Discussion:
Unexpected visitor to A & E
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Mike Ruddock
2020-02-10 08:53:59 UTC
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I had cause to visit A & E in Banbury yesterday (blame storm Ciera).
After triage I was told to sit and await the calling out of my name.
I was a bit surprised when the name Robert Titchener was called out. I
didn't see what he looked like as he had disappeared quickly into the
treatment room.

Mike Ruddock
Mike
2020-02-10 08:59:23 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
I had cause to visit A & E in Banbury yesterday (blame storm Ciera).
After triage I was told to sit and await the calling out of my name.
I was a bit surprised when the name Robert Titchener was called out. I
didn't see what he looked like as he had disappeared quickly into the
treatment room.
Mike Ruddock
One wouldn’t want to delay dealing with a stabbing - clearing up the blood
from the waiting room is so tedious and frankly a real drag.
--
Toodle Pip
steve hague
2020-02-10 12:58:56 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
I had cause to visit A & E in Banbury yesterday (blame storm Ciera).
After triage I was told to sit and await the calling out of my name.
I was a bit surprised when the name Robert Titchener was called out. I
didn't see what he looked like as he had disappeared quickly into the
treatment room.
Mike Ruddock
Perhaps he really felt the need to have the knife removed after all this
time.
Steve
Clive Arthur
2020-02-10 13:46:25 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
I had cause to visit A & E in Banbury yesterday (blame storm Ciera).
After triage I was told to sit and await the calling out of my name.
I was a bit surprised when the name Robert Titchener was called out. I
didn't see what he looked like as he had disappeared quickly into the
treatment room.
Mike Ruddock
You should have stood up and said, "No, I'm Robert Tichener!" and seen
how many followed.
--
Cheers
Clive
Mike
2020-02-10 14:11:03 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Mike Ruddock
I had cause to visit A & E in Banbury yesterday (blame storm Ciera).
After triage I was told to sit and await the calling out of my name.
I was a bit surprised when the name Robert Titchener was called out. I
didn't see what he looked like as he had disappeared quickly into the
treatment room.
Mike Ruddock
You should have stood up and said, "No, I'm Robert Tichener!" and seen
how many followed.
Would there be any point in that?
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-10 14:21:36 UTC
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Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Mike Ruddock
I had cause to visit A & E in Banbury yesterday (blame storm Ciera).
After triage I was told to sit and await the calling out of my name.
I was a bit surprised when the name Robert Titchener was called out.
I didn't see what he looked like as he had disappeared quickly into
the treatment room.
Mike Ruddock
You should have stood up and said, "No, I'm Robert Tichener!" and seen
how many followed.
(-:!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

the plural of 'anecdote' is not 'evidence'. Professor Edzart Ernst, prudential
magazine, AUTUMN 2006, p. 13.
Nick Odell
2020-02-10 15:21:49 UTC
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On Mon, 10 Feb 2020 08:53:59 +0000, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I had cause to visit A & E in Banbury yesterday (blame storm Ciera).
After triage I was told to sit and await the calling out of my name.
I was a bit surprised when the name Robert Titchener was called out. I
didn't see what he looked like as he had disappeared quickly into the
treatment room.
Here's hoping all is now well in the Ruddock household.

Nick
Mike
2020-02-10 15:26:06 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 10 Feb 2020 08:53:59 +0000, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I had cause to visit A & E in Banbury yesterday (blame storm Ciera).
After triage I was told to sit and await the calling out of my name.
I was a bit surprised when the name Robert Titchener was called out. I
didn't see what he looked like as he had disappeared quickly into the
treatment room.
Here's hoping all is now well in the Ruddock household.
Nick
But have you hidden all your knives just in case?
--
Toodle Pip
Mike Ruddock
2020-02-11 17:49:18 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 10 Feb 2020 08:53:59 +0000, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I had cause to visit A & E in Banbury yesterday (blame storm Ciera).
After triage I was told to sit and await the calling out of my name.
I was a bit surprised when the name Robert Titchener was called out. I
didn't see what he looked like as he had disappeared quickly into the
treatment room.
Here's hoping all is now well in the Ruddock household.
Nick
But have you hidden all your knives just in case?
Thank you, all is well, though one of us is feeling a little miffed. My
visit to A & E resulted in my having to go next day to Oxford. It seems
that the cut on my hand was too deep to be treatable by gluing (what
with? Copydex? Araldite? Superglue?) and it would have to be stitched.
They can't do stitches at Banbury (why not? Time was when your local GP
would put a couple of stitches in to your cut and was pleased to show
off his needlecraft) and I would have to go to the John Radcliffe in Oxford.
The JR is vast building with four car parks, all of which seem to be
full 24/7. The building is designed to confuse, since upon entering at
the front you discover that this floor is designated LG2 (I suppose
Lower Ground) and the "ground" floor (designated Floor 0) is two floors up.
The medical staff looked at my cut for a long time, consulted Higher
Authority and sent me home without stitching and merely covering the cut
with (an admittedly huge) dressing.
I was not impressed.
Sorry to have ranted.

Mike Ruddock
Kate B
2020-02-11 18:07:06 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 10 Feb 2020 08:53:59 +0000, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I had cause to visit A & E in Banbury yesterday (blame storm Ciera).
After triage I was told to sit and await the calling out of my name.
I was a bit surprised when the name Robert Titchener was called out. I
didn't see what he looked like as he had disappeared quickly into the
treatment room.
Here's hoping all is now well in the Ruddock household.
Nick
But have you hidden all your knives just in case?
Thank you, all is well, though one of us is feeling a little miffed. My
visit to A & E resulted in my having to go next day to Oxford. It seems
that the cut on my hand was too deep to be treatable by gluing (what
with? Copydex? Araldite? Superglue?) and it would have to be stitched.
They can't do stitches at Banbury (why not? Time was when your local GP
would put a couple of stitches in to your cut and was pleased to show
off his needlecraft) and I would have to go to the John Radcliffe in Oxford.
The JR is vast building with four car parks, all of which seem to be
full 24/7. The building is designed to confuse, since upon entering at
the front you discover that this floor is designated LG2 (I suppose
Lower Ground) and the "ground" floor (designated Floor 0) is two floors up.
The medical staff looked at my cut for a long time, consulted Higher
Authority and sent me home without stitching and merely covering the cut
with (an admittedly huge) dressing.
I was not impressed.
Sorry to have ranted.
That's true - if a wound is very deep it must heal from the bottom up,
so you cannot close it at the surface. You should see a nurse after a
few days, though, and get the dressing changed.

I sliced into my thumb a few months ago - I'm always cutting myself when
cooking but this just wouldn't stop bleeding. I went to A&E in Lewisham
Hospital and they did indeed glue it and with Superglue. I was surprised
to discover that this was in fact one of its original uses:

Wiki says: In 1942, while searching for materials to make clear plastic
gun sights, cyanoacrylate was discovered. At this time they were deemed
too sticky to be of use and were set aside. In 1951, (nine years later),
Coover and his team at Eastman Kodak recognized that he had discovered a
unique adhesive. In 1958, the adhesive, marketed by Kodak as Eastman 910
and then as Super Glue, was introduced for sale.

While much attention was given to the glue's capacity to bond solid
materials, Coover was also the first to recognize and patent
cyanoacrylates as a tissue adhesive after his eldest son cut open his
finger while making a model and glued the cut closed with the glue he
had samples of from the lab, an early formulation of super glue.Super
glue was first used in the Vietnam War in a spray form as a hemostatic
agent to temporarily patch the internal organs of injured soldiers until
conventional surgery could be performed. Tissue adhesives are now used
worldwide for a variety of sutureless surgical applications humans and
animals.
--
Kate B
London
Mike
2020-02-11 18:28:06 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 10 Feb 2020 08:53:59 +0000, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I had cause to visit A & E in Banbury yesterday (blame storm Ciera).
After triage I was told to sit and await the calling out of my name.
I was a bit surprised when the name Robert Titchener was called out. I
didn't see what he looked like as he had disappeared quickly into the
treatment room.
Here's hoping all is now well in the Ruddock household.
Nick
But have you hidden all your knives just in case?
Thank you, all is well, though one of us is feeling a little miffed. My
visit to A & E resulted in my having to go next day to Oxford. It seems
that the cut on my hand was too deep to be treatable by gluing (what
with? Copydex? Araldite? Superglue?) and it would have to be stitched.
They can't do stitches at Banbury (why not? Time was when your local GP
would put a couple of stitches in to your cut and was pleased to show
off his needlecraft) and I would have to go to the John Radcliffe in Oxford.
The JR is vast building with four car parks, all of which seem to be
full 24/7. The building is designed to confuse, since upon entering at
the front you discover that this floor is designated LG2 (I suppose
Lower Ground) and the "ground" floor (designated Floor 0) is two floors up.
The medical staff looked at my cut for a long time, consulted Higher
Authority and sent me home without stitching and merely covering the cut
with (an admittedly huge) dressing.
I was not impressed.
Sorry to have ranted.
That's true - if a wound is very deep it must heal from the bottom up,
so you cannot close it at the surface. You should see a nurse after a
few days, though, and get the dressing changed.
I sliced into my thumb a few months ago - I'm always cutting myself when
cooking but this just wouldn't stop bleeding. I went to A&E in Lewisham
Hospital and they did indeed glue it and with Superglue. I was surprised
Wiki says: In 1942, while searching for materials to make clear plastic
gun sights, cyanoacrylate was discovered. At this time they were deemed
too sticky to be of use and were set aside. In 1951, (nine years later),
Coover and his team at Eastman Kodak recognized that he had discovered a
unique adhesive. In 1958, the adhesive, marketed by Kodak as Eastman 910
and then as Super Glue, was introduced for sale.
While much attention was given to the glue's capacity to bond solid
materials, Coover was also the first to recognize and patent
cyanoacrylates as a tissue adhesive after his eldest son cut open his
finger while making a model and glued the cut closed with the glue he
had samples of from the lab, an early formulation of super glue.Super
glue was first used in the Vietnam War in a spray form as a hemostatic
agent to temporarily patch the internal organs of injured soldiers until
conventional surgery could be performed. Tissue adhesives are now used
worldwide for a variety of sutureless surgical applications humans and
animals.
Well, I’ll be nuggered!
--
Toodle Pip
Sid Nuncius
2020-02-11 19:45:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Kate B
Wiki says: In 1942, while searching for materials to make clear plastic
gun sights, cyanoacrylate was discovered. At this time they were deemed
too sticky to be of use and were set aside. In 1951, (nine years later),
Coover and his team at Eastman Kodak recognized that he had discovered a
unique adhesive. In 1958, the adhesive, marketed by Kodak as Eastman 910
and then as Super Glue, was introduced for sale.
While much attention was given to the glue's capacity to bond solid
materials, Coover was also the first to recognize and patent
cyanoacrylates as a tissue adhesive after his eldest son cut open his
finger while making a model and glued the cut closed with the glue he
had samples of from the lab, an early formulation of super glue.Super
glue was first used in the Vietnam War in a spray form as a hemostatic
agent to temporarily patch the internal organs of injured soldiers until
conventional surgery could be performed. Tissue adhesives are now used
worldwide for a variety of sutureless surgical applications humans and
animals.
Well, I’ll be nuggered!
Not if you've had cyanoacrylate judiciously applied, you won't.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2020-02-11 20:44:38 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike
Post by Kate B
Wiki says: In 1942, while searching for materials to make clear plastic
gun sights, cyanoacrylate was discovered. At this time they were deemed
too sticky to be of use and were set aside. In 1951, (nine years later),
Coover and his team at Eastman Kodak recognized that he had discovered a
unique adhesive. In 1958, the adhesive, marketed by Kodak as Eastman 910
and then as Super Glue, was introduced for sale.
While much attention was given to the glue's capacity to bond solid
materials, Coover was also the first to recognize and patent
cyanoacrylates as a tissue adhesive after his eldest son cut open his
finger while making a model and glued the cut closed with the glue he
had samples of from the lab, an early formulation of super glue.Super
glue was first used in the Vietnam War in a spray form as a hemostatic
agent to temporarily patch the internal organs of injured soldiers until
conventional surgery could be performed. Tissue adhesives are now used
worldwide for a variety of sutureless surgical applications humans and
animals.
Well, I’ll be nuggered!
Not if you've had cyanoacrylate judiciously applied, you won't.
Or if it's applied too late you'll be nuggered for quite some time...
Sid Nuncius
2020-02-12 06:35:28 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike
Post by Kate B
Wiki says: In 1942, while searching for materials to make clear plastic
gun sights, cyanoacrylate was discovered. At this time they were deemed
too sticky to be of use and were set aside. In 1951, (nine years later),
Coover and his team at Eastman Kodak recognized that he had
discovered a
unique adhesive. In 1958, the adhesive, marketed by Kodak as Eastman 910
and then as Super Glue, was introduced for sale.
While much attention was given to the glue's capacity to bond solid
materials, Coover was also the first to recognize and patent
cyanoacrylates as a tissue adhesive after his eldest son cut open his
finger while making a model and glued the cut closed with the glue he
had samples of from the lab, an early formulation of super glue.Super
glue was first used in the Vietnam War in a spray form as a hemostatic
agent to temporarily patch the internal organs of injured soldiers until
conventional surgery could be performed. Tissue adhesives are now used
worldwide for a variety of sutureless surgical applications humans and
animals.
Well, I’ll be nuggered!
Not if you've had cyanoacrylate judiciously applied, you won't.
Or if it's applied too late you'll be nuggered for quite some time...
I've never thought of Mike as stuck-up, though.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2020-02-12 07:38:48 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike
Post by Kate B
Wiki says: In 1942, while searching for materials to make clear plastic
gun sights, cyanoacrylate was discovered. At this time they were deemed
too sticky to be of use and were set aside. In 1951, (nine years later),
Coover and his team at Eastman Kodak recognized that he had discovered a
unique adhesive. In 1958, the adhesive, marketed by Kodak as Eastman 910
and then as Super Glue, was introduced for sale.
While much attention was given to the glue's capacity to bond solid
materials, Coover was also the first to recognize and patent
cyanoacrylates as a tissue adhesive after his eldest son cut open his
finger while making a model and glued the cut closed with the glue he
had samples of from the lab, an early formulation of super glue.Super
glue was first used in the Vietnam War in a spray form as a hemostatic
agent to temporarily patch the internal organs of injured soldiers until
conventional surgery could be performed. Tissue adhesives are now used
worldwide for a variety of sutureless surgical applications humans and
animals.
Well, I’ll be nuggered!
Not if you've had cyanoacrylate judiciously applied, you won't.
Or if it's applied too late you'll be nuggered for quite some time...
I've never thought of Mike as stuck-up, though.
Depends if he's the nuggeree or nuggerere I'd have thought
Mike
2020-02-12 09:02:48 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike
Post by Kate B
Wiki says: In 1942, while searching for materials to make clear plastic
gun sights, cyanoacrylate was discovered. At this time they were deemed
too sticky to be of use and were set aside. In 1951, (nine years later),
Coover and his team at Eastman Kodak recognized that he had discovered a
unique adhesive. In 1958, the adhesive, marketed by Kodak as Eastman 910
and then as Super Glue, was introduced for sale.
While much attention was given to the glue's capacity to bond solid
materials, Coover was also the first to recognize and patent
cyanoacrylates as a tissue adhesive after his eldest son cut open his
finger while making a model and glued the cut closed with the glue he
had samples of from the lab, an early formulation of super glue.Super
glue was first used in the Vietnam War in a spray form as a hemostatic
agent to temporarily patch the internal organs of injured soldiers until
conventional surgery could be performed. Tissue adhesives are now used
worldwide for a variety of sutureless surgical applications humans and
animals.
Well, I’ll be nuggered!
Not if you've had cyanoacrylate judiciously applied, you won't.
Or if it's applied too late you'll be nuggered for quite some time...
I've never thought of Mike as stuck-up, though.
Depends if he's the nuggeree or nuggerere I'd have thought
I don’t mind being the butt of all this merriment...
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2020-02-12 09:00:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike
Post by Kate B
Wiki says: In 1942, while searching for materials to make clear plastic
gun sights, cyanoacrylate was discovered. At this time they were deemed
too sticky to be of use and were set aside. In 1951, (nine years later),
Coover and his team at Eastman Kodak recognized that he had discovered a
unique adhesive. In 1958, the adhesive, marketed by Kodak as Eastman 910
and then as Super Glue, was introduced for sale.
While much attention was given to the glue's capacity to bond solid
materials, Coover was also the first to recognize and patent
cyanoacrylates as a tissue adhesive after his eldest son cut open his
finger while making a model and glued the cut closed with the glue he
had samples of from the lab, an early formulation of super glue.Super
glue was first used in the Vietnam War in a spray form as a hemostatic
agent to temporarily patch the internal organs of injured soldiers until
conventional surgery could be performed. Tissue adhesives are now used
worldwide for a variety of sutureless surgical applications humans and
animals.
Well, I’ll be nuggered!
Not if you've had cyanoacrylate judiciously applied, you won't.
Cheeky!
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-12 13:58:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike
Post by Kate B
Wiki says: In 1942, while searching for materials to make clear plastic
gun sights, cyanoacrylate was discovered. At this time they were deemed
too sticky to be of use and were set aside. In 1951, (nine years later),
Coover and his team at Eastman Kodak recognized that he had discovered a
unique adhesive. In 1958, the adhesive, marketed by Kodak as Eastman 910
and then as Super Glue, was introduced for sale.
While much attention was given to the glue's capacity to bond solid
materials, Coover was also the first to recognize and patent
cyanoacrylates as a tissue adhesive after his eldest son cut open his
finger while making a model and glued the cut closed with the glue he
had samples of from the lab, an early formulation of super glue.Super
glue was first used in the Vietnam War in a spray form as a hemostatic
agent to temporarily patch the internal organs of injured soldiers until
conventional surgery could be performed. Tissue adhesives are now used
worldwide for a variety of sutureless surgical applications humans and
animals.
Well, I’ll be nuggered!
Not if you've had cyanoacrylate judiciously applied, you won't.
Cheeky!
"Put some colour in my cheeks" - Dillie Keane
(from ~4:10)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

the plural of 'anecdote' is not 'evidence'. Professor Edzart Ernst, prudential
magazine, AUTUMN 2006, p. 13.
Joe Kerr
2020-02-12 15:19:01 UTC
Reply
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"Put some colour in my cheeks" - Dillie Keane
http://youtu.be/K7g44bxWRj8 (from ~4:10)
Did I ever mention that I once parked next to Dillie at an FA gig? She
sat in her car until 7:15. I assumed she had been listening to TA.
--
Ric
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-12 18:06:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"Put some colour in my cheeks" - Dillie Keane
http://youtu.be/K7g44bxWRj8 (from ~4:10)
Did I ever mention that I once parked next to Dillie at an FA gig? She
sat in her car until 7:15. I assumed she had been listening to TA.
You didn't mention it here, I don't think.
Nice to know!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The best way to achieve immortality is by not dying.
SODAM
2020-02-12 18:52:59 UTC
Reply
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"Put some colour in my cheeks" - Dillie Keane
http://youtu.be/K7g44bxWRj8 (from ~4:10)
Did I ever mention that I once parked next to Dillie at an FA gig? She
sat in her car until 7:15. I assumed she had been listening to TA.
You didn't mention it here, I don't think.
Nice to know!
At my (previous) local cinema, programmes started at 7.30. Having already
booked and collected tickets, I used to leave home at 6.50, find a space in
the large, free car park and settle down to listen to TA. At 7.15, car
doors would open and about 30 people emerge from their cars to enter the
adjacent cinema. Sometimes I would ask them , “Were you listening to TA?”
and they’d agree, often commenting on what they had just heard. I’d say
about 90% of them were over 60.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Mike
2020-02-12 18:59:48 UTC
Reply
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Post by SODAM
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"Put some colour in my cheeks" - Dillie Keane
http://youtu.be/K7g44bxWRj8 (from ~4:10)
Did I ever mention that I once parked next to Dillie at an FA gig? She
sat in her car until 7:15. I assumed she had been listening to TA.
You didn't mention it here, I don't think.
Nice to know!
At my (previous) local cinema, programmes started at 7.30. Having already
booked and collected tickets, I used to leave home at 6.50, find a space in
the large, free car park and settle down to listen to TA. At 7.15, car
doors would open and about 30 people emerge from their cars to enter the
adjacent cinema. Sometimes I would ask them , “Were you listening to TA?”
and they’d agree, often commenting on what they had just heard. I’d say
about 90% of them were over 60.
I think about 60% of me feels over 60 these days...😉
--
Toodle Pip
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-02-14 17:22:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"Put some colour in my cheeks" - Dillie Keane
http://youtu.be/K7g44bxWRj8 (from ~4:10)
Did I ever mention that I once parked next to Dillie at an FA gig? She
sat in her car until 7:15. I assumed she had been listening to TA.
You didn't mention it here, I don't think.
Nice to know!
At my (previous) local cinema, programmes started at 7.30. Having already
booked and collected tickets, I used to leave home at 6.50, find a space in
the large, free car park and settle down to listen to TA. At 7.15, car
doors would open and about 30 people emerge from their cars to enter the
adjacent cinema. Sometimes I would ask them , “Were you listening to TA?”
and they’d agree, often commenting on what they had just heard. I’d say
about 90% of them were over 60.
Which probably reflects the population of most Ambridge-like
communities. Which is why I find the efforts to engage young listeners
unconvincing. I could have screamed when young Ben Archer was the only
teenager around who, given the opportunity to go and live in Newcastle
for three years studying at a good Russell Group university, would
rather live in some tin-pot rural community and study at some former FE
college in a single tower block.

That said, I have to say I very much enjoyed reading Lynsey Hanley's
book Respectable: The Experience of Class, about growing up in Chelmsley
Wood, the huge council estate squashed between Birmingham and Solihull
(and given to posh Solihull to look after), and eventually escaping from
its suffocating community, so suspicious and even hostile to outsiders
and 'experts'. One thing I learned from that, to my surprise, was that
young people from such communities actually do not generally want to
leave home to study and want to stay close to family. It surprised me
because I've always seen going away to study was an important rite of
passage and escaping from the suffocating confines of
family. Furthermore, apparently they see higher education in terms of a
continuation of school, sitting in neat rows in a classroom being filled
with 'facts' by a teacher rather than self-motivated study, supported by
lectures and tutorials. Yes, I know Ambridge isn't a council estate and
Ben Archer isn't exactly impoverished despite being exploited for much
of his short life as unpaid farm labour, but these things come together
with a book I enjoyed much less, in fact one that infuriated me. David
Goodhart's The Road to Somewhere. Apparently it's a bad thing to be
curious about the world and be hungry to learn, to have broad horizons,
to be comfortable with travelling around the world and to be able to
adapt to different environents and cultures. Much better to be a sad git
who can't leave their washed up communities because great-granny's
budgie is buried their. Better to restrict your ventures away to the
strictly safe, like a fortnight in Benidorm living on fish and chips.

But I'm still convinced that the BBC has been leaned on to celebrate the
'Somewheres' and sneer at the 'Anywheres'. Well, I've spent the first
sixty years of my life trying my best to accept all points of view but
in the last five I've been subjected to no end of irrational abuse just
for being intelligent and comfortable in the world. Should I have
followed my family into the shipyard doing a 'proper' job like being a
welder or a fitter rather than going to university? Should I have
remained in a dreary, run-down post-industrial town just because that's
where my extended family was based? I think not. I tried going back
there and the extended family and the town in general didn't want to
know. Thank heavens I've now found a place in a lively, cosmopolitan
city in a country that isn't hung up about symbols and supposed past
glories. Now we've wandered into the disaster that is Brexit, driven by
inverted snobbery and xenophobia, my gloves are off.

<\rant>
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-15 01:29:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by SODAM
At my (previous) local cinema, programmes started at 7.30. Having already
booked and collected tickets, I used to leave home at 6.50, find a space in
the large, free car park and settle down to listen to TA. At 7.15, car
doors would open and about 30 people emerge from their cars to enter the
adjacent cinema. Sometimes I would ask them , “Were you listening to TA?”
and they’d agree, often commenting on what they had just heard. I’d say
about 90% of them were over 60.
Which probably reflects the population of most Ambridge-like
communities. Which is why I find the efforts to engage young listeners
I think you're right to some extent; I'm in a large village (tiny town,
really) - Charing in Kent - and there's a lot of truth in that. I'm
slightly skewed by the parish council, and I do realise that they're
unrepresentably elderly (in terms of the demographics, though I suspect
far from unusual of such bodies, as it tends to be something only the
retired have time to do), but I think the population _is_ older than
average (not least because of the cost of property. (And yes, I know not
all old people are rich. But a lot of rich people are old.) And I know
it's not quite an Ambridge-like community, but has parallels.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
unconvincing. I could have screamed when young Ben Archer was the only
teenager around who, given the opportunity to go and live in Newcastle
for three years studying at a good Russell Group university, would
rather live in some tin-pot rural community and study at some former FE
college in a single tower block.
Well, I _suppose_ there are some who genuinely feel more inclined to
stay "close to the soil", and also financial thoughts might have
influenced him (he could stay at home rent free), but on the whole, I
tend to agree with you.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
That said, I have to say I very much enjoyed reading Lynsey Hanley's
book Respectable: The Experience of Class, about growing up in Chelmsley
My mother spoke well of "Class" by Jilly Cooper, which is much
misunderstood.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Wood, the huge council estate squashed between Birmingham and Solihull
(and given to posh Solihull to look after), and eventually escaping from
its suffocating community, so suspicious and even hostile to outsiders
My mother, I think, couldn't wait to escape the mining villages she grew
up in, with a similarly limited outlook.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
and 'experts'. One thing I learned from that, to my surprise, was that
young people from such communities actually do not generally want to
leave home to study and want to stay close to family. It surprised me
So, though it's very different from a huge council estate, you accept -
though with surprise - that not _all_ Ben Archers want to flee the nest.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
because I've always seen going away to study was an important rite of
passage and escaping from the suffocating confines of
family. Furthermore, apparently they see higher education in terms of a
continuation of school, sitting in neat rows in a classroom being filled
with 'facts' by a teacher rather than self-motivated study, supported by
That's because you like I/me had an enlightened upbringing, and so
looked forward to an environment that would expand your horizons. _Some_
people find that frightening - even if not consciously, they pick up the
fear of the unknown/different from their parents.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
lectures and tutorials. Yes, I know Ambridge isn't a council estate and
Ben Archer isn't exactly impoverished despite being exploited for much
of his short life as unpaid farm labour, but these things come together
with a book I enjoyed much less, in fact one that infuriated me. David
Goodhart's The Road to Somewhere. Apparently it's a bad thing to be
curious about the world and be hungry to learn, to have broad horizons,
Yes, keep the masses down, and teach them just enough extra to keep the
factories running and up-to-date when they return. I can see why that
would anger you! You, like me, found the greatest benefit from the
higher education environment was the learning how to think - and to
learn. (Although in my case there _was_ a desire/need to suck in extra
knowledge of the vessel-filling type too, for my chosen subject, which
was a "trade". But I _wanted_ that, didn't just see it as a necessity to
be survived.)
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
to be comfortable with travelling around the world and to be able to
adapt to different environents and cultures. Much better to be a sad git
who can't leave their washed up communities because great-granny's
budgie is buried their. Better to restrict your ventures away to the
strictly safe, like a fortnight in Benidorm living on fish and chips.
Try to conceal your despision (?) a _bit_. Not all such people are
_bad_.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
But I'm still convinced that the BBC has been leaned on to celebrate the
'Somewheres' and sneer at the 'Anywheres'. Well, I've spent the first
Yes, "who can refute a sneer". But you aren't innocent of it either:
you're sneering at the "somewheres", i. e. the people who have limited
horizons. They do worry - _sometimes_ with _some_ justification - that
the "anywheres" will break things; yes, many rigid structures need to be
changed, but many "anywheres" do (or want to do) it rapidly, and
sometimes without feeling (even though not always doing so
deliberately). Babies and bathwater: not all that is new is good, and
not all that is established is bad.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
sixty years of my life trying my best to accept all points of view but
in the last five I've been subjected to no end of irrational abuse just
for being intelligent and comfortable in the world. Should I have
Not all on "the other side" are dim or irrational; to think that (in any
argument, whichever side you're on) diminishes your own argument. I
forget who said it (it's in my quote file but I CBA to look up), but
something like "if you cannot make a cogent case for the other side, you
probably don't totally understand your own case".
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
followed my family into the shipyard doing a 'proper' job like being a
welder or a fitter rather than going to university? Should I have
No. But be grateful that you had the opportunity - and don't despise
those who didn't. (I'm not saying you do, but you are in danger of
giving that _impression_.)
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
remained in a dreary, run-down post-industrial town just because that's
where my extended family was based? I think not. I tried going back
there and the extended family and the town in general didn't want to
know. Thank heavens I've now found a place in a lively, cosmopolitan
city in a country that isn't hung up about symbols and supposed past
(Care to say which country?)
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
glories. Now we've wandered into the disaster that is Brexit, driven by
inverted snobbery and xenophobia, my gloves are off.
I'm not going to be drawn into that one, other than to say that not all
leavers were either xenophobic, jingoistic, or economically naive, any
more than all remainers were (insert stereotype of choice). [For "were"
read "were/are", in both cases.] I repeat that I favoured the Community
Charge ("poll tax"), even though I'd have been considerably worse off
under it: I just thought it was fairer. I have little envy; I don't, for
example, resent footballers, entertainers, etc., for being paid many
times what I was.
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
<\rant>
I fear we'll continue to disagree; I'll try to keep it amicably so.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If you are afraid of being lonely, don't try to be right. - Jules Renard,
writer (1864-1910)
Sam Plusnet
2020-02-11 20:28:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
I sliced into my thumb a few months ago - I'm always cutting myself when
cooking but this just wouldn't stop bleeding. I went to A&E in Lewisham
Hospital and they did indeed glue it and with Superglue. I was surprised
I had heard this, but (for no sound reason) felt rather wary about that
"cyano" (= cyanide) bit of the name.
--
Sam Plusnet
Vicky Ayech
2020-02-11 18:28:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 11 Feb 2020 17:49:18 +0000, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 10 Feb 2020 08:53:59 +0000, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I had cause to visit A & E in Banbury yesterday (blame storm Ciera).
After triage I was told to sit and await the calling out of my name.
I was a bit surprised when the name Robert Titchener was called out. I
didn't see what he looked like as he had disappeared quickly into the
treatment room.
Here's hoping all is now well in the Ruddock household.
Nick
But have you hidden all your knives just in case?
Thank you, all is well, though one of us is feeling a little miffed. My
visit to A & E resulted in my having to go next day to Oxford. It seems
that the cut on my hand was too deep to be treatable by gluing (what
with? Copydex? Araldite? Superglue?) and it would have to be stitched.
They can't do stitches at Banbury (why not? Time was when your local GP
would put a couple of stitches in to your cut and was pleased to show
off his needlecraft) and I would have to go to the John Radcliffe in Oxford.
The JR is vast building with four car parks, all of which seem to be
full 24/7. The building is designed to confuse, since upon entering at
the front you discover that this floor is designated LG2 (I suppose
Lower Ground) and the "ground" floor (designated Floor 0) is two floors up.
The medical staff looked at my cut for a long time, consulted Higher
Authority and sent me home without stitching and merely covering the cut
with (an admittedly huge) dressing.
I was not impressed.
Sorry to have ranted.
Mike Ruddock
Well, I hope you are not in any pain and that it heals fast. I do find
I heal slowly now as I am older.
Sid Nuncius
2020-02-11 19:47:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
Thank you, all is well, though one of us is feeling a little miffed. My
visit to A & E resulted in my having to go next day to Oxford. It seems
that the cut on my hand was too deep to be treatable by gluing (what
with? Copydex? Araldite? Superglue?) and it would have to be stitched.
They can't do stitches at Banbury (why not? Time was when your local GP
would put a couple of stitches in to your cut and was pleased to show
off his needlecraft) and I would have to go to the John Radcliffe in Oxford.
The JR is vast building with four car parks, all of which seem to be
full 24/7. The building is designed to confuse, since upon entering at
the front you discover that this floor is designated LG2 (I suppose
Lower Ground) and the "ground" floor (designated Floor 0) is two floors up.
The medical staff looked at my cut for a long time, consulted Higher
Authority and sent me home without stitching and merely covering the cut
with (an admittedly huge) dressing.
I was not impressed.
Sorry to have ranted.
Not at all. Sorry to hear about your troubles. I blame the teachers.

Hope things heal well.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Chris McMillan
2020-02-13 08:37:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
On Mon, 10 Feb 2020 08:53:59 +0000, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
I had cause to visit A & E in Banbury yesterday (blame storm Ciera).
After triage I was told to sit and await the calling out of my name.
I was a bit surprised when the name Robert Titchener was called out. I
didn't see what he looked like as he had disappeared quickly into the
treatment room.
Here's hoping all is now well in the Ruddock household.
Nick
But have you hidden all your knives just in case?
Thank you, all is well, though one of us is feeling a little miffed. My
visit to A & E resulted in my having to go next day to Oxford. It seems
that the cut on my hand was too deep to be treatable by gluing (what
with? Copydex? Araldite? Superglue?) and it would have to be stitched.
They can't do stitches at Banbury (why not? Time was when your local GP
would put a couple of stitches in to your cut and was pleased to show
off his needlecraft) and I would have to go to the John Radcliffe in Oxford.
The JR is vast building with four car parks, all of which seem to be
full 24/7. The building is designed to confuse, since upon entering at
the front you discover that this floor is designated LG2 (I suppose
Lower Ground) and the "ground" floor (designated Floor 0) is two floors up.
The medical staff looked at my cut for a long time, consulted Higher
Authority and sent me home without stitching and merely covering the cut
with (an admittedly huge) dressing.
I was not impressed.
Sorry to have ranted.
Mike Ruddock
Having been, by bus, to the JR, and it was with McT doing a research
project I can’t imagine what it’s like to be finding my way while injured
having been re-directed from your local A and E.

Sincerely Chris
Sam Plusnet
2020-02-13 21:36:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Having been, by bus, to the JR, and it was with McT doing a research
project I can’t imagine what it’s like to be finding my way while injured
having been re-directed from your local A and E.
On Wednesday we went to our local (no longer a proper hospital, now just
a conglomeration of medical departments).
I dropped off Wofe, & spent a few minutes seeking somewhere to park and
then walked back to try to find her.
Having walked around the whole place a couple of times, reading all the
(bi-lingual, for added fun) signs, I gave up and waited in the car.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2020-02-13 23:22:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 13 Feb 2020 21:36:27 +0000, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Having been, by bus, to the JR, and it was with McT doing a research
project I can’t imagine what it’s like to be finding my way while injured
having been re-directed from your local A and E.
On Wednesday we went to our local (no longer a proper hospital, now just
a conglomeration of medical departments).
I dropped off Wofe, & spent a few minutes seeking somewhere to park and
then walked back to try to find her.
Having walked around the whole place a couple of times, reading all the
(bi-lingual, for added fun) signs, I gave up and waited in the car.
At least the parking is free...

Ray and I used to spend a lot of time sitting in the waiting area at the
local infirmary where he had regular appointments to see the podiatrist to
get his gout wounds checked and dressed. The bilingual signs were a source
of fascination - there were two in the waiting area, the English was pretty
much identical on both but the Welsh was completely different.

The free parking there is a bit of a joke - if none of the three disabled
spaces was vacant I had to drop him at the door then drive down the car
park road and hope to find a space there and walk back up the hill. When I
attended for my own physio appts a few years back, I could barely walk but
had no blue badge. One of the instructions the physio gave me was to avoid
walking up or down slopes...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2020-02-14 08:09:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Having been, by bus, to the JR, and it was with McT doing a research
project I can’t imagine what it’s like to be finding my way while injured
having been re-directed from your local A and E.
On Wednesday we went to our local (no longer a proper hospital, now just
a conglomeration of medical departments).
I dropped off Wofe, & spent a few minutes seeking somewhere to park and
then walked back to try to find her.
Having walked around the whole place a couple of times, reading all the
(bi-lingual, for added fun) signs, I gave up and waited in the car.
At least the parking is free...
Ray and I used to spend a lot of time sitting in the waiting area at the
local infirmary where he had regular appointments to see the podiatrist to
get his gout wounds checked and dressed. The bilingual signs were a source
of fascination - there were two in the waiting area, the English was pretty
much identical on both but the Welsh was completely different.
The free parking there is a bit of a joke - if none of the three disabled
spaces was vacant I had to drop him at the door then drive down the car
park road and hope to find a space there and walk back up the hill. When I
attended for my own physio appts a few years back, I could barely walk but
had no blue badge. One of the instructions the physio gave me was to avoid
walking up or down slopes...
A lazy young dog eh?
--
Toodle Pip
Jenny M Benson
2020-02-14 09:15:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
The free parking there is a bit of a joke - if none of the three disabled
spaces was vacant I had to drop him at the door then drive down the car
park road and hope to find a space there and walk back up the hill. When I
attended for my own physio appts a few years back, I could barely walk but
had no blue badge. One of the instructions the physio gave me was to avoid
walking up or down slopes...
At Wrexham Maelor the procedure is to drop the patient at the door, then
drive about 10 mins to Morrison's car park and walk back through the
shortcut footpath
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Penny
2020-02-14 09:28:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 09:15:34 +0000, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
The free parking there is a bit of a joke - if none of the three disabled
spaces was vacant I had to drop him at the door then drive down the car
park road and hope to find a space there and walk back up the hill. When I
attended for my own physio appts a few years back, I could barely walk but
had no blue badge. One of the instructions the physio gave me was to avoid
walking up or down slopes...
At Wrexham Maelor the procedure is to drop the patient at the door, then
drive about 10 mins to Morrison's car park and walk back through the
shortcut footpath
When my walking wasn't so painful I would walk to the infirmary using the
footpaths. It's on the same hill I live on but there is a deep little
valley in between, I couldn't manage that now. The building is on several
levels, even the internal corridor has a slope.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2020-02-14 21:29:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Having been, by bus, to the JR, and it was with McT doing a research
project I can’t imagine what it’s like to be finding my way while injured
having been re-directed from your local A and E.
On Wednesday we went to our local (no longer a proper hospital, now just
a conglomeration of medical departments).
I dropped off Wofe, & spent a few minutes seeking somewhere to park and
then walked back to try to find her.
Having walked around the whole place a couple of times, reading all the
(bi-lingual, for added fun) signs, I gave up and waited in the car.
At least the parking is free...
In one sense of the word. I was one of several drivers trying to squeeze
into tiny spaces on the approach road, since the official car parks were
(as ever) jam packed.
Post by Penny
Ray and I used to spend a lot of time sitting in the waiting area at the
local infirmary where he had regular appointments to see the podiatrist to
get his gout wounds checked and dressed. The bilingual signs were a source
of fascination - there were two in the waiting area, the English was pretty
much identical on both but the Welsh was completely different.
The free parking there is a bit of a joke - if none of the three disabled
spaces was vacant I had to drop him at the door then drive down the car
park road and hope to find a space there and walk back up the hill. When I
attended for my own physio appts a few years back, I could barely walk but
had no blue badge. One of the instructions the physio gave me was to avoid
walking up or down slopes...
"But don't miss any appointments here."
--
Sam Plusnet
steveski
2020-02-14 22:33:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Having been, by bus, to the JR, and it was with McT doing a research
project I can’t imagine what it’s like to be finding my way while
injured having been re-directed from your local A and E.
On Wednesday we went to our local (no longer a proper hospital, now just
a conglomeration of medical departments).
I dropped off Wofe, & spent a few minutes seeking somewhere to park and
then walked back to try to find her.
Having walked around the whole place a couple of times, reading all the
(bi-lingual, for added fun) signs, I gave up and waited in the car.
At least the parking is free...
Ray and I used to spend a lot of time sitting in the waiting area at the
local infirmary where he had regular appointments to see the podiatrist
to get his gout wounds checked and dressed. The bilingual signs were a
source of fascination - there were two in the waiting area, the English
was pretty much identical on both but the Welsh was completely
different.
The free parking there is a bit of a joke - if none of the three
disabled spaces was vacant I had to drop him at the door then drive down
the car park road and hope to find a space there and walk back up the
hill. When I attended for my own physio appts a few years back, I could
barely walk but had no blue badge. One of the instructions the physio
gave me was to avoid walking up or down slopes...
In Hertfordshire you can park in any other space (assuming that the
disabled spaces are full, which is the norm) with your blue badge and
it's still no charge.

However I always draw Parking Pataweyo's [1] attention to it just to be
'flameproof' (FCVO).
--
Steveski

[1] And his black and white cat [2]

[2] -awayo
Penny
2020-02-15 00:40:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 14 Feb 2020 22:33:14 GMT, steveski <***@invalid.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by steveski
Post by Penny
The free parking there is a bit of a joke - if none of the three
disabled spaces was vacant I had to drop him at the door then drive down
the car park road and hope to find a space there and walk back up the
hill. When I attended for my own physio appts a few years back, I could
barely walk but had no blue badge. One of the instructions the physio
gave me was to avoid walking up or down slopes...
In Hertfordshire you can park in any other space (assuming that the
disabled spaces are full, which is the norm) with your blue badge and
it's still no charge.
In Medway my good friend with disabled son always had to park in the
disabled space then, taking son with her, walk to some office deep inside
the building, present him there in order to get some other bit of
paperwork, return with him to the car to put the paperwork beside his blue
badge before taking him to his appointment. He could walk, slowly, with a
walking frame, he was, at the age of 40-something, difficult for her to
push in the patient wheeled-chairs, should one happen to be available -
completely mad system!
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2020-02-15 11:52:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by steveski
Post by Penny
The free parking there is a bit of a joke - if none of the three
disabled spaces was vacant I had to drop him at the door then drive down
the car park road and hope to find a space there and walk back up the
hill. When I attended for my own physio appts a few years back, I could
barely walk but had no blue badge. One of the instructions the physio
gave me was to avoid walking up or down slopes...
In Hertfordshire you can park in any other space (assuming that the
disabled spaces are full, which is the norm) with your blue badge and
it's still no charge.
In Medway my good friend with disabled son always had to park in the
disabled space then, taking son with her, walk to some office deep inside
the building, present him there in order to get some other bit of
paperwork, return with him to the car to put the paperwork beside his blue
badge before taking him to his appointment. He could walk, slowly, with a
walking frame, he was, at the age of 40-something, difficult for her to
push in the patient wheeled-chairs, should one happen to be available -
completely mad system!
Likewise here. Park car in multi storey of several floors, enter hospital
proper where reception desk gives you the document thing, return to your
car and *then* start on your long hike to the desired destination which can
be ten minutes minimum walk for its far reaches.

Alternatively entrust oneself to hospital transport which is a day’s
outing, or an expensive but door to door hopefully not stuck in traffic :
or if you can find a way not to come to Reading at all but make best use of
any clinics based in other parts of the county.

Sincerely Chris
Kosmo
2020-02-15 13:44:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 11:52:36 GMT, Chris McMillan
Alternatively entrust oneself to hospital transport which is a days
or if you can find a way not to come to Reading at all but make best use of
any clinics based in other parts of the county.
Go by train and bus to Guildford because it is impossible to park.
--
Kosmo
Chris McMillan
2020-02-16 12:39:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kosmo
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 11:52:36 GMT, Chris McMillan
Alternatively entrust oneself to hospital transport which is a days
outing, or an expensive but door to door hopefully not stuck in
or if you can find a way not to come to Reading at all but make
best use of
any clinics based in other parts of the county.
Go by train and bus to Guildford because it is impossible to park.
We always have but now we have our own Lakeland we don’t visit

Sincerely Chris
Sam Plusnet
2020-02-17 00:21:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Kosmo
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 11:52:36 GMT, Chris McMillan
Alternatively entrust oneself to hospital transport which is a days
outing, or an expensive but door to door hopefully not stuck in
or if you can find a way not to come to Reading at all but make
best use of
any clinics based in other parts of the county.
Go by train and bus to Guildford because it is impossible to park.
We always have but now we have our own Lakeland we don’t visit
A large number of people have gained their very own lakeland this weekend.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2020-02-17 08:34:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Kosmo
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 11:52:36 GMT, Chris McMillan
Alternatively entrust oneself to hospital transport which is a days
outing, or an expensive but door to door hopefully not stuck in
or if you can find a way not to come to Reading at all but make
best use of
any clinics based in other parts of the county.
Go by train and bus to Guildford because it is impossible to park.
We always have but now we have our own Lakeland we don’t visit
A large number of people have gained their very own lakeland this weekend.
Are you expecting a flood of replies to that comment?
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2020-02-17 15:06:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Kosmo
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 11:52:36 GMT, Chris McMillan
Alternatively entrust oneself to hospital transport which is a days
outing, or an expensive but door to door hopefully not stuck in
or if you can find a way not to come to Reading at all but make
best use of
any clinics based in other parts of the county.
Go by train and bus to Guildford because it is impossible to park.
We always have but now we have our own Lakeland we don’t visit
A large number of people have gained their very own lakeland this weekend.
BTN over here please Sidders !
Sid Nuncius
2020-02-19 19:51:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Kosmo
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 11:52:36 GMT, Chris McMillan
Alternatively entrust oneself to hospital transport which is a days
outing, or an expensive but door to door hopefully not stuck in
or if you can find a way not to come to Reading at all but make
best use of
any clinics based in other parts of the county.
Go by train and bus to Guildford because it is impossible to park.
We always have but now we have our own Lakeland we don’t visit
A large number of people have gained their very own lakeland this weekend.
BTN over here please Sidders !
I should jolly well say so!
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sam Plusnet
2020-02-19 21:30:30 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Kosmo
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 11:52:36 GMT, Chris McMillan
Alternatively entrust oneself to hospital transport which is a days
outing, or an expensive but door to door hopefully not stuck in
or if you can find a way not to come to Reading at all but make
best use of
any clinics based in other parts of the county.
Go by train and bus to Guildford because it is impossible to park.
We always have but now we have our own Lakeland we don’t visit
A large number of people have gained their very own lakeland this weekend.
BTN over here please Sidders !
I should jolly well say so!
Gosh! My dry humour doesn't usually travel very well.
--
Sam Plusnet
BrritSki
2020-02-20 08:08:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Kosmo
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 11:52:36 GMT, Chris McMillan
Alternatively entrust oneself to hospital transport which is a days
outing, or an expensive but door to door hopefully not stuck in
or if you can find a way not to come to Reading at all but make
best use of
any clinics based in other parts of the county.
Go by train and bus to Guildford because it is impossible to park.
We always have but now we have our own Lakeland we don’t visit
A large number of people have gained their very own lakeland this weekend.
BTN over here please Sidders !
I should jolly well say so!
Gosh!  My dry humour doesn't usually travel very well.
:)

Chris McMillan
2020-02-18 10:14:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Kosmo
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 11:52:36 GMT, Chris McMillan
Alternatively entrust oneself to hospital transport which is a days
outing, or an expensive but door to door hopefully not stuck in
or if you can find a way not to come to Reading at all but make
best use of
any clinics based in other parts of the county.
Go by train and bus to Guildford because it is impossible to park.
We always have but now we have our own Lakeland we don’t visit
A large number of people have gained their very own lakeland this weekend.
FeedlinesRUs

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2020-02-18 10:25:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Kosmo
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 11:52:36 GMT, Chris McMillan
Alternatively entrust oneself to hospital transport which is a days
outing, or an expensive but door to door hopefully not stuck in
or if you can find a way not to come to Reading at all but make
best use of
any clinics based in other parts of the county.
Go by train and bus to Guildford because it is impossible to park.
We always have but now we have our own Lakeland we don’t visit
A large number of people have gained their very own lakeland this weekend.
FeedlinesRUs
Sincerely Chris
Then the ideas flooded in...
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2020-02-15 17:29:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 11:52:36 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by steveski
Post by Penny
The free parking there is a bit of a joke - if none of the three
disabled spaces was vacant I had to drop him at the door then drive down
the car park road and hope to find a space there and walk back up the
hill. When I attended for my own physio appts a few years back, I could
barely walk but had no blue badge. One of the instructions the physio
gave me was to avoid walking up or down slopes...
In Hertfordshire you can park in any other space (assuming that the
disabled spaces are full, which is the norm) with your blue badge and
it's still no charge.
In Medway my good friend with disabled son always had to park in the
disabled space then, taking son with her, walk to some office deep inside
the building, present him there in order to get some other bit of
paperwork, return with him to the car to put the paperwork beside his blue
badge before taking him to his appointment. He could walk, slowly, with a
walking frame, he was, at the age of 40-something, difficult for her to
push in the patient wheeled-chairs, should one happen to be available -
completely mad system!
Likewise here. Park car in multi storey of several floors, enter hospital
proper where reception desk gives you the document thing, return to your
car and *then* start on your long hike to the desired destination which can
be ten minutes minimum walk for its far reaches.
Alternatively entrust oneself to hospital transport which is a day’s
or if you can find a way not to come to Reading at all but make best use of
any clinics based in other parts of the county.
Sincerely Chris
A couple of weeks ago I had an appointment at 9.,a.m at Moorfields and
that is too early for B to be able to take me to the station to get
the train fromWatford to Euston and then tube to Old St. I ordered a
mini cab the day before and it didn't arrive next morning. I rang
control and they said on the way. 15 minutes later I rang and they
said 3 minutes away. it was 20 minutes late and luckily I had allowed
time and there were a few trains around that time as it was rush hour.
The letter fromMoorfields said if you are more than 20 minutes late
you will not be seen so I got very upset. I made it about 10 minutes
late. They did see me but I will not use that firm again. The driver
said he had been on till midnight the night before, they woke him to
collect me as no driver. They must have known that in time to let me
know so I could ring another firm.
Mike
2020-02-15 17:57:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kosmo
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 11:52:36 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by steveski
Post by Penny
The free parking there is a bit of a joke - if none of the three
disabled spaces was vacant I had to drop him at the door then drive down
the car park road and hope to find a space there and walk back up the
hill. When I attended for my own physio appts a few years back, I could
barely walk but had no blue badge. One of the instructions the physio
gave me was to avoid walking up or down slopes...
In Hertfordshire you can park in any other space (assuming that the
disabled spaces are full, which is the norm) with your blue badge and
it's still no charge.
In Medway my good friend with disabled son always had to park in the
disabled space then, taking son with her, walk to some office deep inside
the building, present him there in order to get some other bit of
paperwork, return with him to the car to put the paperwork beside his blue
badge before taking him to his appointment. He could walk, slowly, with a
walking frame, he was, at the age of 40-something, difficult for her to
push in the patient wheeled-chairs, should one happen to be available -
completely mad system!
Likewise here. Park car in multi storey of several floors, enter hospital
proper where reception desk gives you the document thing, return to your
car and *then* start on your long hike to the desired destination which can
be ten minutes minimum walk for its far reaches.
Alternatively entrust oneself to hospital transport which is a day’s
or if you can find a way not to come to Reading at all but make best use of
any clinics based in other parts of the county.
Sincerely Chris
A couple of weeks ago I had an appointment at 9.,a.m at Moorfields and
that is too early for B to be able to take me to the station to get
the train fromWatford to Euston and then tube to Old St. I ordered a
mini cab the day before and it didn't arrive next morning. I rang
control and they said on the way. 15 minutes later I rang and they
said 3 minutes away. it was 20 minutes late and luckily I had allowed
time and there were a few trains around that time as it was rush hour.
The letter fromMoorfields said if you are more than 20 minutes late
you will not be seen so I got very upset. I made it about 10 minutes
late. They did see me but I will not use that firm again. The driver
said he had been on till midnight the night before, they woke him to
collect me as no driver. They must have known that in time to let me
know so I could ring another firm.
There seems to be a common practice amongst taxis firms/drivers. I believe
they take on more jobs than they can safely deal with promptly. They do not
need to apologise for late pickups as they just inform you that they were
only given the job x minutes ago and came straight to you. HARRUMPH!
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2020-02-11 19:03:18 UTC
Reply
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Post by Mike Ruddock
I had cause to visit A & E in Banbury yesterday (blame storm Ciera).
After triage I was told to sit and await the calling out of my name.
I was a bit surprised when the name Robert Titchener was called out. I
didn't see what he looked like as he had disappeared quickly into the
treatment room.
Mike Ruddock
Poor chap. Hope he’s never heard of TA. Hope you and Virginia aren’t
seriously injured.

Sincerely Chris
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