Discussion:
OT: self-googling
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BrritSki
2019-11-21 21:29:45 UTC
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"A tilbury is fast, light, sporty and dangerous:"

Once upon a time it would all have been true... :_

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilbury_(carriage)>
Chris McMillan
2019-11-23 08:00:52 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
"A tilbury is fast, light, sporty and dangerous:"
Once upon a time it would all have been true... :_
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilbury_(carriage)>
Who’d have thunk your ancestors must’ve been builders or designers of said
carriage. Have you seen evidence?

Sincerely Chris
BrritSki
2019-11-23 09:20:38 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
"A tilbury is fast, light, sporty and dangerous:"
Once upon a time it would all have been true... :_
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilbury_(carriage)>
Who’d have thunk your ancestors must’ve been builders or designers of said
carriage. Have you seen evidence?
Not personally, but there are plenty of images on t'interweb.

When we lived in the South of France Nice-Matin had a story headed
"Tilbury: un cabriolet fait a main" with a picture of two beautiful
old-fashioned hand-built convertible cars, rather like a Morgan, or and
old MGA (ObTA Tony Archer reference). I never did find out if the makers
were really called that or it was just a reference to the old carriage.
Probably the latter as the Google images are from all over the place
including one being used by the French Postal Service.

<fx: googles again> Yes, and here one is, created by Yves Charles (no
relation):

<http://www.sms-tilbury.com/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=51>
Chris McMillan
2019-11-23 14:48:00 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
"A tilbury is fast, light, sporty and dangerous:"
Once upon a time it would all have been true... :_
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilbury_(carriage)>
Who’d have thunk your ancestors must’ve been builders or designers of said
carriage. Have you seen evidence?
Not personally, but there are plenty of images on t'interweb.
When we lived in the South of France Nice-Matin had a story headed
"Tilbury: un cabriolet fait a main" with a picture of two beautiful
old-fashioned hand-built convertible cars, rather like a Morgan, or and
old MGA (ObTA Tony Archer reference). I never did find out if the makers
were really called that or it was just a reference to the old carriage.
Probably the latter as the Google images are from all over the place
including one being used by the French Postal Service.
<fx: googles again> Yes, and here one is, created by Yves Charles (no
<http://www.sms-tilbury.com/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=51>
Eeeek, Tilbury, not exactly small is it? You’d need a few cushions on the
driving seat!

Sincerely Chris
BrritSki
2019-11-23 15:14:17 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
"A tilbury is fast, light, sporty and dangerous:"
Once upon a time it would all have been true... :_
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilbury_(carriage)>
Who’d have thunk your ancestors must’ve been builders or designers of said
carriage. Have you seen evidence?
Not personally, but there are plenty of images on t'interweb.
When we lived in the South of France Nice-Matin had a story headed
"Tilbury: un cabriolet fait a main" with a picture of two beautiful
old-fashioned hand-built convertible cars, rather like a Morgan, or and
old MGA (ObTA Tony Archer reference). I never did find out if the makers
were really called that or it was just a reference to the old carriage.
Probably the latter as the Google images are from all over the place
including one being used by the French Postal Service.
<fx: googles again> Yes, and here one is, created by Yves Charles (no
<http://www.sms-tilbury.com/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=51>
Eeeek, Tilbury, not exactly small is it?
I bet you say that to all the boys...
Post by Chris McMillan
You’d need a few cushions on the driving seat!
Oooo'er missus !
Post by Chris McMillan
Sincerely Chris
Chris McMillan
2019-11-24 11:08:36 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
"A tilbury is fast, light, sporty and dangerous:"
Once upon a time it would all have been true... :_
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilbury_(carriage)>
Who’d have thunk your ancestors must’ve been builders or designers of said
carriage. Have you seen evidence?
Not personally, but there are plenty of images on t'interweb.
When we lived in the South of France Nice-Matin had a story headed
"Tilbury: un cabriolet fait a main" with a picture of two beautiful
old-fashioned hand-built convertible cars, rather like a Morgan, or and
old MGA (ObTA Tony Archer reference). I never did find out if the makers
were really called that or it was just a reference to the old carriage.
Probably the latter as the Google images are from all over the place
including one being used by the French Postal Service.
<fx: googles again> Yes, and here one is, created by Yves Charles (no
<http://www.sms-tilbury.com/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=51>
Eeeek, Tilbury, not exactly small is it?
I bet you say that to all the boys...
Post by Chris McMillan
You’d need a few cushions on the driving seat!
Oooo'er missus !
Post by Chris McMillan
Sincerely Chris
Snigger! (If anyone can find a photo of Britters at a BBQ, you’ll see he’s
not exactly the tallest umrat ever)

Sincerely Chris
BrritSki
2019-11-24 12:09:02 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
"A tilbury is fast, light, sporty and dangerous:"
Once upon a time it would all have been true... :_
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilbury_(carriage)>
Who’d have thunk your ancestors must’ve been builders or designers of said
carriage. Have you seen evidence?
Not personally, but there are plenty of images on t'interweb.
When we lived in the South of France Nice-Matin had a story headed
"Tilbury: un cabriolet fait a main" with a picture of two beautiful
old-fashioned hand-built convertible cars, rather like a Morgan, or and
old MGA (ObTA Tony Archer reference). I never did find out if the makers
were really called that or it was just a reference to the old carriage.
Probably the latter as the Google images are from all over the place
including one being used by the French Postal Service.
<fx: googles again> Yes, and here one is, created by Yves Charles (no
<http://www.sms-tilbury.com/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=51>
Eeeek, Tilbury, not exactly small is it?
I bet you say that to all the boys...
Post by Chris McMillan
You’d need a few cushions on the driving seat!
Snigger! (If anyone can find a photo of Britters at a BBQ, you’ll see he’s
not exactly the tallest umrat ever)
Maybe not, but at 5'7" I'm not exactly a midget either and drove an MGB
perfectly happily for several years without any need for additional
cusions. Harrumph.
Chris McMillan
2019-11-25 15:17:06 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
"A tilbury is fast, light, sporty and dangerous:"
Once upon a time it would all have been true... :_
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilbury_(carriage)>
Who’d have thunk your ancestors must’ve been builders or designers of said
carriage. Have you seen evidence?
Not personally, but there are plenty of images on t'interweb.
When we lived in the South of France Nice-Matin had a story headed
"Tilbury: un cabriolet fait a main" with a picture of two beautiful
old-fashioned hand-built convertible cars, rather like a Morgan, or and
old MGA (ObTA Tony Archer reference). I never did find out if the makers
were really called that or it was just a reference to the old carriage.
Probably the latter as the Google images are from all over the place
including one being used by the French Postal Service.
<fx: googles again> Yes, and here one is, created by Yves Charles (no
<http://www.sms-tilbury.com/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=51>
Eeeek, Tilbury, not exactly small is it?
I bet you say that to all the boys...
Post by Chris McMillan
You’d need a few cushions on the driving seat!
Snigger! (If anyone can find a photo of Britters at a BBQ, you’ll see he’s
not exactly the tallest umrat ever)
Maybe not, but at 5'7" I'm not exactly a midget either and drove an MGB
perfectly happily for several years without any need for additional
cusions. Harrumph.
Don’t know what a midget car looks like. The tilbury looks like one of
those SUVs in height, the sort I need several step stools to lever myself
up with!

What I had expected to see wasn’t so much a car as a horse drawn type of
carriage though.

Sincerely Chris
BrritSki
2019-11-25 15:44:09 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
"A tilbury is fast, light, sporty and dangerous:"
Once upon a time it would all have been true... :_
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilbury_(carriage)>
This link was to the horse-drawn carriages ^
with more images here
<https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=tilbury+carriage&pws=0&gl=us&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwje-sTs2IXmAhXGSsAKHerZD4cQ_AUoAXoECBEQAw&biw=965&bih=548>
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
Maybe not, but at 5'7" I'm not exactly a midget either and drove an MGB
perfectly happily for several years without any need for additional
cusions. Harrumph.
Don’t know what a midget car looks like.
You're getting confused between me (not a midget) and an MGB, also not a
midget although there was an MG Midget just to add to the confusion :)
Post by Chris McMillan
The tilbury looks like one of those SUVs in height
False perspective in the picture at the top of that page. It's actually
a small, low-slung 2-seater. This image gives you a better idea of the
scale:

<Loading Image...>
BrritSki
2019-11-25 15:48:45 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
"A tilbury is fast, light, sporty and dangerous:"
Once upon a time it would all have been true... :_
False perspective in the picture at the top of that page. It's actually
a small, low-slung 2-seater. This image gives you a better idea of the
<http://i85.servimg.com/u/f85/13/55/41/00/heudre10.jpg>
And the red car to the left of it is an MGA :)
Chris McMillan
2019-11-26 17:00:03 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
"A tilbury is fast, light, sporty and dangerous:"
Once upon a time it would all have been true... :_
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilbury_(carriage)>
This link was to the horse-drawn carriages ^
with more images here
<https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=tilbury+carriage&pws=0&gl=us&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwje-sTs2IXmAhXGSsAKHerZD4cQ_AUoAXoECBEQAw&biw=965&bih=548>
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
Maybe not, but at 5'7" I'm not exactly a midget either and drove an MGB
perfectly happily for several years without any need for additional
cusions. Harrumph.
Don’t know what a midget car looks like.
You're getting confused between me (not a midget) and an MGB, also not a
midget although there was an MG Midget just to add to the confusion :)
Post by Chris McMillan
The tilbury looks like one of those SUVs in height
False perspective in the picture at the top of that page. It's actually
a small, low-slung 2-seater. This image gives you a better idea of the
<http://i85.servimg.com/u/f85/13/55/41/00/heudre10.jpg>
Certainly was confusing to this very little bear!

Thanks. Scuttles off to find a marmalade sandwich.

Sincerely Chris
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-24 18:05:44 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
"A tilbury is fast, light, sporty and dangerous:"
Once upon a time it would all have been true... :_
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilbury_(carriage)>
Who’d have thunk your ancestors must’ve been builders or designers of said
carriage. Have you seen evidence?
Er...is it not more likely that Brritters' ancestors dwelt in Tilbury,
Essex? Perhaps they were present there as Elizabeth I roused her troops
- and one of them implied a vulgar interpretation of the phrase "roused
her troops".
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2019-11-24 21:48:28 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
"A tilbury is fast, light, sporty and dangerous:"
Once upon a time it would all have been true... :_
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilbury_(carriage)>
Who’d have thunk your ancestors must’ve been builders or designers of said
carriage. Have you seen evidence?
Er...is it not more likely that Brritters' ancestors dwelt in Tilbury,
Essex?  Perhaps they were present there as Elizabeth I roused her troops
- and one of them implied a vulgar interpretation of the phrase "roused
her troops".
:)

Yes, I've always believed (with no evidence) that that is the origin of
our name. We're all over the UK now, with my paternal GD being from
Guildford where he ran a coaching inn we believe.

When will WDYTYA call ? Some of us will be made up (geddit?).
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-24 23:03:45 UTC
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[]
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
Er...is it not more likely that Brritters' ancestors dwelt in
Tilbury, Essex?  Perhaps they were present there as Elizabeth I
roused her troops - and one of them implied a vulgar interpretation
of the phrase "roused her troops".
:)
Yes, I've always believed (with no evidence) that that is the origin of
our name. We're all over the UK now, with my paternal GD being from
Guildford where he ran a coaching inn we believe.
When will WDYTYA call ? Some of us will be made up (geddit?).
Since I have Ancestry open, I've just looked at the earliest census
(1841), and there are 502 with the surname Tilbury (that makes it
moderately rare IMO); pretty broadly scattered by then, though mainly
home counties - of the first 20: Middlesex (which is more or less the
area we'd now call London) 3, Berkshire 1, Guernsey 1, Worcestershire 1,
Hampshire 7, Derbyshire 1, Surrey 3, Buckinghamshire 2, Kent 1. On that
unscientific sample, none in the north, a cluster in Hampshire, and
oddly none in Essex. Adding born in Hampshire to the search criteria
gives 105, or Middlesex 76, out of the 502. Essex none! (For "born in"
[though could be a few - ask why if interested]; one for "lived in" - he
was in Chelmsford.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

he was eventually struck off by the BMA in 1968 for not knowing his gluteus
maximus from his humerus.
BrritSki
2019-11-25 08:57:57 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by BrritSki
 Er...is it not more likely that Brritters' ancestors dwelt in
Tilbury,  Essex?  Perhaps they were present there as Elizabeth I
roused her troops  - and one of them implied a vulgar interpretation
of the phrase "roused  her troops".
:)
Yes, I've always believed (with no evidence) that that is the origin
of our name. We're all over the UK now, with my paternal GD being from
Guildford where he ran a coaching inn we believe.
When will WDYTYA call ?  Some of us will be made up (geddit?).
Since I have Ancestry open, I've just looked at the earliest census
(1841), and there are 502 with the surname Tilbury (that makes it
moderately rare IMO); pretty broadly scattered by then, though mainly
home counties - of the first 20: Middlesex (which is more or less the
area we'd now call London) 3, Berkshire 1, Guernsey 1, Worcestershire 1,
Hampshire 7, Derbyshire 1, Surrey 3, Buckinghamshire 2, Kent 1. On that
unscientific sample, none in the north, a cluster in Hampshire, and
oddly none in Essex. Adding born in Hampshire to the search criteria
gives 105, or Middlesex 76, out of the 502. Essex none! (For "born in"
[though could be a few - ask why if interested]; one for "lived in" - he
was in Chelmsford.)
Thanks John. Were any of the Surrey 3 in or near Guildford and is there
an address on the census please ?

I'd like to confirm the Coaching Inn theory. My Grandfather remembered
living in a big house with stables and footmen, but it was later claimed
that this was the Inn and the footmen were just general servants so it
would be interesting to know one way or the other.
Grandfather's name was Horace, but he would not have been alive in 1842
as I guess he was born 40 or 50 years later. Dad (Ronald George) was
born in 1922 in Coventry...
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-25 11:04:49 UTC
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In message <***@mid.individual.net>, BrritSki
<***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by BrritSki
Thanks John. Were any of the Surrey 3 in or near Guildford and is there
an address on the census please ?
I'd like to confirm the Coaching Inn theory. My Grandfather remembered
living in a big house with stables and footmen, but it was later
claimed that this was the Inn and the footmen were just general
servants so it would be interesting to know one way or the other.
Grandfather's name was Horace, but he would not have been alive in 1842
as I guess he was born 40 or 50 years later. Dad (Ronald George) was
born in 1922 in Coventry...
Replying by email.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's
money."
BrritSki
2019-11-25 12:30:31 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by BrritSki
Thanks John. Were any of the Surrey 3 in or near Guildford and is
there an address on the census please ?
I'd like to confirm the Coaching Inn theory. My Grandfather remembered
living in a big house with stables and footmen, but it was later
claimed that this was the Inn and the footmen were just general
servants so it would be interesting to know one way or the other.
Grandfather's name was Horace, but he would not have been alive in
1842 as I guess he was born 40 or 50 years later. Dad (Ronald George)
was born in 1922 in Coventry...
Replying by email.
Thanks John, seems they are not my relatives based on the next post....
Anne B
2019-11-25 12:12:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Thanks John. Were any of the Surrey 3 in or near Guildford and is there
an address on the census please ?
I'd like to confirm the Coaching Inn theory. My Grandfather remembered
living in a big house with stables and footmen, but it was later claimed
that this was the Inn and the footmen were just general servants so it
would be interesting to know one way or the other.
Grandfather's name was Horace, but he would not have been alive in 1842
as I guess he was born 40 or 50 years later. Dad (Ronald George) was
born in 1922 in Coventry...
Reverse timeline
Ronald G Tilbury, mother's surname Foster, born Coventry 1922
Horace W Tilbury married Ellen Foster, Coventry, 1916
Horace Watsons Tilbury, 19, in 1911 census in Guildford with father
William, 49, lodging house keeper, born Norwood.
Horace Tilbury, 8, in 1901 census in Guildford, with father William, 38,
master toll collector, born Norwood
Horace Watson Tilbury born Guildford 1892, mother's maiden surname Martin
William Tilbury married Frances Harriet Martin in Guildford, 1886
William Tilbury, 18, groom, born Norwood, in 1881 census with widowed
mother Mary and 3 siblings
William Tilbury, 8, born Norwood Grove, in 1871 census in Guildford with
parents James, 35, ag lab, and Mary Ann, 37, both born Chilbolton, Hampshire
William Tilbury, mother's surname Fifield, birth registered Uxbridge, 1862
James Tilbury, 26, licensed victualler, and Mary Ann, 27, in The Wolff
Public House, Norwood, in 1861 census; both born Chilbolton
James Tilbury and Mary Ann Fifield marriage registered in Andover (which
includes Chilbolton) in 1858

All information from FreeBMD, GRO index or original documents; and not
one jot or tittle of it from Ancestry, so it should be reasonably reliable.

Anne B
BrritSki
2019-11-25 12:36:40 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by BrritSki
Thanks John. Were any of the Surrey 3 in or near Guildford and is
there an address on the census please ?
I'd like to confirm the Coaching Inn theory. My Grandfather remembered
living in a big house with stables and footmen, but it was later
claimed that this was the Inn and the footmen were just general
servants so it would be interesting to know one way or the other.
Grandfather's name was Horace, but he would not have been alive in
1842 as I guess he was born 40 or 50 years later. Dad (Ronald George)
was born in 1922 in Coventry...
Reverse timeline
Ronald G Tilbury, mother's surname Foster, born Coventry 1922
Horace W Tilbury married Ellen Foster, Coventry, 1916
Horace Watsons Tilbury, 19, in 1911 census in Guildford with father
William, 49, lodging house keeper, born Norwood.
Horace Tilbury, 8, in 1901 census in Guildford, with father William, 38,
master toll collector, born Norwood
Horace Watson Tilbury born Guildford 1892, mother's maiden surname Martin
William Tilbury married Frances Harriet Martin in Guildford, 1886
William Tilbury, 18, groom, born Norwood, in 1881 census with widowed
mother Mary and 3 siblings
William Tilbury, 8, born Norwood Grove, in 1871 census in Guildford with
parents James, 35, ag lab, and Mary Ann, 37, both born Chilbolton, Hampshire
William Tilbury, mother's surname Fifield, birth registered Uxbridge, 1862
James Tilbury, 26, licensed victualler, and Mary Ann, 27, in The Wolff
Public House, Norwood, in 1861 census; both born Chilbolton
James Tilbury and Mary Ann Fifield marriage registered in Andover (which
includes Chilbolton) in 1858
All information from FreeBMD, GRO index or original documents; and not
one jot or tittle of it from Ancestry, so it should be reasonably reliable.
Wow, that's amazing Anne, thank you very much. That certainly confirms
(sort of) what we thought about GGD being an inn-keeper.

Dad's sister married a Martin - I wonder if she knew that was her GM's
maiden name ? Too late to ask her, but maybe her children know -
something to add to the Christmas cards...

I must look into FreeBMD if all that info is available for the Sheddi's
favourite price...
BrritSki
2019-11-25 13:21:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by BrritSki
Thanks John. Were any of the Surrey 3 in or near Guildford and is
there an address on the census please ?
I'd like to confirm the Coaching Inn theory. My Grandfather
remembered living in a big house with stables and footmen, but it was
later claimed that this was the Inn and the footmen were just general
servants so it would be interesting to know one way or the other.
Grandfather's name was Horace, but he would not have been alive in
1842 as I guess he was born 40 or 50 years later. Dad (Ronald George)
was born in 1922 in Coventry...
Reverse timeline
Ronald G Tilbury, mother's surname Foster, born Coventry 1922
Horace W Tilbury married Ellen Foster, Coventry, 1916
Ellen Foster's family were part of the court action that claimed
ownership of a chunk of Manhattan worth 100s of billions of $s.
<https://www.independent.co.uk/news/pirates-heirs-win-right-to-raid-new-york-1122465.html>

Unfortunately they lost the case :(
Joe Kerr
2019-11-25 14:31:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Anne B
Post by BrritSki
Thanks John. Were any of the Surrey 3 in or near Guildford and is
there an address on the census please ?
I'd like to confirm the Coaching Inn theory. My Grandfather
remembered living in a big house with stables and footmen, but it
was later claimed that this was the Inn and the footmen were just
general servants so it would be interesting to know one way or the
other.
Grandfather's name was Horace, but he would not have been alive in
1842 as I guess he was born 40 or 50 years later. Dad (Ronald
George) was born in 1922 in Coventry...
Reverse timeline
Ronald G Tilbury, mother's surname Foster, born Coventry 1922
Horace W Tilbury married Ellen Foster, Coventry, 1916
Ellen Foster's family were part of the court action that claimed
ownership of a chunk of Manhattan worth 100s of billions of $s.
<https://www.independent.co.uk/news/pirates-heirs-win-right-to-raid-new-york-1122465.html>
Unfortunately they lost the case :(
To lose one court case may be regarded as a mis(sed)fortune.
--
Ric
Sam Plusnet
2019-11-25 22:30:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Anne B
Post by BrritSki
Thanks John. Were any of the Surrey 3 in or near Guildford and is
there an address on the census please ?
I'd like to confirm the Coaching Inn theory. My Grandfather
remembered living in a big house with stables and footmen, but it
was later claimed that this was the Inn and the footmen were just
general servants so it would be interesting to know one way or the
other.
Grandfather's name was Horace, but he would not have been alive in
1842 as I guess he was born 40 or 50 years later. Dad (Ronald
George) was born in 1922 in Coventry...
Reverse timeline
Ronald G Tilbury, mother's surname Foster, born Coventry 1922
Horace W Tilbury married Ellen Foster, Coventry, 1916
Ellen Foster's family were part of the court action that claimed
ownership of a chunk of Manhattan worth 100s of billions of $s.
<https://www.independent.co.uk/news/pirates-heirs-win-right-to-raid-new-york-1122465.html>
Unfortunately they lost the case :(
Someone else got there first.

"We'll take Manhattan
The Bronx and Staten Island too..."

(Plus a later bid for Berlin.)
--
Sam Plusnet
Anne B
2019-11-25 13:39:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
I must look into FreeBMD if all that info is available for the Sheddi's
favourite price...
FreeBMD is free, as it says.

So are the GRO indexes, which (unlike FreeBMD) includes maiden surnames
in birth indexes before 1911.
https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certificates/login.asp

You need to have a subscription to a genealogy web site to see the
original census images. Several sites are available; quality of
transcriptions and indexing varies.

If you want a certificate, so not use any site other than the GRO, or
you could shell out ££s for no additional infomation.

Anne B
carolet
2019-12-02 19:04:07 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by BrritSki
 Er...is it not more likely that Brritters' ancestors dwelt in
Tilbury,  Essex?  Perhaps they were present there as Elizabeth I
roused her troops  - and one of them implied a vulgar interpretation
of the phrase "roused  her troops".
:)
Yes, I've always believed (with no evidence) that that is the origin
of our name. We're all over the UK now, with my paternal GD being from
Guildford where he ran a coaching inn we believe.
When will WDYTYA call ?  Some of us will be made up (geddit?).
Since I have Ancestry open, I've just looked at the earliest census
(1841), and there are 502 with the surname Tilbury (that makes it
moderately rare IMO); pretty broadly scattered by then, though mainly
home counties - of the first 20: Middlesex (which is more or less the
area we'd now call London) 3, Berkshire 1, Guernsey 1, Worcestershire 1,
Hampshire 7, Derbyshire 1, Surrey 3, Buckinghamshire 2, Kent 1. On that
unscientific sample, none in the north, a cluster in Hampshire, and
oddly none in Essex. Adding born in Hampshire to the search criteria
gives 105, or Middlesex 76, out of the 502. Essex none! (For "born in"
[though could be a few - ask why if interested]; one for "lived in" - he
was in Chelmsford.)
That census also includes a family of Tilburys in Buckinghamshire that
are part of my tree.
--
CaroleT
Paul Herber
2019-12-02 19:54:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by carolet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by BrritSki
 Er...is it not more likely that Brritters' ancestors dwelt in
Tilbury,  Essex?  Perhaps they were present there as Elizabeth I
roused her troops  - and one of them implied a vulgar interpretation
of the phrase "roused  her troops".
:)
Yes, I've always believed (with no evidence) that that is the origin
of our name. We're all over the UK now, with my paternal GD being from
Guildford where he ran a coaching inn we believe.
When will WDYTYA call ?  Some of us will be made up (geddit?).
Since I have Ancestry open, I've just looked at the earliest census
(1841), and there are 502 with the surname Tilbury (that makes it
moderately rare IMO); pretty broadly scattered by then, though mainly
home counties - of the first 20: Middlesex (which is more or less the
area we'd now call London) 3, Berkshire 1, Guernsey 1, Worcestershire 1,
Hampshire 7, Derbyshire 1, Surrey 3, Buckinghamshire 2, Kent 1. On that
unscientific sample, none in the north, a cluster in Hampshire, and
oddly none in Essex. Adding born in Hampshire to the search criteria
gives 105, or Middlesex 76, out of the 502. Essex none! (For "born in"
[though could be a few - ask why if interested]; one for "lived in" - he
was in Chelmsford.)
That census also includes a family of Tilburys in Buckinghamshire that
are part of my tree.
I used to play squash with a Tilbury in Buckinghamshire.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
BrritSki
2019-12-02 21:10:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by carolet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by BrritSki
 Er...is it not more likely that Brritters' ancestors dwelt in
Tilbury,  Essex?  Perhaps they were present there as Elizabeth I
roused her troops  - and one of them implied a vulgar interpretation
of the phrase "roused  her troops".
:)
Yes, I've always believed (with no evidence) that that is the origin
of our name. We're all over the UK now, with my paternal GD being
from Guildford where he ran a coaching inn we believe.
When will WDYTYA call ?  Some of us will be made up (geddit?).
Since I have Ancestry open, I've just looked at the earliest census
(1841), and there are 502 with the surname Tilbury (that makes it
moderately rare IMO); pretty broadly scattered by then, though mainly
home counties - of the first 20: Middlesex (which is more or less the
area we'd now call London) 3, Berkshire 1, Guernsey 1, Worcestershire
1, Hampshire 7, Derbyshire 1, Surrey 3, Buckinghamshire 2, Kent 1. On
that unscientific sample, none in the north, a cluster in Hampshire,
and oddly none in Essex. Adding born in Hampshire to the search
criteria gives 105, or Middlesex 76, out of the 502. Essex none! (For
"born in" [though could be a few - ask why if interested]; one for
"lived in" - he was in Chelmsford.)
That census also includes a family of Tilburys in Buckinghamshire that
are part of my tree.
Hello cuz !
Chris McMillan
2019-12-03 15:34:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by carolet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by BrritSki
 Er...is it not more likely that Brritters' ancestors dwelt in
Tilbury,  Essex?  Perhaps they were present there as Elizabeth I
roused her troops  - and one of them implied a vulgar interpretation
of the phrase "roused  her troops".
:)
Yes, I've always believed (with no evidence) that that is the origin
of our name. We're all over the UK now, with my paternal GD being from
Guildford where he ran a coaching inn we believe.
When will WDYTYA call ?  Some of us will be made up (geddit?).
Since I have Ancestry open, I've just looked at the earliest census
(1841), and there are 502 with the surname Tilbury (that makes it
moderately rare IMO); pretty broadly scattered by then, though mainly
home counties - of the first 20: Middlesex (which is more or less the
area we'd now call London) 3, Berkshire 1, Guernsey 1, Worcestershire 1,
Hampshire 7, Derbyshire 1, Surrey 3, Buckinghamshire 2, Kent 1. On that
unscientific sample, none in the north, a cluster in Hampshire, and
oddly none in Essex. Adding born in Hampshire to the search criteria
gives 105, or Middlesex 76, out of the 502. Essex none! (For "born in"
[though could be a few - ask why if interested]; one for "lived in" - he
was in Chelmsford.)
That census also includes a family of Tilburys in Buckinghamshire that
are part of my tree.
!!!

Sincerely Chris

BrritSki
2019-11-24 21:51:07 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by BrritSki
"A tilbury is fast, light, sporty and dangerous:"
Once upon a time it would all have been true... :_
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilbury_(carriage)>
Who’d have thunk your ancestors must’ve been builders or designers of said
carriage. Have you seen evidence?
Er...is it not more likely that Brritters' ancestors dwelt in Tilbury,
Essex? Perhaps they were present there as Elizabeth I roused her troops
- and one of them implied a vulgar interpretation of the phrase "roused
her troops".
Found himself in the dock?
I was arrested in the dock once for diving in off the portable landing
stairs. It was in Isola del Giglio, just metres from where the cruise
ship went aground and I was rather drunk at the time. I suggested to the
plain clothes cop that he would need to get in the water with me to make
the arrest and eventually he wandered off, but saw me as I left the next
day and told me not to come back :)
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