Discussion:
Muzak Ban :)
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Anne B
2020-08-25 10:04:15 UTC
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Permalink
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.

I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time.

I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.

Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.

Anne B
Peter
2020-08-25 10:34:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time.
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
It is hateful in any circumstances. There is one very obvious thing
wrong with it - not everyone has the same taste in music. And there is
one also obvious, but maybe not very obvious objection - if one likes
the music being played one would rather it not be treated so cavalierly.
Mike
2020-08-25 10:45:11 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time.
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
It is hateful in any circumstances. There is one very obvious thing
wrong with it - not everyone has the same taste in music. And there is
one also obvious, but maybe not very obvious objection - if one likes
the music being played one would rather it not be treated so cavalierly.
I liked the suggestion on Toady from Jay Rainer of imposing a ‘decibels
limit’ on the muzak; there is a huge fly in that ointment as eny fule or
sound engineer knows as measurements are open to many forms of manipulation
resulting in 10 - 12 dB. variance depending on where, at what time,
weighting employed and averaging or peak measurements etc. implementation
and execution of any such tests and enforcement are another very shaggy dog
story indeed! Err, has anyrat tried to make contact with their local
council when being kept awake or otherwise disturbed by local ‘noise’ of a
man-made nature?
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2020-08-25 20:52:01 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not
happy about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out
certain that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of
muzak all the time.
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
It is hateful in any circumstances.  There is one very obvious thing
wrong with it - not everyone has the same taste in music.  And there is
one also obvious, but maybe not very obvious objection - if one likes
the music being played one would rather it not be treated so cavalierly.
There are lots of people who want constant background music/musak, and
so do treat it as audible wallpaper.

Somehow(?) it reminds me of the chap (a former cow-orker) who always
poured a large heap of salt and pepper over his lunch - regardless of
what was on the plate.
The analogy doesn't really work, but my brain insists on it.
--
Sam Plusnet
Jim Easterbrook
2020-08-25 21:25:58 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
There are lots of people who want constant background music/musak, and
so do treat it as audible wallpaper.
They wouldn't if I was choosing the music.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Peter
2020-08-25 21:41:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sam Plusnet
There are lots of people who want constant background music/musak, and
so do treat it as audible wallpaper.
They wouldn't if I was choosing the music.
That bought to mind E.F. Benson's 'Secret lives', which has been on
today, with gramophones blasting through the party walls.

Would I be right in thinking that there'll be E.F. Benson (Mapp and
Lucia, etc) fans present?
steveski
2020-08-25 23:40:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sam Plusnet
There are lots of people who want constant background music/musak, and
so do treat it as audible wallpaper.
They wouldn't if I was choosing the music.
That bought to mind E.F. Benson's 'Secret lives', which has been on
today, with gramophones blasting through the party walls.
Would I be right in thinking that there'll be E.F. Benson (Mapp and
Lucia, etc) fans present?
<languid wave>
--
Steveski
Sam Plusnet
2020-08-26 22:57:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by Peter
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sam Plusnet
There are lots of people who want constant background music/musak, and
so do treat it as audible wallpaper.
They wouldn't if I was choosing the music.
That bought to mind E.F. Benson's 'Secret lives', which has been on
today, with gramophones blasting through the party walls.
Would I be right in thinking that there'll be E.F. Benson (Mapp and
Lucia, etc) fans present?
<languid wave>
<lw2>

About time Lucia moved from Tilling to Ambridge.
(with Giorgino mio in attendance)
--
Sam Plusnet
Steve Hague
2020-08-26 08:15:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sam Plusnet
There are lots of people who want constant background music/musak, and
so do treat it as audible wallpaper.
They wouldn't if I was choosing the music.
That bought to mind E.F. Benson's 'Secret lives', which has been on
today, with gramophones blasting through the party walls.
Would I be right in thinking that there'll be E.F. Benson (Mapp and
Lucia, etc) fans present?
You would.
Joe Kerr
2020-08-26 15:44:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter
Would I be right in thinking that there'll be E.F. Benson (Mapp and
Lucia, etc) fans present?
We're going to get a present?
--
Ric
Peter
2020-08-26 23:09:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sam Plusnet
There are lots of people who want constant background music/musak, and
so do treat it as audible wallpaper.
They wouldn't if I was choosing the music.
That bought to mind E.F. Benson's 'Secret lives', which has been on
That brought
Post by Peter
today, with gramophones blasting through the party walls.
Would I be right in thinking that there'll be E.F. Benson (Mapp and
Lucia, etc) fans present?
Chris J Dixon
2020-08-26 08:00:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Somehow(?) it reminds me of the chap (a former cow-orker) who always
poured a large heap of salt and pepper over his lunch - regardless of
what was on the plate.
The analogy doesn't really work, but my brain insists on it.
A story, which may well be apocryphal, tells that when McDonald's
were starting their UK operation, they wanted to see if their
burger seasoning was right for UK tastes. They used CCTV and
monitored how much salt and pepper was being used from the
shakers. As everybody seasoned heavily, they put a bit more in
the mix.

The customers kept on seasoning, and they added even more to the
burgers.

After this had gone on for a while, they reached the point that
they could no longer believe that _more_ seasoning could possibly
be needed, and looked a bit more closely at their tapes. They
then found that all the seasoning was being done before a single
morsel had been tasted.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Jenny M Benson
2020-08-26 08:23:28 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
After this had gone on for a while, they reached the point that
they could no longer believe that_more_ seasoning could possibly
be needed, and looked a bit more closely at their tapes. They
then found that all the seasoning was being done before a single
morsel had been tasted.
Guilty. m'lud.

Well, actually, I don't think I've ever added salt or pepper to a
McBurger, but I do like heavily salted food (1) and I do nearly always
add it before I start to eat. Unlike my sister, who uses it in
preference to salt, I am not a great pepper consumer, though it is a
must in scrambled egg. To which, incidentally, I add the seasoning
before cooking and none afterwards.

(1) Yes, I do know how bad for me it is.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Steve Hague
2020-08-26 08:32:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris J Dixon
After this had gone on for a while, they reached the point that
they could no longer believe that_more_  seasoning could possibly
be needed, and looked a bit more closely at their tapes. They
then found that all the seasoning was being done before a single
morsel had been tasted.
Guilty. m'lud.
Well, actually, I don't think I've ever added salt or pepper to a
McBurger, but I do like heavily salted food (1) and I do nearly always
add it before I start to eat.  Unlike my sister, who uses it in
preference to salt, I am not a great pepper consumer, though it is a
must in scrambled egg.  To which, incidentally, I add the seasoning
before cooking and none afterwards.
(1) Yes, I do know how bad for me it is.
The only reason I don't put salt on ice cream is that it makes it melt.
Steve
Vicky Ayech
2020-08-26 10:27:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 26 Aug 2020 09:23:28 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris J Dixon
After this had gone on for a while, they reached the point that
they could no longer believe that_more_ seasoning could possibly
be needed, and looked a bit more closely at their tapes. They
then found that all the seasoning was being done before a single
morsel had been tasted.
Guilty. m'lud.
Well, actually, I don't think I've ever added salt or pepper to a
McBurger, but I do like heavily salted food (1) and I do nearly always
add it before I start to eat. Unlike my sister, who uses it in
preference to salt, I am not a great pepper consumer, though it is a
must in scrambled egg. To which, incidentally, I add the seasoning
before cooking and none afterwards.
(1) Yes, I do know how bad for me it is.
Me too to all of that. I like heavily salted food and add it before
trying and do know it's bad for me. But I get cramp in my feet now and
then and do know that can be lack of salt, so I might need it.
Peter
2020-08-26 10:44:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris J Dixon
After this had gone on for a while, they reached the point that
they could no longer believe that_more_  seasoning could possibly
be needed, and looked a bit more closely at their tapes. They
then found that all the seasoning was being done before a single
morsel had been tasted.
Guilty. m'lud.
Well, actually, I don't think I've ever added salt or pepper to a
McBurger, but I do like heavily salted food (1) and I do nearly always
add it before I start to eat.  Unlike my sister, who uses it in
preference to salt, I am not a great pepper consumer, though it is a
must in scrambled egg.  To which, incidentally, I add the seasoning
before cooking and none afterwards.
(1) Yes, I do know how bad for me it is.
I used to work with a man who had bag of chips for his lunch. To
counteract the greasiness of the chips he would eat a lemon with them.
I kid you not, I'm not saying he sprinkled his chips with lemon juice,
he really did eat the lemon as you and I would eat an orange. To
counteract the acidity of the lemon he would pour half a teaspoon of
salt on each segment.

He had a hatred (not a dislike, a hatred) of the Japanese. He had been
in a Jap POW camp and had seen the guards pour water down a funnel into
a man's stomach so that it was bloated, lay the man on the ground and
stamp on him so that his stomach ruptured. Who was I to tell him that
his attitude to the Japanese in general was racist?
Sam Plusnet
2020-08-26 23:49:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris J Dixon
After this had gone on for a while, they reached the point that
they could no longer believe that_more_  seasoning could possibly
be needed, and looked a bit more closely at their tapes. They
then found that all the seasoning was being done before a single
morsel had been tasted.
Guilty. m'lud.
Well, actually, I don't think I've ever added salt or pepper to a add
it before I start to eat.  Unlike my sister, who uses it in preference
to salt, I am not a great pepper consumer, though it is a must in
scrambled egg.  To which, incidentally, I add the seasoning before
cooking and none afterwards.
(1) Yes, I do know how bad for me it is.
I used to work with a man who had bag of chips for his lunch.  To
counteract the greasiness of the chips he would eat a lemon with them. I
kid you not, I'm not saying he sprinkled his chips with lemon juice, he
really did eat the lemon as you and I would eat an orange.  To
counteract the acidity of the lemon he would pour half a teaspoon of
salt on each segment.
He had a hatred (not a dislike, a hatred) of the Japanese.  He had been
in a Jap POW camp and had seen the guards pour water down a funnel into
a man's stomach so that it was bloated, lay the man on the ground and
stamp on him so that his stomach ruptured.  Who was I to tell him that
his attitude to the Japanese in general was racist?
I once worked with a chap who was Burmese, born around the start of
WWII. The company we worked for was bought by a large Japanese
corporation. He was not pleased by this.
--
Sam Plusnet
Vicky Ayech
2020-08-27 08:47:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris J Dixon
After this had gone on for a while, they reached the point that
they could no longer believe that_more_  seasoning could possibly
be needed, and looked a bit more closely at their tapes. They
then found that all the seasoning was being done before a single
morsel had been tasted.
Guilty. m'lud.
Well, actually, I don't think I've ever added salt or pepper to a add
it before I start to eat.  Unlike my sister, who uses it in preference
to salt, I am not a great pepper consumer, though it is a must in
scrambled egg.  To which, incidentally, I add the seasoning before
cooking and none afterwards.
(1) Yes, I do know how bad for me it is.
I used to work with a man who had bag of chips for his lunch.  To
counteract the greasiness of the chips he would eat a lemon with them. I
kid you not, I'm not saying he sprinkled his chips with lemon juice, he
really did eat the lemon as you and I would eat an orange.  To
counteract the acidity of the lemon he would pour half a teaspoon of
salt on each segment.
He had a hatred (not a dislike, a hatred) of the Japanese.  He had been
in a Jap POW camp and had seen the guards pour water down a funnel into
a man's stomach so that it was bloated, lay the man on the ground and
stamp on him so that his stomach ruptured.  Who was I to tell him that
his attitude to the Japanese in general was racist?
I once worked with a chap who was Burmese, born around the start of
WWII. The company we worked for was bought by a large Japanese
corporation. He was not pleased by this.
My first grown-up job, not a student one, was at the BBC External
Services, as secreatry to the Programme Organiser, Colin Wild, of the
Burmese Section. Some of the Burmese there were unable to go back as
they were part of a rebel organisation.
Chris McMillan
2020-08-27 14:43:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris J Dixon
After this had gone on for a while, they reached the point that
they could no longer believe that_more_  seasoning could possibly
be needed, and looked a bit more closely at their tapes. They
then found that all the seasoning was being done before a single
morsel had been tasted.
Guilty. m'lud.
Well, actually, I don't think I've ever added salt or pepper to a add
it before I start to eat.  Unlike my sister, who uses it in preference
to salt, I am not a great pepper consumer, though it is a must in
scrambled egg.  To which, incidentally, I add the seasoning before
cooking and none afterwards.
(1) Yes, I do know how bad for me it is.
I used to work with a man who had bag of chips for his lunch.  To
counteract the greasiness of the chips he would eat a lemon with them. I
kid you not, I'm not saying he sprinkled his chips with lemon juice, he
really did eat the lemon as you and I would eat an orange.  To
counteract the acidity of the lemon he would pour half a teaspoon of
salt on each segment.
He had a hatred (not a dislike, a hatred) of the Japanese.  He had been
in a Jap POW camp and had seen the guards pour water down a funnel into
a man's stomach so that it was bloated, lay the man on the ground and
stamp on him so that his stomach ruptured.  Who was I to tell him that
his attitude to the Japanese in general was racist?
I once worked with a chap who was Burmese, born around the start of
WWII. The company we worked for was bought by a large Japanese
corporation. He was not pleased by this.
My first grown-up job, not a student one, was at the BBC External
Services, as secreatry to the Programme Organiser, Colin Wild, of the
Burmese Section. Some of the Burmese there were unable to go back as
they were part of a rebel organisation.
I know a few (now retired) from the World Service China section.

In fact they used to sneak three of us in as guests and we’d have our
charity meeting quietly round a table in the staff canteen.

Sincerely Chris

Vicky Ayech
2020-08-25 10:37:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 25 Aug 2020 11:04:15 +0100, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time.
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
I hate music in places. I now and then have to complain at the health
club about loud music inthe changing room. If they want music they can
use headsets. I can't shut it out if it is playing. We came to an
agreement after I and other early morning swimmers complained, no
music before 9.a.m.

The cafe insisted on playing it anyway. It is sometimes played inthe
corridors. I would never use that cafe now because of the music and
thinkit is actually a diability rights issue.It disadvantages whose
who are going deaf. Plus as you said people now have to shout and
apparently that spreads the virus more.
Sam Plusnet
2020-08-25 20:56:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I hate music in places. I now and then have to complain at the health
club about loud music inthe changing room. If they want music they can
use headsets. I can't shut it out if it is playing. We came to an
agreement after I and other early morning swimmers complained, no
music before 9.a.m.
The cafe insisted on playing it anyway. It is sometimes played inthe
corridors. I would never use that cafe now because of the music and
thinkit is actually a diability rights issue.It disadvantages whose
who are going deaf. Plus as you said people now have to shout and
apparently that spreads the virus more.
Print up a number of small notes saying that you are boycotting the cafe
until they do something about the music. You can print a dozen on one
sheet of A4 & cut it up.
Hand one in every time you visit the club.
Tell your friends what you're doing - they might join in.
--
Sam Plusnet
Joe Kerr
2020-08-25 21:13:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Print up a number of small notes saying that you are boycotting the cafe
until they do something about the music.  You can print a dozen on one
sheet of A4 & cut it up.
Hand one in every time you visit the club.
Tell your friends what you're doing - they might join in.
In principle yes. If you keep going in to tell them you are boycotting
the place they might not believe you. You need lots of friends.

Action on hearing loss did this (in Brighton, I think) and it was
generally well received by managers. It was part of their Speak Easy
Campaign (and written up in their magazine) I referred to in my previous
post. All information appears to have vanished from their website.
--
Ric
Joe Kerr
2020-08-25 21:02:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 25 Aug 2020 11:04:15 +0100, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time.
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
I hate music in places. I now and then have to complain at the health
club about loud music inthe changing room. If they want music they can
use headsets. I can't shut it out if it is playing. We came to an
agreement after I and other early morning swimmers complained, no
music before 9.a.m.
The cafe insisted on playing it anyway. It is sometimes played inthe
corridors. I would never use that cafe now because of the music and
thinkit is actually a diability rights issue.It disadvantages whose
who are going deaf. Plus as you said people now have to shout and
apparently that spreads the virus more.
https://actiononhearingloss.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/SpeakEasy-report.pdf

https://actiononhearingloss.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/SpeakEasy-report-1.pdf
(Another copy of the same document)

I have a copy of the guide it refers to explaining how to make
improvements but it does not seem to be on their website any more. I
could email it if desired.

They seem to have been very efficient at removing useful information
from their website. I suspect that their campaign has ended and they
have lost interest (or budget).
--
Ric
Chris McMillan
2020-08-26 15:21:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 25 Aug 2020 11:04:15 +0100, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time.
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
I hate music in places. I now and then have to complain at the health
club about loud music inthe changing room. If they want music they can
use headsets. I can't shut it out if it is playing. We came to an
agreement after I and other early morning swimmers complained, no
music before 9.a.m.
The cafe insisted on playing it anyway. It is sometimes played inthe
corridors. I would never use that cafe now because of the music and
thinkit is actually a diability rights issue.It disadvantages whose
who are going deaf. Plus as you said people now have to shout and
apparently that spreads the virus more.
https://actiononhearingloss.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/SpeakEasy-report.pdf
https://actiononhearingloss.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/SpeakEasy-report-1.pdf
(Another copy of the same document)
I have a copy of the guide it refers to explaining how to make
improvements but it does not seem to be on their website any more. I
could email it if desired.
They seem to have been very efficient at removing useful information
from their website. I suspect that their campaign has ended and they
have lost interest (or budget).
Not impressed with them at all: name change = change in attitude imho

Sincerely Chris
krw
2020-08-25 14:08:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time.
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
In many cases it is not the background music (which doesn't help) but
the furnishings which reflect every single sound at apparently amplified
volume.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Penny
2020-08-25 14:38:54 UTC
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On Tue, 25 Aug 2020 15:08:39 +0100, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time.
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
In many cases it is not the background music (which doesn't help) but
the furnishings which reflect every single sound at apparently amplified
volume.
Interesting.
I used to be heavily involved in organising periodic dinner dances in the
village hall. The acoustics meant when just two - four people were in the
hall setting up tables and chairs we struggled to comprehend what the other
people were saying unless right next to each other. Later, when the hall
was full of people, there was no such problem in having normal level
conversations around the tables unless the band was particularly loud.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2020-08-25 21:00:57 UTC
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Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time.
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
In many cases it is not the background music (which doesn't help) but
the furnishings which reflect every single sound at apparently amplified
volume.
Interesting.
I used to be heavily involved in organising periodic dinner dances in the
village hall. The acoustics meant when just two - four people were in the
hall setting up tables and chairs we struggled to comprehend what the other
people were saying unless right next to each other. Later, when the hall
was full of people, there was no such problem in having normal level
conversations around the tables unless the band was particularly loud.
There's a lot of work done to get just the right reverberation time in
places like concert halls.
The biggest variable is the impact of the audience. You even get
different results for a classical concert - where ladies might wear
evening dress - and something like a 'pop' concert where they tend to
wear rather less material.

Mike will know.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2020-08-26 07:39:05 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time.
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
In many cases it is not the background music (which doesn't help) but
the furnishings which reflect every single sound at apparently amplified
volume.
Interesting.
I used to be heavily involved in organising periodic dinner dances in the
village hall. The acoustics meant when just two - four people were in the
hall setting up tables and chairs we struggled to comprehend what the other
people were saying unless right next to each other. Later, when the hall
was full of people, there was no such problem in having normal level
conversations around the tables unless the band was particularly loud.
There's a lot of work done to get just the right reverberation time in
places like concert halls.
The biggest variable is the impact of the audience. You even get
different results for a classical concert - where ladies might wear
evening dress - and something like a 'pop' concert where they tend to
wear rather less material.
Mike will know.
Indeed, if recording a rehearsal and also the performance in front of an
audience, it is not always possible to edit in material from one to the
other due to the change in acoustic!
--
Toodle Pip
Chris J Dixon
2020-08-26 09:41:00 UTC
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Post by Mike
Indeed, if recording a rehearsal and also the performance in front of an
audience, it is not always possible to edit in material from one to the
other due to the change in acoustic!
BOFE watched Songs of Praise recently (1) (it was billed as
featuring National Trust, but didn't very much).

Some of the vocal groups featured were shown (2) performing
(socially distanced) in the grounds of Coughton Court. I accept
that generally they mime to a track previously recorded, but
there was so much reverb, either actual or simulated, that it was
completely implausible for the location shown.

(1) https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000lqfh
(2) 7:34 and 13:08 in the above programme

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
BrritSki
2020-08-26 10:28:18 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Mike
Indeed, if recording a rehearsal and also the performance in front of an
audience, it is not always possible to edit in material from one to the
other due to the change in acoustic!
BOFE watched Songs of Praise recently (1) (it was billed as
featuring National Trust, but didn't very much).
Some of the vocal groups featured were shown (2) performing
(socially distanced) in the grounds of Coughton Court.
Coughed on Court ? Poor choice during COVID times...
Chris McMillan
2020-08-26 15:21:57 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Mike
Indeed, if recording a rehearsal and also the performance in front of an
audience, it is not always possible to edit in material from one to the
other due to the change in acoustic!
BOFE watched Songs of Praise recently (1) (it was billed as
featuring National Trust, but didn't very much).
Some of the vocal groups featured were shown (2) performing
(socially distanced) in the grounds of Coughton Court. I accept
that generally they mime to a track previously recorded, but
there was so much reverb, either actual or simulated, that it was
completely implausible for the location shown.
(1) https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000lqfh
(2) 7:34 and 13:08 in the above programme
Chris
Oh I bin there!

Sincerely Chris
John Ashby
2020-08-26 16:43:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Mike
Indeed, if recording a rehearsal and also the performance in front of an
audience, it is not always possible to edit in material from one to the
other due to the change in acoustic!
BOFE watched Songs of Praise recently (1) (it was billed as
featuring National Trust, but didn't very much).
Some of the vocal groups featured were shown (2) performing
(socially distanced) in the grounds of Coughton Court. I accept
that generally they mime to a track previously recorded, but
there was so much reverb, either actual or simulated, that it was
completely implausible for the location shown.
(1) https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000lqfh
(2) 7:34 and 13:08 in the above programme
Chris
Did they put the presenter in the priest hole?

john
Mike
2020-08-26 17:37:20 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Mike
Indeed, if recording a rehearsal and also the performance in front of an
audience, it is not always possible to edit in material from one to the
other due to the change in acoustic!
BOFE watched Songs of Praise recently (1) (it was billed as
featuring National Trust, but didn't very much).
Some of the vocal groups featured were shown (2) performing
(socially distanced) in the grounds of Coughton Court. I accept
that generally they mime to a track previously recorded, but
there was so much reverb, either actual or simulated, that it was
completely implausible for the location shown.
(1) https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000lqfh
(2) 7:34 and 13:08 in the above programme
Chris
Did they put the presenter in the priest hole?
john
A bit too vicarious I should think.
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2020-08-26 17:40:53 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Mike
Indeed, if recording a rehearsal and also the performance in front of an
audience, it is not always possible to edit in material from one to the
other due to the change in acoustic!
BOFE watched Songs of Praise recently (1) (it was billed as
featuring National Trust, but didn't very much).
Some of the vocal groups featured were shown (2) performing
(socially distanced) in the grounds of Coughton Court. I accept
that generally they mime to a track previously recorded, but
there was so much reverb, either actual or simulated, that it was
completely implausible for the location shown.
(1) https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000lqfh
(2) 7:34 and 13:08 in the above programme
Chris
Did they put the presenter in the priest hole?
john
A little too vicarious I’d have thought.
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2020-08-26 02:18:59 UTC
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Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time.
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
In many cases it is not the background music (which doesn't help) but
the furnishings which reflect every single sound at apparently amplified
volume.
Interesting.
I used to be heavily involved in organising periodic dinner dances in the
village hall. The acoustics meant when just two - four people were in the
hall setting up tables and chairs we struggled to comprehend what the other
people were saying unless right next to each other. Later, when the hall
was full of people, there was no such problem in having normal level
conversations around the tables unless the band was particularly loud.
Have I got this right? At these periodic dinner dances, people sat
around the periodic tables.

Nick
Mike
2020-08-26 07:47:11 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time.
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
In many cases it is not the background music (which doesn't help) but
the furnishings which reflect every single sound at apparently amplified
volume.
Interesting.
I used to be heavily involved in organising periodic dinner dances in the
village hall. The acoustics meant when just two - four people were in the
hall setting up tables and chairs we struggled to comprehend what the other
people were saying unless right next to each other. Later, when the hall
was full of people, there was no such problem in having normal level
conversations around the tables unless the band was particularly loud.
Have I got this right? At these periodic dinner dances, people sat
around the periodic tables.
Nick
They would have been in their elements.
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2020-08-26 23:54:18 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
Interesting.
I used to be heavily involved in organising periodic dinner dances in the
village hall. The acoustics meant when just two - four people were in the
hall setting up tables and chairs we struggled to comprehend what the other
people were saying unless right next to each other. Later, when the hall
was full of people, there was no such problem in having normal level
conversations around the tables unless the band was particularly loud.
Have I got this right? At these periodic dinner dances, people sat
around the periodic tables.
Nick
They would have been in their elements.
Lots of noble gassing going on.
--
Sam Plusnet
Joe Kerr
2020-08-25 21:28:41 UTC
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Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
Aren't they going to be mainly people already in close personal contact
so at risk of exchanging virii already?
Post by Anne B
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time. >
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Definitely yes to the "so loud you have to raise your voice" but low
level 'zak covers up conversation and reduces eavesdropping in a a near
empty establishment - useful for business lunches and romantic
break-ups. There is probably an argument to gradually turn the volume
down through the evening to offset the noise from chatter and try to
maintain a constant overall level.
Post by Anne B
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
--
Ric
Mike
2020-08-26 07:45:50 UTC
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Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
Aren't they going to be mainly people already in close personal contact
so at risk of exchanging virii already?
Post by Anne B
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time. >
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Definitely yes to the "so loud you have to raise your voice" but low
level 'zak covers up conversation and reduces eavesdropping in a a near
empty establishment - useful for business lunches and romantic
break-ups. There is probably an argument to gradually turn the volume
down through the evening to offset the noise from chatter and try to
maintain a constant overall level.
Post by Anne B
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
Another suggestion that Jay Rainer made in Toady (he is also a musician
apparently) programme on Monday was that a piano tinkling away ‘in the
background’ would be preferable to muzak. Oh hello Stownley, I didn’t see
you there, (and couldn’t hear you above the ‘LOUD MUZAK’).
--
Toodle Pip
Steve Hague
2020-08-26 08:12:39 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time.
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
That was my initial feeling, but on reflection my thinking was that it
wouldn't be the boss who suffered from my lack of patronage, he's a
millionaire several times over, it would be the staff who would be laid
off if branches had to close. We will be visiting our favourite
Wetherspoons again soon. Coincidentally, it's the Green Parrot in
Perranporth, which was our local when we moved to Cornwall in 1978.
Steve
Chris McMillan
2020-08-26 15:16:20 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Anne B
Well done Nicola for banning muzak in restaurants etc to stop people
having to lean close together to make conversation.
I know it's only temporary, and I know lots of restaurants are not happy
about it, but it would be great to be able to book a meal out certain
that you aren't going to have to hear someone else's choice of muzak all
the time.
I'd like it to be permanently illegal to have muzak in eating places
that is so loud you have to raise your voice to talk to your companions.
Wetherspoons don't have muzak, and until the boss began to behave to
badly that was a positive incentive to me to go to a Wetherspoons.
Sadly, since he espoused Brexit and treated his staff like dirt at the
start of lockdown I don't feel I can ever go back to one of his pubs
with a clear conscience.
Anne B
I refuse to go to Wetherspoons since they stopped making coffee as
required.

Sincerely Chris
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