Discussion:
OT: Gin advent calendars
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BrritSki
2019-11-29 21:25:00 UTC
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We've been working with the adorable grandchildren in recent weeks on
advent calendars for their parents. They've drawn and coloured in the
envelopes and they've all (mostly) been filled with gin miniatures, hung
on the "tree" and then decorated.
It all seems to have worked out well and received with delight as no
doubt the contents will be. :)

<https://www.flickr.com/photos/rogertil/49143662757/in/dateposted-public/>
Sam Plusnet
2019-11-29 21:46:18 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
We've been working with the adorable grandchildren in recent weeks on
advent calendars for their parents. They've drawn and coloured in the
envelopes and they've all (mostly) been filled with gin miniatures, hung
on the "tree" and then decorated.
It all seems to have worked out well and received with delight as no
doubt the contents will be.  :)
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/rogertil/49143662757/in/dateposted-public/>
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.


P.S. I have an Advent calendar question to ask EU.

Wofe has said that as a gril she always wanted an advent calendar but
never got one.
Working on the "It's never too late to..." principle, I have obtained
one of those 'calendars' with a tiny wooden drawer for each day (just
enough room for a small sweet).
Hence my problem.
When do I 'reveal' this calendar to said spouse?
Do I put it up early, with a "You can look but don't touch"
instruction[1]?
Or do I wait until the 1st of December?

[1] When we married, 3,000 years ago, proto-Wofe checked the wording of
the marriage vows to ensure the word "obey" wasn't included. She has
stuck to her guns ever since.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2019-11-30 00:24:19 UTC
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On Fri, 29 Nov 2019 21:46:18 +0000, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Wofe has said that as a gril she always wanted an advent calendar but
never got one.
Working on the "It's never too late to..." principle, I have obtained
one of those 'calendars' with a tiny wooden drawer for each day (just
enough room for a small sweet).
Hence my problem.
When do I 'reveal' this calendar to said spouse?
Do I put it up early, with a "You can look but don't touch"
instruction[1]?
Or do I wait until the 1st of December?
Wait until Sunday.

We used to get advent calendars when I was small. They were usually the
size and form of a (then) normal birthday/Christmas card with a picture
with numbers on it. Each number indicated a tiny door which would open to
reveal an even tinier picture - an angel, a teddy bear - that sort of
thing.

When my own children were small they had something larger but along similar
lines. In fact I acquired a fairly robust (but still cardboard) one in a
post Christmas sale which is (I still have it somewhere) in the form of a
puzzle picture. Around the edge were numbered pieces which each had part of
the whole picture on them. These were then placed in the appropriately
numbered space in the central area. Not terribly exciting but they could
take turns in removing and placing the day's piece. No chocolate was
consumed in the entire process.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jane Vernon
2019-11-30 08:12:44 UTC
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Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Wofe has said that as a gril she always wanted an advent calendar but
never got one.
Working on the "It's never too late to..." principle, I have obtained
one of those 'calendars' with a tiny wooden drawer for each day (just
enough room for a small sweet).
Hence my problem.
When do I 'reveal' this calendar to said spouse?
Do I put it up early, with a "You can look but don't touch"
instruction[1]?
Or do I wait until the 1st of December?
Wait until Sunday.
We used to get advent calendars when I was small. They were usually the
size and form of a (then) normal birthday/Christmas card with a picture
with numbers on it. Each number indicated a tiny door which would open to
reveal an even tinier picture - an angel, a teddy bear - that sort of
thing.
When my own children were small they had something larger but along similar
lines. In fact I acquired a fairly robust (but still cardboard) one in a
post Christmas sale which is (I still have it somewhere) in the form of a
puzzle picture. Around the edge were numbered pieces which each had part of
the whole picture on them. These were then placed in the appropriately
numbered space in the central area. Not terribly exciting but they could
take turns in removing and placing the day's piece. No chocolate was
consumed in the entire process.
I still haved all mine somewhere. The earliest dates to about 1959.
--
Jane
The Potter in the Purple socks - to reply, please remove PURPLE
BTME

http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm - Umrats' recipes
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-30 09:07:24 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Wofe has said that as a gril she always wanted an advent calendar but
never got one.
Working on the "It's never too late to..." principle, I have obtained
one of those 'calendars' with a tiny wooden drawer for each day (just
enough room for a small sweet).
Hence my problem.
When do I 'reveal' this calendar to said spouse?
Do I put it up early, with a "You can look but don't touch"
instruction[1]?
Or do I wait until the 1st of December?
Wait until Sunday.
We used to get advent calendars when I was small. They were usually the
size and form of a (then) normal birthday/Christmas card with a picture
with numbers on it. Each number indicated a tiny door which would open to
reveal an even tinier picture - an angel, a teddy bear - that sort of
thing.
When my own children were small they had something larger but along similar
lines. In fact I acquired a fairly robust (but still cardboard) one in a
post Christmas sale which is (I still have it somewhere) in the form of a
puzzle picture. Around the edge were numbered pieces which each had part of
the whole picture on them. These were then placed in the appropriately
numbered space in the central area. Not terribly exciting but they could
take turns in removing and placing the day's piece. No chocolate was
consumed in the entire process.
We've just got one each from Postcode Lottery. B wouldn't let me open
the windows. Said to wait. I think I got the daughters chocolate ones.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-30 00:58:05 UTC
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In message <***@brightview.co.uk>, Sam
Plusnet <***@home.com> writes:
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
[]
Depends to some extent on the type of tree. If a real but cut one, then
more than a few days before will have you knee deep in needles (and a
very bare looking skeleton) by 12th night. (I think the Nordman fir is
the best variety for not dropping.) An artificial tree obviously
doesn't, and a live one in a pot is probably OK if you keep it watered
and don't have a very hot house.

(I've given up my quest for a potted-tree rental company near Newcastle.
There seem to be about half a dozen companies around the country
[including one who isn't doing it this year as he's recovering from an
accident], but none in the north.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

After I'm dead I'd rather have people ask why I have no monument than why I
have one. -Cato the Elder, statesman, soldier, and writer (234-149 BCE)
Sam Plusnet
2019-11-30 02:51:52 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
[]
Depends to some extent on the type of tree. If a real but cut one, then
more than a few days before will have you knee deep in needles (and a
very bare looking skeleton) by 12th night. (I think the Nordman fir is
the best variety for not dropping.) An artificial tree obviously
doesn't, and a live one in a pot is probably OK if you keep it watered
and don't have a very hot house.
I agree on the topic of real trees.
I was really using the tree as a stalking horse for the whole topic of
the 'right' time for Christmas decorations to go up.

p.s. Having looked into the derivation of the stalking horse, I can't
understand why we don't refer to stalking cows. If you must hide behind
a large quadruped, a cow seems like a much better bet.
--
Sam Plusnet
BrritSki
2019-11-30 08:36:32 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
[]
Depends to some extent on the type of tree. If a real but cut one,
then more than a few days before will have you knee deep in needles
(and a very bare looking skeleton) by 12th night. (I think the Nordman
fir is the best variety for not dropping.) An artificial tree
obviously doesn't, and a live one in a pot is probably OK if you keep
it watered and don't have a very hot house.
I agree on the topic of real trees.
I was really using the tree as a stalking horse for the whole topic of
the 'right' time for Christmas decorations to go up.
Our tree (a cut Nordman fir probably) won't be put up until we return
from Tenerife in a couple of weeks, which has me worried that they'll
have run out of decent ones.
Post by Sam Plusnet
p.s. Having looked into the derivation of the stalking horse, I can't
understand why we don't refer to stalking cows.  If you must hide behind
a large quadruped, a cow seems like a much better bet.
Yes but a cow is not normally so easily led, esp. an aurochs, and if
large prey animal turns on you it's much easier to jump on the horse and
make yourself scarce.
Penny
2019-11-30 15:46:31 UTC
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On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 08:36:32 +0000, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Yes but a cow is not normally so easily led, esp. an aurochs, and if
large prey animal turns on you it's much easier to jump on the horse and
make yourself scarce.
IRTA "if large prey animals turn you on" and was then confused by mention
of jumping a horse...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-11-30 15:49:24 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Yes but a cow is not normally so easily led, esp. an aurochs, and if
large prey animal turns on you it's much easier to jump on the horse and
make yourself scarce.
IRTA "if large prey animals turn you on" and was then confused by mention
of jumping a horse...
Only in UMRA....
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2019-11-30 16:30:12 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
Yes but a cow is not normally so easily led, esp. an aurochs, and if
large prey animal turns on you it's much easier to jump on the horse and
make yourself scarce.
IRTA "if large prey animals turn you on" and was then confused by mention
of jumping a horse...
YACatherinetheGreatAICM5urbanmiffs
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-30 09:09:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
[]
Depends to some extent on the type of tree. If a real but cut one, then
more than a few days before will have you knee deep in needles (and a
very bare looking skeleton) by 12th night. (I think the Nordman fir is
the best variety for not dropping.) An artificial tree obviously
doesn't, and a live one in a pot is probably OK if you keep it watered
and don't have a very hot house.
I agree on the topic of real trees.
I was really using the tree as a stalking horse for the whole topic of
the 'right' time for Christmas decorations to go up.
p.s. Having looked into the derivation of the stalking horse, I can't
understand why we don't refer to stalking cows. If you must hide behind
a large quadruped, a cow seems like a much better bet.
The health club put their decorations and trees up on Monday and homes
here inthe estate have trees in the windows this week too.
BrritSki
2019-11-30 08:32:41 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
P.S. I have an Advent calendar question to ask EU.
Wofe has said that as a gril she always wanted an advent calendar but
never got one.
Working on the "It's never too late to..." principle, I have obtained
one of those 'calendars' with a tiny wooden drawer for each day (just
enough room for a small sweet).
Hence my problem.
When do I 'reveal' this calendar to said spouse?
Do I put it up early, with a "You can look but don't touch" instruction[1]?
Or do I wait until the 1st of December?
The calendar needs to be in the holders hands by today at the latest so
the first d[raw]oor can be opened at sparrow-fart tomorrow.

As for proper trees and other decs, our family rule is not before errrm,
Dec 1. Removal by Twelfth Night latest. YFMV
Post by Sam Plusnet
[1] When we married, 3,000 years ago, proto-Wofe checked the wording of
the marriage vows to ensure the word "obey" wasn't included.  She has
stuck to her guns ever since.
:)
Nick Odell
2019-11-30 14:13:43 UTC
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Permalink
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 08:32:41 +0000, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
P.S. I have an Advent calendar question to ask EU.
Wofe has said that as a gril she always wanted an advent calendar but
never got one.
Working on the "It's never too late to..." principle, I have obtained
one of those 'calendars' with a tiny wooden drawer for each day (just
enough room for a small sweet).
Hence my problem.
When do I 'reveal' this calendar to said spouse?
Do I put it up early, with a "You can look but don't touch" instruction[1]?
Or do I wait until the 1st of December?
The calendar needs to be in the holders hands by today at the latest so
the first d[raw]oor can be opened at sparrow-fart tomorrow.
As for proper trees and other decs, our family rule is not before errrm,
Dec 1. Removal by Twelfth Night latest. YFMV
Post by Sam Plusnet
[1] When we married, 3,000 years ago, proto-Wofe checked the wording of
the marriage vows to ensure the word "obey" wasn't included.  She has
stuck to her guns ever since.
:)
The Coffee Advent Calendar will be unveiled for the first time
tomorrow, Dec 1st.

The family rule use to be not to put any Christmas decorations up
until after second son's mid-December birthday but now he lives
somewhere else, I suppose it's okay to put them up sooner.

Nick
Mike
2019-11-30 14:40:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 08:32:41 +0000, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
P.S. I have an Advent calendar question to ask EU.
Wofe has said that as a gril she always wanted an advent calendar but
never got one.
Working on the "It's never too late to..." principle, I have obtained
one of those 'calendars' with a tiny wooden drawer for each day (just
enough room for a small sweet).
Hence my problem.
When do I 'reveal' this calendar to said spouse?
Do I put it up early, with a "You can look but don't touch" instruction[1]?
Or do I wait until the 1st of December?
The calendar needs to be in the holders hands by today at the latest so
the first d[raw]oor can be opened at sparrow-fart tomorrow.
As for proper trees and other decs, our family rule is not before errrm,
Dec 1. Removal by Twelfth Night latest. YFMV
Post by Sam Plusnet
[1] When we married, 3,000 years ago, proto-Wofe checked the wording of
the marriage vows to ensure the word "obey" wasn't included.  She has
stuck to her guns ever since.
:)
The Coffee Advent Calendar will be unveiled for the first time
tomorrow, Dec 1st.
The family rule use to be not to put any Christmas decorations up
until after second son's mid-December birthday but now he lives
somewhere else, I suppose it's okay to put them up sooner.
Nick
Of course it isn’t Nick! No, not at all; standards must be upheld I tell
you!
Whatis the world coming to I ask you? Harrumph and Scrooge, bah HumNug.
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-11-30 15:50:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 14:13:43 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
The family rule use to be not to put any Christmas decorations up
until after second son's mid-December birthday but now he lives
somewhere else, I suppose it's okay to put them up sooner.
Only if you want to.
I have not decorated my house in December for many years - I don't think I
even did it when d#1 +1 came over for Christmas - photos show we did have
crackers but I expect she brought those with her.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-30 16:42:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 14:13:43 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
The family rule use to be not to put any Christmas decorations up
until after second son's mid-December birthday but now he lives
somewhere else, I suppose it's okay to put them up sooner.
Only if you want to.
I have not decorated my house in December for many years - I don't think I
I'm usually away, so don't. I have a white cube on my windowsill, which
lights up in various colours, which I tend to turn on in December
evenings, but little else (I've never bought a tree, for example).

Not that I'm against decorations etc. - lights in particular make the
long cold nights cheery. I just don't do them for myself.

(One interesting aspect from my childhood in Germany: their tree lights,
especially outdoor ones, tended to be all white; only the British
quarters had colours. I don't know what countries other than those two
do, nor whether the development of LEDs has changed things.)
Post by Penny
even did it when d#1 +1 came over for Christmas - photos show we did have
crackers but I expect she brought those with her.
This will _really_ make me a Scrooge, but of all the aspects of
Christmas, I think crackers are one of the things I hate _most_. I'm
sure IANA, though.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Advertising is legalized lying. - H.G. Wells
Mike
2019-11-30 16:52:13 UTC
Reply
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 14:13:43 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
The family rule use to be not to put any Christmas decorations up
until after second son's mid-December birthday but now he lives
somewhere else, I suppose it's okay to put them up sooner.
Only if you want to.
I have not decorated my house in December for many years - I don't think I
I'm usually away, so don't. I have a white cube on my windowsill, which
lights up in various colours, which I tend to turn on in December
evenings, but little else (I've never bought a tree, for example).
Not that I'm against decorations etc. - lights in particular make the
long cold nights cheery. I just don't do them for myself.
(One interesting aspect from my childhood in Germany: their tree lights,
especially outdoor ones, tended to be all white; only the British
quarters had colours. I don't know what countries other than those two
do, nor whether the development of LEDs has changed things.)
Post by Penny
even did it when d#1 +1 came over for Christmas - photos show we did have
crackers but I expect she brought those with her.
This will _really_ make me a Scrooge, but of all the aspects of
Christmas, I think crackers are one of the things I hate _most_. I'm
sure IANA, though.
Nope YANAOU!
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-11-30 17:15:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 16:42:44 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
This will _really_ make me a Scrooge, but of all the aspects of
Christmas, I think crackers are one of the things I hate _most_. I'm
sure IANA, though.
When I did such things I would get big ones - in the post-Christmas sales,
natch - and carefully open one end so I could introduce a miniature chosen
to please the specific adults (I put name labels on the crackers) and a
small but rather better toy or whatever for the small people.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Penny
2019-11-30 17:16:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 17:15:17 +0000, Penny <***@labyrinth.freeuk.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 16:42:44 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
This will _really_ make me a Scrooge, but of all the aspects of
Christmas, I think crackers are one of the things I hate _most_. I'm
sure IANA, though.
When I did such things I would get big ones - in the post-Christmas sales,
natch - and carefully open one end so I could introduce a miniature chosen
to please the specific adults (I put name labels on the crackers) and a
small but rather better toy or whatever for the small people.
Forgot to say, this is one thing d#1, at least, has copied.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2019-12-01 12:47:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
P.S. I have an Advent calendar question to ask EU.
Wofe has said that as a gril she always wanted an advent calendar but
never got one.
Working on the "It's never too late to..." principle, I have obtained
one of those 'calendars' with a tiny wooden drawer for each day (just
enough room for a small sweet).
Hence my problem.
When do I 'reveal' this calendar to said spouse?
Do I put it up early, with a "You can look but don't touch" instruction[1]?
Or do I wait until the 1st of December?
The calendar needs to be in the holders hands by today at the latest so
the first d[raw]oor can be opened at sparrow-fart tomorrow.
As for proper trees and other decs, our family rule is not before errrm,
Dec 1. Removal by Twelfth Night latest. YFMV
Post by Sam Plusnet
[1] When we married, 3,000 years ago, proto-Wofe checked the wording of
the marriage vows to ensure the word "obey" wasn't included.  She has
stuck to her guns ever since.
:)
Lidl had an adult advent calendar this year (spanners). So the son in law
is building his xmas pressie. Seeing Claire, not yet two, watching Martin
open it was amazing. Its obvious she knows its interesting: her back view
tells you. Without the ‘t’internet we’d have missed out on this moment!

Sincerely Chris
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-12-01 13:48:55 UTC
Reply
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In message <UDOEF.37851$***@fx29.am4>, Chris McMillan
<***@ntlworld.com> writes:
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Lidl had an adult advent calendar this year
The mind boggled!
Post by Chris McMillan
(spanners).
Ah, now the mind is just puzzled. Is this a _huge_ advent calendar, the
size of a trunk or something?
[]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Actors are fairly modest...A lot of us have quite a lot to be modest about. -
Simon Greenall (voice of Aleksandr the "Simples!" Meerkat), RT 11-17 Dec 2010
Penny
2019-11-30 08:38:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 29 Nov 2019 21:46:18 +0000, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
I forgot to reply to this bit, having got caught up in reminiscence over
advent calendars.

As a child I think the tree came in and the decs went up after my mother's
birthday on 22nd.

I kept this up in my own household and the tree was always decorated on
Christmas Eve. Everything then stayed up until 12th night when I would burn
the very crisp holly on the fire while listening to Hymn to Freedom played
by Oscar Peterson.

My children didn't like this long wait when their friends homes had been
decorated since early December and both of them now decorate much earlier.

But I'm the Granny who doesn't like Christmas. Last year our not-xmas get
together was postponed until February half term. In previous years it has
been as early as October - governed partly by the start of panto season
when SiL was theatre tech and always had to do 8-10 shows a week until
Christmas Day itself when he got a day off.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2019-11-30 18:36:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
I forgot to reply to this bit, having got caught up in reminiscence over
advent calendars.
As a child I think the tree came in and the decs went up after my mother's
birthday on 22nd.
Anchoring the start of decorations to a convenient family birthday seems
to be a common feature. That's how things were done in my childhood.

I suppose families without a convenient December birthday are left to
drift rudderless and could end up starting earlier and earlier each year.
--
Sam Plusnet
John Ashby
2019-11-30 18:55:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
I forgot to reply to this bit, having got caught up in reminiscence over
advent calendars.
As a child I think the tree came in and the decs went up after my mother's
birthday on 22nd.
Anchoring the start of decorations to a convenient family birthday seems
to be a common feature.  That's how things were done in my childhood.
I suppose families without a convenient December birthday are left to
drift rudderless and could end up starting earlier and earlier each year.
Does this explain the supermarkets' habit of now starting to sell
Christmas goods in September?

john
Sam Plusnet
2019-12-01 19:57:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
I forgot to reply to this bit, having got caught up in reminiscence over
advent calendars.
As a child I think the tree came in and the decs went up after my mother's
birthday on 22nd.
Anchoring the start of decorations to a convenient family birthday
seems to be a common feature.  That's how things were done in my
childhood.
I suppose families without a convenient December birthday are left to
drift rudderless and could end up starting earlier and earlier each year.
Does this explain the supermarkets' habit of now starting to sell
Christmas goods in September?
They have to fill the shelf space left vacant, once they've sold all the
"Back to School" stuff.
--
Sam Plusnet
Joe Kerr
2019-12-01 22:39:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
I forgot to reply to this bit, having got caught up in reminiscence over
advent calendars.
As a child I think the tree came in and the decs went up after my mother's
birthday on 22nd.
Anchoring the start of decorations to a convenient family birthday
seems to be a common feature.  That's how things were done in my
childhood.
I suppose families without a convenient December birthday are left to
drift rudderless and could end up starting earlier and earlier each year.
Does this explain the supermarkets' habit of now starting to sell
Christmas goods in September?
No. I think it is because they were threatened with legislation to stop
them selling them in August.
Post by John Ashby
john
--
Ric
steveski
2019-12-02 16:13:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 18:55:47 +0000, John Ashby wrote:

[]
Post by John Ashby
Does this explain the supermarkets' habit of now starting to sell
Christmas goods in September?
Q. How do you know it's Christmas?

A. Because of the Easter eggs in the shops.

IGM white fur-trimmed red jacket.
--
Steveski
Mike
2019-12-02 16:24:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steveski
[]
Post by John Ashby
Does this explain the supermarkets' habit of now starting to sell
Christmas goods in September?
Q. How do you know it's Christmas?
A. Because of the Easter eggs in the shops.
IGM white fur-trimmed red jacket.
Keep your Clause off my goat!
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2019-12-02 21:28:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by steveski
[]
Post by John Ashby
Does this explain the supermarkets' habit of now starting to sell
Christmas goods in September?
Q. How do you know it's Christmas?
A. Because of the Easter eggs in the shops.
IGM white fur-trimmed red jacket.
Keep your Clause off my goat!
Get Chris to buy you some goat-hangers for Christmas.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2019-12-03 08:52:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by steveski
[]
Post by John Ashby
Does this explain the supermarkets' habit of now starting to sell
Christmas goods in September?
Q. How do you know it's Christmas?
A. Because of the Easter eggs in the shops.
IGM white fur-trimmed red jacket.
Keep your Clause off my goat!
Get Chris to buy you some goat-hangers for Christmas.
What? For my very delicately crafted goat’s hair clobber?! I don’t want
just any old goat hair craft hangars thanks!
--
Toodle Pip
Paul Herber
2019-12-02 16:27:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steveski
[]
Post by John Ashby
Does this explain the supermarkets' habit of now starting to sell
Christmas goods in September?
Q. How do you know it's Christmas?
A. Because of the Easter eggs in the shops.
IGM white fur-trimmed red jacket.
that's one's er, mine.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Mike
2019-12-02 16:43:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Herber
Post by steveski
[]
Post by John Ashby
Does this explain the supermarkets' habit of now starting to sell
Christmas goods in September?
Q. How do you know it's Christmas?
A. Because of the Easter eggs in the shops.
IGM white fur-trimmed red jacket.
that's one's er, mine.
Did you mink of that all on your own? (Go on, admit you stole it).
--
Toodle Pip
Paul Herber
2019-12-02 16:54:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Paul Herber
Post by steveski
[]
Post by John Ashby
Does this explain the supermarkets' habit of now starting to sell
Christmas goods in September?
Q. How do you know it's Christmas?
A. Because of the Easter eggs in the shops.
IGM white fur-trimmed red jacket.
that's one's er, mine.
Did you mink of that all on your own? (Go on, admit you stole it).
Fur fox sake, of course I did!
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Mike
2019-12-02 18:14:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Mike
Post by Paul Herber
Post by steveski
[]
Post by John Ashby
Does this explain the supermarkets' habit of now starting to sell
Christmas goods in September?
Q. How do you know it's Christmas?
A. Because of the Easter eggs in the shops.
IGM white fur-trimmed red jacket.
that's one's er, mine.
Did you mink of that all on your own? (Go on, admit you stole it).
Fur fox sake, of course I did!
It is important to know your Faux...
--
Toodle Pip
SODAM
2019-12-02 22:44:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Paul Herber
Fur fox sake, of course I did!
It is important to know your Faux...
Toodles feels he musquash in as many puns as possible.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Mike
2019-12-03 09:59:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Post by Paul Herber
Fur fox sake, of course I did!
It is important to know your Faux...
Toodles feels he musquash in as many puns as possible.
:-)))
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2019-12-03 15:50:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Does this explain the supermarkets' habit of now starting to sell
Christmas goods in September?
Nothing new. Woolworths would have the first Christmas cards out on 1
August to ensure they caught the last posting dates for surface mail
during the month (late 60's early 70's).
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Penny
2019-11-30 22:32:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 30 Nov 2019 18:36:59 +0000, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
As a child I think the tree came in and the decs went up after my mother's
birthday on 22nd.
Anchoring the start of decorations to a convenient family birthday seems
to be a common feature. That's how things were done in my childhood.
I suppose families without a convenient December birthday are left to
drift rudderless and could end up starting earlier and earlier each year.
I wouldn't know - my father, 2nd husband and one of my step sons all had
25th December birthdays. It would have been a bit late to wait that long.

I suspect it was just an easy answer to "can we put the decorations up
yet?".
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-12-01 10:31:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
As a child I think the tree came in and the decs went up after my mother's
birthday on 22nd.
Anchoring the start of decorations to a convenient family birthday seems
to be a common feature. That's how things were done in my childhood.
I suppose families without a convenient December birthday are left to
drift rudderless and could end up starting earlier and earlier each year.
I wouldn't know - my father, 2nd husband and one of my step sons all had
25th December birthdays. It would have been a bit late to wait that long.
I suspect it was just an easy answer to "can we put the decorations up
yet?".
We gave our Son in Law an advent calendar with a difference - he has opened
the first window this morning to reveal an empty box; subsequent windows
will reveal components of a socket set.
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2019-12-01 12:47:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
As a child I think the tree came in and the decs went up after my mother's
birthday on 22nd.
Anchoring the start of decorations to a convenient family birthday seems
to be a common feature. That's how things were done in my childhood.
I suppose families without a convenient December birthday are left to
drift rudderless and could end up starting earlier and earlier each year.
I wouldn't know - my father, 2nd husband and one of my step sons all had
25th December birthdays. It would have been a bit late to wait that long.
I suspect it was just an easy answer to "can we put the decorations up
yet?".
We gave our Son in Law an advent calendar with a difference - he has opened
the first window this morning to reveal an empty box; subsequent windows
will reveal components of a socket set.
Whatever the difference between a socket set and a spanner set might be. I
thought sockets lived in walls (and I once worked with a very eccentric man
while on the railway by the name of Sockett). Never heard the surname
since

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2019-12-01 13:51:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
As a child I think the tree came in and the decs went up after my mother's
birthday on 22nd.
Anchoring the start of decorations to a convenient family birthday seems
to be a common feature. That's how things were done in my childhood.
I suppose families without a convenient December birthday are left to
drift rudderless and could end up starting earlier and earlier each year.
I wouldn't know - my father, 2nd husband and one of my step sons all had
25th December birthdays. It would have been a bit late to wait that long.
I suspect it was just an easy answer to "can we put the decorations up
yet?".
We gave our Son in Law an advent calendar with a difference - he has opened
the first window this morning to reveal an empty box; subsequent windows
will reveal components of a socket set.
Whatever the difference between a socket set and a spanner set might be. I
thought sockets lived in walls (and I once worked with a very eccentric man
while on the railway by the name of Sockett). Never heard the surname
since
Sincerely Chris
He had an eye to the main chance - though his name might have a familiar
ring to it.
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-12-01 14:03:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Mike
We gave our Son in Law an advent calendar with a difference - he has opened
the first window this morning to reveal an empty box; subsequent windows
will reveal components of a socket set.
Whatever the difference between a socket set and a spanner set might be. I
thought sockets lived in walls (and I once worked with a very eccentric man
Spanners approach nuts (and bolts) sideways - either open ended (with a
slot in the end), or not (usually called "ring spanners", which I hope
is obvious. A lot of spanners have an open end one end and a ring the
other). O------<= (Though that halves the range of sizes
you can have with a given number of them.)

Sockets, in this context, are short little tubes with hexagonal hollow
in one end, that are slid over the bolt head, and usually a square hole
at the other end, which goes onto a separate handle, often containing a
ratchet (that can be reversed), making it easier to tighten/loosen
without having to repeatedly take the tool off the target and
reposition. (Though you can get ratchet ring spanners too.) ]<=

Thinking about it, they both do _mostly_ the same thing: a socket set is
usually smaller, as it only has one long handle, so you can carry more
different sizes in the same toolbox space. You can generally get more
force with a spanner, and also use it where you can't get "over" the
head, such as to adjust a nut that's on a long stud (threaded shaft).
Post by Chris McMillan
while on the railway by the name of Sockett). Never heard the surname
since
(I've never encountered it, even in genealogy where I find lots of weird
ones.)
Post by Chris McMillan
Sincerely Chris
John
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Actors are fairly modest...A lot of us have quite a lot to be modest about. -
Simon Greenall (voice of Aleksandr the "Simples!" Meerkat), RT 11-17 Dec 2010
Penny
2019-12-01 17:36:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 1 Dec 2019 14:03:32 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris McMillan
while on the railway by the name of Sockett). Never heard the surname
since
(I've never encountered it, even in genealogy where I find lots of weird
ones.)
Unusual names are a boon in genealogy - except the census people tended to
write them down wrong.

I am pleased to be descended from Batterhams and Ledbeters (though too many
spelling variants there), less happy about Hill and Ardern - both turn up
too much in place names - and Campbell. The Rickards get transcribed as
Richards and Godwins as Goodwin.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-12-01 20:15:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Sun, 1 Dec 2019 14:03:32 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris McMillan
while on the railway by the name of Sockett). Never heard the surname
since
(I've never encountered it, even in genealogy where I find lots of weird
ones.)
Unusual names are a boon in genealogy - except the census people tended to
write them down wrong.
I am pleased to be descended from Batterhams and Ledbeters (though too many
spelling variants there), less happy about Hill and Ardern - both turn up
too much in place names - and Campbell. The Rickards get transcribed as
Richards and Godwins as Goodwin.
My only slightly unusual Grandsurname is Weightman - and those are
common in Northumberland, especially in Shilbottle. The other three are
Carter and Martin - pretty common - and as for Haley!

(Full list of G3GPs as I knew them in 2017 follows. If anyrats are
related, I'd be delighted!)

Regards, JPG


All placenames England, except those in Flint(shire) which are in Wales,
and Dumfries which is Scotland

Grandparent surnames are *starred*

NAME DOB POB DOD
Edward *Carter* 1812 Mollington, Cheshire -1869/3/26
Mary Mason ~1812 Croughton, Cheshire
James Worrall ~1816 Brombro, Cheshire -1874/7/13
Ellen Meacock 1806 Ledsham, Cheshire -1871/12/21
Thomas Hughes 1793-12-23 Doddlestone, Flintshire -1871/12/6
Ann Jones ~1787 Flint -1841/5/2_
Edward Mitchell ~1816 Tamworth, Staffordshire
Ann Robinson 1813 Hill Ridware, Staffordshire
John *Martin* 1822 Betley, Staffordshire -1887
Ann Perry ~1823 W*, Cheshire -1897
Samuel Foxley 1814 Bunbury, Cheshire -1892/5/5
Martha Bromley 1817 Mucklestone, Staffordshire -1877
Thomas Davall 1825 Stone, Staffordshire -1894/2/11
Ellen Marson 1825 Caverswall, Staffordshire
Joseph Rushton ~1833 Dilhorne, Staffordshire -1906/5/13
Sarah Lees 1833 Stone, Staffordshire
Andrew *Weightman*~1823 Shilbottle, Northumberland -1854/11/22
Mary Tunney 1821 Shilbottle, Northumberland -1864/12
Thomas Scott ~1821 Northumberland
Alice Oliver 1826/5/29 Ford, Northumberland
Joseph Hudspeth 1814/12/29 Coal Eglingham, Northumberland -1887/1/2
Mary Ann Millar 1814/7/20 Amble, Northumberland -1878
George Surtees ~181_ Northumberland BEF 1891/4/_
Margaret Cooper ~181_ Northumberland BEF 1863/3/23
Hugh *Haley* ~1820 Dumfries, Ayrshire BEF 1881
Jane C ? 1827 Sanquhar, Dumfries
William Dixon Kennedy 1824 Newcastle, Northumberland -1871/2/12
Ann Young ~1829 Newcastle, Northumberland -1903
James Neave 1802 Barton Turf, Norfolk -1888/12/31
Ann Curtis ~1804 East Ruston, Norfolk -1881/12/30
Matthew Slaughter ~1824 Scottow, Norfolk
Lucy Ann Matthews 1824 Buxton, Norfolk -1894
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.
Joe Kerr
2019-12-01 22:37:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
I forgot to reply to this bit, having got caught up in reminiscence over
advent calendars.
As a child I think the tree came in and the decs went up after my mother's
birthday on 22nd.
Anchoring the start of decorations to a convenient family birthday seems
to be a common feature.  That's how things were done in my childhood.
I suppose families without a convenient December birthday are left to
drift rudderless and could end up starting earlier and earlier each year.
There's a fairly prominent chap's birthday on December 25th. That could
be used as a marker.
--
Ric
Sid Nuncius
2019-12-02 06:30:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Sam Plusnet
Anchoring the start of decorations to a convenient family birthday
seems to be a common feature.  That's how things were done in my
childhood.
I suppose families without a convenient December birthday are left to
drift rudderless and could end up starting earlier and earlier each year.
There's a fairly prominent chap's birthday on December 25th. That could
be used as a marker.
But does Isaac Newton really count as a family member?
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike
2019-12-02 08:42:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Sam Plusnet
Anchoring the start of decorations to a convenient family birthday
seems to be a common feature.  That's how things were done in my
childhood.
I suppose families without a convenient December birthday are left to
drift rudderless and could end up starting earlier and earlier each year.
There's a fairly prominent chap's birthday on December 25th. That could
be used as a marker.
But does Isaac Newton really count as a family member?
Maybe not, but I think many would feel the gravity of the occasion.
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2019-11-30 08:46:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by BrritSki
We've been working with the adorable grandchildren in recent weeks on
advent calendars for their parents. They've drawn and coloured in the
envelopes and they've all (mostly) been filled with gin miniatures, hung
on the "tree" and then decorated.
It all seems to have worked out well and received with delight as no
doubt the contents will be.  :)
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/rogertil/49143662757/in/dateposted-public/>
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
P.S. I have an Advent calendar question to ask EU.
Wofe has said that as a gril she always wanted an advent calendar but
never got one.
Working on the "It's never too late to..." principle, I have obtained
one of those 'calendars' with a tiny wooden drawer for each day (just
enough room for a small sweet).
Hence my problem.
When do I 'reveal' this calendar to said spouse?
Do I put it up early, with a "You can look but don't touch"
instruction[1]?
Or do I wait until the 1st of December?
[1] When we married, 3,000 years ago, proto-Wofe checked the wording of
the marriage vows to ensure the word "obey" wasn't included. She has
stuck to her guns ever since.
The ‘sweet’ date would be December the first I’d say.
--
Toodle Pip
Joe Kerr
2019-12-01 22:50:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
Ours always went up on Christmas Eve and remained so (minus a few ^W lot
of needles) until Twelfth Night. It is, after all, a Christmas tree, not
a December tree.

Personally, I've never bothered with one.
--
Ric
Mike
2019-12-02 08:41:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
Ours always went up on Christmas Eve and remained so (minus a few ^W lot
of needles) until Twelfth Night. It is, after all, a Christmas tree, not
a December tree.
Personally, I've never bothered with one.
I can’t say I pine for one these days either.
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2019-12-02 09:15:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
Ours always went up on Christmas Eve and remained so (minus a few ^W lot
of needles) until Twelfth Night. It is, after all, a Christmas tree, not
a December tree.
Personally, I've never bothered with one.
I can’t say I pine for one these days either.
When we had them they gave me the needle. (s)
Sam Plusnet
2019-12-02 21:34:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Sam Plusnet
When did/does the "tree" go up?
This seems to vary a great deal between families.
In my childhood no decorations would go up until four or five days
before Christmas, and would remain in place until Twelfth Night.
Ours always went up on Christmas Eve and remained so (minus a few ^W lot
of needles) until Twelfth Night. It is, after all, a Christmas tree, not
a December tree.
Personally, I've never bothered with one.
It took us a whole day to make up those paper-chains, so it was as well
we started a few days before Christmas.
I can still remember the taste of the glue (yuck!).
--
Sam Plusnet
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