of the job they do and I suppose some may go on to have
symptoms later..
Assuming they remain asymptomatic, how long do they carry the virus? I know
you get asymptomatic carriers of other diseases - like the original Typhoid
Mary who infected a great many people. Is that only a 'thing' with
bacterial infections and genetic problems? Has anyone figured out with any
certainty how long someone with Covid is infectious for?
A friend of ours in a care home was proven asymptomatic picked up when all
residents and staff were tested for the first time. She needed to be
isolated for three weeks. I wouldn’t know this had Jean not been capable of
using a phone unaided as we don’t know her family.
Sincerely Chris
A friend's mother (the mother is 96 btw) tested positive with no
symptoms, then had minor symptoms and has now recovered and has tested
negative.
Friend who is using mother's money to fund £8000/month care home plus
mother who really does not want to be here might have preferred another
outcome.
It’s truly said no one knows how the virus will treat anyone!

Interesting that it’s showing up slightly differently across the country.
I’d already heard this happened by country.

I really should get out more.

Sincerely Chris
Flop
2020-06-08 15:43:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
It’s truly said no one knows how the virus will treat anyone!
Interesting that it’s showing up slightly differently across the country.
I’d already heard this happened by country.
I really should get out more.
Sincerely Chris
The logical and expected reason is that the virus mutates.

All living material mutates - either because of the environment or
mistakes in duplication when reproducing. There is no reason why viruses
should not mutate and several why they should. Including a lifetime in
differing environments.

In general viruses mutate to the better for their victims. A less
virulent mutation is good and a more virulent mutation is also good
because it can kill the host before it has reproduced and spread.

Which explains the bell-shaped curve seen in death rates from almost
every country. It is a time factor and the only impact different
locations have is whether the curve is high (UK or US) or shallow
(Sweden or NZ).

So, in a week or so everything will be back to normal including
(unfortunately) the government.
--
Flop


"I wouldn't give sixpence for Boris". "Why not?". "because that is what
he can turn on".
Mike
2020-06-04 12:14:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
In theory, it's only those parliamentarians who were within 2m of the
Business Sec, for 15mins or more who will need to go into purdah
Does it takes 15 minutes for the virus to jump from one person to
another? What's it doing in those 15 minutes - just hanging in the air?
If so, then social distancing isn't going to help much if someone
steps into that air after the infected person moves away from it.
Says something about politicians and hot air perhaps?
--
Toodle Pip
Serena Blanchflower
2020-06-04 13:33:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
In theory, it's only those parliamentarians who were within 2m of the
Business Sec, for 15mins or more who will need to go into purdah
Does it takes 15 minutes for the virus to jump from one person to
another?  What's it doing in those 15 minutes - just hanging in the air?
 If so, then social distancing isn't going to help much if someone
steps into that air after the infected person moves away from it.
Almost certainly not but, from what I've heard, that's the criteria that
the contact checkers are using. Presumably, it's to try to get a balance
between, on the one hand, contacting, and forcing self-isolation on,
people who are vanishingly unlikely to be infected and, on the other,
not contacting the bulk of people who are likely to become ill. I have
no idea what, if any, science lies behind where they've chosen to draw
the line.

As far as I can see, until or unless we get a working app (and it's
taken up by the majority of the population), track and trace is pretty
laughable. It seems likely that, for most people who are being
reasonably sensible about the risks, that the list of people they know
and can give contact details for, who meet those criteria will be
reasonably small. It's also likely, for a lot of people, that they will
have contacted them anyway, long before the government gets in touch.
The people they need to be able to contact are the unknown people;
people who've been close beside you in a queue, or on the bus, for example.
--
Happy hibernating and stay well,
best wishes, Serena
Always remember: you are braver than you believe. Stronger than you seem
and smarter than you think. (A.A. Milne)
krw
2020-06-04 14:29:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
As far as I can see, until or unless we get a working app (and it's
taken up by the majority of the population), track and trace is pretty
laughable.
Boris has said that it was all working on 1 June and it is world
beating. How can that be laughable?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Mike
2020-06-04 14:44:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Serena Blanchflower
As far as I can see, until or unless we get a working app (and it's
taken up by the majority of the population), track and trace is pretty
laughable.
Boris has said that it was all working on 1 June and it is world
beating. How can that be laughable?
Because ‘Boris has said that it was all working on 1 June and it is world
beating.’ Perhaps it stopped working on the second of June?
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Leverton
2020-06-04 15:57:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Serena Blanchflower
As far as I can see, until or unless we get a working app (and it's
taken up by the majority of the population), track and trace is pretty
laughable.
Boris has said that it was all working on 1 June and it is world
beating. How can that be laughable?
Your first three words explain how ...

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Sam Plusnet
2020-06-04 20:40:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Serena Blanchflower
As far as I can see, until or unless we get a working app (and it's
taken up by the majority of the population), track and trace is pretty
laughable.
Boris has said that it was all working on 1 June and it is world
beating.  How can that be laughable?
Was that claim more or less credible than HMG's claims on the number of
tests carried out?
Discuss:
--
Sam Plusnet
Sid Nuncius
2020-06-05 05:04:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by krw
Post by Serena Blanchflower
As far as I can see, until or unless we get a working app (and it's
taken up by the majority of the population), track and trace is
pretty laughable.
Boris has said that it was all working on 1 June and it is world
beating.  How can that be laughable?
Was that claim more or less credible than HMG's claims on the number of
tests carried out?
It's all crystal clear: 19,000 of the tests which have already been done
count as new tests. It's a well-established principle:

--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-06-05 11:28:45 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 5 Jun 2020 at 06:04:10, Sid Nuncius
<***@hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
Was that claim more or less credible than HMG's claims on the number
of tests carried out?
What's also interesting is the number of _people_ tested, which is fewer
than the number of tests, which is to be expected, as some people will
be tested more than once (one would have _hoped_ that many NHS staff
would be tested frequently, though I fear that's not happening).

They published (on
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-information-for-the-public#number-of-cases
, an official page), both figures, every day, from at least the 6th of
April (253k tests and 209k people by then), up to 22 May (3.2m tests,
2.1m people); then the figure for the (total) number of people tested
_stopped appearing_. It made a brief reappearance on 27 May (3.8m tests,
1.1m people), and _hasn't been seen since_. Total _tests_ has now just
topped 5m. And yes, I did notice when it made its brief return that the
total number of _people_ tested had gone _down_ (more or less halved).
Post by Sid Nuncius
It's all crystal clear: 19,000 of the tests which have already been
http://youtu.be/3doKuvZsWFU
(-:. [One of the many cases where I'd rather have had a _proportion_
than a bald figure: it doesn't make a lot of difference to me whether
it's 50,000 new nurses or only 39,000, if I don't know how many there
already _are_ (which I didn't and don't - and I suspect most people
don't either) - in other words, is the new addition 50%, 5%, 0.5%, or
less/fewer?]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I still say a church steeple with a lightning rod on top shows a lack of
confidence. D McLeod
Chris McMillan
2020-06-05 08:25:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Jenny M Benson
In theory, it's only those parliamentarians who were within 2m of the
Business Sec, for 15mins or more who will need to go into purdah
Does it takes 15 minutes for the virus to jump from one person to
another?  What's it doing in those 15 minutes - just hanging in the air?
 If so, then social distancing isn't going to help much if someone
steps into that air after the infected person moves away from it.
Almost certainly not but, from what I've heard, that's the criteria that
the contact checkers are using. Presumably, it's to try to get a balance
between, on the one hand, contacting, and forcing self-isolation on,
people who are vanishingly unlikely to be infected and, on the other,
not contacting the bulk of people who are likely to become ill. I have
no idea what, if any, science lies behind where they've chosen to draw
the line.
As far as I can see, until or unless we get a working app (and it's
taken up by the majority of the population), track and trace is pretty
laughable. It seems likely that, for most people who are being
reasonably sensible about the risks, that the list of people they know
and can give contact details for, who meet those criteria will be
reasonably small. It's also likely, for a lot of people, that they will
have contacted them anyway, long before the government gets in touch.
The people they need to be able to contact are the unknown people;
people who've been close beside you in a queue, or on the bus, for example.
Yes, Serena, exactly that. Those we don’t know.

Sincerely Chris
steve hague
2020-06-05 07:38:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
  If the business secretary had Corona and yesterday was in parliament
for an hour and the voting lobby queue and also a cabinet meeting,
don't all those MPs he came into contact with have to isolate now for
2 weeks? and their families?   Doesn't take a lot of tracking and
tracing to see who needs to go home and stay there. I suppose the test
has not been returned yet for him, but do the rest just circulate
until the results come?
They remain on the loose, until/unless his test results come back,
confirming that he does have Covid-19. In theory, it's only those
parliamentarians who were within 2m of the Business Sec, for 15mins or
more who will need to go into purdah after that but that could add up to
a significant number.
I can't help hoping though that this includes a certain Jacob Rees-Mogg.
 Even without that though, it may make even some loyalists question the
sanity of pushing MPs back to Westminster, rather than most of them
working from home.
Yes. Free range MPs are much healthier and happier than battery MPs.
Steve
Chris McMillan
2020-06-05 08:25:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Serena Blanchflower
  If the business secretary had Corona and yesterday was in parliament
for an hour and the voting lobby queue and also a cabinet meeting,
don't all those MPs he came into contact with have to isolate now for
2 weeks? and their families?   Doesn't take a lot of tracking and
tracing to see who needs to go home and stay there. I suppose the test
has not been returned yet for him, but do the rest just circulate
until the results come?
They remain on the loose, until/unless his test results come back,
confirming that he does have Covid-19. In theory, it's only those
parliamentarians who were within 2m of the Business Sec, for 15mins or
more who will need to go into purdah after that but that could add up to
a significant number.
I can't help hoping though that this includes a certain Jacob Rees-Mogg.
 Even without that though, it may make even some loyalists question the
sanity of pushing MPs back to Westminster, rather than most of them
working from home.
Yes. Free range MPs are much healthier and happier than battery MPs.
Steve
Splutter

Sincerely Chris
Chris J Dixon
2020-06-05 10:15:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Serena Blanchflower
They remain on the loose, until/unless his test results come back,
confirming that he does have Covid-19. In theory, it's only those
parliamentarians who were within 2m of the Business Sec, for 15mins or
more who will need to go into purdah after that but that could add up to
a significant number.
I can't help hoping though that this includes a certain Jacob Rees-Mogg.
 Even without that though, it may make even some loyalists question the
sanity of pushing MPs back to Westminster, rather than most of them
working from home.
Yes. Free range MPs are much healthier and happier than battery MPs.
I don't think there are many offers of Rescue re homing. Perhaps
they should just be put out to grass.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Mike
2020-06-05 10:27:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steve hague
Post by Serena Blanchflower
They remain on the loose, until/unless his test results come back,
confirming that he does have Covid-19. In theory, it's only those
parliamentarians who were within 2m of the Business Sec, for 15mins or
more who will need to go into purdah after that but that could add up to
a significant number.
I can't help hoping though that this includes a certain Jacob Rees-Mogg.
 Even without that though, it may make even some loyalists question the
sanity of pushing MPs back to Westminster, rather than most of them
working from home.
Yes. Free range MPs are much healthier and happier than battery MPs.
I don't think there are many offers of Rescue re homing. Perhaps
they should just be put out to grass.
Chris
But battery MP’s live in cells don’t they?
--
Toodle Pip
John Ashby
2020-06-05 12:52:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steve hague
Post by Serena Blanchflower
They remain on the loose, until/unless his test results come back,
confirming that he does have Covid-19. In theory, it's only those
parliamentarians who were within 2m of the Business Sec, for 15mins or
more who will need to go into purdah after that but that could add up to
a significant number.
I can't help hoping though that this includes a certain Jacob Rees-Mogg.
 Even without that though, it may make even some loyalists question the
sanity of pushing MPs back to Westminster, rather than most of them
working from home.
Yes. Free range MPs are much healthier and happier than battery MPs.
I don't think there are many offers of Rescue re homing. Perhaps
they should just be put out to grass.
Chris
As long as they don't inhale.

john
Nick Leverton
2020-06-05 14:44:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steve hague
Post by Serena Blanchflower
They remain on the loose, until/unless his test results come back,
confirming that he does have Covid-19. In theory, it's only those
parliamentarians who were within 2m of the Business Sec, for 15mins or
more who will need to go into purdah after that but that could add up to
a significant number.
I can't help hoping though that this includes a certain Jacob Rees-Mogg.
 Even without that though, it may make even some loyalists question the
sanity of pushing MPs back to Westminster, rather than most of them
working from home.
Yes. Free range MPs are much healthier and happier than battery MPs.
I don't think there are many offers of Rescue re homing. Perhaps
they should just be put out to grass.
Chris
As long as they don't inhale.
Or exhale - you never know what they might be shedding.

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Mike
2020-06-05 14:48:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by John Ashby
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steve hague
Post by Serena Blanchflower
They remain on the loose, until/unless his test results come back,
confirming that he does have Covid-19. In theory, it's only those
parliamentarians who were within 2m of the Business Sec, for 15mins or
more who will need to go into purdah after that but that could add up to
a significant number.
I can't help hoping though that this includes a certain Jacob Rees-Mogg.
 Even without that though, it may make even some loyalists question the
sanity of pushing MPs back to Westminster, rather than most of them
working from home.
Yes. Free range MPs are much healthier and happier than battery MPs.
I don't think there are many offers of Rescue re homing. Perhaps
they should just be put out to grass.
Chris
As long as they don't inhale.
Or exhale - you never know what they might be shedding.
Nick
Responsibility for their mistakes probably...
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2020-06-05 19:07:54 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 5 Jun 2020 14:44:19 +0000 (UTC), Nick Leverton
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by John Ashby
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steve hague
Post by Serena Blanchflower
They remain on the loose, until/unless his test results come back,
confirming that he does have Covid-19. In theory, it's only those
parliamentarians who were within 2m of the Business Sec, for 15mins or
more who will need to go into purdah after that but that could add up to
a significant number.
I can't help hoping though that this includes a certain Jacob Rees-Mogg.
 Even without that though, it may make even some loyalists question the
sanity of pushing MPs back to Westminster, rather than most of them
working from home.
Yes. Free range MPs are much healthier and happier than battery MPs.
I don't think there are many offers of Rescue re homing. Perhaps
they should just be put out to grass.
Chris
As long as they don't inhale.
Or exhale - you never know what they might be shedding.
BTN!!!

another Nick
Sid Nuncius
2020-06-05 17:42:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 5 Jun 2020 14:44:19 +0000 (UTC), Nick Leverton
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by John Ashby
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steve hague
Yes. Free range MPs are much healthier and happier than battery MPs.
I don't think there are many offers of Rescue re homing. Perhaps
they should just be put out to grass.
As long as they don't inhale.
Or exhale - you never know what they might be shedding.
BTN!!!
Not really. Sorry. (Or have I missed something significant in the word
"shedding"?)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
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