Discussion:
OT: Any Buttermakers here?
(too old to reply)
Nick Odell
2019-01-08 16:58:30 UTC
Permalink
I bought masses of double cream for mere pennies in the grand New Year
sell-off of unwanted Christmas stuff at Morrisons. I now have a freezer
full of ice cream: vanilla, rum & raisin and blackberry ripple in
copious quantities[1]

I've tried to turn the rest of the cream into butter. To do this I
whipped the plain double cream beyond the aerating and firming stage
until it ended up as a slightly yellow and pretty solid lump in the
bottom of the bowl, wrapped this lump up in muslin and squeezed out the
buttermilk. About a third of the weight of the original was drained off
as buttermilk but it still doesn't quite look like butter as I know it.
For one thing, the texture is a bit crumbly; for another the greaseproof
paper I wrapped it in is getting quite wet.

Any tips or tricks I could take on board for next time?


Thanks,
Nick
[1]My ice cream recipe is a little different from most published ones
but works: two measures of double cream to one measure of full cream
milk plus one measure of caster sugar. One teaspoon of vanilla essence
for every 300ml of liquid before you start whipping it. Whip it (an
electric whisk on slow setting is okay) until it has more or less
doubled in size and gone stiff enough to leave peaks. Freeze it. Eat it.
Nothing can possibly go wrong[2]
[2]Unless the ambient temperature in your kitchen is around 36 deg C as
I learned last January in Buenos Aires.
Penny
2019-01-08 23:10:40 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 16:58:30 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I've tried to turn the rest of the cream into butter. To do this I
whipped the plain double cream beyond the aerating and firming stage
until it ended up as a slightly yellow and pretty solid lump in the
bottom of the bowl, wrapped this lump up in muslin and squeezed out the
buttermilk. About a third of the weight of the original was drained off
as buttermilk but it still doesn't quite look like butter as I know it.
For one thing, the texture is a bit crumbly; for another the greaseproof
paper I wrapped it in is getting quite wet.
Any tips or tricks I could take on board for next time?
I haven't made butter since primary school when there was a fad for shaking
cream in a (clean) ink bottle to produce a small lump of the stuff, which
was then difficult to extract. I think shaking is the more usual method, a
churn just sort of turns it end for end in a vaguely spiral motion. So
perhaps that whisking puts too much air into it which somehow stops the
buttermilk escaping as it should? OTOH, whisking it once it's made might
make butter soft enough to spread straight from the fridge - or do you need
a bit of added oil for that?

After straining, batting it about with pats to form shape is the usual next
stage I think, which probably knocks some more of the liquid out. Not sure
when you add salt (if you're going to) but suppose that also has an effect
upon the liquid bit.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2019-01-09 01:31:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 16:58:30 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I've tried to turn the rest of the cream into butter. To do this I
whipped the plain double cream beyond the aerating and firming stage
until it ended up as a slightly yellow and pretty solid lump in the
bottom of the bowl, wrapped this lump up in muslin and squeezed out the
buttermilk. About a third of the weight of the original was drained off
as buttermilk but it still doesn't quite look like butter as I know it.
For one thing, the texture is a bit crumbly; for another the greaseproof
paper I wrapped it in is getting quite wet.
Any tips or tricks I could take on board for next time?
I haven't made butter since primary school when there was a fad for shaking
cream in a (clean) ink bottle to produce a small lump of the stuff, which
was then difficult to extract. I think shaking is the more usual method, a
churn just sort of turns it end for end in a vaguely spiral motion. So
perhaps that whisking puts too much air into it which somehow stops the
buttermilk escaping as it should? OTOH, whisking it once it's made might
make butter soft enough to spread straight from the fridge - or do you need
a bit of added oil for that?
After straining, batting it about with pats to form shape is the usual next
stage I think, which probably knocks some more of the liquid out. Not sure
when you add salt (if you're going to) but suppose that also has an effect
upon the liquid bit.
Thanks. I suspect I may not have patted it either vigorously or long
enough because I was fairly delicate in my handling there. I came across
a Normandy butter with salt crystals that exploded with suddenn bouts of
saltyness when you ate the butter so I tried to do something like that.
I flattened the pat of butter, sprinkled sea salt on it and then folded
and refolded the pat rather like making flaky pastry. Unfortunately with
all that buttermilk still on board the salt has probably dissolved.

I've left my two pats - one salted, one not - wrapped in greaseproof
paper in the fridge and I'll see how it looks in a couple of days.

Thanks,

Nick
steveski
2019-01-09 02:35:55 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 09 Jan 2019 01:31:26 +0000, Nick Odell wrote:

[]
I came across a Normandy butter with salt crystals that exploded with
suddenn bouts of saltyness when you ate the butter

Welsh butter is similar.
--
Steveski
Penny
2019-01-09 09:18:00 UTC
Permalink
On 9 Jan 2019 02:35:55 GMT, steveski <***@invalid.com> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by steveski
[]
I came across a Normandy butter with salt crystals that exploded with
suddenn bouts of saltyness when you ate the butter
Welsh butter is similar.
I had some like that from Lidl recently - very good (and the cheapest
butter in town).
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Penny
2019-01-09 09:16:33 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 9 Jan 2019 01:31:26 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I've left my two pats - one salted, one not - wrapped in greaseproof
paper in the fridge and I'll see how it looks in a couple of days.
If too much buttermilk remains the unsalted butter won't keep for long.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-01-09 16:25:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Thanks. I suspect I may not have patted it either vigorously or long
enough because I was fairly delicate in my handling there.
Just as well really, there has been more than enough patting going on
in.... eh? Oh, .....as you were then.
--
Toodle Pip
steveski
2019-01-09 02:32:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 16:58:30 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I've tried to turn the rest of the cream into butter. To do this I
whipped the plain double cream beyond the aerating and firming stage
until it ended up as a slightly yellow and pretty solid lump in the
bottom of the bowl, wrapped this lump up in muslin and squeezed out the
buttermilk. About a third of the weight of the original was drained off
as buttermilk but it still doesn't quite look like butter as I know it.
For one thing, the texture is a bit crumbly; for another the greaseproof
paper I wrapped it in is getting quite wet.
Any tips or tricks I could take on board for next time?
I haven't made butter since primary school when there was a fad for
shaking cream in a (clean) ink bottle to produce a small lump of the
stuff, which was then difficult to extract. I think shaking is the more
usual method, a churn just sort of turns it end for end in a vaguely
spiral motion. So perhaps that whisking puts too much air into it which
somehow stops the buttermilk escaping as it should? OTOH, whisking it
once it's made might make butter soft enough to spread straight from the
fridge - or do you need a bit of added oil for that?
After straining, batting it about with pats to form shape is the usual
next stage I think, which probably knocks some more of the liquid out.
Not sure when you add salt (if you're going to) but suppose that also
has an effect upon the liquid bit.
If you churn the cream, it allows the fat globules to agglutinate whereas
if you whisk you are just keeping the emulsion (poss. colloid?) separated.
--
Steveski
Nick Odell
2019-01-09 03:33:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by Penny
On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 16:58:30 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I've tried to turn the rest of the cream into butter. To do this I
whipped the plain double cream beyond the aerating and firming stage
until it ended up as a slightly yellow and pretty solid lump in the
bottom of the bowl, wrapped this lump up in muslin and squeezed out the
buttermilk. About a third of the weight of the original was drained off
as buttermilk but it still doesn't quite look like butter as I know it.
For one thing, the texture is a bit crumbly; for another the greaseproof
paper I wrapped it in is getting quite wet.
Any tips or tricks I could take on board for next time?
I haven't made butter since primary school when there was a fad for
shaking cream in a (clean) ink bottle to produce a small lump of the
stuff, which was then difficult to extract. I think shaking is the more
usual method, a churn just sort of turns it end for end in a vaguely
spiral motion. So perhaps that whisking puts too much air into it which
somehow stops the buttermilk escaping as it should? OTOH, whisking it
once it's made might make butter soft enough to spread straight from the
fridge - or do you need a bit of added oil for that?
After straining, batting it about with pats to form shape is the usual
next stage I think, which probably knocks some more of the liquid out.
Not sure when you add salt (if you're going to) but suppose that also
has an effect upon the liquid bit.
If you churn the cream, it allows the fat globules to agglutinate whereas
if you whisk you are just keeping the emulsion (poss. colloid?) separated.
That sounds logical. Maybe I can work out how to tumble the cream rather
than whisk it before I find another cheap batch.

Thanks,

Nick
Nick Odell
2019-01-16 14:11:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by steveski
Post by Penny
On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 16:58:30 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I've tried to turn the rest of the cream into butter. To do this I
whipped the plain double cream beyond the aerating and firming stage
until it ended up as a slightly yellow and pretty solid lump in the
bottom of the bowl, wrapped this lump up in muslin and squeezed out the
buttermilk. About a third of the weight of the original was drained off
as buttermilk but it still doesn't quite look like butter as I know it.
For one thing, the texture is a bit crumbly; for another the greaseproof
paper I wrapped it in is getting quite wet.
Any tips or tricks I could take on board for next time?
I haven't made butter since primary school when there was a fad for
shaking cream in a (clean) ink bottle to produce a small lump of the
stuff, which was then difficult to extract. I think shaking is the more
usual method, a churn just sort of turns it end for end in a vaguely
spiral motion. So perhaps that whisking puts too much air into it which
somehow stops the buttermilk escaping as it should? OTOH, whisking it
once it's made might make butter soft enough to spread straight from the
fridge - or do you need a bit of added oil for that?
After straining, batting it about with pats to form shape is the usual
next stage I think, which probably knocks some more of the liquid out.
Not sure when you add salt (if you're going to) but suppose that also
has an effect upon the liquid bit.
If you churn the cream, it allows the fat globules to agglutinate whereas
if you whisk you are just keeping the emulsion (poss. colloid?) separated.
That sounds logical. Maybe I can work out how to tumble the cream rather
than whisk it before I find another cheap batch.
Thanks,
Just to add that I took the now somewhat wet and soggy salted "butter"
out of the fridge yesterday and in time=honoured buttermakers' fashion..





...mashed it firmly with a fork.
A lot more buttermilk came out - I ought to have weighed it[1] but the
remainder was mashed - butter! I patted it back into an -erme- pat and
put it in the butter dish and guess what I'm enjoying - yes really -
enjoying on my lunchtime toast?

Clearly, doing it properly in the first place would be better next time
but it's nice to know that the situation was recoverable.


Now I'm thinking about how to churn it in the future and I'm imagining
something like a large-ish hamster-wheel with the tubs of cream tumbling
inside[2]

Thanks again,
Nick
[1]No Mike, not wheyed it
[2]And now I'm imagining one of the tubs bursting open and cream going
everywhere so, perhaps not.
Mike
2019-01-16 14:42:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by steveski
Post by Penny
On Tue, 8 Jan 2019 16:58:30 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
I've tried to turn the rest of the cream into butter. To do this I
whipped the plain double cream beyond the aerating and firming stage
until it ended up as a slightly yellow and pretty solid lump in the
bottom of the bowl, wrapped this lump up in muslin and squeezed out the
buttermilk. About a third of the weight of the original was drained off
as buttermilk but it still doesn't quite look like butter as I know it.
For one thing, the texture is a bit crumbly; for another the greaseproof
paper I wrapped it in is getting quite wet.
Any tips or tricks I could take on board for next time?
I haven't made butter since primary school when there was a fad for
shaking cream in a (clean) ink bottle to produce a small lump of the
stuff, which was then difficult to extract. I think shaking is the more
usual method, a churn just sort of turns it end for end in a vaguely
spiral motion. So perhaps that whisking puts too much air into it which
somehow stops the buttermilk escaping as it should? OTOH, whisking it
once it's made might make butter soft enough to spread straight from the
fridge - or do you need a bit of added oil for that?
After straining, batting it about with pats to form shape is the usual
next stage I think, which probably knocks some more of the liquid out.
Not sure when you add salt (if you're going to) but suppose that also
has an effect upon the liquid bit.
If you churn the cream, it allows the fat globules to agglutinate whereas
if you whisk you are just keeping the emulsion (poss. colloid?) separated.
That sounds logical. Maybe I can work out how to tumble the cream rather
than whisk it before I find another cheap batch.
Thanks,
Just to add that I took the now somewhat wet and soggy salted "butter"
out of the fridge yesterday and in time=honoured buttermakers' fashion..
...mashed it firmly with a fork.
A lot more buttermilk came out - I ought to have weighed it[1] but the
remainder was mashed - butter! I patted it back into an -erme- pat and
put it in the butter dish and guess what I'm enjoying - yes really -
enjoying on my lunchtime toast?
Clearly, doing it properly in the first place would be better next time
but it's nice to know that the situation was recoverable.
Now I'm thinking about how to churn it in the future and I'm imagining
something like a large-ish hamster-wheel with the tubs of cream tumbling
inside[2]
Thanks again,
Nick
[1]No Mike, not wheyed it
[2]And now I'm imagining one of the tubs bursting open and cream going
everywhere so, perhaps not.
Hadn’t o curd to me until you mentioned it - well not today anyway.
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-01-16 14:56:45 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 16 Jan 2019 14:11:25 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Now I'm thinking about how to churn it in the future and I'm imagining
something like a large-ish hamster-wheel with the tubs of cream tumbling
inside
It's occurred to me that what we were shaking in our little ink bottles was
full cream milk or the 'top'* thereof - not the homogenised stuff
supermarkets sell these days.

I googled and the suggestion was it only takes 7 minutes of shaking to
separate out the fat. Playground experience showed this does not have to be
7 minutes of continuous shaking so you probably don't need anything
elaborate, just shake it a bit, have a rest, shake it some more. Or I'm
sure you could find some suitable music and do a butter dance ;)

*My mother always poured the top-of-the-milk into a separate jug for use on
breakfast cereal. One of my favourite childhood memories is of frosty
mornings when the liquid in the 'cream' jug had frozen** into little plates
of ice and what came out when poured was very creamy. The slivers of ice
had a lovely texture too.

**the fridge was at the far end of the (fairly long) larder by the
perforated zinc 'window' - it got rather too cold in winter.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Kate B
2019-01-19 11:35:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 16 Jan 2019 14:11:25 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Now I'm thinking about how to churn it in the future and I'm imagining
something like a large-ish hamster-wheel with the tubs of cream tumbling
inside
It's occurred to me that what we were shaking in our little ink bottles was
full cream milk or the 'top'* thereof - not the homogenised stuff
supermarkets sell these days.
I googled and the suggestion was it only takes 7 minutes of shaking to
separate out the fat. Playground experience showed this does not have to be
7 minutes of continuous shaking so you probably don't need anything
elaborate, just shake it a bit, have a rest, shake it some more. Or I'm
sure you could find some suitable music and do a butter dance ;)
*My mother always poured the top-of-the-milk into a separate jug for use on
breakfast cereal. One of my favourite childhood memories is of frosty
mornings when the liquid in the 'cream' jug had frozen** into little plates
of ice and what came out when poured was very creamy. The slivers of ice
had a lovely texture too.
**the fridge was at the far end of the (fairly long) larder by the
perforated zinc 'window' - it got rather too cold in winter.
I lived next to a farmhouse in Austria. They delivered a large jug of
just-produced unpasteurised milk every evening and we poured it into a
shallow dish and left it in the larder. Next morning the cream had all
risen and was thick enough to whip for our morning coffee. Bliss. Even
in winter it never quite froze solid, though. The fat content must have
been astronomical, but we never made butter ourselves as there was never
any cream left :)
--
Kate B
London
Fenny
2019-01-16 18:32:49 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 16 Jan 2019 14:11:25 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Now I'm thinking about how to churn it in the future and I'm imagining
something like a large-ish hamster-wheel with the tubs of cream tumbling
inside[2]
Bicycle powered butter churn?
--
Fenny
Paul Herber
2019-01-16 20:55:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 16 Jan 2019 14:11:25 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Now I'm thinking about how to churn it in the future and I'm imagining
something like a large-ish hamster-wheel with the tubs of cream tumbling
inside[2]
Bicycle powered butter churn?
that's a good whey to do it.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
http://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Sally Thompson
2019-01-20 06:14:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
That sounds logical. Maybe I can work out how to tumble the cream rather
than whisk it before I find another cheap batch.
Just to add that I took the now somewhat wet and soggy salted "butter"
out of the fridge yesterday and in time=honoured buttermakers' fashion..
...mashed it firmly with a fork.
A lot more buttermilk came out - I ought to have weighed it[1] but the
remainder was mashed - butter! I patted it back into an -erme- pat and
put it in the butter dish and guess what I'm enjoying - yes really -
enjoying on my lunchtime toast?
Clearly, doing it properly in the first place would be better next time
but it's nice to know that the situation was recoverable.
Now I'm thinking about how to churn it in the future and I'm imagining
something like a large-ish hamster-wheel with the tubs of cream tumbling
inside[2]
Thanks again,
Just a thought but would something like this help? Sorry if it's already
been suggested, I'm a bit behind.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Sid Nuncius
2019-01-20 06:47:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Just a thought but would something like this help? Sorry if it's already
been suggested, I'm a bit behind.
YA a Zen Master AICM5 koans.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike
2019-01-20 08:55:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
That sounds logical. Maybe I can work out how to tumble the cream rather
than whisk it before I find another cheap batch.
Just to add that I took the now somewhat wet and soggy salted "butter"
out of the fridge yesterday and in time=honoured buttermakers' fashion..
...mashed it firmly with a fork.
A lot more buttermilk came out - I ought to have weighed it[1] but the
remainder was mashed - butter! I patted it back into an -erme- pat and
put it in the butter dish and guess what I'm enjoying - yes really -
enjoying on my lunchtime toast?
Clearly, doing it properly in the first place would be better next time
but it's nice to know that the situation was recoverable.
Now I'm thinking about how to churn it in the future and I'm imagining
something like a large-ish hamster-wheel with the tubs of cream tumbling
inside[2]
Thanks again,
Just a thought but would something like this help? Sorry if it's already
been suggested, I'm a bit behind.
I think something has creamed off the link.
--
Toodle Pip
Sally Thompson
2019-01-20 22:37:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
That sounds logical. Maybe I can work out how to tumble the cream rather
than whisk it before I find another cheap batch.
Just to add that I took the now somewhat wet and soggy salted "butter"
out of the fridge yesterday and in time=honoured buttermakers' fashion..
...mashed it firmly with a fork.
A lot more buttermilk came out - I ought to have weighed it[1] but the
remainder was mashed - butter! I patted it back into an -erme- pat and
put it in the butter dish and guess what I'm enjoying - yes really -
enjoying on my lunchtime toast?
Clearly, doing it properly in the first place would be better next time
but it's nice to know that the situation was recoverable.
Now I'm thinking about how to churn it in the future and I'm imagining
something like a large-ish hamster-wheel with the tubs of cream tumbling
inside[2]
Thanks again,
Just a thought but would something like this help? Sorry if it's already
been suggested, I'm a bit behind.
I'm so sorry. I'm a bit distrait here.

<https://www.amazon.co.uk/Kilner-25-348-Manual-Butter-Churner/dp/B00VSLGHOI/ref=sr_1_2?>ie=UTF8&qid=1548023746&sr=8-2&keywords=kilner+butter+churner
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Fenny
2019-01-20 23:19:56 UTC
Permalink
On 20 Jan 2019 22:37:19 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
That sounds logical. Maybe I can work out how to tumble the cream rather
than whisk it before I find another cheap batch.
Just to add that I took the now somewhat wet and soggy salted "butter"
out of the fridge yesterday and in time=honoured buttermakers' fashion..
...mashed it firmly with a fork.
A lot more buttermilk came out - I ought to have weighed it[1] but the
remainder was mashed - butter! I patted it back into an -erme- pat and
put it in the butter dish and guess what I'm enjoying - yes really -
enjoying on my lunchtime toast?
Clearly, doing it properly in the first place would be better next time
but it's nice to know that the situation was recoverable.
Now I'm thinking about how to churn it in the future and I'm imagining
something like a large-ish hamster-wheel with the tubs of cream tumbling
inside[2]
Thanks again,
Just a thought but would something like this help? Sorry if it's already
been suggested, I'm a bit behind.
I'm so sorry. I'm a bit distrait here.
<https://www.amazon.co.uk/Kilner-25-348-Manual-Butter-Churner/dp/B00VSLGHOI/ref=sr_1_2?>ie=UTF8&qid=1548023746&sr=8-2&keywords=kilner+butter+churner
"Hand wash only"! Well, even if I did want to make my own butter, I
wouldn't be paying over £20 for something I couldn't stick in the
dishwasher.
--
Fenny
Nick Odell
2019-01-21 00:09:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
That sounds logical. Maybe I can work out how to tumble the cream rather
than whisk it before I find another cheap batch.
Just to add that I took the now somewhat wet and soggy salted "butter"
out of the fridge yesterday and in time=honoured buttermakers' fashion..
...mashed it firmly with a fork.
A lot more buttermilk came out - I ought to have weighed it[1] but the
remainder was mashed - butter! I patted it back into an -erme- pat and
put it in the butter dish and guess what I'm enjoying - yes really -
enjoying on my lunchtime toast?
Clearly, doing it properly in the first place would be better next time
but it's nice to know that the situation was recoverable.
Now I'm thinking about how to churn it in the future and I'm imagining
something like a large-ish hamster-wheel with the tubs of cream tumbling
inside[2]
Thanks again,
Just a thought but would something like this help? Sorry if it's already
been suggested, I'm a bit behind.
I'm so sorry. I'm a bit distrait here.
<https://www.amazon.co.uk/Kilner-25-348-Manual-Butter-Churner/dp/B00VSLGHOI/ref=sr_1_2?>ie=UTF8&qid=1548023746&sr=8-2&keywords=kilner+butter+churner
There's another one on the same page which just requires you do shake it
up and down for a bit which rather appeals. But as it looks like a
glorified jam jar I'm wondering if I couldn't use a jam jar and do
exactly the same thing? Maybe that's what I should try next time.
Unfortunately next time is likely to be after next Christmas or whenever
next they sell off surplus cream for pennies.

Nick
Penny
2019-01-21 12:14:57 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 21 Jan 2019 00:09:13 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
There's another one on the same page which just requires you do shake it
up and down for a bit which rather appeals. But as it looks like a
glorified jam jar I'm wondering if I couldn't use a jam jar and do
exactly the same thing? Maybe that's what I should try next time.
Unfortunately next time is likely to be after next Christmas or whenever
next they sell off surplus cream for pennies.
That's pretty much what we did at school. That cunning jar does make it
easier to get the butter out but any wide-topped jar would be easier than
an ink bottle ;)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2019-01-21 20:29:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Mon, 21 Jan 2019 00:09:13 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
There's another one on the same page which just requires you do shake it
up and down for a bit which rather appeals. But as it looks like a
glorified jam jar I'm wondering if I couldn't use a jam jar and do
exactly the same thing? Maybe that's what I should try next time.
Unfortunately next time is likely to be after next Christmas or whenever
next they sell off surplus cream for pennies.
That's pretty much what we did at school. That cunning jar does make it
easier to get the butter out but any wide-topped jar would be easier than
an ink bottle ;)
Repurpose a (clean) largish plastic milk bottle, & cut it open to free
the butter?
--
Sam Plusnet
steveski
2019-01-21 22:39:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
On Mon, 21 Jan 2019 00:09:13 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
There's another one on the same page which just requires you do shake
it up and down for a bit which rather appeals. But as it looks like a
glorified jam jar I'm wondering if I couldn't use a jam jar and do
exactly the same thing? Maybe that's what I should try next time.
Unfortunately next time is likely to be after next Christmas or
whenever next they sell off surplus cream for pennies.
That's pretty much what we did at school. That cunning jar does make it
easier to get the butter out but any wide-topped jar would be easier
than an ink bottle ;)
Repurpose a (clean) largish plastic milk bottle, & cut it open to free
the butter?
Me <--- impressed.
--
Steveski
Serena Blanchflower
2019-01-21 11:33:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
I'm so sorry. I'm a bit distrait here.
That doesn't sound good. Hope all's well.
--
Best wishes, Serena
The 'good life' begins when you stop wanting a better one (Nkosiphambili
E. Molapis)
Sally Thompson
2019-01-21 12:43:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Sally Thompson
I'm so sorry. I'm a bit distrait here.
That doesn't sound good. Hope all's well.
Not really, but I'm coping:-)
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Serena Blanchflower
2019-01-21 13:18:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Sally Thompson
I'm so sorry. I'm a bit distrait here.
That doesn't sound good. Hope all's well.
Not really, but I'm coping:-)
:( Sending hugs.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest
(Mark Twain)
Loading...