Discussion:
Lynda is eminating from our smart speaker.
(too old to reply)
Mike McMillan
2021-09-05 14:24:06 UTC
Permalink
Just thought you might like to know the Toodles’s have just started to
listen to La Snell reading ‘Lynda Snell’s Ambridge Inheritance’. (RNIB
Talking Book Service y’know…)
When Lynda met William Grundy riding the bike gifted to him by Caroline
(his Godmother)and asked him what he wanted, he was eager to have Lynda
‘Lend him a Fiver’; Lynda said she would ‘Give him a fiver’ in return for a
little job. William offered to repaint her bike that was ‘a horrible
colour’ and Lynda then declined and dismissed him with a flea in his ear.
Ok, what colour was Lynda’s bike at that time (and probably still)?
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Jenny M Benson
2021-09-05 14:34:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Just thought you might like to know the Toodles’s have just started to
listen to La Snell reading ‘Lynda Snell’s Ambridge Inheritance’. (RNIB
Talking Book Service y’know…)
When Lynda met William Grundy riding the bike gifted to him by Caroline
(his Godmother)and asked him what he wanted, he was eager to have Lynda
‘Lend him a Fiver’; Lynda said she would ‘Give him a fiver’ in return for a
little job. William offered to repaint her bike that was ‘a horrible
colour’ and Lynda then declined and dismissed him with a flea in his ear.
Ok, what colour was Lynda’s bike at that time (and probably still)?
Anyone remember ‘Doughie Hood’?
I certainly remember the name, but not anything about him.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Chris
2021-09-05 20:05:26 UTC
Permalink
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Just thought you might like to know the Toodles’s have just started to
listen to La Snell reading ‘Lynda Snell’s Ambridge Inheritance’. (RNIB
Talking Book Service y’know…)
When Lynda met William Grundy riding the bike gifted to him by Caroline
(his Godmother)and asked him what he wanted, he was eager to have Lynda
‘Lend him a Fiver’; Lynda said she would ‘Give him a fiver’ in return for a
little job. William offered to repaint her bike that was ‘a horrible
colour’ and Lynda then declined and dismissed him with a flea in his ear.
Ok, what colour was Lynda’s bike at that time (and probably still)?
Anyone remember ‘Doughie Hood’?
Another post which has failed to reach me :(
Is this an eternal September problem?
Post by Jenny M Benson
I certainly remember the name, but not anything about him.
He was a baker (obvs) and I remember him well, mainly because his close
friend Arnold Ridley later played Private Godfrey in Dad's Army - he also
wrote 'The ghost train' (where do it come from, where do it go?') .
Much of what The Book says about him and his family was before my time, but
I don't recall any of the later events. I did recognise the voice as soon
as I heard it on Dad's Army so he must have made some impression upon me.
Thanks Penny!

Sincerely Chris
Vicky Ayech
2021-09-05 20:17:44 UTC
Permalink
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Just thought you might like to know the Toodles’s have just started to
listen to La Snell reading ‘Lynda Snell’s Ambridge Inheritance’. (RNIB
Talking Book Service y’know…)
When Lynda met William Grundy riding the bike gifted to him by Caroline
(his Godmother)and asked him what he wanted, he was eager to have Lynda
‘Lend him a Fiver’; Lynda said she would ‘Give him a fiver’ in return for a
little job. William offered to repaint her bike that was ‘a horrible
colour’ and Lynda then declined and dismissed him with a flea in his ear.
Ok, what colour was Lynda’s bike at that time (and probably still)?
Anyone remember ‘Doughie Hood’?
Another post which has failed to reach me :(
Is this an eternal September problem?
Post by Jenny M Benson
I certainly remember the name, but not anything about him.
He was a baker (obvs) and I remember him well, mainly because his close
friend Arnold Ridley later played Private Godfrey in Dad's Army - he also
wrote 'The ghost train' (where do it come from, where do it go?') .
Much of what The Book says about him and his family was before my time, but
I don't recall any of the later events. I did recognise the voice as soon
as I heard it on Dad's Army so he must have made some impression upon me.
I'm on the German system and got that post
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-06 05:28:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Another post which has failed to reach me :(
Is this an eternal September problem?
I'm on the German system and got that post
Zey have veys of making us talk.

(I'm on the Berlin sever, too, and am getting all posts.)
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike McMillan
2021-09-06 07:18:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Another post which has failed to reach me :(
Is this an eternal September problem?
I'm on the German system and got that post
Zey have veys of making us talk.
(I'm on the Berlin sever, too, and am getting all posts.)
The unkindest cut of all Sid! Ouch.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Peter Withey
2021-09-06 09:04:05 UTC
Permalink
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
Just thought you might like to know the Toodles’s have just started to
listen to La Snell reading ‘Lynda Snell’s Ambridge Inheritance’. (RNIB
Talking Book Service y’know…)
When Lynda met William Grundy riding the bike gifted to him by Caroline
(his Godmother)and asked him what he wanted, he was eager to have Lynda
‘Lend him a Fiver’; Lynda said she would ‘Give him a fiver’ in return for a
little job. William offered to repaint her bike that was ‘a horrible
colour’ and Lynda then declined and dismissed him with a flea in his ear.
Ok, what colour was Lynda’s bike at that time (and probably still)?
Anyone remember ‘Doughie Hood’?
Another post which has failed to reach me :(
Is this an eternal September problem?
Is this a common problem? If the headers are correct I see you are
using Forte Agent. Do you have any filters set up? I use a later
version and some time ago realised I wasn't receiving all the messages
in several groups including umra. I disabled filtering for those
groups, downloaded the last 500 messages again and the missing
messages were there. A common filter I'd set up to catch "rubbish" was
also catching "good" one. Worth a look?
Post by Jenny M Benson
I certainly remember the name, but not anything about him.
He was a baker (obvs) and I remember him well, mainly because his close
friend Arnold Ridley later played Private Godfrey in Dad's Army - he also
wrote 'The ghost train' (where do it come from, where do it go?') .
Much of what The Book says about him and his family was before my time, but
I don't recall any of the later events. I did recognise the voice as soon
as I heard it on Dad's Army so he must have made some impression upon me.
--
Pete
Nick Odell
2021-09-06 09:40:03 UTC
Permalink
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike McMillan
Just thought you might like to know the Toodles’s have just started to
listen to La Snell reading ‘Lynda Snell’s Ambridge Inheritance’. (RNIB
Talking Book Service y’know…)
When Lynda met William Grundy riding the bike gifted to him by Caroline
(his Godmother)and asked him what he wanted, he was eager to have Lynda
‘Lend him a Fiver’; Lynda said she would ‘Give him a fiver’ in return for a
little job. William offered to repaint her bike that was ‘a horrible
colour’ and Lynda then declined and dismissed him with a flea in his ear.
Ok, what colour was Lynda’s bike at that time (and probably still)?
Anyone remember ‘Doughie Hood’?
Another post which has failed to reach me :(
Is this an eternal September problem?
<snip>
I don't think so. I use ES and an elderly agent and I seem to receive
everything. Although that response might not be totally reliable:
presumably we each access the ES server at random times and it could
be serving glitches that I'm lucky enough to to avoid. For instance,
when I came on line a few minutes ago, the first response from Agent
was the "unable to connect with..." message so ES didn't give me
anything. When I tried again, a few seconds later, everything
downloaded as normal.


Nick
Serena Blanchflower
2021-09-06 15:19:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike McMillan
Just thought you might like to know the Toodles’s have just started to
listen to La Snell reading ‘Lynda Snell’s Ambridge Inheritance’. (RNIB
Talking Book Service y’know…)
When Lynda met William Grundy riding the bike gifted to him by Caroline
(his Godmother)and asked him what he wanted, he was eager to have Lynda
‘Lend him a Fiver’; Lynda said she would ‘Give him a fiver’ in return for a
little job. William offered to repaint her bike that was ‘a horrible
colour’ and Lynda then declined and dismissed him with a flea in his ear.
Ok, what colour was Lynda’s bike at that time (and probably still)?
Anyone remember ‘Doughie Hood’?
Another post which has failed to reach me :(
Is this an eternal September problem?
<snip>
I don't think so. I use ES and an elderly agent and I seem to receive
presumably we each access the ES server at random times and it could
be serving glitches that I'm lucky enough to to avoid. For instance,
when I came on line a few minutes ago, the first response from Agent
was the "unable to connect with..." message so ES didn't give me
anything. When I tried again, a few seconds later, everything
downloaded as normal.
Oops, I've just realised (when Nick replied to me) that I originally
sent this by email, rather than to umra! Sorry about that ;)


Penny's is another one which hasn't reached me, here on the Plusnet
server. I don't know what's going on but I don't think Eternal
September can be to blame. As well as the PN server, I also have
Eternal September set up[1] on this machine and, when I checked just
now, both Penny's post and the post I'd been missing from Sid were
present and correct on my ES feed.



[1] Even since a time when there were problems with PlusNet, IIRC.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I'm supposed to respect my elders, but it's getting harder and harder
for me to find one now.
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-06 05:29:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
When Lynda met William Grundy riding the bike gifted to him by Caroline
(his Godmother)and asked him what he wanted, he was eager to have Lynda
‘Lend him a Fiver’; Lynda said she would ‘Give him a fiver’ in return for a
little job. William offered to repaint her bike that was ‘a horrible
colour’ and Lynda then declined and dismissed him with a flea in his ear.
Ok, what colour was Lynda’s bike at that time (and probably still)?
IMHO purple is a horrible colour.  Many people disagree.
A certain potter of this parish takes a different view.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Jenny M Benson
2021-09-06 10:10:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
IMHO purple is a horrible colour.  Many people disagree.
A certain potter of this parish takes a different view.
I should make it clear that I eschew all things purple EXCEPT our dear
potter.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Hellerat
2021-09-06 10:27:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
IMHO purple is a horrible colour.  Many people disagree.
A certain potter of this parish takes a different view.
I should make it clear that I eschew all things purple EXCEPT our dear potter.
I have no idea if this is correct as I seem to have lots of strange "false memories" the
older I get, but when I read your post about purple, Jenny, I had an image of you on a
television quiz show many years ago, wearing purple. Is this proof that I am completely
off my trolley?
--
Yassas,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Hellerat
Jenny M Benson
2021-09-06 12:34:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hellerat
I have no idea if this is correct as I seem to have lots of strange
"false memories" the older I get, but when I read your post about
purple, Jenny, I had an image of you on a television quiz show many
years ago, wearing purple. Is this proof that I am completely off my
trolley?
You could have seen me on a tv quiz show as I have done 3 but there's no
way I would have been wearing purple!
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Mike McMillan
2021-09-06 12:49:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Hellerat
I have no idea if this is correct as I seem to have lots of strange
"false memories" the older I get, but when I read your post about
purple, Jenny, I had an image of you on a television quiz show many
years ago, wearing purple. Is this proof that I am completely off my
trolley?
You could have seen me on a tv quiz show as I have done 3 but there's no
way I would have been wearing purple!
When we eventually (and no UMRAT is anywhere near that yet!) grow
disgustingly old, aren’t we supposed to turn to wearing purple. (Even Mrs.
Lynda Snell told us this at an UMRA BBQ one year when she recited a peom to
us.)
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Hellerat
2021-09-06 13:08:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Hellerat
I have no idea if this is correct as I seem to have lots of strange
"false memories" the older I get, but when I read your post about
purple, Jenny, I had an image of you on a television quiz show many
years ago, wearing purple. Is this proof that I am completely off my
trolley?
You could have seen me on a tv quiz show as I have done 3 but there's no
way I would have been wearing purple!
Potty I am, then!
Post by Mike McMillan
When we eventually (and no UMRAT is anywhere near that yet!) grow
disgustingly old, aren’t we supposed to turn to wearing purple. (Even Mrs.
Lynda Snell told us this at an UMRA BBQ one year when she recited a peom to
us.)
I always assumed/understood that was where the PP got it from. Pome is "Warning" by Jenny
Joseph, as follows:

When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals, and say we’ve no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I’m tired
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
And run my stick along the public railings
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick flowers in other people’s gardens
And learn to spit.

You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go
Or only bread and pickle for a week
And hoard pens and pencils and beermats and things in boxes.

But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
And pay our rent and not swear in the street
And set a good example for the children.
We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.

But maybe I ought to practise a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.
--
Yassas,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Hellerat
Mike McMillan
2021-09-06 13:51:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hellerat
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Hellerat
I have no idea if this is correct as I seem to have lots of strange
"false memories" the older I get, but when I read your post about
purple, Jenny, I had an image of you on a television quiz show many
years ago, wearing purple. Is this proof that I am completely off my
trolley?
You could have seen me on a tv quiz show as I have done 3 but there's no
way I would have been wearing purple!
Potty I am, then!
Post by Mike McMillan
When we eventually (and no UMRAT is anywhere near that yet!) grow
disgustingly old, aren’t we supposed to turn to wearing purple. (Even Mrs.
Lynda Snell told us this at an UMRA BBQ one year when she recited a peom to
us.)
I always assumed/understood that was where the PP got it from. Pome is "Warning" by Jenny
When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals, and say we’ve no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I’m tired
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
And run my stick along the public railings
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick flowers in other people’s gardens
And learn to spit.
You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go
Or only bread and pickle for a week
And hoard pens and pencils and beermats and things in boxes.
But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
And pay our rent and not swear in the street
And set a good example for the children.
We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.
But maybe I ought to practise a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.
And in Sid’s case, he might consider a dirty purple rainc… Ouch that hurt
Sid!
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Nick Odell
2021-09-06 15:00:32 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 6 Sep 2021 13:51:28 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Hellerat
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Hellerat
I have no idea if this is correct as I seem to have lots of strange
"false memories" the older I get, but when I read your post about
purple, Jenny, I had an image of you on a television quiz show many
years ago, wearing purple. Is this proof that I am completely off my
trolley?
You could have seen me on a tv quiz show as I have done 3 but there's no
way I would have been wearing purple!
Potty I am, then!
Post by Mike McMillan
When we eventually (and no UMRAT is anywhere near that yet!) grow
disgustingly old, aren’t we supposed to turn to wearing purple. (Even Mrs.
Lynda Snell told us this at an UMRA BBQ one year when she recited a peom to
us.)
I always assumed/understood that was where the PP got it from. Pome is "Warning" by Jenny
When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals, and say we’ve no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I’m tired
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
And run my stick along the public railings
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick flowers in other people’s gardens
And learn to spit.
You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go
Or only bread and pickle for a week
And hoard pens and pencils and beermats and things in boxes.
But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
And pay our rent and not swear in the street
And set a good example for the children.
We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.
But maybe I ought to practise a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.
And in Sid’s case, he might consider a dirty purple rainc… Ouch that hurt
Sid!
Oh. Thank. You. So. Much. Mike.

You have done earwormed me good and proper.

Nick
Nick Odell
2021-09-06 15:10:48 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 06 Sep 2021 16:00:32 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 6 Sep 2021 13:51:28 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Hellerat
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Hellerat
I have no idea if this is correct as I seem to have lots of strange
"false memories" the older I get, but when I read your post about
purple, Jenny, I had an image of you on a television quiz show many
years ago, wearing purple. Is this proof that I am completely off my
trolley?
You could have seen me on a tv quiz show as I have done 3 but there's no
way I would have been wearing purple!
Potty I am, then!
Post by Mike McMillan
When we eventually (and no UMRAT is anywhere near that yet!) grow
disgustingly old, aren’t we supposed to turn to wearing purple. (Even Mrs.
Lynda Snell told us this at an UMRA BBQ one year when she recited a peom to
us.)
I always assumed/understood that was where the PP got it from. Pome is "Warning" by Jenny
When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals, and say we’ve no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I’m tired
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
And run my stick along the public railings
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick flowers in other people’s gardens
And learn to spit.
You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go
Or only bread and pickle for a week
And hoard pens and pencils and beermats and things in boxes.
But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
And pay our rent and not swear in the street
And set a good example for the children.
We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.
But maybe I ought to practise a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.
And in Sid’s case, he might consider a dirty purple rainc… Ouch that hurt
Sid!
Oh. Thank. You. So. Much. Mike.
You have done earwormed me good and proper.
Oops! Forgot the link to the earworm so everybody else can suffer:




Nick
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-06 15:50:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 06 Sep 2021 16:00:32 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 6 Sep 2021 13:51:28 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
And in Sid’s case, he might consider a dirty purple rainc… Ouch that hurt
Sid!
Oh. Thank. You. So. Much. Mike.
You have done earwormed me good and proper.
http://youtu.be/S6Y1gohk5-A
Oh, I thought it was to go with my dirty red bandana[1], wherein I keep
my harpoon so I can play soft while Bobby sings the...eh?

Another earworm? Oh, sorry, Nick - I had no idea.


[1]Which doesn't go.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-06 15:40:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Hellerat
I always assumed/understood that was where the PP got it from. Pome is "Warning" by Jenny
When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals, and say we’ve no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I’m tired
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
And run my stick along the public railings
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick flowers in other people’s gardens
And learn to spit.
You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go
Or only bread and pickle for a week
And hoard pens and pencils and beermats and things in boxes.
But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
And pay our rent and not swear in the street
And set a good example for the children.
We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.
But maybe I ought to practise a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.
And in Sid’s case, he might consider a dirty purple rainc… Ouch that hurt
Sid!
Serves you right.

That is an outstanding poem (thanks, Anne!), but while I wholeheartedly
support it's use in clothing for the more mature lady personess, I'm not
sure purple is quite right for the older gentleman. However, I suspect
that I may approaching the time when I shall start wearing the bottoms
of my trousers rolled.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Nick Odell
2021-09-06 17:55:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Hellerat
I always assumed/understood that was where the PP got it from. Pome is "Warning" by Jenny
When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals, and say we’ve no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I’m tired
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
And run my stick along the public railings
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick flowers in other people’s gardens
And learn to spit.
You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go
Or only bread and pickle for a week
And hoard pens and pencils and beermats and things in boxes.
But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
And pay our rent and not swear in the street
And set a good example for the children.
We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.
But maybe I ought to practise a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.
And in Sid’s case, he might consider a dirty purple rainc… Ouch that hurt
Sid!
Serves you right.
That is an outstanding poem (thanks, Anne!), but while I wholeheartedly
support it's use in clothing for the more mature lady personess, I'm not
sure purple is quite right for the older gentleman. However, I suspect
that I may approaching the time when I shall start wearing the bottoms
of my trousers rolled.
You and Mike are a right pair of nuggers: not content with giving me
new ear-worms, now you are playing with my midnight muttering
retreats.

When my bladder wakes me in the middle of the night I am wont to haul
my legs over the side of the bed, look down at my feet and tell them:
"Let us go then, you and I.. ...Oh, do not ask, 'What is it?' Let us
go and make our visit."

And now my mind will be scrolling even further down the verse each
time I stand in front of the wardrobe to select a pair of white
flannels.

Abstrads!

Nick
Rosalind Mitchell
2021-09-06 18:01:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Hellerat
I always assumed/understood that was where the PP got it from. Pome is "Warning" by Jenny
When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals, and say we’ve no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I’m tired
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
And run my stick along the public railings
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick flowers in other people’s gardens
And learn to spit.
You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go
Or only bread and pickle for a week
And hoard pens and pencils and beermats and things in boxes.
But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
And pay our rent and not swear in the street
And set a good example for the children.
We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.
But maybe I ought to practise a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.
And in Sid’s case, he might consider a dirty purple rainc… Ouch that hurt
Sid!
Serves you right.
That is an outstanding poem (thanks, Anne!), but while I wholeheartedly
support it's use in clothing for the more mature lady personess, I'm not
sure purple is quite right for the older gentleman. However, I suspect
that I may approaching the time when I shall start wearing the bottoms
of my trousers rolled.
You and Mike are a right pair of nuggers: not content with giving me
new ear-worms, now you are playing with my midnight muttering
retreats.
When my bladder wakes me in the middle of the night I am wont to haul
"Let us go then, you and I.. ...Oh, do not ask, 'What is it?' Let us
go and make our visit."
And now my mind will be scrolling even further down the verse each
time I stand in front of the wardrobe to select a pair of white
flannels.
Abstrads!
Nick
Here, enjoy this nice ripe peach.

R
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-06 19:00:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Hellerat
I always assumed/understood that was where the PP got it from. Pome is "Warning" by Jenny
When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals, and say we’ve no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I’m tired
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
And run my stick along the public railings
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick flowers in other people’s gardens
And learn to spit.
You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go
Or only bread and pickle for a week
And hoard pens and pencils and beermats and things in boxes.
But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
And pay our rent and not swear in the street
And set a good example for the children.
We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.
But maybe I ought to practise a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.
And in Sid’s case, he might consider a dirty purple rainc… Ouch that hurt
Sid!
Serves you right.
That is an outstanding poem (thanks, Anne!), but while I wholeheartedly
support it's use in clothing for the more mature lady personess, I'm not
sure purple is quite right for the older gentleman. However, I suspect
that I may approaching the time when I shall start wearing the bottoms
of my trousers rolled.
You and Mike are a right pair of nuggers: not content with giving me
new ear-worms, now you are playing with my midnight muttering
retreats.
When my bladder wakes me in the middle of the night I am wont to haul
"Let us go then, you and I.. ...Oh, do not ask, 'What is it?' Let us
go and make our visit."
And now my mind will be scrolling even further down the verse each
time I stand in front of the wardrobe to select a pair of white
flannels.
Abstrads!
Here, enjoy this nice ripe peach.
I would, but garlic and sapphires in the mud clot the bedded axle tree.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike McMillan
2021-09-06 18:42:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Hellerat
I always assumed/understood that was where the PP got it from. Pome is
"Warning" by Jenny
When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals, and say we’ve no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I’m tired
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
And run my stick along the public railings
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick flowers in other people’s gardens
And learn to spit.
You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go
Or only bread and pickle for a week
And hoard pens and pencils and beermats and things in boxes.
But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
And pay our rent and not swear in the street
And set a good example for the children.
We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.
But maybe I ought to practise a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.
And in Sid’s case, he might consider a dirty purple rainc… Ouch that hurt
Sid!
Serves you right.
That is an outstanding poem (thanks, Anne!), but while I wholeheartedly
support it's use in clothing for the more mature lady personess, I'm not
sure purple is quite right for the older gentleman. However, I suspect
that I may approaching the time when I shall start wearing the bottoms
of my trousers rolled.
You and Mike are a right pair of nuggers: not content with giving me
new ear-worms, now you are playing with my midnight muttering
retreats.
When my bladder wakes me in the middle of the night I am wont to haul
"Let us go then, you and I.. ...Oh, do not ask, 'What is it?' Let us
go and make our visit."
And now my mind will be scrolling even further down the verse each
time I stand in front of the wardrobe to select a pair of white
flannels.
Abstrads!
Nick
Yes, we composed and printed many a letter and oodles of cassette labels on
our Amstrads… (8512’s as it happens)
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Sam Plusnet
2021-09-06 19:55:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
However, I suspect
that I may approaching the time when I shall start wearing the bottoms
of my trousers rolled.
Funny you should quote that.
I've been doing exactly that, with a pair or two of strides, for the
last few years.
Dead poetical me.
--
Sam Plusnet
Jim Easterbrook
2021-09-06 20:59:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Dead poetical me.
Are you in that dead poets society then?
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Sam Plusnet
2021-09-07 19:13:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sam Plusnet
Dead poetical me.
Are you in that dead poets society then?
I seem to be in the society of posters who find half of their text
failed to make it into the posted err.. post.
--
Sam Plusnet
steve hague
2021-09-07 14:23:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Serves you right.
That is an outstanding poem (thanks, Anne!), but while I wholeheartedly
support it's use in clothing for the more mature lady personess, I'm not
sure purple is quite right for the older gentleman. However, I suspect
that I may approaching the time when I shall start wearing the bottoms
of my trousers rolled.
Don't forget the cardigan and the flat cap. You could drive an Austin
Cambridge if you can find one. And possibly learn to smoke a pipe.
Steve
Mike McMillan
2021-09-07 14:27:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Serves you right.
That is an outstanding poem (thanks, Anne!), but while I wholeheartedly
support it's use in clothing for the more mature lady personess, I'm not
sure purple is quite right for the older gentleman. However, I suspect
that I may approaching the time when I shall start wearing the bottoms
of my trousers rolled.
Don't forget the cardigan and the flat cap. You could drive an Austin
Cambridge if you can find one. And possibly learn to smoke a pipe.
Steve
I thought a festering shooting brake with mouldy wood framework was the
regulation vehicle?
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
steve hague
2021-09-10 10:31:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by steve hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Serves you right.
That is an outstanding poem (thanks, Anne!), but while I wholeheartedly
support it's use in clothing for the more mature lady personess, I'm not
sure purple is quite right for the older gentleman. However, I suspect
that I may approaching the time when I shall start wearing the bottoms
of my trousers rolled.
Don't forget the cardigan and the flat cap. You could drive an Austin
Cambridge if you can find one. And possibly learn to smoke a pipe.
Steve
I thought a festering shooting brake with mouldy wood framework was the
regulation vehicle?
When driving a trilby hat with a small feather in it is mandatory.
Mike McMillan
2021-09-10 11:15:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by steve hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Serves you right.
That is an outstanding poem (thanks, Anne!), but while I wholeheartedly
support it's use in clothing for the more mature lady personess, I'm not
sure purple is quite right for the older gentleman. However, I suspect
that I may approaching the time when I shall start wearing the bottoms
of my trousers rolled.
Don't forget the cardigan and the flat cap. You could drive an Austin
Cambridge if you can find one. And possibly learn to smoke a pipe.
Steve
I thought a festering shooting brake with mouldy wood framework was the
regulation vehicle?
When driving a trilby hat with a small feather in it is mandatory.
I’ve never driven a trilby hat, but then I’ve never driven much other than
nails,and others round the bend…
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-10 18:02:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by steve hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Serves you right.
That is an outstanding poem (thanks, Anne!), but while I wholeheartedly
support it's use in clothing for the more mature lady personess, I'm not
sure purple is quite right for the older gentleman. However, I suspect
that I may approaching the time when I shall start wearing the bottoms
of my trousers rolled.
Don't forget the cardigan and the flat cap. You could drive an Austin
Cambridge if you can find one. And possibly learn to smoke a pipe.
I thought a festering shooting brake with mouldy wood framework was the
regulation vehicle?
When driving a trilby hat with a small feather in it is mandatory.
Let's not forget the red velvet steering-wheel cover:


And does anyone still wear those leather (or imitation leather) "driving
gloves" with the string backs? I see that they can still be purchased
for a mere £115.00. In the early 70s, somewhat cheaper versions were
considered essential by some drivers - all of whom I remember being
complete dickheads.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sam Plusnet
2021-09-10 19:15:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steve hague
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by steve hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Serves you right.
That is an outstanding poem (thanks, Anne!), but while I
wholeheartedly
support it's use in clothing for the more mature lady personess, I'm not
sure purple is quite right for the older gentleman. However, I suspect
that I may approaching the time when I shall start wearing the bottoms
of my trousers rolled.
Don't forget the cardigan and the flat cap. You could drive an Austin
Cambridge if you can find one. And possibly learn to smoke a pipe.
I thought a festering shooting brake with mouldy wood framework was the
regulation vehicle?
When driving a trilby hat with a small feather in it is mandatory.
http://youtu.be/XIoxdFqPdfs
And does anyone still wear those leather (or imitation leather) "driving
gloves" with the string backs?  I see that they can still be purchased
for a mere £115.00.  In the early 70s, somewhat cheaper versions were
considered essential by some drivers - all of whom I remember being
complete dickheads.
Was the silk scarf only for use in open-topped vehicles?
--
Isadora Duncan
Min
2021-09-11 00:51:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steve hague
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by steve hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Serves you right.
That is an outstanding poem (thanks, Anne!), but while I
wholeheartedly
support it's use in clothing for the more mature lady personess, I'm not
sure purple is quite right for the older gentleman. However, I suspect
that I may approaching the time when I shall start wearing the bottoms
of my trousers rolled.
Don't forget the cardigan and the flat cap. You could drive an Austin
Cambridge if you can find one. And possibly learn to smoke a pipe.
I thought a festering shooting brake with mouldy wood framework was the
regulation vehicle?
When driving a trilby hat with a small feather in it is mandatory.
http://youtu.be/XIoxdFqPdfs
And does anyone still wear those leather (or imitation leather) "driving
gloves" with the string backs? I see that they can still be purchased
for a mere £115.00. In the early 70s, somewhat cheaper versions were
considered essential by some drivers - all of whom I remember being
complete dickheads.
Was the silk scarf only for use in open-topped vehicles?
I think it was Willie Rushton that wanted to know whether string backed
gloves concealed hairy palms...
--
Min
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-11 05:14:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steve hague
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by steve hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Serves you right.
That is an outstanding poem (thanks, Anne!), but while I
wholeheartedly
support it's use in clothing for the more mature lady personess, I'm not
sure purple is quite right for the older gentleman. However, I suspect
that I may approaching the time when I shall start wearing the bottoms
of my trousers rolled.
Don't forget the cardigan and the flat cap. You could drive an Austin
Cambridge if you can find one. And possibly learn to smoke a pipe.
I thought a festering shooting brake with mouldy wood framework was the
regulation vehicle?
When driving a trilby hat with a small feather in it is mandatory.
http://youtu.be/XIoxdFqPdfs
And does anyone still wear those leather (or imitation leather)
"driving gloves" with the string backs?  I see that they can still be
purchased for a mere £115.00.  In the early 70s, somewhat cheaper
versions were considered essential by some drivers - all of whom I
remember being complete dickheads.
Was the silk scarf only for use in open-topped vehicles?
They did sometimes make me wish an Isadora Duncan-like outcome on their
owners, but I have developed sympathy with silk scarves when worn around
the head. During my university years I had long hair, which eventually
came over half way down my back.[1] I also hitch-hiked a lot. During
one journey in an open-topped sports car, my hair flew pleasingly (and
naively) all over the place in the wind. Not quite so pleasing was
trying to get a comb or brush through it afterward, which was painful,
involved a lot of pulled-out hair and broken-off tangles, and took
absolutely ages. It was at that point I realised why women might wear a
scarf over their hair in an open car. (Lady umratesses will, of course,
have known this from birth in the way that women seem to, while we chaps
blunder around learning painful lessons.)

Lifts in sports cars were rare, but my solution thereafter was to tuck
my hair firmly into my shirt or jumper and then lean back on it to
prevent escape.


[1]I know somerats will be formulating responses along the lines of
"Gosh - and was your chest as hairy as your back?"), but you know what I
mean.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Min
2021-09-12 01:59:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
They did sometimes make me wish an Isadora Duncan-like outcome on their
owners, but I have developed sympathy with silk scarves when worn around
the head. During my university years I had long hair, which eventually
came over half way down my back.[1] I also hitch-hiked a lot. During
one journey in an open-topped sports car, my hair flew pleasingly (and
naively) all over the place in the wind. Not quite so pleasing was
trying to get a comb or brush through it afterward, which was painful,
involved a lot of pulled-out hair and broken-off tangles, and took
absolutely ages. It was at that point I realised why women might wear a
scarf over their hair in an open car. (Lady umratesses will, of course,
have known this from birth in the way that women seem to, while we chaps
blunder around learning painful lessons.)
Lifts in sports cars were rare, but my solution thereafter was to tuck
my hair firmly into my shirt or jumper and then lean back on it to
prevent escape.
[1]I know somerats will be formulating responses along the lines of
"Gosh - and was your chest as hairy as your back?"), but you know what I
mean.
A good friend of mine once pursued two beautiful blondes in an open-topped
sports car, only to find when they stopped, an Afghan Hound and his (male)
owner.....
--
Min
Mike McMillan
2021-09-12 07:51:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Min
Post by Sid Nuncius
They did sometimes make me wish an Isadora Duncan-like outcome on their
owners, but I have developed sympathy with silk scarves when worn around
the head. During my university years I had long hair, which eventually
came over half way down my back.[1] I also hitch-hiked a lot. During
one journey in an open-topped sports car, my hair flew pleasingly (and
naively) all over the place in the wind. Not quite so pleasing was
trying to get a comb or brush through it afterward, which was painful,
involved a lot of pulled-out hair and broken-off tangles, and took
absolutely ages. It was at that point I realised why women might wear a
scarf over their hair in an open car. (Lady umratesses will, of course,
have known this from birth in the way that women seem to, while we chaps
blunder around learning painful lessons.)
Lifts in sports cars were rare, but my solution thereafter was to tuck
my hair firmly into my shirt or jumper and then lean back on it to
prevent escape.
[1]I know somerats will be formulating responses along the lines of
"Gosh - and was your chest as hairy as your back?"), but you know what I
mean.
A good friend of mine once pursued two beautiful blondes in an open-topped
sports car, only to find when they stopped, an Afghan Hound and his (male)
owner.....
Pursued … or doggedly followed them?
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Jane Vernon
2021-09-12 09:03:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
And does anyone still wear those leather (or imitation leather) "driving
gloves" with the string backs?  I see that they can still be purchased
for a mere £115.00.  In the early 70s, somewhat cheaper versions were
considered essential by some drivers - all of whom I remember being
complete dickheads.
They have appeared as a prize in this season of Richard Osman's House of
Games.

For anyone who has never watched this - I thoroughly recommend it. It's
just such fun and interesting and quirky and .... my favourite quiz
program without doubt. 6pm BBC2 weekday nights (except when it's
interrupted, and no idea how exactly they get all five into a week but
they do.)

It's probably all on iPlayer.

Purple Potter
Nick Odell
2021-09-12 10:59:48 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 12 Sep 2021 10:03:48 +0100, Jane Vernon
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Sid Nuncius
And does anyone still wear those leather (or imitation leather) "driving
gloves" with the string backs?  I see that they can still be purchased
for a mere £115.00.  In the early 70s, somewhat cheaper versions were
considered essential by some drivers - all of whom I remember being
complete dickheads.
They have appeared as a prize in this season of Richard Osman's House of
Games.
For anyone who has never watched this - I thoroughly recommend it. It's
just such fun and interesting and quirky and .... my favourite quiz
program without doubt. 6pm BBC2 weekday nights (except when it's
interrupted, and no idea how exactly they get all five into a week but
they do.)
It's probably all on iPlayer.
What's more, it finishes just in time to listen to Richard Osman's
Birthday Cake Game on Tuesday evenings, Radio 4, 18.30 after the news.

For anybody who has ever said that Richard Osman's voice is so warm
and reassuring that they could spend hours just listening to him
reading out the telephone directory, The Birthday Cake Game is the
show they have been waiting for.

Nick
Nick Odell
2021-09-12 12:37:48 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 12 Sep 2021 13:20:41 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Nick Odell
For anybody who has ever said that Richard Osman's voice is so warm
and reassuring that they could spend hours just listening to him
reading out the telephone directory, The Birthday Cake Game is the
show they have been waiting for.
Exactly! I couldn't believe that Richard Osman would associate himself
with anything *quite* so puerile. He didn't invent that one as well as
Pointless, did he? The cake thing is certainly pointless.
A very restrained and dignified response, if I may say so, Jenny.
Matched only by the tact and diplomacy shown by Miranda Sawyer in the
Grauniad:
<https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2021/sep/04/the-birthday-cake-game-richard-osman-review-a-wish-for-afghanistan-lyse-doucet-finding-q-dr-death-miracle-man>

I was not quite so restrained or dignified as either you or Ms Sawyer
when I commented in uk.media.radio.bbc-r4.

Nick
Chris
2021-09-12 16:32:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Sun, 12 Sep 2021 13:20:41 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Nick Odell
For anybody who has ever said that Richard Osman's voice is so warm
and reassuring that they could spend hours just listening to him
reading out the telephone directory, The Birthday Cake Game is the
show they have been waiting for.
Exactly! I couldn't believe that Richard Osman would associate himself
with anything *quite* so puerile. He didn't invent that one as well as
Pointless, did he? The cake thing is certainly pointless.
A very restrained and dignified response, if I may say so, Jenny.
Matched only by the tact and diplomacy shown by Miranda Sawyer in the
<https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2021/sep/04/the-birthday-cake-game-richard-osman-review-a-wish-for-afghanistan-lyse-doucet-finding-q-dr-death-miracle-man>
I was not quite so restrained or dignified as either you or Ms Sawyer
when I commented in uk.media.radio.bbc-r4.
Nick
You’ve stuck with that, Nick? Respect’

Sincerely Chris
Chris
2021-09-12 16:32:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Sun, 12 Sep 2021 10:03:48 +0100, Jane Vernon
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Sid Nuncius
And does anyone still wear those leather (or imitation leather) "driving
gloves" with the string backs?  I see that they can still be purchased
for a mere £115.00.  In the early 70s, somewhat cheaper versions were
considered essential by some drivers - all of whom I remember being
complete dickheads.
They have appeared as a prize in this season of Richard Osman's House of
Games.
For anyone who has never watched this - I thoroughly recommend it. It's
just such fun and interesting and quirky and .... my favourite quiz
program without doubt. 6pm BBC2 weekday nights (except when it's
interrupted, and no idea how exactly they get all five into a week but
they do.)
It's probably all on iPlayer.
What's more, it finishes just in time to listen to Richard Osman's
Birthday Cake Game on Tuesday evenings, Radio 4, 18.30 after the news.
For anybody who has ever said that Richard Osman's voice is so warm
and reassuring that they could spend hours just listening to him
reading out the telephone directory, The Birthday Cake Game is the
show they have been waiting for.
Nick
Chuckle, not what I think of when I hear him at all! I missed a chance to
meet him a few years ago by not attending the AGM of the Nystagmus Network
U.K. a few years ago now.

Sincerely Chris
Chris
2021-09-12 16:32:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
For anybody who has ever said that Richard Osman's voice is so warm
and reassuring that they could spend hours just listening to him
reading out the telephone directory, The Birthday Cake Game is the
show they have been waiting for.
Exactly! I couldn't believe that Richard Osman would associate himself
with anything *quite* so puerile. He didn't invent that one as well as
Pointless, did he? The cake thing is certainly pointless.
Yes I think he probably did. He’s actually a very serious sort of chap,
until “Pointless” he was a tv cameraman. And even with everything I know
I’m in awe of how he became a pro cameraman. Watch his eyes snd you’ll see
what I mean.

Sincerely Chris
Jenny M Benson
2021-09-12 21:55:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris
Yes I think he probably did. He’s actually a very serious sort of chap,
until “Pointless” he was a tv cameraman.
I thought he was a Producer before he came up with the idea for
Pointless and then was chosen to be part of the show when he was putting
his idea to the Beeb.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Chris J Dixon
2021-09-13 08:03:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Yes I think he probably did. He’s actually a very serious sort of chap,
until “Pointless” he was a tv cameraman.
I thought he was a Producer before he came up with the idea for
Pointless and then was chosen to be part of the show when he was putting
his idea to the Beeb.
That sounds about right.

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Osman>

"Osman began his career working as executive producer on British
game shows, including Deal or No Deal, Channel 4 comedy panel
game 8 out of 10 Cats and satirical comedy 10 O'Clock Live. He
was the creative director at TV company Endemol, pitching the
idea for Pointless to the BBC, becoming its co-presenter with his
former university friend, Alexander Armstrong, when it launched
in 2009.

He created the short-lived 2013 ITV gameshow Prize Island.[6] His
other credits include Whose Line is it Anyway?, Total Wipeout and
the game show 24 Hour Quiz. As a producer of Deal or No Deal,
Osman was the one who revealed the identity of The Banker to be
the show's producer Glenn Hugill.

Osman acted as script editor for BBC One's Total Wipeout and in
1999, created and wrote the Channel 4 sitcom Boyz Unlimited with
David Walliams and Matt Lucas. In 2005, he co-created and
co-wrote the animated Channel 4 sitcom Bromwell High.[7][8][9]

Osman left Endemol in 2020.[10] "

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Chris
2021-09-13 17:04:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Jenny M Benson
Yes I think he probably did. He’s actually a very serious sort of chap,
until “Pointless” he was a tv cameraman.
I thought he was a Producer before he came up with the idea for
Pointless and then was chosen to be part of the show when he was putting
his idea to the Beeb.
That sounds about right.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Osman>
"Osman began his career working as executive producer on British
game shows, including Deal or No Deal, Channel 4 comedy panel
game 8 out of 10 Cats and satirical comedy 10 O'Clock Live. He
was the creative director at TV company Endemol, pitching the
idea for Pointless to the BBC, becoming its co-presenter with his
former university friend, Alexander Armstrong, when it launched
in 2009.
He created the short-lived 2013 ITV gameshow Prize Island.[6] His
other credits include Whose Line is it Anyway?, Total Wipeout and
the game show 24 Hour Quiz. As a producer of Deal or No Deal,
Osman was the one who revealed the identity of The Banker to be
the show's producer Glenn Hugill.
Osman acted as script editor for BBC One's Total Wipeout and in
1999, created and wrote the Channel 4 sitcom Boyz Unlimited with
David Walliams and Matt Lucas. In 2005, he co-created and
co-wrote the animated Channel 4 sitcom Bromwell High.[7][8][9]
Osman left Endemol in 2020.[10] "
Chris
Phew.

Sincerely Chris
Chris
2021-09-13 17:04:53 UTC
Permalink
Jenny wrote. I thought he was a producer. You thought right. Wikipedia
has him listed as ‘comedian’.

Mea culpa.

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2021-09-12 12:53:54 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 12 Sep 2021 10:03:48 +0100, Jane Vernon
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Sid Nuncius
And does anyone still wear those leather (or imitation leather) "driving
gloves" with the string backs?  I see that they can still be purchased
for a mere £115.00.  In the early 70s, somewhat cheaper versions were
considered essential by some drivers - all of whom I remember being
complete dickheads.
They have appeared as a prize in this season of Richard Osman's House of
Games.
I've a feeling they are not 'real' leather.
Post by Jane Vernon
For anyone who has never watched this - I thoroughly recommend it. It's
just such fun and interesting and quirky and .... my favourite quiz
program without doubt.
I agree, good fun.
I rarely know (of) more than one of the four contestants in any week but
that doesn't matter (although I get cross with some of those I do know
when, presumably assuming they won't be able to answer anything, make no
effort).

I think the key to the whole thing is the carefully crafted questions. A
random group of people of different ages and interests can all find
something they can win a point at - the same applies to the audience. I
suspect the range of subjects is tailored to the group of the week. It
probably helps if they've watched the programme too.
--
Penny
Happiness comes in through doors you didn't even know you'd left open.
Sid Nuncius
2021-09-12 17:25:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Sid Nuncius
And does anyone still wear those leather (or imitation leather)
"driving gloves" with the string backs?  I see that they can still be
purchased for a mere £115.00.  In the early 70s, somewhat cheaper
versions were considered essential by some drivers - all of whom I
remember being complete dickheads.
They have appeared as a prize in this season of Richard Osman's House of
Games.
For anyone who has never watched this - I thoroughly recommend it.  It's
just such fun and interesting and quirky and ....  my favourite quiz
program without doubt.  6pm BBC2 weekday nights (except when it's
interrupted, and no idea how exactly they get all five into a week but
they do.)
It's probably all on iPlayer.
<languid wave> to all that. I love it, and regularly watch it on
iPlayer; it's engaging, witty, good-natured and often makes me laugh.
TBH, it's helped me through the tougher times of the last few months by
reliably lifting my spirits.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Penny
2021-09-15 09:58:54 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 12 Sep 2021 10:03:48 +0100, Jane Vernon
Post by Jane Vernon
Post by Sid Nuncius
And does anyone still wear those leather (or imitation leather) "driving
gloves" with the string backs?  I see that they can still be purchased
for a mere £115.00.  In the early 70s, somewhat cheaper versions were
considered essential by some drivers - all of whom I remember being
complete dickheads.
They have appeared as a prize in this season of Richard Osman's House of
Games.
For anyone who has never watched this - I thoroughly recommend it. It's
just such fun and interesting and quirky and .... my favourite quiz
program without doubt. 6pm BBC2 weekday nights (except when it's
interrupted, and no idea how exactly they get all five into a week but
they do.)
I forgot to say...
I assume they record a whole week's-worth in one day. Do you think they are
obliged to bring five different outfits to wear to reinforce the illusion
of 'yesterday'?

I know some people do wear different clothes every day - I've never been
one of them.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2021-09-15 10:38:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
I forgot to say...
I assume they record a whole week's-worth in one day. Do you think they are
obliged to bring five different outfits to wear to reinforce the illusion
of 'yesterday'?
I know some people do wear different clothes every day - I've never been
one of them.
--
Coincidentally, that same thought occurred to me yesterday.

Other thoughts occur to me from time time, such as why does Richard
always refer to "wheely luggage" and not just call it a suitcase?

Is there a price for the first person to spot someone wheeling a House
of Games suitcase?
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Penny
2021-09-15 21:59:10 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 15 Sep 2021 11:38:39 +0100, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I forgot to say...
I assume they record a whole week's-worth in one day. Do you think they are
obliged to bring five different outfits to wear to reinforce the illusion
of 'yesterday'?
I know some people do wear different clothes every day - I've never been
one of them.
--
Coincidentally, that same thought occurred to me yesterday.
Other thoughts occur to me from time time, such as why does Richard
always refer to "wheely luggage" and not just call it a suitcase?
I must have been watching it for too long - I find it strange when a guest
calls it luggage. It's a bit like being surprised when you get a strange
look from someone because you just used a deliberate 'family'
mispronunciation.
Post by Jenny M Benson
Is there a price for the first person to spot someone wheeling a House
of Games suitcase?
I think it's free but doubt there's a prize ;)

Last week the two blokes with short dark hair and specs who took home the
hoodie and the luggage thought they looked bespoke for themselves.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2021-09-16 08:59:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
It's a bit like being surprised when you get a strange
look from someone because you just used a deliberate 'family'
mispronunciation.
That was rather what prompted my query about a prize for seeing the
first person with an Osman suitcase. When we were children and being
taken anywhere such as to an agricultural show or a special event, my
father would offer us "1d for the one who sees the first tent" or "2d to
the first one to see a direction sign." On our way to our cottage in
the Lake District we would pass through Backbarrow (which we called The
Blue Place) where Reckitt's Blue was made. The colour blue was very
much in evidence and we'd get, perhaps, 3d for seeing a blue
wheelbarrow, but best of all was 6d for seeing a blue man.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Chris
2021-09-06 16:08:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sid Nuncius
IMHO purple is a horrible colour.  Many people disagree.
A certain potter of this parish takes a different view.
I should make it clear that I eschew all things purple EXCEPT our dear
potter.
:)

Sincerely Chris
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