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Music
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Steve Hague
2020-12-21 21:03:11 UTC
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I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
Steve
Vicky Ayech
2020-12-21 22:42:01 UTC
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On Mon, 21 Dec 2020 21:03:11 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
Steve
No can't bear him. Every breath you take is a stalker's anthem.
Steve Hague
2020-12-22 18:17:04 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Mon, 21 Dec 2020 21:03:11 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
Steve
No can't bear him. Every breath you take is a stalker's anthem.
Did you ever hear the Spitting Image version of it, Vicky? Wow. Sting
wrote some magnificent songs, and I don't believe for a minute he was a
stalker. Try "Fragile"
Steve
Sid Nuncius
2020-12-22 18:39:14 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Mon, 21 Dec 2020 21:03:11 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
Steve
No can't bear him. Every breath you take is a stalker's anthem.
Did you ever hear the Spitting Image version of it, Vicky? Wow. Sting
wrote some magnificent songs, and I don't believe for a minute he was a
stalker. Try "Fragile"
<languid wave>

Or this fantastic version of Roxanne:

--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Steve Hague
2020-12-22 18:44:00 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Mon, 21 Dec 2020 21:03:11 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
Steve
No can't bear him. Every breath you take is a stalker's anthem.
Did you ever hear the Spitting Image version of it, Vicky? Wow. Sting
wrote some magnificent songs, and I don't believe for a minute he was
a stalker. Try "Fragile"
<languid wave>
http://youtu.be/hC8iSpwZQjk
Thanks for that Sid. Superb.
Vicky Ayech
2020-12-22 19:26:04 UTC
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On Tue, 22 Dec 2020 18:44:00 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Mon, 21 Dec 2020 21:03:11 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
Steve
No can't bear him. Every breath you take is a stalker's anthem.
Did you ever hear the Spitting Image version of it, Vicky? Wow. Sting
wrote some magnificent songs, and I don't believe for a minute he was
a stalker. Try "Fragile"
<languid wave>
http://youtu.be/hC8iSpwZQjk
Thanks for that Sid. Superb.
Still no.Sorry, but thank you.
Sid Nuncius
2020-12-22 08:13:01 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
You are a sentimental old fool. As am I. I love it.

I'm listening to a lot of music, too. I find that I'm much more
susceptible to a slightly cheesy Country song than I was. Emmylou
Harris and Mark Knopfler performing Red Dirt Girl actually made me cry
the other day. Mind you, so did the Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
speech in last night's Upstart Crow. I've had that by heart for decades
and it's never had that effect on me before. A combination of becoming
a foolish, fond old man and the times we live in, I suspect.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2020-12-22 18:06:41 UTC
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...  Mind you, so did the Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
speech in last night's Upstart Crow.  I've had that by heart for decades
and it's never had that effect on me before.  A combination of becoming
a foolish, fond old man and the times we live in, I suspect.
All that plus the lead-up was brilliantly written to hint at all the
little phrases and set the scene for the mood and then the speech was
indeed very moving. The whole thing captured the current mood remarkably
well....
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-12-23 01:50:08 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
You are a sentimental old fool. As am I. I love it.
I'm not too fond of his music, but when I've seen him interviewed (which
isn't for some years), I think I like him as a person.
Post by Sid Nuncius
I'm listening to a lot of music, too. I find that I'm much more
susceptible to a slightly cheesy Country song than I was. Emmylou
Harris and Mark Knopfler performing Red Dirt Girl actually made me cry
Can't say I know that one.

I'm very susceptible to music - to an embarrassing (to me anyway)
extent. When I was younger than teens, two that always got me were "If
you go away" by Dusty, and Honey by (IIRR) Bobby Goldsborough. (Both
from my Mum's pop collection, which was eclectic.) For a long time four
Piaf tracks; more recently several Vera Lynn. I don't know why - both
predate me! (Well, I know Dame Vera only recently died, but YKWIM.)

There are a few that make me cry with happiness, which is just as
embarrassing. Either because they're happy tunes, or classics.

Quite a few, just the first few notes set me off - sometimes one note.

On a related note, I presume others share with me the phenomenon of
version specificity: you become familiar with a particular recording of
a song (usually the one you hear first), and any other one isn't _right_
- certainly if it's by someone else (even if it's someone you like, and
it's well done), but even if competently done by the same artist. For
example, there's one that starts "I'm", sung unaccompanied, and both my
brother and I can immediately tell whether it's the "right" one. I
wonder if any UMRAts can identify song and singer. (Sorry if I've
mentioned it before - I probably have.)
Post by Sid Nuncius
the other day. Mind you, so did the Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
speech in last night's Upstart Crow. I've had that by heart for
decades and it's never had that effect on me before. A combination of
becoming a foolish, fond old man and the times we live in, I suspect.
I certainly find I'm retweeting things I would have been embarrassed to
even a year ago - same combination of reasons, I think (though I was in
some ways an old softie even before this); even tending towards cat
pictures ...
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

... the greatest musical festival in the world that doesn't involve mud.
- Eddie Mair, RT 2014/8/16-22
Penny
2021-01-02 17:29:39 UTC
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On Wed, 23 Dec 2020 01:50:08 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I'm very susceptible to music - to an embarrassing (to me anyway)
extent. When I was younger than teens, two that always got me were "If
you go away" by Dusty, and Honey by (IIRR) Bobby Goldsborough. (Both
from my Mum's pop collection, which was eclectic.) For a long time four
Piaf tracks; more recently several Vera Lynn. I don't know why - both
predate me! (Well, I know Dame Vera only recently died, but YKWIM.)
Johnny Cash's 'I still miss someone' had that effect upon me - I loved the
song but it was years before I could sing it without getting a catch in my
voice and giving up.

More recently, I was surprised by my reaction to one of the tracks on Tim
Minchin's 1st album. I'd teared up at the snippet of it he posted before
release but cried uncontrollably when I heard the whole thing - I blame the
general grief I've been feeling caused by the pandemic :(

Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On a related note, I presume others share with me the phenomenon of
version specificity: you become familiar with a particular recording of
a song (usually the one you hear first), and any other one isn't _right_
Yep, I'd never heard the Roberta Flack version, familiar to my (younger)
college colleagues when I played them Peggy Seeger singing 'The first time
ever I saw your face'. They all hated it :(
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Steve Hague
2020-12-23 17:33:19 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
You are a sentimental old fool.  As am I.  I love it.
I'm listening to a lot of music, too.  I find that I'm much more
susceptible to a slightly cheesy Country song than I was.  Emmylou
Harris and Mark Knopfler performing Red Dirt Girl actually made me cry
the other day.  Mind you, so did the Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
speech in last night's Upstart Crow.  I've had that by heart for decades
and it's never had that effect on me before.  A combination of becoming
a foolish, fond old man and the times we live in, I suspect.
I would have to put up Ewan McColl's "First Time Ever I Saw Your Face
" up there. I've heard lots of versions, but the one that had my eyes
streaming was June Tabor, unaccompanied at The Acorn, Penzance about 20
years ago.
Steve
Vicky Ayech
2020-12-23 18:39:02 UTC
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On Wed, 23 Dec 2020 17:33:19 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
You are a sentimental old fool.  As am I.  I love it.
I'm listening to a lot of music, too.  I find that I'm much more
susceptible to a slightly cheesy Country song than I was.  Emmylou
Harris and Mark Knopfler performing Red Dirt Girl actually made me cry
the other day.  Mind you, so did the Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
speech in last night's Upstart Crow.  I've had that by heart for decades
and it's never had that effect on me before.  A combination of becoming
a foolish, fond old man and the times we live in, I suspect.
I would have to put up Ewan McColl's "First Time Ever I Saw Your Face
" up there. I've heard lots of versions, but the one that had my eyes
streaming was June Tabor, unaccompanied at The Acorn, Penzance about 20
years ago.
Steve
That was a good song but I can't remember who I heard sing it first.
Sid Nuncius
2020-12-23 18:51:36 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 23 Dec 2020 17:33:19 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
You are a sentimental old fool.  As am I.  I love it.
I'm listening to a lot of music, too.  I find that I'm much more
susceptible to a slightly cheesy Country song than I was.  Emmylou
Harris and Mark Knopfler performing Red Dirt Girl actually made me cry
the other day.  Mind you, so did the Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
speech in last night's Upstart Crow.  I've had that by heart for decades
and it's never had that effect on me before.  A combination of becoming
a foolish, fond old man and the times we live in, I suspect.
I would have to put up Ewan McColl's "First Time Ever I Saw Your Face
" up there. I've heard lots of versions, but the one that had my eyes
streaming was June Tabor, unaccompanied at The Acorn, Penzance about 20
years ago.
That was a good song but I can't remember who I heard sing it first.
Probably Roberta Flack.


That was the first time ever I heard it and I still love her version.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Vicky Ayech
2020-12-23 21:31:06 UTC
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On Wed, 23 Dec 2020 18:51:36 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 23 Dec 2020 17:33:19 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
You are a sentimental old fool.  As am I.  I love it.
I'm listening to a lot of music, too.  I find that I'm much more
susceptible to a slightly cheesy Country song than I was.  Emmylou
Harris and Mark Knopfler performing Red Dirt Girl actually made me cry
the other day.  Mind you, so did the Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
speech in last night's Upstart Crow.  I've had that by heart for decades
and it's never had that effect on me before.  A combination of becoming
a foolish, fond old man and the times we live in, I suspect.
I would have to put up Ewan McColl's "First Time Ever I Saw Your Face
" up there. I've heard lots of versions, but the one that had my eyes
streaming was June Tabor, unaccompanied at The Acorn, Penzance about 20
years ago.
That was a good song but I can't remember who I heard sing it first.
Probably Roberta Flack.
http://youtu.be/VqW-eO3jTVU
That was the first time ever I heard it and I still love her version.
That's i!
krw
2020-12-23 22:53:58 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 23 Dec 2020 18:51:36 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 23 Dec 2020 17:33:19 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
You are a sentimental old fool.  As am I.  I love it.
I'm listening to a lot of music, too.  I find that I'm much more
susceptible to a slightly cheesy Country song than I was.  Emmylou
Harris and Mark Knopfler performing Red Dirt Girl actually made me cry
the other day.  Mind you, so did the Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
speech in last night's Upstart Crow.  I've had that by heart for decades
and it's never had that effect on me before.  A combination of becoming
a foolish, fond old man and the times we live in, I suspect.
I would have to put up Ewan McColl's "First Time Ever I Saw Your Face
" up there. I've heard lots of versions, but the one that had my eyes
streaming was June Tabor, unaccompanied at The Acorn, Penzance about 20
years ago.
That was a good song but I can't remember who I heard sing it first.
Probably Roberta Flack.
http://youtu.be/VqW-eO3jTVU
That was the first time ever I heard it and I still love her version.
That's i!
Which is so different to the McColl version that it almost seems like
another song, having heard Peggy tell the story and then sing it.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Vicky Ayech
2020-12-24 08:56:40 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 23 Dec 2020 18:51:36 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 23 Dec 2020 17:33:19 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
You are a sentimental old fool.  As am I.  I love it.
I'm listening to a lot of music, too.  I find that I'm much more
susceptible to a slightly cheesy Country song than I was.  Emmylou
Harris and Mark Knopfler performing Red Dirt Girl actually made me cry
the other day.  Mind you, so did the Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
speech in last night's Upstart Crow.  I've had that by heart for decades
and it's never had that effect on me before.  A combination of becoming
a foolish, fond old man and the times we live in, I suspect.
I would have to put up Ewan McColl's "First Time Ever I Saw Your Face
" up there. I've heard lots of versions, but the one that had my eyes
streaming was June Tabor, unaccompanied at The Acorn, Penzance about 20
years ago.
That was a good song but I can't remember who I heard sing it first.
Probably Roberta Flack.
http://youtu.be/VqW-eO3jTVU
That was the first time ever I heard it and I still love her version.
That's i!
Which is so different to the McColl version that it almost seems like
another song, having heard Peggy tell the story and then sing it.
Oh that might be the version I heard. I should go and listen to some
versions but am not in the mood.
Steve Hague
2020-12-24 06:30:50 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 23 Dec 2020 17:33:19 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
You are a sentimental old fool.  As am I.  I love it.
I'm listening to a lot of music, too.  I find that I'm much more
susceptible to a slightly cheesy Country song than I was.  Emmylou
Harris and Mark Knopfler performing Red Dirt Girl actually made me cry
the other day.  Mind you, so did the Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
speech in last night's Upstart Crow.  I've had that by heart for decades
and it's never had that effect on me before.  A combination of becoming
a foolish, fond old man and the times we live in, I suspect.
I would have to put up Ewan McColl's "First Time Ever I Saw Your Face
" up there. I've heard lots of versions, but the one that had my eyes
streaming was June Tabor, unaccompanied at The Acorn, Penzance about 20
years ago.
That was a good song but I can't remember who I heard sing it first.
Probably Roberta Flack.
http://youtu.be/VqW-eO3jTVU
That was the first time ever I heard it and I still love her version.
For me it was the Cleo Laine and John Williams version.
Vicky Ayech
2020-12-24 08:57:06 UTC
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On Thu, 24 Dec 2020 06:30:50 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 23 Dec 2020 17:33:19 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
You are a sentimental old fool.  As am I.  I love it.
I'm listening to a lot of music, too.  I find that I'm much more
susceptible to a slightly cheesy Country song than I was.  Emmylou
Harris and Mark Knopfler performing Red Dirt Girl actually made me cry
the other day.  Mind you, so did the Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
speech in last night's Upstart Crow.  I've had that by heart for decades
and it's never had that effect on me before.  A combination of becoming
a foolish, fond old man and the times we live in, I suspect.
I would have to put up Ewan McColl's "First Time Ever I Saw Your Face
" up there. I've heard lots of versions, but the one that had my eyes
streaming was June Tabor, unaccompanied at The Acorn, Penzance about 20
years ago.
That was a good song but I can't remember who I heard sing it first.
Probably Roberta Flack.
http://youtu.be/VqW-eO3jTVU
That was the first time ever I heard it and I still love her version.
For me it was the Cleo Laine and John Williams version.
I am pretty sure I didn't hear that one but do like her.
Vicky Ayech
2020-12-24 09:36:11 UTC
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On Thu, 24 Dec 2020 06:30:50 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 23 Dec 2020 17:33:19 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I would have to put up Ewan McColl's "First Time Ever I Saw Your Face
" up there. I've heard lots of versions, but the one that had my eyes
streaming was June Tabor, unaccompanied at The Acorn, Penzance about 20
years ago.
That was a good song but I can't remember who I heard sing it first.
Probably Roberta Flack.
http://youtu.be/VqW-eO3jTVU
That was the first time ever I heard it and I still love her version.
For me it was the Cleo Laine and John Williams version.
Post porridge

A search is bringing up Elvis, Celine Dion, and Ewan who is described
as Kirsty's dad! Peter, Paul and Mary, Shirley Bassey, George Micheal,
James Blake, Leona Lewis, Sinead OConnor and Christy Moore.

I can't find who is singing with him here.

I like her voice and this version. I didn't like the Peggy Seegerone.
Very harsh and shrill. Not keen on the Elvis one or George Micheal.

Thhinking back I am pretty sure I saw either a guest or floor singer
sing it at the Hampstead Folk Club in the 60s. It was a very simple
version and think a female.
krw
2020-12-24 10:44:34 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Ewan who is described
as Kirsty's dad!
Well he was. But he had little do with bringing her up.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Nick Odell
2020-12-24 11:03:35 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
Ewan who is described
as Kirsty's dad!
Well he was. But he had little do with bringing her up.
Although Wikipedia claims that he changed his name for the actors
union, Equity, there is another version of the story that says he did
it to evade arrest for desertion by the military police. It wasn't
only the British Army he deserted.

Nick
Vicky Ayech
2020-12-24 11:40:30 UTC
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On Thu, 24 Dec 2020 11:03:35 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
Ewan who is described
as Kirsty's dad!
Well he was. But he had little do with bringing her up.
Although Wikipedia claims that he changed his name for the actors
union, Equity, there is another version of the story that says he did
it to evade arrest for desertion by the military police. It wasn't
only the British Army he deserted.
Nick
he had an active and troubled political career. And I didn't know
until checking today that he'd been married to Joan Littlewood first
and helped set up the theatre workshop.
Vicky Ayech
2020-12-24 11:35:45 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
Ewan who is described
as Kirsty's dad!
Well he was. But he had little do with bringing her up.
My objection was he was better known for ages, until Fairy Tale of NY.
Or was the man down the fish shop before that?
krw
2020-12-24 22:45:50 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
Ewan who is described
as Kirsty's dad!
Well he was. But he had little do with bringing her up.
My objection was he was better known for ages, until Fairy Tale of NY.
Or was the man down the fish shop before that?
Not in those shoes but fish shop was earlier and she had a cameo in the
background of another act on TOTP even earlier.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Sid Nuncius
2020-12-25 06:46:19 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
Ewan who is described
as Kirsty's dad!
Well he was.  But he had little do with bringing her up.
My objection was he was better known for ages, until Fairy Tale of NY.
Or was the man down the fish shop before that?
Not in those shoes but fish shop was earlier and she had a cameo in the
background of another act on TOTP even earlier.
There's A Man Works Down The Chip Shop was 1981 and A New England was
1984, both of which Top 20 hits. Fairy Tale[1] was 1988, so she was
already pretty well known by then - certainly by me. I love her work;
Chip Shop is one of my favourite pop songs ever and anyone who has the
wit to title an album Electric Landlady gets my vote[2].

Nonetheless, Ewan MacColl was an absolute giant of the folk and protest
scenes and, whatever his personal failings, to describe him primarily as
Kirsty's father is an insult. I'm pleased to see that Wiki does no such
thing.


[1]I discovered fairly recently that a childhood friend with whom I went
on holiday and spent a lot of time generally grew up to be Jem Finer,
founding member of The Pogues. We've not been in touch for 50 years and
more, but I remember him with great affection and am very glad he's been
successful.

[2]Non-Hendrix fans may wish to know that Mr Hendrix issued an album in
1967 entitled Electric Ladyland, the centrefold of which featured a
number of ladies in a state of déshabille.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Steve Hague
2020-12-25 13:44:26 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
Ewan who is described
as Kirsty's dad!
Well he was.  But he had little do with bringing her up.
My objection was he was better known for ages, until Fairy Tale of NY.
Or was the man down the fish shop before that?
Not in those shoes but fish shop was earlier and she had a cameo in
the background of another act on TOTP even earlier.
There's A Man Works Down The Chip Shop was 1981 and A New England was
1984, both of which Top 20 hits. Fairy Tale[1] was 1988, so she was
already pretty well known by then - certainly by me. I love her work;
Chip Shop is one of my favourite pop songs ever and anyone who has the
wit to title an album Electric Landlady gets my vote[2].
Nonetheless, Ewan MacColl was an absolute giant of the folk and protest
scenes and, whatever his personal failings, to describe him primarily as
Kirsty's father is an insult. I'm pleased to see that Wiki does no such
thing.
[1]I discovered fairly recently that a childhood friend with whom I went
on holiday and spent a lot of time generally grew up to be Jem Finer,
founding member of The Pogues. We've not been in touch for 50 years and
more, but I remember him with great affection and am very glad he's been
successful.
[2]Non-Hendrix fans may wish to know that Mr Hendrix issued an album in
1967 entitled Electric Ladyland, the centrefold of which featured a
number of ladies in a state of déshabille.
I think the musical difference is that Ewan was more of a niche
musician, firmly rooted in folk music. He wrote some cracking sons
though, Dirty Old Town is another. I believe he ran a folk club in
London. Kirsty on the other hand was a prolific songwriter, who covered
a range of genres. I think we have all her CDs, but haven't played her
for a while.
Steve
krw
2020-12-25 23:17:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
Ewan who is described
as Kirsty's dad!
Well he was.  But he had little do with bringing her up.
My objection was he was better known for ages, until Fairy Tale of NY.
Or was the man down the fish shop before that?
Not in those shoes but fish shop was earlier and she had a cameo in
the background of another act on TOTP even earlier.
There's A Man Works Down The Chip Shop was 1981 and A New England was
1984, both of which Top 20 hits. Fairy Tale[1] was 1988, so she was
already pretty well known by then - certainly by me. I love her work;
Chip Shop is one of my favourite pop songs ever and anyone who has the
wit to title an album Electric Landlady gets my vote[2].
Nonetheless, Ewan MacColl was an absolute giant of the folk and
protest scenes and, whatever his personal failings, to describe him
primarily as Kirsty's father is an insult. I'm pleased to see that
Wiki does no such thing.
[1]I discovered fairly recently that a childhood friend with whom I
went on holiday and spent a lot of time generally grew up to be Jem
Finer, founding member of The Pogues. We've not been in touch for 50
years and more, but I remember him with great affection and am very
glad he's been successful.
[2]Non-Hendrix fans may wish to know that Mr Hendrix issued an album
in 1967 entitled Electric Ladyland, the centrefold of which featured a
number of ladies in a state of déshabille.
I think the musical difference is that Ewan was more of a niche
musician, firmly rooted in folk music. He wrote some cracking sons
though, Dirty Old Town is another. I believe he ran a folk club in
London. Kirsty on the other hand was a prolific songwriter, who covered
a range of genres. I think we have all her CDs, but haven't played her
for a while.
Steve
I can confirm that Ewan and Peggy ran a folk club - sometime in the late
70's I actually attended it once. I also attended a concert in 2015
celebrating what would have been his 100th birthday which was where
Peggy told the story of "First Time" and then sang it.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Vicky Ayech
2020-12-24 09:47:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 24 Dec 2020 06:30:50 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 23 Dec 2020 17:33:19 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've
ever heard?
You are a sentimental old fool.  As am I.  I love it.
I'm listening to a lot of music, too.  I find that I'm much more
susceptible to a slightly cheesy Country song than I was.  Emmylou
Harris and Mark Knopfler performing Red Dirt Girl actually made me cry
the other day.  Mind you, so did the Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow
speech in last night's Upstart Crow.  I've had that by heart for decades
and it's never had that effect on me before.  A combination of becoming
a foolish, fond old man and the times we live in, I suspect.
I would have to put up Ewan McColl's "First Time Ever I Saw Your Face
" up there. I've heard lots of versions, but the one that had my eyes
streaming was June Tabor, unaccompanied at The Acorn, Penzance about 20
years ago.
That was a good song but I can't remember who I heard sing it first.
Probably Roberta Flack.
http://youtu.be/VqW-eO3jTVU
That was the first time ever I heard it and I still love her version.
For me it was the Cleo Laine and John Williams version.
Special mention and as usual he nails it

Sid Nuncius
2020-12-23 19:17:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old
fool, or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs
I've ever heard?
You are a sentimental old fool.  As am I.  I love it.
I'm listening to a lot of music, too.  I find that I'm much more
susceptible to a slightly cheesy Country song than I was.  Emmylou
Harris and Mark Knopfler performing Red Dirt Girl actually made me cry
the other day.  Mind you, so did the Tomorrow and Tomorrow and
Tomorrow speech in last night's Upstart Crow.  I've had that by heart
for decades and it's never had that effect on me before.  A
combination of becoming a foolish, fond old man and the times we live
in, I suspect.
I would have to put up Ewan McColl's "First Time Ever I Saw Your Face
" up there. I've heard lots of versions, but the one that had my eyes
streaming was June Tabor, unaccompanied at The Acorn, Penzance about 20
years ago.
There is lots of music which can make me cry. Some because it is just
so full of lambent beauty; a couple of examples are the third Agnus Dei
from Josquin's Missa L'homme Armé Sexti Toni[1]
(starting at 3'45")
or the third movement of Beethoven's Op.132 String Quartet


Some songs do it because they are very moving combinations of music and
lyrics, like Dimming Of The Day (RT), Man Of The World (Fleetwood Mac),
Sweet Little Mystery (John Martyn), Willow (Joan
Armatrading)...er...this might be a very long list indeed, but you get
my drift, and some because they are so closely associated with people
whose loss gives me pain and are excruciatingly evocative.

For example, my beloved little sister, who died 15 years ago, was
obsessed with Mary Queen Of Scots when she was 14 and I was 17. She
would stick my copy of What We Did On Our Holidays on the record
player[1] and play Fotheringay over and over again. It's a fabulous
song, but I can't listen to it without thinking of her and how much I
wish she were still here.


Sorry. Far more than you wanted to know.


[1]Don't even think about it, Brritski.

[2]The only one the house, in the living room.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2020-12-23 20:19:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1]Don't even think about it, Brritski.
I'm ALWAYS thinking about it <sniffFFFF>
Vicky Ayech
2020-12-23 21:32:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 23 Dec 2020 19:17:50 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
For example, my beloved little sister, who died 15 years ago, was
obsessed with Mary Queen Of Scots when she was 14 and I was 17. She
would stick my copy of What We Did On Our Holidays on the record
player[1] and play Fotheringay over and over again. It's a fabulous
song, but I can't listen to it without thinking of her and how much I
wish she were still here.
http://youtu.be/ZbnLVvAJrec
Sorry. Far more than you wanted to know.
[1]Don't even think about it, Brritski.
I loved the song Mary Hamilton
Last night there were four Marys
Tonight there'e be but three
There was Mary Seaton, and Mary Beaton
And Mary Carmicheal and me.
Jenny M Benson
2020-12-24 09:49:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I loved the song Mary Hamilton
Last night there were four Marys
Tonight there'e be but three
There was Mary Seaton, and Mary Beaton
And Mary Carmicheal and me.
Eh? I think that should be Mary Cotter, Mary Radley, Mary Field and
Mary Simpson!
--
Jenny M Benson
Anne B
2020-12-24 11:03:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I loved the song Mary Hamilton
Last night there were four Marys
Tonight there'e be but three
There was Mary Seaton, and Mary Beaton
And Mary Carmicheal and me.
Eh?  I think that should be Mary Cotter, Mary Radley, Mary Field and
Mary Simpson!
Absolutely not. It's an old song

Four Marys

Last night the Queen had four Marys
Tonight there'll be but three
There was Mary Seton and Mary Beaton
And Mary Carmichael and me.

Oh, often have I dressed my Queen
And put on her braw silk gown
But all the thanks I've got tonight
Is to be hanged in Edinburgh Town.

Full often have I dressed my Queen
Put gold upon her hair
But I have got for my reward
The gallows to be my share.

Oh, little did my mother know
The day she cradled me
The land I was to travel in
The death I was to dee.

Oh, happy, happy is the maid
That's born of beauty free
Oh, it was my rosy, dimpled cheeks
That's been the devil to me.

They'll tie a kerchief around my eyes
That I may not see to dee
And they'll never tell my father or mother
But that I'm across the sea.

The four Marys were Mary, Queen of Scots' ladies-in-waiting, but these
were Mary Seton, Mary Beaton, Mary Fleming and Mary Livingston. There
was no Mary Carmichael but this popular song was believed to be relating
to Mary, Queen of Scots until it was traced back to the court of the
Tsar. The ballad dates between 1719 and 1764 and narrates the story of
Mary Hamilton, a Scottish maid of Peter the Great's wife Catherine, who
was executed for the murder of her illegitimate child, product of an
affair with the Tsar Peter.

The two stories of Mary Hamilton and Mary, Queen of Scots were grafted
onto each other.

Who are Cotter, Radley, Field and Simpson?

Anne B
Vicky Ayech
2020-12-24 11:38:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 24 Dec 2020 11:03:03 +0000, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Vicky Ayech
I loved the song Mary Hamilton
Last night there were four Marys
Tonight there'e be but three
There was Mary Seaton, and Mary Beaton
And Mary Carmicheal and me.
Eh?  I think that should be Mary Cotter, Mary Radley, Mary Field and
Mary Simpson!
Absolutely not. It's an old song
Four Marys
Last night the Queen had four Marys
Tonight there'll be but three
There was Mary Seton and Mary Beaton
And Mary Carmichael and me.
Oh, often have I dressed my Queen
And put on her braw silk gown
But all the thanks I've got tonight
Is to be hanged in Edinburgh Town.
Full often have I dressed my Queen
Put gold upon her hair
But I have got for my reward
The gallows to be my share.
Oh, little did my mother know
The day she cradled me
The land I was to travel in
The death I was to dee.
Oh, happy, happy is the maid
That's born of beauty free
Oh, it was my rosy, dimpled cheeks
That's been the devil to me.
They'll tie a kerchief around my eyes
That I may not see to dee
And they'll never tell my father or mother
But that I'm across the sea.
The four Marys were Mary, Queen of Scots' ladies-in-waiting, but these
were Mary Seton, Mary Beaton, Mary Fleming and Mary Livingston. There
was no Mary Carmichael but this popular song was believed to be relating
to Mary, Queen of Scots until it was traced back to the court of the
Tsar. The ballad dates between 1719 and 1764 and narrates the story of
Mary Hamilton, a Scottish maid of Peter the Great's wife Catherine, who
was executed for the murder of her illegitimate child, product of an
affair with the Tsar Peter.
I didn't know that! It spoiled the romance :( I thought they sent 4
Marys over to the French court with the little royal Mary when she
married the French prince.
Post by Anne B
The two stories of Mary Hamilton and Mary, Queen of Scots were grafted
onto each other.
Who are Cotter, Radley, Field and Simpson?
Anne B
Anne B
2020-12-24 22:15:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 24 Dec 2020 11:03:03 +0000, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Vicky Ayech
I loved the song Mary Hamilton
Last night there were four Marys
Tonight there'e be but three
There was Mary Seaton, and Mary Beaton
And Mary Carmicheal and me.
Eh?  I think that should be Mary Cotter, Mary Radley, Mary Field and
Mary Simpson!
Absolutely not. It's an old song
Four Marys
Last night the Queen had four Marys
Tonight there'll be but three
There was Mary Seton and Mary Beaton
And Mary Carmichael and me.
Oh, often have I dressed my Queen
And put on her braw silk gown
But all the thanks I've got tonight
Is to be hanged in Edinburgh Town.
Full often have I dressed my Queen
Put gold upon her hair
But I have got for my reward
The gallows to be my share.
Oh, little did my mother know
The day she cradled me
The land I was to travel in
The death I was to dee.
Oh, happy, happy is the maid
That's born of beauty free
Oh, it was my rosy, dimpled cheeks
That's been the devil to me.
They'll tie a kerchief around my eyes
That I may not see to dee
And they'll never tell my father or mother
But that I'm across the sea.
The four Marys were Mary, Queen of Scots' ladies-in-waiting, but these
were Mary Seton, Mary Beaton, Mary Fleming and Mary Livingston. There
was no Mary Carmichael but this popular song was believed to be relating
to Mary, Queen of Scots until it was traced back to the court of the
Tsar. The ballad dates between 1719 and 1764 and narrates the story of
Mary Hamilton, a Scottish maid of Peter the Great's wife Catherine, who
was executed for the murder of her illegitimate child, product of an
affair with the Tsar Peter.
I didn't know that! It spoiled the romance :( I thought they sent 4
Marys over to the French court with the little royal Mary when she
married the French prince.
That's exactly what they did, but this not-quite-so-romantic story seems
to have got attached to the story of Mary's four Marys who were sent
with her to France.
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Anne B
The two stories of Mary Hamilton and Mary, Queen of Scots were grafted
onto each other.
Who are Cotter, Radley, Field and Simpson?
Anne B
Serena Blanchflower
2020-12-24 12:02:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Who are Cotter, Radley, Field and Simpson?
I assumed, and Google has confirmed, that it was a reference to "The
Four Marys", who I had thought were by Enid Blyton but Google tells me
that they were in Bunty.
--
Best wishes, Serena
There is nothing stronger in the world than gentleness (Han Suyin)
Anne B
2020-12-24 22:19:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Anne B
Who are Cotter, Radley, Field and Simpson?
I assumed, and Google has confirmed, that it was a reference to "The
Four Marys", who I had thought were by Enid Blyton but Google tells me
that they were in Bunty.
Ah, yes, thank you. I think there is something stirring vaguely in the
depths of my memory. The Four Marys in 'Bunty' were an allusion to the
historical four Marys who accompanied Mary Queen of Scots to France. I
could have named the historical quartet but not the 'Bunty' ones.

Anne B
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-12-24 17:19:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by Vicky Ayech
I loved the song Mary Hamilton
Last night there were four Marys
Tonight there'e be but three
There was Mary Seaton, and Mary Beaton
And Mary Carmicheal and me.
Eh?  I think that should be Mary Cotter, Mary Radley, Mary Field and
Mary Simpson!
Absolutely not. It's an old song
Four Marys
Last night the Queen had four Marys
Tonight there'll be but three
There was Mary Seton and Mary Beaton
And Mary Carmichael and me.
Oh, often have I dressed my Queen
And put on her braw silk gown
But all the thanks I've got tonight
Is to be hanged in Edinburgh Town.
Full often have I dressed my Queen
Put gold upon her hair
But I have got for my reward
The gallows to be my share.
Oh, little did my mother know
The day she cradled me
The land I was to travel in
The death I was to dee.
Oh, happy, happy is the maid
That's born of beauty free
Oh, it was my rosy, dimpled cheeks
That's been the devil to me.
They'll tie a kerchief around my eyes
That I may not see to dee
And they'll never tell my father or mother
But that I'm across the sea.
The four Marys were Mary, Queen of Scots' ladies-in-waiting, but these
were Mary Seton, Mary Beaton, Mary Fleming and Mary Livingston. There
was no Mary Carmichael but this popular song was believed to be
relating to Mary, Queen of Scots until it was traced back to the court
of the Tsar. The ballad dates between 1719 and 1764 and narrates the
story of Mary Hamilton, a Scottish maid of Peter the Great's wife
Catherine, who was executed for the murder of her illegitimate child,
product of an affair with the Tsar Peter.
The two stories of Mary Hamilton and Mary, Queen of Scots were grafted
onto each other.
Who are Cotter, Radley, Field and Simpson?
Anne B
I suggest you repost this in uk.music.folk; it's more or less dormant if
you judge by number of posts, but I think there are a lot of - not
lurkers; I don't know the term for those who don't start threads but
reply if someone asks a question.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"...told me to connect with the electorate, and I did!" John Prescott on
having punched the man who threw an egg at him (Top Gear, 2011-2-28)
Penny
2020-12-26 00:38:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 24 Dec 2020 09:49:05 +0000, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
I loved the song Mary Hamilton
Last night there were four Marys
Tonight there'e be but three
There was Mary Seaton, and Mary Beaton
And Mary Carmicheal and me.
Eh? I think that should be Mary Cotter, Mary Radley, Mary Field and
Mary Simpson!
:))
I remember them but could not have named them.
I loved Bunty!
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2020-12-26 09:52:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Eh? I think that should be Mary Cotter, Mary Radley, Mary Field and
Mary Simpson!
:))
I remember them but could not have named them.
I loved Bunty!
Was it Bunty that had the doll figure on the back and a selection of
clothes, so one could cut them out and dress her? Saw the same idea in
a shop (1) recently but it was all cardboard or plastic and no cutting
out involved. Modern children have it far too easy!

(1)Actually it was a Dobbie's Garden Centre.
--
Jenny M Benson
Sam Plusnet
2020-12-26 19:59:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Thu, 24 Dec 2020 09:49:05 +0000, Jenny M Benson
scrawled in the dust...
Eh?  I think that should be Mary Cotter, Mary Radley, Mary Field and
Mary Simpson!
:))
I remember them but could not have named them.
I loved Bunty!
clothes, so one could cut them out and dress her?  Saw the same idea in
a shop (1) recently but it was all cardboard or plastic and no cutting
out involved.  Modern children have it far too easy!
(1)Actually it was a Dobbie's Garden Centre.
You can't give modern children scissors, nor sell anything which implies
that they might get their hands on a pair.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2021-01-02 17:38:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 26 Dec 2020 09:52:40 +0000, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Eh? I think that should be Mary Cotter, Mary Radley, Mary Field and
Mary Simpson!
:))
I remember them but could not have named them.
I loved Bunty!
Was it Bunty that had the doll figure on the back and a selection of
clothes, so one could cut them out and dress her?
Yes.
Post by Jenny M Benson
Saw the same idea in
a shop (1) recently but it was all cardboard or plastic and no cutting
out involved. Modern children have it far too easy!
I bought a magnetic paper set for d#2 (then aged 4) when we spent Christmas
in Australia. The figure had magnetic tape on the back and the sheet
printed with the clothes had iron filings glued to the back. There was
enough 'spare' iron filings paper to create extra clothing so I copied the
design on her Christmas-themed t-shirt and shorts outfit. She was delighted
by it.

I bought youngest granddaughter a set last year (also aged 4). The figure
and clothes were wood so no cutting required, although I guess you could
use the wooden pieces as a template to make some from paper.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2021-01-02 18:12:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Eh? I think that should be Mary Cotter, Mary Radley, Mary Field and
Mary Simpson!
:))
I remember them but could not have named them.
I loved Bunty!
Was it Bunty that had the doll figure on the back and a selection of
clothes, so one could cut them out and dress her?
Yes.
Post by Jenny M Benson
Saw the same idea in
a shop (1) recently but it was all cardboard or plastic and no cutting
out involved. Modern children have it far too easy!
I bought a magnetic paper set for d#2 (then aged 4) when we spent Christmas
in Australia. The figure had magnetic tape on the back and the sheet
printed with the clothes had iron filings glued to the back. There was
enough 'spare' iron filings paper to create extra clothing so I copied the
design on her Christmas-themed t-shirt and shorts outfit. She was delighted
by it.
I bought youngest granddaughter a set last year (also aged 4). The figure
and clothes were wood so no cutting required, although I guess you could
use the wooden pieces as a template to make some from paper.
I'm just idly wondering which Christmas you spent in Australia? I took
the two boys, the latex and my mother over for Christmas 1987. More
accurately, Boxing Day 1987, since being up in the air on Christmas
Day itself made the flight several hundred pounds cheaper for the lot
of us.

Nick
Penny
2021-01-02 21:35:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 02 Jan 2021 18:12:54 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I'm just idly wondering which Christmas you spent in Australia? I took
the two boys, the latex and my mother over for Christmas 1987. More
accurately, Boxing Day 1987, since being up in the air on Christmas
Day itself made the flight several hundred pounds cheaper for the lot
of us.
We flew into Sidney on Christmas Day 1989 - to be greeted by two females in
skimpy Santa outfits, dishing out 'lollies' to children on the flight.

It probably was cheaper to do that but did not feature in the decision,
made at some point in late October/early November. It was just the first
flight we could book.

It also coincided with what had become the annual airline pilots strike in
Australia. If I'd been more aware of these things we probably could have
got there more cheaply by hitching a lift with one of the relief pilots
flying in (and out) from Europe. As it was, we could not fly to Launceston,
just down the road from Bro#2, so he spent much of Christmas Day driving
down to Hobart to collect us and drive us back to his place.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2021-01-02 21:55:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Sat, 02 Jan 2021 18:12:54 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I'm just idly wondering which Christmas you spent in Australia? I took
the two boys, the latex and my mother over for Christmas 1987. More
accurately, Boxing Day 1987, since being up in the air on Christmas
Day itself made the flight several hundred pounds cheaper for the lot
of us.
We flew into Sidney on Christmas Day 1989 - to be greeted by two females in
skimpy Santa outfits, dishing out 'lollies' to children on the flight.
It probably was cheaper to do that but did not feature in the decision,
made at some point in late October/early November. It was just the first
flight we could book.
It also coincided with what had become the annual airline pilots strike in
Australia. If I'd been more aware of these things we probably could have
got there more cheaply by hitching a lift with one of the relief pilots
flying in (and out) from Europe. As it was, we could not fly to Launceston,
just down the road from Bro#2, so he spent much of Christmas Day driving
down to Hobart to collect us and drive us back to his place.
We flew Garuda Indonesia which was not so much an international
airline as a local island-hopping bus service but it was cheap so what
did we care? Getting off the plane in Bali, I wondered why they had
left the engines running only to realise that there was no sound and
the searing heat was coming from the sun. Still, it prepared us for
the delayed Christmas Day festivities inland in Victoria where the
temperature was in the low forties - which in itself conditioned us
for the many days the temperatures there would be in the middle to
high forties instead.

Nick
BrritSki
2021-01-03 09:47:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
We flew into Sidney on Christmas Day 1989
I feel a bit better now - I thought you'd flown over there recently to
attend the BTA Ceremony.
Penny
2021-01-03 10:19:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 3 Jan 2021 09:47:01 +0000, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
We flew into Sidney on Christmas Day 1989
I feel a bit better now - I thought you'd flown over there recently to
attend the BTA Ceremony.
That was my complaint yesterday when I responded to your change of venue
post. I like small islands but I'm not a fan of the tropics and Tuvalu is
tiny, less than half the size of Gozo and not nearly as interesting.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
a l l y
2020-12-22 21:57:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
It's a very good song. I'm not sure about it being one of the finest, but I
do like it.

ally
I've listened to a lot more than I usually do. Am I a sentimental old fool,
or is Sting's "Fields of Gold" one of the finest love songs I've ever
heard?
Steve
--
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