Discussion:
Latin mnemonics
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Mike Ruddock
2018-11-15 16:09:32 UTC
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My wife quoted to me earlier today a bit of verse she learned at school
to help with Latin grammar. There are, I believe, many such. This one was:
A, ab, absque, coram, de,
palam, clam, cum, ex or e,
sine, tenens, pro and prae,
When state not motion is implied.
(I think there must be a word or two to make clear which case was to be
used.)

Do ant umrats recall similar bits of memory proppage?

My wife pointed out to me that she had last written Latin with intent
more than 60 years ago. For myself I did two years of the stuff at
school and scuttled off into the safety of science subjects as soon as I
was allowed to.

Mike Ruddock
Mike
2018-11-15 16:13:11 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
My wife quoted to me earlier today a bit of verse she learned at school
A, ab, absque, coram, de,
palam, clam, cum, ex or e,
sine, tenens, pro and prae,
When state not motion is implied.
(I think there must be a word or two to make clear which case was to be
used.)
Do ant umrats recall similar bits of memory proppage?
My wife pointed out to me that she had last written Latin with intent
more than 60 years ago. For myself I did two years of the stuff at
school and scuttled off into the safety of science subjects as soon as I
was allowed to.
Mike Ruddock
It’s all Dutch to me!
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2018-11-15 16:35:03 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
My wife quoted to me earlier today a bit of verse she learned at school
A, ab, absque, coram, de,
palam, clam, cum, ex or e,
sine, tenens, pro and prae,
When state not motion is implied.
(I think there must be a word or two to make clear which case was to be
used.)
Do ant umrats recall similar bits of memory proppage?
My wife pointed out to me that she had last written  Latin with intent
more than 60 years ago. For myself I did two years of the stuff at
school and scuttled off into the safety of science subjects as soon as I
was allowed to.
Mike Ruddock
I do not remember anything like that. I did a year of Latin and then
moved into a set which did no more Latin.

Then my parents moved house and I moved school and ended up in class
that was doing the second year of Latin but having had a year in which
to forget most of what I had learnt I struggled for much of the year.

These days I struggle to remember that I once did any Latin.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-15 20:27:59 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Mike Ruddock
My wife quoted to me earlier today a bit of verse she learned at
school to help with Latin grammar. There are, I believe, many such.
A, ab, absque, coram, de,
palam, clam, cum, ex or e,
sine, tenens, pro and prae,
When state not motion is implied.
(I think there must be a word or two to make clear which case was to
be used.)
Do ant umrats recall similar bits of memory proppage?
There are always

Latin is a language, as dead as dead may be -
it killed the ancient Romans, and now it's killing me!

and

Caesar adsum jam forte,
Brutus aderat;
Caesar sic in omnibus,
Brutus sic in at.

But if you want ones that actually _helped_ with the language, I only
remember NVAGDA - the Russian spy who helped us remember the names of
the cases - and "towns and small islands, domus and rus", which were
what _didn't_ take directional propositions (a Roman would say "I go
Rome", not "I am going TO Rome"). I partly remember it because someone -
could have been me - asked how you knew whether an island counted as
small or not, and the answer was "smaller than Rhodes", since Rhodes
sometimes had and sometimes hadn't had such prepositions; this caused
amusement because Rhodes was the name of a large lad in the upper
school, so nothing could be larger than Rhodes. It isn't a rhyme,
though.
Post by krw
Post by Mike Ruddock
My wife pointed out to me that she had last written  Latin with
intent more than 60 years ago. For myself I did two years of the
stuff at school and scuttled off into the safety of science subjects
as soon as I was allowed to.
Mike Ruddock
I too did science - but am glad I did the Latin, despite it having been
of no practical use whatsoever in my professional life. It _did_ (and
does) help - marginally - in the understanding of other languages, and
the rhythms and general sense of it I find pleasing.
Post by krw
I do not remember anything like that. I did a year of Latin and then
moved into a set which did no more Latin.
Then my parents moved house and I moved school and ended up in class
that was doing the second year of Latin but having had a year in which
to forget most of what I had learnt I struggled for much of the year.
Harrumph. I must have mentioned before now that I wasn't able to do
German until (IIRR) the third year by when I'd forgotten a lot of the
instinctive feel for it I'd had on arrival.
Post by krw
These days I struggle to remember that I once did any Latin.
(-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Can a blue man sing the whites?
steveski
2018-11-16 00:35:23 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike Ruddock
My wife quoted to me earlier today a bit of verse she learned at
school to help with Latin grammar. There are, I believe, many such.
A, ab, absque, coram, de,
palam, clam, cum, ex or e,
sine, tenens, pro and prae,
When state not motion is implied.
(I think there must be a word or two to make clear which case was to
be used.)
Do ant umrats recall similar bits of memory proppage?
There are always
Latin is a language, as dead as dead may be -
it killed the ancient Romans, and now it's killing me!
and
Caesar adsum jam forte,
Brutus aderat;
Caesar sic in omnibus,
Brutus sic in at.
I always knew that last line as "Brutus sic in Transit".
--
Steveski
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-11-16 01:43:43 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike Ruddock
My wife quoted to me earlier today a bit of verse she learned at
school to help with Latin grammar. There are, I believe, many such.
A, ab, absque, coram, de,
palam, clam, cum, ex or e,
sine, tenens, pro and prae,
When state not motion is implied.
(I think there must be a word or two to make clear which case was to
be used.)
Do ant umrats recall similar bits of memory proppage?
There are always
Latin is a language, as dead as dead may be -
it killed the ancient Romans, and now it's killing me!
and
Caesar adsum jam forte,
Brutus aderat;
Caesar sic in omnibus,
Brutus sic in at.
I always knew that last line as "Brutus sic in Transit".
Wouldn't rhyme or scan though!

Then there's the note on the garage calendar, about the boss's
girlfriend bringing in her problematic van to be fixed next week:

Sick Transit, Gloria, Monday.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"I hate the guys that criticize the enterprise of other guys whose enterprise
has made them rise above the guys who criticize!" (W9BRD, former editor of
"How's DX?" column in "QST")
SODAM
2018-11-15 19:06:28 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
My wife quoted to me earlier today a bit of verse she learned at school
A, ab, absque, coram, de,
palam, clam, cum, ex or e,
sine, tenens, pro and prae,
When state not motion is implied.
(I think there must be a word or two to make clear which case was to be
used.)
Do ant umrats recall similar bits of memory proppage?
My wife pointed out to me that she had last written Latin with intent
more than 60 years ago. For myself I did two years of the stuff at
school and scuttled off into the safety of science subjects as soon as I
was allowed to.
Mike Ruddock
< hand up and waving>”Please, sir, me, sir!””
I learned that same mnemonic but the last line I learned as: “ Ablative
with these we spy.”
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Fenny
2018-11-15 22:51:56 UTC
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Post by Mike Ruddock
My wife quoted to me earlier today a bit of verse she learned at school
A, ab, absque, coram, de,
palam, clam, cum, ex or e,
sine, tenens, pro and prae,
When state not motion is implied.
(I think there must be a word or two to make clear which case was to be
used.)
Do ant umrats recall similar bits of memory proppage?
My wife pointed out to me that she had last written Latin with intent
more than 60 years ago. For myself I did two years of the stuff at
school and scuttled off into the safety of science subjects as soon as I
was allowed to.
Mike Ruddock
< hand up and waving>”Please, sir, me, sir!””
I learned that same mnemonic but the last line I learned as: “ Ablative
with these we spy.”
I did Latin, but didn't learn this mnemonic. However, I do remember
that a / ab, ex /e take the ablative.

Ma learned all kinds of Latin mnemonics, but I'm not going to ring her
now and ask!
--
Fenny
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