Discussion:
post epi spoiler 28th Nov
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Chris McMillan
2018-11-28 19:16:40 UTC
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Spare us some Xmas cheer Roy!

Sincerely Chris
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-28 21:58:41 UTC
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On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 19:16:40 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Spare us some Xmas cheer Roy!
Sincerely Chris
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Although she keeps saying she loves him I just do not believe it. I
could see her reasons were good and a bit of googling is not
convincing as a plan to move abroad, especially in view of Brexit. I
am not sure though she really loves him.

I am very glad Horrid Hannah is worried about neil checking the
numbers and I hope he finds he is right and manages to get Justin to
see it.No bounus!

I am not convinced HH mean well with her advice on Tom's love life but
even though I hope the relationship doesn't end in marriage I hope it
lasts enough to annoy HH.

Lynda should use her annoying persistence and talent for nagging and
bullying for serious purposes. She should work on getting affordable
housing for Ambridge. Countryfile covered how many villages are dying
and that is why, lack of AH. Councils can allow more than they think
and communities can organise too. She could be a leader in that.
krw
2018-11-28 22:35:40 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
I am very glad Horrid Hannah is worried about neil checking the
numbers and I hope he finds he is right and manages to get Justin to
see it.
I am not at all sure the additional movement costs would not be offset
by the additional profit on the pigs reaching full weight. It does
depend how full the trips which Hannah loaded were.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-29 01:37:00 UTC
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In message <***@4ax.com>, Vicky Ayech
<***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Lynda should use her annoying persistence and talent for nagging and
bullying for serious purposes. She should work on getting affordable
housing for Ambridge. Countryfile covered how many villages are dying
and that is why, lack of AH. Councils can allow more than they think
and communities can organise too. She could be a leader in that.
Communities are often their own worst enemies though. I was speaking to
some on the parish council at a recent workshop, and I suggested there
should be more _one_-bedroom accommodation built - as that's one of the
main demands, but seems woefully underprovided. I also dared to suggest
flats don't hurt - I'm not talking about tower blocks, just small units
that make better use of available land (also, young single working folk
often don't have _time_ to garden, nor often desire), but I was told
that even the _suggestion_ of three-storey buildings had apparently
caused uproar at some public meeting )-:.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Have you ever heard about a petition, disagreed with it, but been frustrated
that there's no way you can *show* that you disagree? If so, have a look at
https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/232770 - and please pass it on if you
agree, especially to twitter, facebook, gransnet/mumsnet, or any such forum.

DOS means never having to live hand-to-mouse.
Penny
2018-11-29 11:13:05 UTC
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On Thu, 29 Nov 2018 01:37:00 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Communities are often their own worst enemies though. I was speaking to
some on the parish council at a recent workshop, and I suggested there
should be more _one_-bedroom accommodation built - as that's one of the
main demands, but seems woefully underprovided. I also dared to suggest
flats don't hurt - I'm not talking about tower blocks, just small units
that make better use of available land (also, young single working folk
often don't have _time_ to garden, nor often desire), but I was told
that even the _suggestion_ of three-storey buildings had apparently
caused uproar at some public meeting )-:.
All our recent house-building activity here has included 3 and 4 storey
buildings with one and two bedroom flats. But this was a woollen mill town
in the 19th century and the mills were usually 4 storey, the lower two
often consisting of back-to-back accommodation with the upper floors open
plan along the terrace so the working area had the best light. Some of the
new blocks do look a bit too big (modern standards won't allow low
ceilings) but they generally fit in and are surely more thermally efficient
than the remaining old mills which have been converted.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-29 15:04:19 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Thu, 29 Nov 2018 01:37:00 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Communities are often their own worst enemies though. I was speaking to
some on the parish council at a recent workshop, and I suggested there
should be more _one_-bedroom accommodation built - as that's one of the
main demands, but seems woefully underprovided. I also dared to suggest
flats don't hurt - I'm not talking about tower blocks, just small units
that make better use of available land (also, young single working folk
often don't have _time_ to garden, nor often desire), but I was told
that even the _suggestion_ of three-storey buildings had apparently
caused uproar at some public meeting )-:.
All our recent house-building activity here has included 3 and 4 storey
buildings with one and two bedroom flats. But this was a woollen mill town
in the 19th century and the mills were usually 4 storey, the lower two
often consisting of back-to-back accommodation with the upper floors open
plan along the terrace so the working area had the best light. Some of the
new blocks do look a bit too big (modern standards won't allow low
ceilings) but they generally fit in and are surely more thermally efficient
than the remaining old mills which have been converted.
Sounds like an enlightened council - not afraid of (a) flats (b) one-bed
housing.

The "modern standards won't allow low ceilings" bit puzzles me: why not?
I know some people like vast spaces above them, and my mother certainly
used to enthuse; however, it's never bothered me having a low ceiling,
and I certainly feel it's cheaper to heat. (And, presumably, gets more
accommodation in a fixed volume.) Or is it only _very_ low that's
banned? AFAICS, as long as it's well above the height of, say, the top
1% of the population, why do you need any more?

I don't know if park homes are exempt: I can just reach my ceiling with
three fingertips with feet flat on floor, or all my fingers and thumbs
(not quite palms) if on tiptoe. Hang on, I'll measure: about 7'5" or 226
cm. That seems more than enough to me. (A thought: light fittings. I
don't have any dangly ones except one over the dining table.)
Have you ever disagreed with a petition, but been frustrated that there's no
way you can *show* that you disagree? If so, visit 255soft.uk - and please
pass it on, especially to twitter, facebook, gransnet/mumsnet, or any such.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"He who will not reason is a bigot;
he who cannot is a fool;
he who dares not is a slave."
- Sir William Drummond

Above all things, use your mind.
Don't be that bigot, fool, or slave.
Jenny M Benson
2018-11-29 18:19:24 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Sounds like an enlightened council - not afraid of (a) flats (b) one-bed
housing.
Nearly every episode of the numerous "housing programs" on tv features
at least one property which the presenter assures us is ripe for
expansion. I wish the Planning authorities would clap down on this
enlarging of small properties because it won't be long before there are
no houses left for people who only want/need/can afford a small place
with jusr 1 or 2 bedeooms.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
The "modern standards won't allow low ceilings" bit puzzles me: why not?
I know some people like vast spaces above them,
I don't understand why so many people seem to favour tremendously high
ceilings. Quite apart from any other reason, as hot air rises so much
of the heat generated by radiators or under-floor heating must be wasted.
--
Jenny M Benson
Serena Blanchflower
2018-11-29 20:06:35 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Sounds like an enlightened council - not afraid of (a) flats (b) one-bed
housing.
Nearly every episode of the numerous "housing programs" on tv features
at least one property which the presenter assures us is ripe for
expansion.  I wish the Planning authorities would clap down on this
enlarging of small properties because it won't be long before there are
no houses left for people who only want/need/can afford a small place
with jusr 1 or 2 bedeooms.
My local authority certainly used to be pretty strict about not allowing
this. I'm not sure whether it's still the case though.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I have deja vu and amnesia at once, I've forgotten this before! (anon)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-30 01:12:21 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Sounds like an enlightened council - not afraid of (a) flats (b) one-bed
housing.
Nearly every episode of the numerous "housing programs" on tv
features at least one property which the presenter assures us is ripe
for expansion.  I wish the Planning authorities would clap down on
this enlarging of small properties because it won't be long before
there are no houses left for people who only want/need/can afford a
small place with jusr 1 or 2 bedeooms.
My local authority certainly used to be pretty strict about not
allowing this. I'm not sure whether it's still the case though.
While I too rather dislike these programmes, I suspect the majority of
the "ripe for expansion" properties are larger than one bedroom in the
first place.

Not that there's any easy solution: if a family feel they _do_ need to
change from 2-bed to 3-bed (say, elderly relative coming to live with
them, or boy and girl growing up and need their own rooms), they either
grow their home, thus reducing by one the number of 2-bed available, or
they move to a new 3-bed which has been built on scarce space. (Yes, I
now see the fallacy of my thinking - it doesn't have to be a new one -
but still.)


Have you ever disagreed with a petition, but been frustrated that there's no
way you can *show* that you disagree? If so, visit 255soft.uk - and please
pass it on, especially to twitter, facebook, gransnet/mumsnet, or any such.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

science is not intended to be foolproof. Science is about crawling toward the
truth over time. - Scott Adams, 2015-2-2
Penny
2018-11-29 19:00:39 UTC
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On Thu, 29 Nov 2018 15:04:19 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
The "modern standards won't allow low ceilings" bit puzzles me: why not?
I know some people like vast spaces above them, and my mother certainly
used to enthuse; however, it's never bothered me having a low ceiling,
and I certainly feel it's cheaper to heat. (And, presumably, gets more
accommodation in a fixed volume.) Or is it only _very_ low that's
banned? AFAICS, as long as it's well above the height of, say, the top
1% of the population, why do you need any more?
If you've ever driven through Bredgar you'll have seen my old house
https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1449547 I'm about 5'6" and could put my
hand flat on the ceilings of the two front rooms. Many visitors hit their
heads on the beam across the middle of the room on the left (especially
when playing snooker in there) and had to duck through doorways. I think
current regs demand a minimum of 7'.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-29 21:53:50 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Penny
On Thu, 29 Nov 2018 15:04:19 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
The "modern standards won't allow low ceilings" bit puzzles me: why not?
I know some people like vast spaces above them, and my mother certainly
used to enthuse; however, it's never bothered me having a low ceiling,
and I certainly feel it's cheaper to heat. (And, presumably, gets more
accommodation in a fixed volume.) Or is it only _very_ low that's
banned? AFAICS, as long as it's well above the height of, say, the top
1% of the population, why do you need any more?
If you've ever driven through Bredgar you'll have seen my old house
https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1449547 I'm about 5'6" and could put my
hand flat on the ceilings of the two front rooms. Many visitors hit their
heads on the beam across the middle of the room on the left (especially
when playing snooker in there) and had to duck through doorways. I think
current regs demand a minimum of 7'.
Our old house is on Geograph too
https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/6648
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-29 11:19:52 UTC
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On Thu, 29 Nov 2018 01:37:00 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Lynda should use her annoying persistence and talent for nagging and
bullying for serious purposes. She should work on getting affordable
housing for Ambridge. Countryfile covered how many villages are dying
and that is why, lack of AH. Councils can allow more than they think
and communities can organise too. She could be a leader in that.
Communities are often their own worst enemies though. I was speaking to
some on the parish council at a recent workshop, and I suggested there
should be more _one_-bedroom accommodation built - as that's one of the
main demands, but seems woefully underprovided. I also dared to suggest
flats don't hurt - I'm not talking about tower blocks, just small units
that make better use of available land (also, young single working folk
often don't have _time_ to garden, nor often desire), but I was told
that even the _suggestion_ of three-storey buildings had apparently
caused uproar at some public meeting )-:.
One village has converted a disused pub in the centre into two one-bed
and two two-bed flats at affordable prices and a community centre.
BrritSki
2018-11-29 08:52:54 UTC
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On 28/11/2018 21:58, Vicky Ayech wrote:
<spoilers snipped>
I am not convinced HH mean well...
Countryfile covered how many villages are dying and that is why, lack of AH.
HH > Horrid Hannah therefore
AH > Adorable Hannah ?
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