Discussion:
Crude remarks on the BBC
(too old to reply)
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-26 21:03:42 UTC
Permalink
Wofe was listening to the news on radio 4 earlier, and only half
listening to a piece on NASA and the moon.

Apparently there was some mention of future crude missions and she
couldn't quite understand what would cause them to be so described.

Only later did the alternative version "crewed" occur to her.
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter
2020-10-26 21:32:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Wofe was listening to the news on radio 4 earlier, and only half
listening to a piece on NASA and the moon.
Apparently there was some mention of future crude missions and she
couldn't quite understand what would cause them to be so described.
Maybe Jim Naughtie is going to report on them.
Post by Sam Plusnet
Only later did the alternative version "crewed" occur to her.
"Manned" would have been idiomatic, but someone (I'm guessing) thinks
that "manned" means "crewed by adult males". It doesn't.
--
When, once, reference was made to a statesman almost universally
recognized as one of the villains of this century, in order to
induce him to a negative judgment, he replied: "My situation is
so different from his, that it is not for me to pass judgment".
Ernst Specker on Paul Bernays
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-27 17:44:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by Sam Plusnet
Wofe was listening to the news on radio 4 earlier, and only half
listening to a piece on NASA and the moon.
Apparently there was some mention of future crude missions and she
couldn't quite understand what would cause them to be so described.
Maybe Jim Naughtie is going to report on them.
Post by Sam Plusnet
Only later did the alternative version "crewed" occur to her.
And the subtitling. It threw me briefly (only half-listening as I
usually am), but I did realise fairly quickly, but I did see the
subtitling say "crude" - though it said "crewed" within a few seconds.
Post by Peter
"Manned" would have been idiomatic, but someone (I'm guessing) thinks
that "manned" means "crewed by adult males". It doesn't.
You're probably right. (In this case, quite possibly originating from
the USA.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The first banjo solo I played was actually just a series of mistakes. In fact
it was all the mistakes I knew at the time. - Tim Dowling, RT2015/6/20-26
Peter
2020-10-27 17:59:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Peter
Post by Sam Plusnet
Wofe was listening to the news on radio 4 earlier, and only half
listening to a piece on NASA and the moon.
 Apparently there was some mention of future crude missions and she
couldn't quite understand what would cause them to be so described.
Maybe Jim Naughtie is going to report on them.
Post by Sam Plusnet
 Only later did the alternative version "crewed" occur to her.
And the subtitling. It threw me briefly (only half-listening as I
usually am), but I did realise fairly quickly, but I did see the
subtitling say "crude" - though it said "crewed" within a few seconds.
Post by Peter
"Manned" would have been idiomatic, but someone (I'm guessing) thinks
that "manned" means "crewed by adult males".  It doesn't.
You're probably right. (In this case, quite possibly originating from
the USA.)
Some women don't like being called chairmen. Presumably they think a
chairman is a man who chairs something. It isn't, it means a person who
chairs something, as a quick look in a dictionary will confirm. Some of
those women wish to be called chair thereby putting themselves in the
silly position of being called a piece of furniture.
--
When, once, reference was made to a statesman almost universally
recognized as one of the villains of this century, in order to
induce him to a negative judgment, he replied: "My situation is
so different from his, that it is not for me to pass judgment".
Ernst Specker on Paul Bernays
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-27 18:08:37 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by Peter
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Peter
"Manned" would have been idiomatic, but someone (I'm guessing)
thinks that "manned" means "crewed by adult males".  It doesn't.
You're probably right. (In this case, quite possibly originating from
the USA.)
Some women don't like being called chairmen. Presumably they think a
chairman is a man who chairs something. It isn't, it means a person
who chairs something, as a quick look in a dictionary will confirm.
Some of those women wish to be called chair thereby putting themselves
in the silly position of being called a piece of furniture.
Such people should be firmly sat on?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Mike Jackson |\ _,,,---,,_
and Squeak /,`.-'`' -. ;-;;,_ Shame there's no snooze button
[1998] |,4- ) )-,_..;\ ( `'- on a cat who wants breakfast
zzz '---''(_/--' `-'\_)
Mike McMillan
2020-10-27 18:58:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Peter
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Peter
"Manned" would have been idiomatic, but someone (I'm guessing)
thinks that "manned" means "crewed by adult males".  It doesn't.
You're probably right. (In this case, quite possibly originating from
the USA.)
Some women don't like being called chairmen. Presumably they think a
chairman is a man who chairs something. It isn't, it means a person
who chairs something, as a quick look in a dictionary will confirm.
Some of those women wish to be called chair thereby putting themselves
in the silly position of being called a piece of furniture.
Such people should be firmly sat on?
Where does that leave ottoman?
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Joe Kerr
2020-10-27 22:16:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Peter
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Peter
"Manned" would have been idiomatic, but someone (I'm guessing)
thinks that "manned" means "crewed by adult males".  It doesn't.
You're probably right. (In this case, quite possibly originating from
the USA.)
Some women don't like being called chairmen. Presumably they think a
chairman is a man who chairs something. It isn't, it means a person
who chairs something, as a quick look in a dictionary will confirm.
Some of those women wish to be called chair thereby putting themselves
in the silly position of being called a piece of furniture.
Such people should be firmly sat on?
Where does that leave ottoman?
I think he was the umpire.
--
Ric
Min
2020-10-27 22:53:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Peter
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Peter
"Manned" would have been idiomatic, but someone (I'm guessing)
thinks that "manned" means "crewed by adult males".  It doesn't.
You're probably right. (In this case, quite possibly originating from
the USA.)
Some women don't like being called chairmen. Presumably they think a
chairman is a man who chairs something. It isn't, it means a person
who chairs something, as a quick look in a dictionary will confirm.
Some of those women wish to be called chair thereby putting themselves
in the silly position of being called a piece of furniture.
Such people should be firmly sat on?
Where does that leave ottoman?
Their second album was rubbish.
--
Min
Sid Nuncius
2020-10-28 08:00:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Min
Post by Mike McMillan
Where does that leave ottoman?
Their second album was rubbish.
:o)

All together now:
D-I-S-C-O...
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Nick Leverton
2020-10-27 18:21:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Peter
Post by Sam Plusnet
Wofe was listening to the news on radio 4 earlier, and only half
listening to a piece on NASA and the moon.
 Apparently there was some mention of future crude missions and she
couldn't quite understand what would cause them to be so described.
Maybe Jim Naughtie is going to report on them.
Post by Sam Plusnet
 Only later did the alternative version "crewed" occur to her.
And the subtitling. It threw me briefly (only half-listening as I
usually am), but I did realise fairly quickly, but I did see the
subtitling say "crude" - though it said "crewed" within a few seconds.
Post by Peter
"Manned" would have been idiomatic, but someone (I'm guessing) thinks
that "manned" means "crewed by adult males".  It doesn't.
You're probably right. (In this case, quite possibly originating from
the USA.)
Some women don't like being called chairmen. Presumably they think a
chairman is a man who chairs something. It isn't, it means a person who
chairs something, as a quick look in a dictionary will confirm. Some of
those women wish to be called chair thereby putting themselves in the
silly position of being called a piece of furniture.
"Chair has been used to refer to a seat or office of authority since the
middle of the 17th century; its earliest citation in the Oxford English
Dictionary dates to 1658–1659, four years after the first citation
for chairman"

Maybe it's time for you to rejoin the 17th century ?

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Peter
2020-10-27 18:39:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Peter
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Peter
Post by Sam Plusnet
Wofe was listening to the news on radio 4 earlier, and only half
listening to a piece on NASA and the moon.
 Apparently there was some mention of future crude missions and she
couldn't quite understand what would cause them to be so described.
Maybe Jim Naughtie is going to report on them.
Post by Sam Plusnet
 Only later did the alternative version "crewed" occur to her.
And the subtitling. It threw me briefly (only half-listening as I
usually am), but I did realise fairly quickly, but I did see the
subtitling say "crude" - though it said "crewed" within a few seconds.
Post by Peter
"Manned" would have been idiomatic, but someone (I'm guessing) thinks
that "manned" means "crewed by adult males".  It doesn't.
You're probably right. (In this case, quite possibly originating from
the USA.)
Some women don't like being called chairmen. Presumably they think a
chairman is a man who chairs something. It isn't, it means a person who
chairs something, as a quick look in a dictionary will confirm. Some of
those women wish to be called chair thereby putting themselves in the
silly position of being called a piece of furniture.
"Chair has been used to refer to a seat or office of authority since the
middle of the 17th century; its earliest citation in the Oxford English
Dictionary dates to 1658–1659, four years after the first citation
for chairman"
Maybe it's time for you to rejoin the 17th century ?
Nick
I just write this nonsense. I can't be held responsible for its veracity.
--
When, once, reference was made to a statesman almost universally
recognized as one of the villains of this century, in order to
induce him to a negative judgment, he replied: "My situation is
so different from his, that it is not for me to pass judgment".
Ernst Specker on Paul Bernays
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-27 22:12:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Peter
Post by Sam Plusnet
Wofe was listening to the news on radio 4 earlier, and only half
listening to a piece on NASA and the moon.
 Apparently there was some mention of future crude missions and she
couldn't quite understand what would cause them to be so described.
Maybe Jim Naughtie is going to report on them.
Post by Sam Plusnet
 Only later did the alternative version "crewed" occur to her.
And the subtitling. It threw me briefly (only half-listening as I
usually am), but I did realise fairly quickly, but I did see the
subtitling say "crude" - though it said "crewed" within a few seconds.
Subtitles? FM radio eschews such fripperies.
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Odell
2020-10-28 19:20:35 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 27 Oct 2020 17:44:28 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
And the subtitling. It threw me briefly (only half-listening as I
usually am), but I did realise fairly quickly, but I did see the
subtitling say "crude" - though it said "crewed" within a few seconds.
Tell me more: subtitles on the radio is one of my particular
hobby-horses. Is it now a thing?

Nick
krw
2020-10-28 16:35:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Tue, 27 Oct 2020 17:44:28 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
And the subtitling. It threw me briefly (only half-listening as I
usually am), but I did realise fairly quickly, but I did see the
subtitling say "crude" - though it said "crewed" within a few seconds.
Tell me more: subtitles on the radio is one of my particular
hobby-horses. Is it now a thing?
Nick
If I am playing R2 on the new car wireless on FM it often tells me what
is playing and the artist. No idea how it works.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-28 17:01:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Nick Odell
On Tue, 27 Oct 2020 17:44:28 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
And the subtitling. It threw me briefly (only half-listening as I
usually am), but I did realise fairly quickly, but I did see the
subtitling say "crude" - though it said "crewed" within a few seconds.
Tell me more: subtitles on the radio is one of my particular
hobby-horses. Is it now a thing?
Nick
Sorry, no - I meant on the (TV) news channel.
Post by krw
If I am playing R2 on the new car wireless on FM it often tells me what
is playing and the artist. No idea how it works.
That's just RDS - it's been around for years (decades I think); just not
a lot of radios necessarily have the decoders for it (nor stations
transmit it).
Radio Data System, IIRR. Mainly known for traffic-alert switching (and
station naming), but does have the ability to convey slowly-changing
textual info, such as track details as you've discovered. (Your radio
may have a toggle setting somewhere between station name and track
details - but these choices are usually buried in an obscure menu; if
you're happy with what it does, I'd leave well alone, in case you make
an unwanted change and can't change it back.) I don't _think_ it could
go fast enough for subtitles - certainly not for speech.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Usenet is a way of being annoyed by people you otherwise never would have
met."
- John J. Kinyon
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-28 21:03:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Sorry, no - I meant on the (TV) news channel.
TV? Is that anything like the Wireless?

I find it hard to keep up with modern trends.
--
Sam Plusnet
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