Discussion:
Could the unlikely re-wilding be on the money?
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Vicky Ayech
2019-12-31 18:12:47 UTC
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https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmland-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb

Is Justin spotting a trend?
Vicky Ayech
2019-12-31 18:17:46 UTC
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On Tue, 31 Dec 2019 18:12:47 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmland-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb
Is Justin spotting a trend?
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-50958960#
Mike
2019-12-31 18:37:10 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmland-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb
Is Justin spotting a trend?
I noticed that Lidl are including plant based burgers and mince in their
product range shown in next weeks catalogue; we will be trying them out...
--
Toodle Pip
Peter Percival
2019-12-31 18:58:20 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmland-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb
Is Justin spotting a trend?
I noticed that Lidl are including plant based burgers and mince in their
The Burghers of Calais may be found in Victoria Tower Gardens. Being
static they cannot be said to mince.
Post by Mike
product range shown in next weeks catalogue; we will be trying them out...
Chris McMillan
2020-01-01 09:37:48 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmland-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb
Is Justin spotting a trend?
What I want to know is if we need to reduce plastic and our carbon
footprint, surely we need to wear and use less synthetic materials as well?
If we reduce our livestock where will we get our wool and leather from?
Cotton will have to still be imported of course so something needs to be
done to keep this import as cheap as possible.

Still a bit woolly thinking??

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2020-01-01 10:02:18 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmland-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb
Is Justin spotting a trend?
What I want to know is if we need to reduce plastic and our carbon
footprint, surely we need to wear and use less synthetic materials as well?
If we reduce our livestock where will we get our wool and leather from?
Cotton will have to still be imported of course so something needs to be
done to keep this import as cheap as possible.
Still a bit woolly thinking??
Sincerely Chris
The gummint will fabric ate some excuse.
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-01 10:50:58 UTC
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On Wed, 01 Jan 2020 09:37:48 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmland-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb
Is Justin spotting a trend?
What I want to know is if we need to reduce plastic and our carbon
footprint, surely we need to wear and use less synthetic materials as well?
If we reduce our livestock where will we get our wool and leather from?
Cotton will have to still be imported of course so something needs to be
done to keep this import as cheap as possible.
Still a bit woolly thinking??
Sincerely Chris
Hemp?
Mike
2020-01-01 10:53:16 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 01 Jan 2020 09:37:48 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmland-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb
Is Justin spotting a trend?
What I want to know is if we need to reduce plastic and our carbon
footprint, surely we need to wear and use less synthetic materials as well?
If we reduce our livestock where will we get our wool and leather from?
Cotton will have to still be imported of course so something needs to be
done to keep this import as cheap as possible.
Still a bit woolly thinking??
Sincerely Chris
Hemp?
Are you just clearing your throat?
--
Toodle Pip
SODAM
2020-01-01 12:44:52 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 01 Jan 2020 09:37:48 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Still a bit woolly thinking??
Hemp?
You called, modom?
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Chris McMillan
2020-01-02 12:31:47 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 01 Jan 2020 09:37:48 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmland-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb
Is Justin spotting a trend?
What I want to know is if we need to reduce plastic and our carbon
footprint, surely we need to wear and use less synthetic materials as well?
If we reduce our livestock where will we get our wool and leather from?
Cotton will have to still be imported of course so something needs to be
done to keep this import as cheap as possible.
Still a bit woolly thinking??
Sincerely Chris
Hemp?
Is that a warm material or more like a cotton?

Sincerely Chris
Serena Blanchflower
2020-01-02 12:42:32 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Hemp?
Is that a warm material or more like a cotton?
Very similar to linen.
--
Best wishes, Serena
What happens if you get scared half to death - - twice?
Chris McMillan
2020-01-02 19:19:00 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Chris McMillan
Hemp?
Is that a warm material or more like a cotton?
Very similar to linen.
Hmm. Not that warm. Smart though.

Sincerely Chris
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-02 18:09:06 UTC
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On Thu, 02 Jan 2020 12:31:47 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 01 Jan 2020 09:37:48 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmland-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb
Is Justin spotting a trend?
What I want to know is if we need to reduce plastic and our carbon
footprint, surely we need to wear and use less synthetic materials as well?
If we reduce our livestock where will we get our wool and leather from?
Cotton will have to still be imported of course so something needs to be
done to keep this import as cheap as possible.
Still a bit woolly thinking??
Sincerely Chris
Hemp?
Is that a warm material or more like a cotton?
Sincerely Chris
often used to refer only to Cannabis strains cultivated for industrial
(non-drug) use. Industrial hemp has many uses, including paper,
textiles, biodegradable plastics, construction, health food, and fuel.
It is one of the fastest growing biomasses knownand one of the
earliest domesticated plants known.

use of industrial hemp has evolved into an even greater variety of
products, including health foods, organic body care, clothing,
construction materials, biofuels, plastic composites and more
(according to one source, more than 25,000 products can be made from
hemp)

Only 1 acre of hemp is said to produce more oxygen than 25 acres of
current forest. Wood pellets are very common, however hemp pellets for
stoves and boilers are a much better solution.

Hemp fiber is one of the strongest and most durable of all natural
textile fibers. ... Due to the porous nature of the fiber, hemp is
more water absorbent, and will dye and retain its color better than
any fabric including cotton. This porous nature allows hemp to
"breathe," so that it is cool in warm weather.

Hemp fabric is deliciously soft on the skin, and is known for growing
softer with each wear. It's also naturally resistant to bacteria and
provides natural UV protection. That means it protects your skin, and
retains color better than other fabrics.
Penny
2020-01-02 19:38:52 UTC
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On Thu, 02 Jan 2020 18:09:06 +0000, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 02 Jan 2020 12:31:47 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 01 Jan 2020 09:37:48 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmland-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb
Is Justin spotting a trend?
What I want to know is if we need to reduce plastic and our carbon
footprint, surely we need to wear and use less synthetic materials as well?
If we reduce our livestock where will we get our wool and leather from?
Cotton will have to still be imported of course so something needs to be
done to keep this import as cheap as possible.
Still a bit woolly thinking??
Sincerely Chris
Hemp?
Is that a warm material or more like a cotton?
Sincerely Chris
often used to refer only to Cannabis strains cultivated for industrial
(non-drug) use. Industrial hemp has many uses, including paper,
textiles, biodegradable plastics, construction, health food, and fuel.
It is one of the fastest growing biomasses knownand one of the
earliest domesticated plants known.
use of industrial hemp has evolved into an even greater variety of
products, including health foods, organic body care, clothing,
construction materials, biofuels, plastic composites and more
(according to one source, more than 25,000 products can be made from
hemp)
Only 1 acre of hemp is said to produce more oxygen than 25 acres of
current forest. Wood pellets are very common, however hemp pellets for
stoves and boilers are a much better solution.
Hemp fiber is one of the strongest and most durable of all natural
textile fibers. ... Due to the porous nature of the fiber, hemp is
more water absorbent, and will dye and retain its color better than
any fabric including cotton. This porous nature allows hemp to
"breathe," so that it is cool in warm weather.
Hemp fabric is deliciously soft on the skin, and is known for growing
softer with each wear. It's also naturally resistant to bacteria and
provides natural UV protection. That means it protects your skin, and
retains color better than other fabrics.
Interesting.
I'd only come across bamboo clothing because youngest granddaughter shows
signs of being allergic to much of the world and now sleeps in bamboo
sheets and bamboo pyjamas in a room with filtered air (although she spent
last weekend in an hotel - not sure if she and her mother got much sleep).

I imagine the antibacterial properties (and maybe some of the others) may
also exist in bamboo.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-01-04 00:37:19 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 02 Jan 2020 12:31:47 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 01 Jan 2020 09:37:48 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmlan
d-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb
Is Justin spotting a trend?
What I want to know is if we need to reduce plastic and our carbon
footprint, surely we need to wear and use less synthetic materials as well?
If we reduce our livestock where will we get our wool and leather from?
Cotton will have to still be imported of course so something needs to be
done to keep this import as cheap as possible.
Still a bit woolly thinking??
Sincerely Chris
Hemp?
Is that a warm material or more like a cotton?
Sincerely Chris
often used to refer only to Cannabis strains cultivated for industrial
(non-drug) use. Industrial hemp has many uses, including paper,
textiles, biodegradable plastics, construction, health food, and fuel.
It is one of the fastest growing biomasses knownand one of the
earliest domesticated plants known.
use of industrial hemp has evolved into an even greater variety of
products, including health foods, organic body care, clothing,
construction materials, biofuels, plastic composites and more
(according to one source, more than 25,000 products can be made from
hemp)
Only 1 acre of hemp is said to produce more oxygen than 25 acres of
current forest. Wood pellets are very common, however hemp pellets for
stoves and boilers are a much better solution.
Hemp fiber is one of the strongest and most durable of all natural
textile fibers. ... Due to the porous nature of the fiber, hemp is
more water absorbent, and will dye and retain its color better than
any fabric including cotton. This porous nature allows hemp to
"breathe," so that it is cool in warm weather.
Hemp fabric is deliciously soft on the skin, and is known for growing
softer with each wear. It's also naturally resistant to bacteria and
provides natural UV protection. That means it protects your skin, and
retains color better than other fabrics.
Interesting.
Indeed. So what are the _dis_advantages that stop it being more widely
grown - in UK in particular?
[]
Post by Penny
I imagine the antibacterial properties (and maybe some of the others) may
also exist in bamboo.
Presumably the a/b property/ies dissipate? (E. g. after multiple
washings?)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The first banjo solo I played was actually just a series of mistakes. In fact
it was all the mistakes I knew at the time. - Tim Dowling, RT2015/6/20-26
Penny
2020-01-04 09:50:41 UTC
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On Sat, 4 Jan 2020 00:37:19 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Hemp fiber is one of the strongest and most durable of all natural
textile fibers. ... Due to the porous nature of the fiber, hemp is
more water absorbent, and will dye and retain its color better than
any fabric including cotton. This porous nature allows hemp to
"breathe," so that it is cool in warm weather.
Hemp fabric is deliciously soft on the skin, and is known for growing
softer with each wear. It's also naturally resistant to bacteria and
provides natural UV protection. That means it protects your skin, and
retains color better than other fabrics.
Interesting.
Indeed. So what are the _dis_advantages that stop it being more widely
grown - in UK in particular?
It is grown quite widely in the UK but not in great quantity - tends to get
people excited when seen in a field because it looks very like other
members of the Cannabis family. You need a licence from the Home Office to
grow it these days which costs £580 for the first year - cheaper when
renewed. There are also restrictions on where you can grow it, because the
'controlled substance' label covers all cannabis plants, so you are less
likely to spot it growing in roadside fields or those with public rights of
way going through them.

The grain produces oil, used medicinally as well as meal for feeding
livestock (or people). The fibrous leaves and stems are used for paper and
cloth as well as rope, particularly rope which will be handled, in theatres
and schools.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Penny
2020-01-01 13:23:36 UTC
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On Wed, 01 Jan 2020 09:37:48 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmland-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb
Is Justin spotting a trend?
What I want to know is if we need to reduce plastic and our carbon
footprint, surely we need to wear and use less synthetic materials as well?
If we reduce our livestock where will we get our wool and leather from?
Cotton will have to still be imported of course so something needs to be
done to keep this import as cheap as possible.
Still a bit woolly thinking??
Bamboo, linen and flax grow here - not sure the bamboo is suitable for
clothing, I don't know if a special breed is used.

I want to know who would mow Wales if we lost all the sheep.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2020-01-01 16:25:54 UTC
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Post by Penny
Bamboo, linen and flax grow here - not sure the bamboo is suitable for
clothing, I don't know if a special breed is used.
Bamboo knitting yarn is widely available.
Post by Penny
I want to know who would mow Wales if we lost all the sheep.
This is one of my big objections to vegetarianism/veganism: if people
believe they are "best" they must want everyone to espouse them. If
everyone did, what do they think would happen to all the cows, sheep,
goats, deer, fish etc which are currently cultivated for food (for
humans and for each other) and what would happen to all the land which
currently sustains such livestock?
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Nick Odell
2020-01-01 17:12:46 UTC
Reply
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On Wed, 1 Jan 2020 16:25:54 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
Bamboo, linen and flax grow here - not sure the bamboo is suitable for
clothing, I don't know if a special breed is used.
Bamboo knitting yarn is widely available.
Post by Penny
I want to know who would mow Wales if we lost all the sheep.
This is one of my big objections to vegetarianism/veganism: if people
believe they are "best" they must want everyone to espouse them. If
everyone did, what do they think would happen to all the cows, sheep,
goats, deer, fish etc which are currently cultivated for food (for
humans and for each other) and what would happen to all the land which
currently sustains such livestock?
Not too long ago there was an edition of Costing The Earth (I think)
which seemed to suggest that the ancient system of crop rotation
involving three different productive years followed by a year fallow
with the land in that fourth year being fertilised by the manure of
the animals grazing on it was the least environmentally unfriendly way
of producing food.

Nick
krw
2020-01-01 23:25:48 UTC
Reply
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Post by Nick Odell
On Wed, 1 Jan 2020 16:25:54 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
Bamboo, linen and flax grow here - not sure the bamboo is suitable for
clothing, I don't know if a special breed is used.
Bamboo knitting yarn is widely available.
Post by Penny
I want to know who would mow Wales if we lost all the sheep.
This is one of my big objections to vegetarianism/veganism: if people
believe they are "best" they must want everyone to espouse them. If
everyone did, what do they think would happen to all the cows, sheep,
goats, deer, fish etc which are currently cultivated for food (for
humans and for each other) and what would happen to all the land which
currently sustains such livestock?
Not too long ago there was an edition of Costing The Earth (I think)
which seemed to suggest that the ancient system of crop rotation
involving three different productive years followed by a year fallow
with the land in that fourth year being fertilised by the manure of
the animals grazing on it was the least environmentally unfriendly way
of producing food.
Nick
Can you confirm that means it is a good way to go?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Mike
2020-01-02 08:24:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
Post by Nick Odell
Not too long ago there was an edition of Costing The Earth (I think)
which seemed to suggest that the ancient system of crop rotation
involving three different productive years followed by a year fallow
with the land in that fourth year being fertilised by the manure of
the animals grazing on it was the least environmentally unfriendly way
of producing food.
Nick
Can you confirm that means it is a good way to go?
I read that and wondered who had been discussing ways to die and how had I
missed it.
Burying our dead in the fields would probably be a good way to fertilise
them - cats buried in the lawn always made the grass grow
greener/longer/faster.
But isn’t the tabby themed grass a little distracting?
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2020-01-02 12:31:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Wed, 1 Jan 2020 16:25:54 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
Bamboo, linen and flax grow here - not sure the bamboo is suitable for
clothing, I don't know if a special breed is used.
Bamboo knitting yarn is widely available.
Post by Penny
I want to know who would mow Wales if we lost all the sheep.
This is one of my big objections to vegetarianism/veganism: if people
believe they are "best" they must want everyone to espouse them. If
everyone did, what do they think would happen to all the cows, sheep,
goats, deer, fish etc which are currently cultivated for food (for
humans and for each other) and what would happen to all the land which
currently sustains such livestock?
Not too long ago there was an edition of Costing The Earth (I think)
which seemed to suggest that the ancient system of crop rotation
involving three different productive years followed by a year fallow
with the land in that fourth year being fertilised by the manure of
the animals grazing on it was the least environmentally unfriendly way
of producing food.
Nick
Never heard of bamboo wool. Have lost my confidence with knitting.

Sincerely Chris
Clive Arthur
2020-01-02 14:59:20 UTC
Reply
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On 01/01/2020 16:25, Jenny M Benson wrote:

<snip>
This is one of my big objections to vegetarianism/veganism:  if people
believe they are "best" they must want everyone to espouse them.  If
everyone did, what do they think would happen to all the cows, sheep,
goats, deer, fish etc which are currently cultivated for food (for
humans and for each other) and what would happen to all the land which
currently sustains such livestock?
Assuming it didn't happen overnight, the cows etc need not be bred, some
of the land should be used to grow crops and some returned to forest.

But that won't happen because humans care about today more than next
year, about the next decade even less, and next century can go to Helena
Handbasket.

Cheers
--
Clive
krw
2020-01-02 15:08:02 UTC
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and next century can go to Helena Handbasket.
Is that an island close to St Helena?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Mike
2020-01-02 15:14:15 UTC
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Post by krw
and next century can go to Helena Handbasket.
Is that an island close to St Helena?
Weave been here before haven’t we?
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-01 18:02:42 UTC
Reply
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 01 Jan 2020 09:37:48 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmland-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb
Is Justin spotting a trend?
What I want to know is if we need to reduce plastic and our carbon
footprint, surely we need to wear and use less synthetic materials as well?
If we reduce our livestock where will we get our wool and leather from?
Cotton will have to still be imported of course so something needs to be
done to keep this import as cheap as possible.
Still a bit woolly thinking??
Bamboo, linen and flax grow here - not sure the bamboo is suitable for
clothing, I don't know if a special breed is used.
I want to know who would mow Wales if we lost all the sheep.
https://bambooclothing.co.uk/
Penny
2020-01-01 20:31:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 01 Jan 2020 18:02:42 +0000, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 01 Jan 2020 09:37:48 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmland-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb
Is Justin spotting a trend?
What I want to know is if we need to reduce plastic and our carbon
footprint, surely we need to wear and use less synthetic materials as well?
If we reduce our livestock where will we get our wool and leather from?
Cotton will have to still be imported of course so something needs to be
done to keep this import as cheap as possible.
Still a bit woolly thinking??
Bamboo, linen and flax grow here - not sure the bamboo is suitable for
clothing, I don't know if a special breed is used.
I want to know who would mow Wales if we lost all the sheep.
https://bambooclothing.co.uk/
Grown and processed in China, as I suspected. The forests may be
sustainable, the processing environmentally friendly but it's still the
other side of the world. Then it moves on to India or Turkey for the
knitting or weaving and actual clothes production.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2020-01-02 12:31:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 01 Jan 2020 09:37:48 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/dec/31/convert-farmland-to-nature-climate-crisis?CMP=share_btn_fb
Is Justin spotting a trend?
What I want to know is if we need to reduce plastic and our carbon
footprint, surely we need to wear and use less synthetic materials as well?
If we reduce our livestock where will we get our wool and leather from?
Cotton will have to still be imported of course so something needs to be
done to keep this import as cheap as possible.
Still a bit woolly thinking??
Bamboo, linen and flax grow here - not sure the bamboo is suitable for
clothing, I don't know if a special breed is used.
I want to know who would mow Wales if we lost all the sheep.
The only bamboo I know in the UK is the garden sort: a menace. I only know
the Asian types which are used for everything from furniture to panda food
to a recyclable material used for heatproof recycled long lasting mugs.

Flax I know nothing of. Would linen be capable of replacing a wool?

Sincerely Chris

Sincerely Chris
Chris J Dixon
2020-01-05 07:43:32 UTC
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Post by Penny
Bamboo, linen and flax grow here - not sure the bamboo is suitable for
clothing, I don't know if a special breed is used.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bamboo_textile>

"Modern clothing labeled as being made from bamboo is usually
viscose rayon, a fiber made by dissolving the cellulose in the
bamboo, and then extruding it to form fibres. This process
destroys the natural characteristics of bamboo fibre.
Furthermore, rayon from all cellulose sources is identical."

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Penny
2020-01-05 09:09:01 UTC
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On Sun, 05 Jan 2020 07:43:32 +0000, Chris J Dixon <***@cdixon.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
Bamboo, linen and flax grow here - not sure the bamboo is suitable for
clothing, I don't know if a special breed is used.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bamboo_textile>
"Modern clothing labeled as being made from bamboo is usually
viscose rayon, a fiber made by dissolving the cellulose in the
bamboo, and then extruding it to form fibres. This process
destroys the natural characteristics of bamboo fibre.
Furthermore, rayon from all cellulose sources is identical."
Even more interesting - I remember Rayon. I was the little girl who ate her
new dress...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-05 09:45:36 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
Bamboo, linen and flax grow here - not sure the bamboo is suitable for
clothing, I don't know if a special breed is used.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bamboo_textile>
"Modern clothing labeled as being made from bamboo is usually
viscose rayon, a fiber made by dissolving the cellulose in the
bamboo, and then extruding it to form fibres. This process
destroys the natural characteristics of bamboo fibre.
Furthermore, rayon from all cellulose sources is identical."
Even more interesting - I remember Rayon. I was the little girl who ate her
new dress...
I don't remember rayon as feeling comfortable, not a natural feel like
cotton. Although I find some wool not comfortable too. Whereas the Bam
hoodie and skirt I have are very comfortable and don't irritate.
Kate B
2020-01-05 11:29:22 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
Bamboo, linen and flax grow here - not sure the bamboo is suitable for
clothing, I don't know if a special breed is used.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bamboo_textile>
"Modern clothing labeled as being made from bamboo is usually
viscose rayon, a fiber made by dissolving the cellulose in the
bamboo, and then extruding it to form fibres. This process
destroys the natural characteristics of bamboo fibre.
Furthermore, rayon from all cellulose sources is identical."
Even more interesting - I remember Rayon. I was the little girl who ate her
new dress...
I don't remember rayon as feeling comfortable, not a natural feel like
cotton. Although I find some wool not comfortable too. Whereas the Bam
hoodie and skirt I have are very comfortable and don't irritate.
Viscose can make lovely textures - like silk or brushed cotton or even
cashmere - that don't feel artificial. Rayon has come a long way from
the scratchy stuff you used to get in cheap blouses and petticoats.

I don't think I've worn a petticoat in about three decades. Or a blouse,
for that matter...
--
Kate B
London
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-05 11:49:21 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by Vicky Ayech
I don't remember rayon as feeling comfortable, not a natural feel like
cotton. Although I find some wool not comfortable too. Whereas the Bam
hoodie and skirt I have are very comfortable and don't irritate.
Viscose can make lovely textures - like silk or brushed cotton or even
cashmere - that don't feel artificial. Rayon has come a long way from
the scratchy stuff you used to get in cheap blouses and petticoats.
I don't think I've worn a petticoat in about three decades. Or a blouse,
for that matter...
I still wear a full-lenth slip if I wear a skirt or dress in cooler
weather, sort of instead of a vest. I only wear those if going to
grandchildren or sometimes medical appointments. Most days with
trousers you can't.
Penny
2020-01-05 17:24:55 UTC
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On Sun, 05 Jan 2020 11:49:21 +0000, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
I still wear a full-lenth slip if I wear a skirt or dress in cooler
weather, sort of instead of a vest. I only wear those if going to
grandchildren or sometimes medical appointments. Most days with
trousers you can't.
Baffled by that last bit - I wear jeans 99% of the time, and always with a
vest in cooler weather.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2020-01-05 17:49:38 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
I still wear a full-lenth slip if I wear a skirt or dress in cooler
weather, sort of instead of a vest. I only wear those if going to
grandchildren or sometimes medical appointments. Most days with
trousers you can't.
Baffled by that last bit - I wear jeans 99% of the time, and always with a
vest in cooler weather.
but not trousers and slip
Penny
2020-01-05 18:15:58 UTC
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On Sun, 05 Jan 2020 17:49:38 +0000, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
I still wear a full-lenth slip if I wear a skirt or dress in cooler
weather, sort of instead of a vest. I only wear those if going to
grandchildren or sometimes medical appointments. Most days with
trousers you can't.
Baffled by that last bit - I wear jeans 99% of the time, and always with a
vest in cooler weather.
but not trousers and slip
Well, of course, that would be silly ;)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Penny
2020-01-05 17:32:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 5 Jan 2020 11:29:22 +0000, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
Bamboo, linen and flax grow here - not sure the bamboo is suitable for
clothing, I don't know if a special breed is used.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bamboo_textile>
"Modern clothing labeled as being made from bamboo is usually
viscose rayon, a fiber made by dissolving the cellulose in the
bamboo, and then extruding it to form fibres. This process
destroys the natural characteristics of bamboo fibre.
Furthermore, rayon from all cellulose sources is identical."
Even more interesting - I remember Rayon. I was the little girl who ate her
new dress...
I don't remember rayon as feeling comfortable, not a natural feel like
cotton. Although I find some wool not comfortable too. Whereas the Bam
hoodie and skirt I have are very comfortable and don't irritate.
Viscose can make lovely textures - like silk or brushed cotton or even
cashmere - that don't feel artificial. Rayon has come a long way from
the scratchy stuff you used to get in cheap blouses and petticoats.
Hmm, I remember the dress I ate as being a soft weave in some newish
fabric, maybe it wasn't viscose/rayon. This would have been mid '50s, I was
very young. After sucking part of the dress for a while it just sort of
dissolved or at least became easy to chew bits off.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
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