Discussion:
Ask Umra - heritage research
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Vicky Ayech
2018-11-07 22:12:20 UTC
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Permalink
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
99.2% Jewish :). To see details of any relatives or mathces you have
to take out an annual subscription and there are 3 levels. I don't
know much about how useful the different kids are and there is a
discount for the first year but then not. I haven't taken one out yet
as was waiting for the dns results. Do umrats that do research pay to
join sites like this?

Also within a couple of hours of getting the result I had an email
from someone in Amsterdam who is apparently a match, although I can't
see them so far on the list of matches. I can't see how close they
are. All the matches I can see are at the level of first cousin twice
removed or second cousin twice removed etc.

I think when I started this I was hoiping for some information on my
father's family, in Prague.
LFS
2018-11-07 22:44:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
99.2% Jewish :). To see details of any relatives or mathces you have
to take out an annual subscription and there are 3 levels. I don't
know much about how useful the different kids are and there is a
discount for the first year but then not. I haven't taken one out yet
as was waiting for the dns results. Do umrats that do research pay to
join sites like this?
Also within a couple of hours of getting the result I had an email
from someone in Amsterdam who is apparently a match, although I can't
see them so far on the list of matches. I can't see how close they
are. All the matches I can see are at the level of first cousin twice
removed or second cousin twice removed etc.
I think when I started this I was hoiping for some information on my
father's family, in Prague.
Husband joined one of these sites, not sure which one, and constantly
receives messages about very distant relationships. Given the DNA
result, you might get better information via these people: www.jgsgb.org.uk

My cousin's widow in California is deeply into genealogy. She asked me
to do a DNA test to see if I was related to some people she'd found in
Moscow. When I mentioned this to my other cousins here they all told me
not to. Two of them are lawyers, the other a journalist and they seemed
to think having one's DNA floating around was a very bad thing. So I
didn't.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-07 23:09:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
99.2% Jewish :). To see details of any relatives or mathces you have
to take out an annual subscription and there are 3 levels. I don't
know much about how useful the different kids are and there is a
discount for the first year but then not. I haven't taken one out yet
as was waiting for the dns results. Do umrats that do research pay to
join sites like this?
Also within a couple of hours of getting the result I had an email
from someone in Amsterdam who is apparently a match, although I can't
see them so far on the list of matches. I can't see how close they
are. All the matches I can see are at the level of first cousin twice
removed or second cousin twice removed etc.
I think when I started this I was hoiping for some information on my
father's family, in Prague.
Husband joined one of these sites, not sure which one, and constantly
receives messages about very distant relationships. Given the DNA
result, you might get better information via these people: www.jgsgb.org.uk
My cousin's widow in California is deeply into genealogy. She asked me
to do a DNA test to see if I was related to some people she'd found in
Moscow. When I mentioned this to my other cousins here they all told me
not to. Two of them are lawyers, the other a journalist and they seemed
to think having one's DNA floating around was a very bad thing. So I
didn't.
I looked at the website you suggest and can't see how much it is to
join. They say a fee to use the library if non member but no fee to
join. There is an application form. I think you have to fill it in
with your details and get to the end and maybe then find the fee!
LFS
2018-11-08 07:05:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by LFS
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
99.2% Jewish :). To see details of any relatives or mathces you have
to take out an annual subscription and there are 3 levels. I don't
know much about how useful the different kids are and there is a
discount for the first year but then not. I haven't taken one out yet
as was waiting for the dns results. Do umrats that do research pay to
join sites like this?
Also within a couple of hours of getting the result I had an email
from someone in Amsterdam who is apparently a match, although I can't
see them so far on the list of matches. I can't see how close they
are. All the matches I can see are at the level of first cousin twice
removed or second cousin twice removed etc.
I think when I started this I was hoiping for some information on my
father's family, in Prague.
Husband joined one of these sites, not sure which one, and constantly
receives messages about very distant relationships. Given the DNA
result, you might get better information via these people: www.jgsgb.org.uk
My cousin's widow in California is deeply into genealogy. She asked me
to do a DNA test to see if I was related to some people she'd found in
Moscow. When I mentioned this to my other cousins here they all told me
not to. Two of them are lawyers, the other a journalist and they seemed
to think having one's DNA floating around was a very bad thing. So I
didn't.
I looked at the website you suggest and can't see how much it is to
join. They say a fee to use the library if non member but no fee to
join. There is an application form. I think you have to fill it in
with your details and get to the end and maybe then find the fee!
http://www.jgsgb.org.uk/application-forms

£35 p.a. I don't know how that compares to other sites.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-08 09:24:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by LFS
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
99.2% Jewish :). To see details of any relatives or mathces you have
to take out an annual subscription and there are 3 levels. I don't
know much about how useful the different kids are and there is a
discount for the first year but then not. I haven't taken one out yet
as was waiting for the dns results. Do umrats that do research pay to
join sites like this?
Also within a couple of hours of getting the result I had an email
from someone in Amsterdam who is apparently a match, although I can't
see them so far on the list of matches. I can't see how close they
are. All the matches I can see are at the level of first cousin twice
removed or second cousin twice removed etc.
I think when I started this I was hoiping for some information on my
father's family, in Prague.
Husband joined one of these sites, not sure which one, and constantly
receives messages about very distant relationships. Given the DNA
result, you might get better information via these people: www.jgsgb.org.uk
My cousin's widow in California is deeply into genealogy. She asked me
to do a DNA test to see if I was related to some people she'd found in
Moscow. When I mentioned this to my other cousins here they all told me
not to. Two of them are lawyers, the other a journalist and they seemed
to think having one's DNA floating around was a very bad thing. So I
didn't.
I looked at the website you suggest and can't see how much it is to
join. They say a fee to use the library if non member but no fee to
join. There is an application form. I think you have to fill it in
with your details and get to the end and maybe then find the fee!
http://www.jgsgb.org.uk/application-forms
£35 p.a. I don't know how that compares to other sites.
Thank you. £90 for basic and £143 for 'full'
What you get...
Unlimited access to 9.3 billion historical records
Birth, marriage and death records
Census, military, immigration and legal records
Newspapers, yearbooks, directories and guides
Family trees, photos, documents and maps
And many other records from around the world...
Share with your family
Organize, preserve and share your family tree online with advanced
tools that help you grow your tree and upload photos and stories

This is 30% discount so goes up after first year. Includes VAT

https://www.myheritage.com/paywall?s=556468651&action=extend&source=site&reason=138&subscription_type=site&context=Purchase.UserStrip

shows the differences. I don't know enough to see the uses and am
getting confused.
LFS
2018-11-08 12:51:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by LFS
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by LFS
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
99.2% Jewish :). To see details of any relatives or mathces you have
to take out an annual subscription and there are 3 levels. I don't
know much about how useful the different kids are and there is a
discount for the first year but then not. I haven't taken one out yet
as was waiting for the dns results. Do umrats that do research pay to
join sites like this?
Also within a couple of hours of getting the result I had an email
from someone in Amsterdam who is apparently a match, although I can't
see them so far on the list of matches. I can't see how close they
are. All the matches I can see are at the level of first cousin twice
removed or second cousin twice removed etc.
I think when I started this I was hoiping for some information on my
father's family, in Prague.
Husband joined one of these sites, not sure which one, and constantly
receives messages about very distant relationships. Given the DNA
result, you might get better information via these people: www.jgsgb.org.uk
My cousin's widow in California is deeply into genealogy. She asked me
to do a DNA test to see if I was related to some people she'd found in
Moscow. When I mentioned this to my other cousins here they all told me
not to. Two of them are lawyers, the other a journalist and they seemed
to think having one's DNA floating around was a very bad thing. So I
didn't.
I looked at the website you suggest and can't see how much it is to
join. They say a fee to use the library if non member but no fee to
join. There is an application form. I think you have to fill it in
with your details and get to the end and maybe then find the fee!
http://www.jgsgb.org.uk/application-forms
£35 p.a. I don't know how that compares to other sites.
Thank you. £90 for basic and £143 for 'full'
What you get...
Unlimited access to 9.3 billion historical records
Birth, marriage and death records
Census, military, immigration and legal records
Newspapers, yearbooks, directories and guides
Family trees, photos, documents and maps
And many other records from around the world...
Share with your family
Organize, preserve and share your family tree online with advanced
tools that help you grow your tree and upload photos and stories
This is 30% discount so goes up after first year. Includes VAT
https://www.myheritage.com/paywall?s=556468651&action=extend&source=site&reason=138&subscription_type=site&context=Purchase.UserStrip
shows the differences. I don't know enough to see the uses and am
getting confused.
The JGSGB provides guides to undertaking genealogical research. You can
email their adviser and ask questions and they can put you in touch with
professional researchers who will, for a fee, do the research for you.

Other sites mine internet records and will throw up apparent connections
but as far as I can see they do little more than provide you with online
access and leave you to do all the work. One problem with tracing family
in E Europe is that family names and place names change so you need some
background knowledge. Forums where people share information can be very
helpful.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-08 21:28:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
The JGSGB provides guides to undertaking genealogical research. You can
email their adviser and ask questions and they can put you in touch with
professional researchers who will, for a fee, do the research for you.
Other sites mine internet records and will throw up apparent connections
but as far as I can see they do little more than provide you with online
access and leave you to do all the work. One problem with tracing family
in E Europe is that family names and place names change so you need some
background knowledge. Forums where people share information can be very
helpful.
Thank you, I have joined them and will think about others.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-08 15:34:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by LFS
http://www.jgsgb.org.uk/application-forms
£35 p.a. I don't know how that compares to other sites.
Thank you. £90 for basic and £143 for 'full'
What you get...
Unlimited access to 9.3 billion historical records
Birth, marriage and death records
You can get those for free (donations accepted - I'll stop saying that)
from https://www.freebmd.org.uk/cgi/search.pl, for England and Wales
back to mid-1837, and (with the addition of mother's maiden name before
191x and age at death before FreeBMD have them, but at the expense of
only being able to search 5 years at a time and only up to 1917) from
https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certificates/indexes_search.asp .
Post by Vicky Ayech
Census, military, immigration and legal records
Ancestry and FindMyPast have all the censuses 1841-1911 and the 1939
register. The 1881, I think it is, is free (though possibly only
transcripts rather than images of the actual documents). A and FMP both
have military and immigration records, though not the same ones. I think
they both - certainly A - have probate calendars, which give
confirmation of death date and place, the value of the estate, and who
the executor(s) was/were.
Post by Vicky Ayech
Newspapers, yearbooks, directories and guides
A and FMP both have some newspapers; an FMP subscription includes access
to the entire British Newspaper Archive which is big (though allegedly
the search facility you get for it with an FMP subscription is inferior
to that you get if you subscribe to the BNA directly). Not sure what
yearbooks and guides are. FMP and A both have some directories (these
are trade directories, like Kelly's), and at least one of them - I
forget which - has 'phone books too.
Post by Vicky Ayech
Family trees, photos, documents and maps
That's ones other members have submitted, mostly, though they ("they"
will mean A and FMP from now on unless I say otherwise) have absorbed
some photographic archives and lots of maps. There are other sources of
maps - oldmaps is one, which is really set up to sell access to old OS
maps, but can be used free in preview mode; another very good one is the
National Library of Scotland, which has a lot of England too.
Post by Vicky Ayech
And many other records from around the world...
Share with your family
Organize, preserve and share your family tree online with advanced
tools that help you grow your tree and upload photos and stories
Ancestry do that too; FMP let you upload and manage, though I'm not sure
if you can look at others' trees. (Ancestry give you the option to make
them "private"; there's lots of debate on whether you should.) IMO, any
serious genealogist will keep a local (and backed-up) copy rather than
trust it entirely to one of the companies, though there's nothing wrong
with putting it there _as well_, other than the hassle of keeping both
up to date and in step (which some software - mainly "Family Tree Maker"
for Ancestry - will automate).
Post by Vicky Ayech
This is 30% discount so goes up after first year. Includes VAT
https://www.myheritage.com/paywall?s=556468651&action=extend&source=site
&reason=138&subscription_type=site&context=Purchase.UserStrip
shows the differences. I don't know enough to see the uses and am
getting confused.
Many public libraries have a subscription to either Ancestry or
FindMyPast, so - especially if you can find one of each - you can try to
see if it's any use to you. (I don't know if any have MyHeritage.)

There's also a vast amount of material, mostly free, available from the
church of Jesus Christ and the Latter-Day Saints (what used to be called
the Mormons), universally known as LDS, at familysearch.org; they have
their own religious beliefs that have caused them to gather lots of
genealogical information, but they allow the rest of us free access to
it, and IME do not evangelise at all. (They have "family history
centres" dotted around the world, including England, which you can drop
in and use, though the internet has reduced the need to do so. [Note far
from all LDS churches have one, so if there's such in your area it
probably isn't, though they should be able to tell you where the nearest
one is.])
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The first banjo solo I played was actually just a series of mistakes. In fact
it was all the mistakes I knew at the time. - Tim Dowling, RT2015/6/20-26
Penny
2018-11-08 16:11:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 8 Nov 2018 15:34:38 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
There's also a vast amount of material, mostly free, available from the
church of Jesus Christ and the Latter-Day Saints (what used to be called
the Mormons), universally known as LDS, at familysearch.org; they have
their own religious beliefs that have caused them to gather lots of
genealogical information, but they allow the rest of us free access to
it, and IME do not evangelise at all.
Yes, they've done a good job of gathering the information. One of my 2nd
cousins married a Mormon and he converted; his mother thought it wonderful
that this new D-i-L was taking such an interest in the family history and
taking notes of names and dates of birth. Then she found out the LDS were
gathering this information so they could 'baptise' everyone (alive or dead)
into their church and was less impressed.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2018-11-08 16:30:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
Yes, they've done a good job of gathering the information. One of my 2nd
cousins married a Mormon and he converted; his mother thought it wonderful
that this new D-i-L was taking such an interest in the family history and
taking notes of names and dates of birth. Then she found out the LDS were
gathering this information so they could 'baptise' everyone (alive or dead)
into their church and was less impressed.
Either the LDS have got it right and it's in everyone's best interest to
be baptised by them, or they've got it wrong and them baptising all your
dead relatives (1) is totally pointless and matters not a jot.

IMHO, anyway.

I have a lot of time for LDS members. Some of their ... not sure what
word to use, not "beliefs" or "rules" but something similar ... are very
good, although I do think their religious beliefs are largely tosh. I
have received unfailing kindness and help from LDS members and never any
preaching. I have done volunteer transcribing for them in the past as
some little "pay back" and contribute to their FamilyTree largely, I
must admit, in the hope of connecting with others researching my family
lines.

(1) I THINK they only baptise willing living people and I have an idea
they say the dead are free to refuse it if they wish.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
LFS
2018-11-08 17:42:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
Yes, they've done a good job of gathering the information. One of my 2nd
cousins married a Mormon and he converted; his mother thought it wonderful
that this new D-i-L was taking such an interest in the family history and
taking notes of names and dates of birth. Then she found out the LDS were
gathering this information so they could 'baptise' everyone (alive or dead)
into their church and was less impressed.
Either the LDS have got it right and it's in everyone's best interest to
be baptised by them, or they've got it wrong and them baptising all your
dead relatives (1) is totally pointless and matters not a jot.
IMHO, anyway.
I have a lot of time for LDS members.  Some of their ... not sure what
word to use, not "beliefs" or "rules" but something similar ... are very
good, although I do think their religious beliefs are largely tosh.  I
have received unfailing kindness and help from LDS members and never any
preaching.  I have done volunteer transcribing for them in the past as
some little "pay back" and contribute to their FamilyTree largely, I
must admit, in the hope of connecting with others researching my family
lines.
(1) I THINK they only baptise willing living people and I have an idea
they say the dead are free to refuse it if they wish.
At Miami airport we were sitting next to an LDS member wearing a large
name badge which said he was called Jesus. Husband's specs chose that
moment to collapse, a disaster as he can barely see without them and his
spare pair was of course packed in his checked in luggage. "No problem,
sir!" announced Jesus who rummaged in his backpack, produced some tape
and deftly conducted a temporary repair. Husband amused people for some
time by remarking that he had been saved by Jesus.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-08 19:21:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
Yes, they've done a good job of gathering the information. One of my 2nd
cousins married a Mormon and he converted; his mother thought it wonderful
that this new D-i-L was taking such an interest in the family history and
taking notes of names and dates of birth. Then she found out the LDS were
gathering this information so they could 'baptise' everyone (alive
or dead)
into their church and was less impressed.
That was my understanding of their belief, too. Seemed fairly harmless
and generates lots of good genealogical work.
Post by LFS
Post by Jenny M Benson
Either the LDS have got it right and it's in everyone's best
interest to be baptised by them, or they've got it wrong and them
baptising all your dead relatives (1) is totally pointless and
matters not a jot.
IMHO, anyway.
I have a lot of time for LDS members.  Some of their ... not sure
what word to use, not "beliefs" or "rules" but something similar ...
are very good, although I do think their religious beliefs are
largely tosh.  I have received unfailing kindness and help from LDS
members and never any preaching.  I have done volunteer transcribing
Likewise, either from the website or the at "family history centre" in
NE London I visited a few times a couple of decades ago.

Some of them were at a boarding house I was at in South Shields around
1980; not sure why - missionary work in Geordieland I think! They were
nice lads; the landlady liked them, as they didn't bring girls home,
didn't drink (even tea or coffee), and were generally very quiet. (She
did say they had rather a lot of white shirts, mind.) They didn't "foul
their own nest" either - didn't bother the other lodgers; I remember
only one night when we had a religious discussion, and I think one of us
instigated that.
Post by LFS
Post by Jenny M Benson
for them in the past as some little "pay back" and contribute to
their FamilyTree largely, I must admit, in the hope of connecting
with others researching my family lines.
(1) I THINK they only baptise willing living people and I have an
idea they say the dead are free to refuse it if they wish.
At Miami airport we were sitting next to an LDS member wearing a large
name badge which said he was called Jesus. Husband's specs chose that
moment to collapse, a disaster as he can barely see without them and
his spare pair was of course packed in his checked in luggage. "No
problem, sir!" announced Jesus who rummaged in his backpack, produced
some tape and deftly conducted a temporary repair. Husband amused
people for some time by remarking that he had been saved by Jesus.
It's a standard joke in Cambridge (and I presume Oxford too, as they
also have a Jesus College - rather Welsh, the Oxford one) to say "I have
a friend in Jesus".
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Never. For me, there has to be a meaning. There's not much meaning in eating
bugs. - Darcey Bussell (on whether she'd appear on /I'm a Celebrity/), in RT
2015/11/28-12/4
Sam Plusnet
2018-11-09 20:14:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
It's a standard joke in Cambridge (and I presume Oxford too, as they
also have a Jesus College - rather Welsh, the Oxford one) to say "I have
a friend in Jesus".
Also to ring the porter's lodge on the 25th of December and sing

"Happy Birthday to you
Happy Birthday..."
--
Sam Plusnet
LFS
2018-11-08 18:06:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by LFS
http://www.jgsgb.org.uk/application-forms
£35 p.a. I don't know how that compares to other sites.
Thank you. £90 for basic and £143 for 'full'
What you get...
Unlimited access to 9.3 billion historical records
Birth, marriage and death records
You can get those for free (donations accepted - I'll stop saying that)
from https://www.freebmd.org.uk/cgi/search.pl, for England and Wales
back to mid-1837, and (with the addition of mother's maiden name before
191x and age at death before FreeBMD have them, but at the expense of
only being able to search 5 years at a time and only up to 1917) from
https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certificates/indexes_search.asp .
Post by Vicky Ayech
Census, military, immigration and legal records
Ancestry and FindMyPast have all the censuses 1841-1911 and the 1939
register. The 1881, I think it is, is free (though possibly only
transcripts rather than images of the actual documents). A and FMP both
have military and immigration records, though not the same ones. I think
they both - certainly A - have probate calendars, which give
confirmation of death date and place, the value of the estate, and who
the executor(s) was/were.
Post by Vicky Ayech
Newspapers, yearbooks, directories and guides
A and FMP both have some newspapers; an FMP subscription includes access
to the entire British Newspaper Archive which is big (though allegedly
the search facility you get for it with an FMP subscription is inferior
to that you get if you subscribe to the BNA directly). Not sure what
yearbooks and guides are. FMP and A both have some directories (these
are trade directories, like Kelly's), and at least one of them - I
forget which - has 'phone books too.
Post by Vicky Ayech
Family trees, photos, documents and maps
That's ones other members have submitted, mostly, though they ("they"
will mean A and FMP from now on unless I say otherwise) have absorbed
some photographic archives and lots of maps. There are other sources of
maps - oldmaps is one, which is really set up to sell access to old OS
maps, but can be used free in preview mode; another very good one is the
National Library of Scotland, which has a lot of England too.
Post by Vicky Ayech
And many other records from around the world...
Share with your family
Organize, preserve and share your family tree online with advanced
tools that help you grow your tree and upload photos and stories
Ancestry do that too; FMP let you upload and manage, though I'm not sure
if you can look at others' trees. (Ancestry give you the option to make
them "private"; there's lots of debate on whether you should.) IMO, any
serious genealogist will keep a local (and backed-up) copy rather than
trust it entirely to one of the companies, though there's nothing wrong
with putting it there _as well_, other than the hassle of keeping both
up to date and in step (which some software - mainly "Family Tree Maker"
for Ancestry - will automate).
Post by Vicky Ayech
This is 30% discount so goes up after first year.  Includes VAT
https://www.myheritage.com/paywall?s=556468651&action=extend&source=site
&reason=138&subscription_type=site&context=Purchase.UserStrip
shows the differences. I don't know enough to see the uses and am
getting confused.
Many public libraries have a subscription to either Ancestry or
FindMyPast, so - especially if you can find one of each - you can try to
see if it's any use to you. (I don't know if any have MyHeritage.)
There's also a vast amount of material, mostly free, available from the
church of Jesus Christ and the Latter-Day Saints (what used to be called
the Mormons), universally known as LDS, at familysearch.org; they have
their own religious beliefs that have caused them to gather lots of
genealogical information, but they allow the rest of us free access to
it, and IME do not evangelise at all. (They have "family history
centres" dotted around the world, including England, which you can drop
in and use, though the internet has reduced the need to do so. [Note far
from all LDS churches have one, so if there's such in your area it
probably isn't, though they should be able to tell you where the nearest
one is.])
I'd just like to point out that, although some of these sources can be
helpful horizontally, for people like Vicky and me the material
available is quite limited as much information was lost in Europe when
most of a generation was wiped out and their history with them. That's
why I suggested that she might do better with a specialist genealogical
organisation.

I am sometimes envious of people who can consult church records and
construct family trees going back to the 17th century or earlier. I can
go back to the 19th on my father's side because my great grandparents
came here then but I can find nothing about their forebears. Even less
on my mother's side.

Even those who are very sensitive to the plight of refugees rarely
consider the impact of losing your family history, something that can
also affect future generations, however well assimilated they may seem
to be.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-08 19:39:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <***@mid.individual.net>, LFS
<***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by LFS
I'd just like to point out that, although some of these sources can be
helpful horizontally, for people like Vicky and me the material
available is quite limited as much information was lost in Europe when
most of a generation was wiped out and their history with them. That's
I was somewhat concerned about that, as Prague would have been under
occupation for some of the time. Normally, the German people I know are
meticulous about things like records, but at that time, their views were
somewhat affected by views on origins, so they might not have been as
careful as they usually were, and/or the records may have been destroyed
(deliberately or otherwise) when they left. Or Allied bombing or other
action, of course.
Post by LFS
why I suggested that she might do better with a specialist genealogical
organisation.
It is an impressive percentage she has there! However, on the whole, the
"ethnic origins" part of what you get from a DNA test tends to report
your origins from thousands or at least hundreds of years ago, whereas I
think she's after e. g. 19th century data.
Post by LFS
I am sometimes envious of people who can consult church records and
construct family trees going back to the 17th century or earlier. I can
England and Wales, if you have a fair wind, you can get into mid-17xx
without too much difficulty, or late 16xx if you're lucky. Usually
there's a blockage or indecision though - I mean you can't decide
between two or three people which is the right one. I've got several
lines into late 17xx, but only one or two into 16xx.
Post by LFS
go back to the 19th on my father's side because my great grandparents
came here then but I can find nothing about their forebears. Even less
on my mother's side.
Where did your forebears come from?
Post by LFS
Even those who are very sensitive to the plight of refugees rarely
consider the impact of losing your family history, something that can
also affect future generations, however well assimilated they may seem
to be.
Indeed. Even adoption can break the thread - not so much nowadays now we
have laws of access to information, but mid to early twentieth century,
let alone earlier, can break the chain. It can be important not just for
curiosity value, but for medical reasons (hereditary conditions, or
immunities, for example).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Never. For me, there has to be a meaning. There's not much meaning in eating
bugs. - Darcey Bussell (on whether she'd appear on /I'm a Celebrity/), in RT
2015/11/28-12/4
LFS
2018-11-09 15:07:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by LFS
I am sometimes envious of people who can consult church records and
construct family trees going back to the 17th century or earlier. I can
England and Wales, if you have a fair wind, you can get into mid-17xx
without too much difficulty, or late 16xx if you're lucky. Usually
there's a blockage or indecision though - I mean you can't decide
between two or three people which is the right one. I've got several
lines into late 17xx, but only one or two into 16xx.
Post by LFS
go back to the 19th on my father's side because my great grandparents
came here then but I can find nothing about their forebears. Even less
on my mother's side.
Where did your forebears come from?
On my mother's side, from Lithuania and Poland, arriving here via
Belgium. My paternal great grandparents had Dutch connections but I
think my great grandfather came from Poland originally.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Nick Odell
2018-11-08 14:48:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
99.2% Jewish :).  To see details of any relatives or mathces you have
to take out an annual subscription and there are 3 levels. I don't
know much about how useful the different kids are and there is a
discount for the first year but then not. I haven't taken one out yet
as was waiting for the dns results. Do umrats that do research pay to
join sites like this?
Also within a couple of hours of getting the result I had an email
from someone in Amsterdam who is apparently a match, although I can't
see them so far on the list of matches. I can't see how close they
are. All the matches I can see are at the level of first cousin twice
removed or second cousin twice removed etc.
I think when I started this I was hoiping for some information on my
father's family, in Prague.
Husband joined one of these sites, not sure which one, and constantly
receives messages about very distant relationships. Given the DNA
result, you might get better information via these people: www.jgsgb.org.uk
My cousin's widow in California is deeply into genealogy. She asked me
to do a DNA test to see if I was related to some people she'd found in
Moscow. When I mentioned this to my other cousins here they all told me
not to. Two of them are lawyers, the other a journalist and they seemed
to think having one's DNA floating around was a very bad thing. So I
didn't.
I agree with that last part. Without taking any DNA test I already
know[1] that 25% of me is probably South African[1] and the other 75%
probably isn't and in a country where Stephen Yaxley-Lennon could become
Prime Minister I'd rather not have that sort of information floating
around in the public domain.

Nick
[1]whatever that means
Jenny M Benson
2018-11-07 23:10:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
99.2% Jewish :). To see details of any relatives or mathces you have
to take out an annual subscription and there are 3 levels. I don't
know much about how useful the different kids are and there is a
discount for the first year but then not. I haven't taken one out yet
as was waiting for the dns results. Do umrats that do research pay to
join sites like this?
I have not, and probably will not, subscribed to MyHeritage because
their records are not sufficiently relevant to me, the majority of whose
family are and were based in the UK. I have paid subscriptions to
Ancestry and FindMyPast, have done for some years and will probably
continue to subscribe for some years.
Post by Vicky Ayech
Also within a couple of hours of getting the result I had an email
from someone in Amsterdam who is apparently a match, although I can't
see them so far on the list of matches. I can't see how close they
are. All the matches I can see are at the level of first cousin twice
removed or second cousin twice removed etc.
Had you asked before you did it I would have said "if you go ahead, test
with Ancestry." Someone who's opinion I trust strongly recommends
Ancestry (if you are only going to test with one company). Apart from
any other possible reason, far more people have tested with Ancestry and
therefore there is a greater chance of you finding matches.

I have tested with Ancestry. My results matched me to several quite
close relatives who I already knew about and to loads of more distant
"cousins." I have already been in touch with 2 people who are related
to me through my maternal grandmother's line and got helpful information
from them. I have many, many more "first contact" messages to send.

I have also uploaded my results to gedmatch.com in order to widen the
scope for finding matches.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-08 09:03:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 23:10:47 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
99.2% Jewish :). To see details of any relatives or mathces you have
to take out an annual subscription and there are 3 levels. I don't
know much about how useful the different kids are and there is a
discount for the first year but then not. I haven't taken one out yet
as was waiting for the dns results. Do umrats that do research pay to
join sites like this?
I have not, and probably will not, subscribed to MyHeritage because
their records are not sufficiently relevant to me, the majority of whose
family are and were based in the UK. I have paid subscriptions to
Ancestry and FindMyPast, have done for some years and will probably
continue to subscribe for some years.
Post by Vicky Ayech
Also within a couple of hours of getting the result I had an email
from someone in Amsterdam who is apparently a match, although I can't
see them so far on the list of matches. I can't see how close they
are. All the matches I can see are at the level of first cousin twice
removed or second cousin twice removed etc.
Had you asked before you did it I would have said "if you go ahead, test
with Ancestry." Someone who's opinion I trust strongly recommends
Ancestry (if you are only going to test with one company). Apart from
any other possible reason, far more people have tested with Ancestry and
therefore there is a greater chance of you finding matches.
I have tested with Ancestry. My results matched me to several quite
close relatives who I already knew about and to loads of more distant
"cousins." I have already been in touch with 2 people who are related
to me through my maternal grandmother's line and got helpful information
from them. I have many, many more "first contact" messages to send.
I have also uploaded my results to gedmatch.com in order to widen the
scope for finding matches.
I wish I'd asked first. There seem to be around 500 matches so far
but remote.
Penny
2018-11-08 13:07:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 23:10:47 +0000, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Had you asked before you did it I would have said "if you go ahead, test
with Ancestry." Someone who's opinion I trust strongly recommends
Ancestry (if you are only going to test with one company). Apart from
any other possible reason, far more people have tested with Ancestry and
therefore there is a greater chance of you finding matches.
Ah, good, I was going to say something similar but I have not had a DNA
test myself.

I have had one contact through Lost Cousins (free although there are extras
with a sub I think) which proved fruitful in information exchange in both
directions, in particular a copy of my great, great grandmother's will,
but came from her branch of the family which I wasn't particularly working
on at the time.

I also found (and met) one of my mother's cousins who I was not previously
aware of who has a huge archive of old family photos. Her brother (of whose
existence I was already aware and who has a web site) put me in touch. I'm
still vaguely thinking of starting a family tree blog for the benefit of
living family members I know and the possibility of finding others who I
don't. I haven't had a paid subscription to any of the big sites but from
the sound of the archives available on My Heritage it is using Find My Past
data.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-08 15:48:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <***@4ax.com>, Penny
<***@labyrinth.freeuk.com> writes:
[]
Post by Penny
I have had one contact through Lost Cousins (free although there are extras
with a sub I think) which proved fruitful in information exchange in both
I'd second the recommendation for LostCousins; apart from anything else
he (it's run by one person I think, called Peter Calder) produces a very
good (free) newsletter. (The latest edition is linked from the website,
with all previous ones linked from that, including a search facility. If
you join - free but he likes you to upload details of some of your
ancestors [since the nominal aim of the site is to put cousins in touch]
- he sends you an email whenever there's a new newsletter.) He's got a
few hobby-horses, but it's worth it for the information: he tends to
know when the various companies have special offers on for both DNA
testing and membership, and also which sets of records have recently
been added to what's online, and by whom. (I keep a couple of the old
newsletters bookmarked as they list which out of Ancestry and FindMyPast
have the parish records of which counties.) The main extra with a sub is
the ability to contact other members who share your ancestors: because
of the way he insists on having the data, such matches are more likely
to be correct than most other sites. He makes that part free from time
to time, usually for three or four days over something like Easter or
Remembrance weekend.
[]
Post by Penny
don't. I haven't had a paid subscription to any of the big sites but from
the sound of the archives available on My Heritage it is using Find My Past
data.
That's an interesting deduction.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The first banjo solo I played was actually just a series of mistakes. In fact
it was all the mistakes I knew at the time. - Tim Dowling, RT2015/6/20-26
Penny
2018-11-08 16:15:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 8 Nov 2018 15:48:54 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
<G6JPG-***@255soft.uk> scrawled in the dust...
I wrote...
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
don't. I haven't had a paid subscription to any of the big sites but from
the sound of the archives available on My Heritage it is using Find My Past
data.
That's an interesting deduction.
It was the inclusion of newspapers which prompted it BIMBAM.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2018-11-08 16:34:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I'd second the recommendation for LostCousins;
Thirded.

apart from anything else
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
he (it's run by one person I think, called Peter Calder)
Peter Calver. (DINTAFPOU?)
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-08 21:44:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 8 Nov 2018 16:34:38 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I'd second the recommendation for LostCousins;
Thirded.
apart from anything else
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
he (it's run by one person I think, called Peter Calder)
Peter Calver. (DINTAFPOU?)
I wonder whether church records or even most UK ones will show
anything about the areas of family I am looking for. My parents
marriage and deaths will be there. Mother's parents' deaths too. Not
much else.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-08 21:55:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <***@4ax.com>, Vicky Ayech
<***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
I wonder whether church records or even most UK ones will show
anything about the areas of family I am looking for. My parents
marriage and deaths will be there. Mother's parents' deaths too. Not
much else.
If they were in the UK, then census records will show where they were,
and their professions. They're not released until 100 years after they
were taken though, so you have a while to wait! (And one of them - 1931
IIRR - was destroyed during the war [not by enemy action, just a fire;
someone had unwisely decided to store it in the same building as a
furniture warehouse]).

Telephone and trade directories might help, for UK folk again.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Scheisse," said Pooh, trying out his German.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-07 23:40:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
Oh dear, I wish you'd asked first: you get better matching with
Ancestry, as they have had more submissions than all the others put
together - and also, they (Ancestry) don't let you upload results from
any of the other testing companies to them, whereas (some) other sites
do let you upload Ancestry results. Anyway, can't be helped. You _can_
upload MyHeritage data to GEDmatch - specific instructions are at
https://www.gedmatch.com/gedwiki/index.php?title=MyHeritage_DNA_Upload,
though I'm not sure if you have to log in to GEDmatch to see it.
GEDmatch is a free site (though of course they accept donations) to
which anyone can upload raw DNA data from Ancestry, FTDNA, WeGene,
MyHeritage, and some users of 23andMe, or any company that has the
information in the right format. They then let you compare to anyone
else who has uploaded to them - and they _don't_ send any automatic
emails, though the individuals might.
Post by Vicky Ayech
99.2% Jewish :). To see details of any relatives or mathces you have
I don't think it sways their results, but I think MyHeritage are based
in Israel. But Oy Vey, that's a high percentage!
Post by Vicky Ayech
to take out an annual subscription and there are 3 levels. I don't
know much about how useful the different kids are and there is a
discount for the first year but then not. I haven't taken one out yet
as was waiting for the dns results. Do umrats that do research pay to
join sites like this?
It depends what you want out of it. For general genealogical research,
I'd say it's a toss-up between Ancestry and FindMyPast - unfortunately
they each have lots of records the others don't, though they both have
all the censuses (1841-1911, every ten years) and the 1939 register. I
don't know what records MyHeritage have. If it's just DNA matches, I'm
not sure what paying MyHeritage gets you: I have a free account with
them, and I could still upload my DNA data and see matches (and I
_think_ contact them). I don't know what the various levels at
MyHeritage give you; at A and FMP, the three levels give you (access to)
some British (and Irish) records, all British and Irish records the
particular company has, and all world-wide records the company has.
(They also have a lowest level subscription which gives you pay-per-view
access, but that soon racks up as a false economy, and also inhibits
your searching: if you know you're going to have to use up credits to
see each record, you search very hesitantly, whereas any of the other
levels gives you unlimited [except by area] access.)
Post by Vicky Ayech
Also within a couple of hours of getting the result I had an email
from someone in Amsterdam who is apparently a match, although I can't
see them so far on the list of matches. I can't see how close they
are. All the matches I can see are at the level of first cousin twice
removed or second cousin twice removed etc.
If true, those are close matches. If you know how many centimorgans
overlap you have, the chart at https://dnapainter.com/tools/sharedcm/
(scroll down a bit) will tell you the sort of relationship they're
likely to be.
Post by Vicky Ayech
I think when I started this I was hoiping for some information on my
father's family, in Prague.
I fear DNA testing isn't a replacement for the hard slog of tracing by
conventional means - though I have no experience with Czech records. DNA
_can_ break down "brick walls", but can't solve on its own )-:.

Good luck, though - it's a fascinating hobby! (How many generations back
is the Prague connection?)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If vegetarians eat vegetables,..beware of humanitarians!
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-08 09:07:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 7 Nov 2018 23:40:51 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
I think when I started this I was hoiping for some information on my
father's family, in Prague.
I fear DNA testing isn't a replacement for the hard slog of tracing by
conventional means - though I have no experience with Czech records. DNA
_can_ break down "brick walls", but can't solve on its own )-:.
Good luck, though - it's a fascinating hobby! (How many generations back
is the Prague connection?)
My father's family came from there and so his parent were there but
didn't survive. One brother got out and went to Israel but died after
a couple of years. I know no further back than my father's father, who
was a doctor, so I thought there must be records of his appointments
and qualifications and then further generations.
Fenny
2018-11-08 00:04:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 07 Nov 2018 22:12:20 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
99.2% Jewish :). To see details of any relatives or mathces you have
to take out an annual subscription and there are 3 levels. I don't
know much about how useful the different kids are and there is a
discount for the first year but then not. I haven't taken one out yet
as was waiting for the dns results. Do umrats that do research pay to
join sites like this?
Also within a couple of hours of getting the result I had an email
from someone in Amsterdam who is apparently a match, although I can't
see them so far on the list of matches. I can't see how close they
are. All the matches I can see are at the level of first cousin twice
removed or second cousin twice removed etc.
I think when I started this I was hoiping for some information on my
father's family, in Prague.
I have no experience in DNA testing and matching, as I don't feel it
would be of much use to me. I know who most of my close relatives are
for at least 4 generations back and don't think that finding their
unknown decendants is going to be of much use for what I'm after.

DNA testing is only as much use as the data that has been uploaded.
And whilst the major sites (I use FindMyPast, as I find it far less
intrusive and binding than Ancestry) have access to most civil
registration documents and an increasing number of church records,
they will only have these for the countries in which they are
available. As I have no reason to be searching Czech records, I have
no idea how many of what type might be available. And if your
relatives haven't done DNA testing, I wonder how close a match you
will actually find.

I wouldn't pay to join a site that was too restrictive. If you can
upload your test results to other places for free, go with that first,
as others are likely to have done the same to spread their results
out.
--
Fenny
steveski
2018-11-08 01:06:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 07 Nov 2018 22:12:20 +0000, Vicky Ayech wrote:

[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
To see details of any relatives or mathces
"Mathces? We don't need no steenkin' mathces . . . [1]
--
Steveski

[1] Sorry, Vicky - couldn't stop myself :-)
Sam Plusnet
2018-11-08 02:00:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
99.2% Jewish :).
What a wonderful opportunity for some one-up-manship.
--
Sam Plusnet
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-08 09:09:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
99.2% Jewish :).
What a wonderful opportunity for some one-up-manship.
? How? I was sort of hoping for some Chinese and Red Indian!
Serena Blanchflower
2018-11-08 09:32:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
? How? I was sort of hoping for some Chinese and Red Indian!
I was proved to be almost 100% white European but the remaining tiny
percentage was probably Native American. This was a particular delight,
as my eldest brother had been obsessed with injuns, as a child :)
--
Best wishes, Serena
A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy
enough people to make it worth the effort. (Herm Albright)
Sam Plusnet
2018-11-09 20:22:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
99.2% Jewish :).
What a wonderful opportunity for some one-up-manship.
? How? I was sort of hoping for some Chinese and Red Indian!
Imagine a friend mentioning that he or she was 94.6% Jewish - wouldn't
there be just the slightest temptation to reply...?
--
Sam Plusnet
Jim Easterbrook
2018-11-08 07:32:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
99.2% Jewish :).
So are you thoroughbred or inbred? (-:
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Vicky Ayech
2018-11-08 09:28:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 8 Nov 2018 07:32:21 GMT, Jim Easterbrook
Post by Vicky Ayech
I know some umrats do this and have for some time and I'd like advice.
I gave a dna sample to MyHeritage and they've come back with details.
99.2% Jewish :).
B has already suggested the latter :). Attila did come from that
area. 0.8% is Balkan. Isn't almost everyone related to Attila and the
Queen if we go far enough back?
Jim Easterbrook
2018-11-08 09:47:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Isn't almost everyone related to Attila and the Queen if
we go far enough back?
They've kept that scandal quiet!
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-08 15:05:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Isn't almost everyone related to Attila and the Queen if
we go far enough back?
If you work out how many ancestors you have n generations back (2^n, or
slightly less because of cousin marriages), and compare that to world
(or UK, or ...) population at the various dates, it becomes fairly
obvious that we're all related. Fairly obvious doesn't mean correct -
there are flaws in the reasoning - but the truth isn't far off. And for
recent history at least (back as far as I've gone, which isn't far
before 1700), generations are 20-30 years, so you don't have to go
_that_ many centuries back for 2^n to exceed the population of the UK,
or planet. 2^10 is of course 1024, or around 1000, so each 10
generations in theory gives an extra three 0s - a million by 20 (so 600
years or less), a billion by 30. Of course, the more ancestors there are
in the pool the more chance of (unknowing) cousin marriages, so it's a
lot less in reality (much before the railways, and even after, _most_
people did not travel more than five or ten miles throughout their
lives, plus geographical effects for Britons at least - island nation
and all that).
Post by Jim Easterbrook
They've kept that scandal quiet!
(-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The first banjo solo I played was actually just a series of mistakes. In fact
it was all the mistakes I knew at the time. - Tim Dowling, RT2015/6/20-26
Serena Blanchflower
2018-11-08 09:28:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I think when I started this I was hoiping for some information on my
father's family, in Prague.
I have a feeling that you may be out of luck with that. Unless
MyHeritage are different from most of the genealogical DNA tests around,
it will only have been looking at your mitochondrial DNA and, therefore,
will only give you information on your mother's family.

I did a DNA test with 23andme, a few years ago but that was mainly so
that it could be used for some ME research that's going on. I haven't
bothered to contact any of the potential relatives it's flagged up for me.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Be yourself, everyone else is taken (Oscar Wilde)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-08 14:54:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
I think when I started this I was hoiping for some information on my
father's family, in Prague.
I have a feeling that you may be out of luck with that. Unless
MyHeritage are different from most of the genealogical DNA tests
around, it will only have been looking at your mitochondrial DNA and,
therefore, will only give you information on your mother's family.
No, there are three sorts going round: mitochondrial which follows the
maternal lines, one which follows the paternal line, and one
general-purpose, which is better than the other two unless you're
specifically wanting to do something (such as follow your surname, which
tends to go down the male line of course). Ancestry's is the
general-purpose one; not sure about MyHeritage's. One of the other two
types is called autosomal, I forget which.

Whichever, and whoever with, you do, it's worth downloading the raw data
from whoever you tested with and uploading it to GEDmatch, where it'll
be compared to lots of others who have done the same.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I did a DNA test with 23andme, a few years ago but that was mainly so
that it could be used for some ME research that's going on. I haven't
bothered to contact any of the potential relatives it's flagged up for me.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The first banjo solo I played was actually just a series of mistakes. In fact
it was all the mistakes I knew at the time. - Tim Dowling, RT2015/6/20-26
Serena Blanchflower
2018-11-08 21:53:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
I think when I started this I was hoiping for some information on my
father's family, in Prague.
I have a feeling that you may be out of luck with that.  Unless
MyHeritage are different from most of the genealogical DNA tests
around, it will only have been looking at your mitochondrial DNA and,
therefore, will only give you information on your mother's family.
No, there are three sorts going round: mitochondrial which follows the
maternal lines, one which follows the paternal line, and one
general-purpose, which is better than the other two unless you're
specifically wanting to do something (such as follow your surname, which
tends to go down the male line of course). Ancestry's is the
general-purpose one; not sure about MyHeritage's. One of the other two
types is called autosomal, I forget which.
Ah, yes, I think you're right. I've just had a look at the MyHeritage
site (at <https://www.myheritage.com/dna>) but I can't find exactly
which type it is but I don't think it's the mitochondrial kind.
--
Best wishes, Serena
If you are going through hell, keep going. (Winston Churchill)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-08 23:33:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
I think when I started this I was hoiping for some information on my
father's family, in Prague.
I have a feeling that you may be out of luck with that.  Unless
MyHeritage are different from most of the genealogical DNA tests
around, it will only have been looking at your mitochondrial DNA and,
therefore, will only give you information on your mother's family.
No, there are three sorts going round: mitochondrial which follows
the maternal lines, one which follows the paternal line, and one
general-purpose, which is better than the other two unless you're
specifically wanting to do something (such as follow your surname,
which tends to go down the male line of course). Ancestry's is the
general-purpose one; not sure about MyHeritage's. One of the other two
types is called autosomal, I forget which.
Ah, yes, I think you're right. I've just had a look at the MyHeritage
site (at <https://www.myheritage.com/dna>) but I can't find exactly
which type it is but I don't think it's the mitochondrial kind.
There's a good article on the three types of DNA test (and which company
to test with!) here:
https://www.lostcousins.com/newsletters2/may18news.htm#WhichDNA
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Advertising is legalized lying. - H.G. Wells
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