Discussion:
You picked a fine time to leave us :(
Add Reply
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-21 07:16:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I guess he knew when to fold 'em.

I saw him live in Wembly some years ago and have been a fan of his
music and C&W so enjoyed it very much. One of my favourite songs is
Bobby McGee and I think his was the second of the many versions I've
heard and one of the good ones.
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-22 09:45:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 07:16:06 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
I guess he knew when to fold 'em.
I saw him live in Wembly some years ago and have been a fan of his
music and C&W so enjoyed it very much. One of my favourite songs is
Bobby McGee and I think his was the second of the many versions I've
heard and one of the good ones.
Come on umrats! Does nobody else care?
Mike
2020-03-22 10:37:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 07:16:06 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
I guess he knew when to fold 'em.
I saw him live in Wembly some years ago and have been a fan of his
music and C&W so enjoyed it very much. One of my favourite songs is
Bobby McGee and I think his was the second of the many versions I've
heard and one of the good ones.
Come on umrats! Does nobody else care?
My late mum used to play ‘Ruby, don’t take your love to town’ on repeat
(and loudly!)
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-03-23 02:47:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 07:16:06 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
I guess he knew when to fold 'em.
[]
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
Come on umrats! Does nobody else care?
I like "Coward of the county", as well as several others.
Post by Mike
My late mum used to play ‘Ruby, don’t take your love to town’ on repeat
(and loudly!)
I first became aware of that as "Ruby, garde ton coeur ici" [garde has
two syllables - the e like that in regrette in Piaf's song], by of all
people, Nana Mouskouri! Who collected a wide variety of music of all
genres, and sang many of them in assorted languages. But I was surprised
when I heard KR sing it in English!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Bother," said the Borg, "we assimilated a Pooh."
Chris McMillan
2020-03-23 16:20:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 07:16:06 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
I guess he knew when to fold 'em.
I saw him live in Wembly some years ago and have been a fan of his
music and C&W so enjoyed it very much. One of my favourite songs is
Bobby McGee and I think his was the second of the many versions I've
heard and one of the good ones.
Come on umrats! Does nobody else care?
My late mum used to play ‘Ruby, don’t take your love to town’ on repeat
(and loudly!)
Your mum had some of the widest music tastes of anyone I’ve met, McT, but
I’d have got on much better with your dad’s music tastes!

Sincerely Chris
Clive Arthur
2020-03-22 10:38:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 07:16:06 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
I guess he knew when to fold 'em.
I saw him live in Wembly some years ago and have been a fan of his
music and C&W so enjoyed it very much. One of my favourite songs is
Bobby McGee and I think his was the second of the many versions I've
heard and one of the good ones.
Come on umrats! Does nobody else care?

--
Cheers
Clive
Sid Nuncius
2020-03-22 19:47:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 07:16:06 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
I guess he knew when to fold 'em.
I saw him live in Wembly some years ago and have been a fan of his
music and C&W so enjoyed it very much. One of my favourite songs is
Bobby McGee and I think his was the second of the many versions I've
heard and one of the good ones.
Come on umrats! Does nobody else care?
Yes, I do. The trouble is, I'm so concerned about how I'm going to feed
the two of us and spending so much time trying to organise it that poor
old Kenny isn't getting the attention he would otherwise deserve.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-22 22:19:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 22 Mar 2020 19:47:15 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 07:16:06 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
I guess he knew when to fold 'em.
I saw him live in Wembly some years ago and have been a fan of his
music and C&W so enjoyed it very much. One of my favourite songs is
Bobby McGee and I think his was the second of the many versions I've
heard and one of the good ones.
Come on umrats! Does nobody else care?
Yes, I do. The trouble is, I'm so concerned about how I'm going to feed
the two of us and spending so much time trying to organise it that poor
old Kenny isn't getting the attention he would otherwise deserve.
Oh dear. I hope your energy levels improve. I do know how that feels
as we often can't do more than put ready meals in the oven or
microwave.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-03-23 02:41:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sun, 22 Mar 2020 19:47:15 +0000, Sid Nuncius
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Sid Nuncius
Yes, I do. The trouble is, I'm so concerned about how I'm going to feed
the two of us and spending so much time trying to organise it that poor
old Kenny isn't getting the attention he would otherwise deserve.
I'm sorry to hear that. I hope things improve.
Post by Vicky Ayech
Oh dear. I hope your energy levels improve. I do know how that feels
as we often can't do more than put ready meals in the oven or
microwave.
I have recently developed a liking for "slices" - little pastry pillows,
that come in cheese and onion, steak, and chicken and mushroom - bit
like pies I suppose perhaps. (Lidl and Morrisons sell them - probably
all the stores do.) Very simple. I'd been thinking of asking EU anyway:
they say "not suitable for microwave cooking", but they've obviously
been cooked anyway (the pastry is browned, not uncooked pastry), so I
just warm them up - but some (I think the Morrisons ones) said "not
suitable for microwave heating", so I wondered why. (I will admit I
_have_ been doing, and haven't experienced any ill effects so far.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Bother," said the Borg, "we assimilated a Pooh."
Serena Blanchflower
2020-03-23 09:06:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I have recently developed a liking for "slices" - little pastry pillows,
that come in cheese and onion, steak, and chicken and mushroom - bit
like pies I suppose perhaps. (Lidl and Morrisons sell them - probably
they say "not suitable for microwave cooking", but they've obviously
been cooked anyway (the pastry is browned, not uncooked pastry), so I
just warm them up - but some (I think the Morrisons ones) said "not
suitable for microwave heating", so I wondered why. (I will admit I
_have_ been doing, and haven't experienced any ill effects so far.)
Assuming they don't come packed in metal trays, which definitely
shouldn't be put in the microwave, I would assume it's just that they
won't be quite so nice if they're cooked that way. If they're reheated
in the oven, the pastry will stay crisp and flaky, while if microwaved,
it's likely to go soggy. It won't do you any harm though, if you don't
mind soggy pastry.
--
Best wishes, Serena
You Must Learn from the Mistakes of Others. You Will Never Live Long
Enough to Make Them All Yourself (Various)
Sam Plusnet
2020-03-23 22:38:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I have recently developed a liking for "slices" - little pastry
pillows, that come in cheese and onion, steak, and chicken and
mushroom - bit like pies I suppose perhaps. (Lidl and Morrisons sell
them - probably all the stores do.) Very simple. I'd been thinking of
asking EU anyway: they say "not suitable for microwave cooking", but
they've obviously been cooked anyway (the pastry is browned, not
uncooked pastry), so I just warm them up - but some (I think the
Morrisons ones) said "not suitable for microwave heating", so I
wondered why. (I will admit I _have_ been doing, and haven't
experienced any ill effects so far.)
Assuming they don't come packed in metal trays, which definitely
shouldn't be put in the microwave, I would assume it's just that they
won't be quite so nice if they're cooked that way.  If they're reheated
in the oven, the pastry will stay crisp and flaky, while if microwaved,
it's likely to go soggy.  It won't do you any harm though, if you don't
mind soggy pastry.
I think there are two types of people.
One group are particular about pastry, and want the texture and taste to
be just right,
The second group think of pastry as edible packaging.
--
Sam Plusnet
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-24 09:24:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
I think there are two types of people.
One group are particular about pastry, and want the texture and taste to
be just right,
The second group think of pastry as edible packaging.
Oh I love pastry. It is the best part of the item and the right ratio
of it to filling is important. A generous amount of pasty is ideal. B
has a Ginster sausage roll for breakfast daily. He prefers Greggs but
there is none near by. Wall's is no longer acceptable. He puts it in
the oven and then turns the oven on and takes it out after it has
warmed through and it smells wonderful. Pastry is not WW compliant
really. And I am not that keen on sausage rolls, especially for
breakfast, when porridge is best. What I want to find is a nice pie
with pastry the same as his sausage rolls. Pie pastry is differnt. And
the filling to be not meat I think. Potato and..cheese? cabbage?
Not for breakfast but for supper. Pies I have tried have fallen
short.
BrritSki
2020-03-24 09:29:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
<snip sausage roll discussion, but observing that Greggs ARE the best, but rarely hot enough in the shop>
... What I want to find is a nice pie
with pastry the same as his sausage rolls. Pie pastry is differnt. And
the filling to be not meat I think. Potato and..cheese? cabbage?
Not for breakfast but for supper. Pies I have tried have fallen
short.
I usually make my own with bought ready-roll pastry [1], but Pukka Pies
are usually pretty good. Only meat fillings I think though...

[1] Thinks: must finish off Christmas with that frozen turkey and ham in
a pie :)
Penny
2020-03-24 11:13:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 09:29:07 +0000, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
I usually make my own with bought ready-roll pastry [1], but Pukka Pies
are usually pretty good. Only meat fillings I think though...
Are they those shallow little pies in an aluminium foil 'tin', often
microwaved (still in tin) in chip shops?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
BrritSki
2020-03-24 11:30:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
I usually make my own with bought ready-roll pastry [1], but Pukka Pies
are usually pretty good. Only meat fillings I think though...
Are they those shallow little pies in an aluminium foil 'tin', often
microwaved (still in tin) in chip shops?
Indeed. But our local has them kept warm in a cabinet. Ambrosia :)
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-24 11:37:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
I usually make my own with bought ready-roll pastry [1], but Pukka Pies
are usually pretty good. Only meat fillings I think though...
Are they those shallow little pies in an aluminium foil 'tin', often
microwaved (still in tin) in chip shops?
They are in tin and in chip shops but can't be microwaved. Have to be
baked in the oven. I suppose if you get it from the chip shop, at
atleast twice the price, it is cooked so you'd microwave it to heat
again.
If one gets a takeaway now, say Indian, or whatever, how big is the
danger from the Corona virus?
Penny
2020-03-24 12:26:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 11:37:03 +0000, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
I usually make my own with bought ready-roll pastry [1], but Pukka Pies
are usually pretty good. Only meat fillings I think though...
Are they those shallow little pies in an aluminium foil 'tin', often
microwaved (still in tin) in chip shops?
They are in tin and in chip shops but can't be microwaved.
I've seen it done - not recently. I think I asked about it and was told the
tin was so shallow it was ok.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2020-03-24 19:51:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
I usually make my own with bought ready-roll pastry [1], but Pukka Pies
are usually pretty good. Only meat fillings I think though...
Are they those shallow little pies in an aluminium foil 'tin', often
microwaved (still in tin) in chip shops?
They are in tin and in chip shops but can't be microwaved.
I've seen it done - not recently. I think I asked about it and was told the
tin was so shallow it was ok.
I sometimes put the butter in the stainless steel dish into the
microwave for a burst of a few seconds to soften it up a bit. Given
that most microwave ovens - at least of my generation - have rotating
metal paddles somewhere to bounce the waves around, I don´t think the
mere presence of metal is the problem. It is the shape and the
proximity to other bits of metal that matters.

Nick
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-24 18:40:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 16:51:20 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
I usually make my own with bought ready-roll pastry [1], but Pukka Pies
are usually pretty good. Only meat fillings I think though...
Are they those shallow little pies in an aluminium foil 'tin', often
microwaved (still in tin) in chip shops?
They are in tin and in chip shops but can't be microwaved.
I've seen it done - not recently. I think I asked about it and was told the
tin was so shallow it was ok.
I sometimes put the butter in the stainless steel dish into the
microwave for a burst of a few seconds to soften it up a bit. Given
that most microwave ovens - at least of my generation - have rotating
metal paddles somewhere to bounce the waves around, I don´t think the
mere presence of metal is the problem. It is the shape and the
proximity to other bits of metal that matters.
Nick
I didn't mean it is not safe becaus of the foil case but that is
doesn't cook properly in the microwave. It needs to be baked.
Joe Kerr
2020-03-24 23:16:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
I usually make my own with bought ready-roll pastry [1], but Pukka Pies
are usually pretty good. Only meat fillings I think though...
Are they those shallow little pies in an aluminium foil 'tin', often
microwaved (still in tin) in chip shops?
They are in tin and in chip shops but can't be microwaved.
I've seen it done - not recently. I think I asked about it and was told the
tin was so shallow it was ok.
I sometimes put the butter in the stainless steel dish into the
microwave for a burst of a few seconds to soften it up a bit. Given
that most microwave ovens - at least of my generation - have rotating
metal paddles somewhere to bounce the waves around, I don´t think the
mere presence of metal is the problem. It is the shape and the
proximity to other bits of metal that matters.
Nick
I was always a little confused by "Never put anything metal in a
microwave" and "If something small (like a fish tail) is cooking too
fast, cover it foil" so I have always played safe. A long time ago I put
something in in a silvery plastic sachet in the microwave. Hindsight
says the silvery quality probably came from a metal content. There was a
mini November 5th with bangs and flashes all over the place and it
blasted a hole in the glass turntable. I've never done that again.
--
Ric
Nick Odell
2020-03-25 03:31:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
I usually make my own with bought ready-roll pastry [1], but Pukka Pies
are usually pretty good. Only meat fillings I think though...
Are they those shallow little pies in an aluminium foil 'tin', often
microwaved (still in tin) in chip shops?
They are in tin and in chip shops but can't be microwaved.
I've seen it done - not recently. I think I asked about it and was told the
tin was so shallow it was ok.
I sometimes put the butter in the stainless steel dish into the
microwave for a burst of a few seconds to soften it up a bit. Given
that most microwave ovens - at least of my generation - have rotating
metal paddles somewhere to bounce the waves around, I don´t think the
mere presence of metal is the problem. It is the shape and the
proximity to other bits of metal that matters.
Nick
I was always a little confused by "Never put anything metal in a
microwave" and "If something small (like a fish tail) is cooking too
fast, cover it foil" so I have always played safe. A long time ago I put
something in in a silvery plastic sachet in the microwave. Hindsight
says the silvery quality probably came from a metal content. There was a
mini November 5th with bangs and flashes all over the place and it
blasted a hole in the glass turntable. I've never done that again.
As a general rule of thumb, I find that a general lump or shape or
form of metal has no effect other than to bounce the microwaves around
a bit much as the paddles do. Anything that approximates a coil or a
loop or a ring of metal becomes energised in much the same way as a
coiled extension lead connected to a three bar electric fire (Do NOT
try that at home!)

Apart from the odd CD-ROM put into the microwave oven for effect and
the discovery that the gold ring on the edge of a fine tea cup
conducts electrickery too, the only surprise was when I put a plastic
handled teaspoon in and it melted. There was a loop of metal embedded
in the plastic.

Nick
Chris J Dixon
2020-03-25 08:12:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
As a general rule of thumb, I find that a general lump or shape or
form of metal has no effect other than to bounce the microwaves around
a bit much as the paddles do. Anything that approximates a coil or a
loop or a ring of metal becomes energised in much the same way as a
coiled extension lead connected to a three bar electric fire (Do NOT
try that at home!)
Apart from the odd CD-ROM put into the microwave oven for effect and
the discovery that the gold ring on the edge of a fine tea cup
conducts electrickery too, the only surprise was when I put a plastic
handled teaspoon in and it melted. There was a loop of metal embedded
in the plastic.
I have a combination microwave oven, and it has the usual oven
open metal shelf. The only design feature of interest is that the
bars are unevenly spaced. No apparent attempt to prevent closed
loop effects.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Nick Odell
2020-03-25 14:42:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Nick Odell
As a general rule of thumb, I find that a general lump or shape or
form of metal has no effect other than to bounce the microwaves around
a bit much as the paddles do. Anything that approximates a coil or a
loop or a ring of metal becomes energised in much the same way as a
coiled extension lead connected to a three bar electric fire (Do NOT
try that at home!)
Apart from the odd CD-ROM put into the microwave oven for effect and
the discovery that the gold ring on the edge of a fine tea cup
conducts electrickery too, the only surprise was when I put a plastic
handled teaspoon in and it melted. There was a loop of metal embedded
in the plastic.
I have a combination microwave oven, and it has the usual oven
open metal shelf. The only design feature of interest is that the
bars are unevenly spaced. No apparent attempt to prevent closed
loop effects.
Nugger. That doesfer that theory then.

Nick
Mike
2020-03-25 13:58:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Nick Odell
As a general rule of thumb, I find that a general lump or shape or
form of metal has no effect other than to bounce the microwaves around
a bit much as the paddles do. Anything that approximates a coil or a
loop or a ring of metal becomes energised in much the same way as a
coiled extension lead connected to a three bar electric fire (Do NOT
try that at home!)
Apart from the odd CD-ROM put into the microwave oven for effect and
the discovery that the gold ring on the edge of a fine tea cup
conducts electrickery too, the only surprise was when I put a plastic
handled teaspoon in and it melted. There was a loop of metal embedded
in the plastic.
I have a combination microwave oven, and it has the usual oven
open metal shelf. The only design feature of interest is that the
bars are unevenly spaced. No apparent attempt to prevent closed
loop effects.
Nugger. That doesfer that theory then.
Nick
We have a Neff combination Microwave oven and there is no turntable but is
equipped with 2 removable metal shelves (evenly spaced bars) and a glass
tray. We use it as a microwave cooker with a metal shelf in place and it
works fine. The destructions even suggest putting a metal spoon in a cup
with the fluid whilst heating it. Can’t say I have actually ever tried this
though.
--
Toodle Pip
Jenny M Benson
2020-03-25 18:38:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
We have a Neff combination Microwave oven and there is no turntable but is
equipped with 2 removable metal shelves (evenly spaced bars) and a glass
tray. We use it as a microwave cooker with a metal shelf in place and it
works fine. The destructions even suggest putting a metal spoon in a cup
with the fluid whilst heating it. Can’t say I have actually ever tried this
though.
My combi has a metal turntable and 2 shelves like yours. I wondered if
the shelves were coated with something which is partially no longer
there because when I use one of them to combi-cook jacket potatoes there
are a couple of places where sparks fly and the potato skin gets burned.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-03-25 16:07:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 25 Mar 2020 at 11:42:33, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Nick Odell
As a general rule of thumb, I find that a general lump or shape or
form of metal has no effect other than to bounce the microwaves around
a bit much as the paddles do. Anything that approximates a coil or a
loop or a ring of metal becomes energised in much the same way as a
coiled extension lead connected to a three bar electric fire (Do NOT
try that at home!)
Apart from the odd CD-ROM put into the microwave oven for effect and
the discovery that the gold ring on the edge of a fine tea cup
conducts electrickery too, the only surprise was when I put a plastic
handled teaspoon in and it melted. There was a loop of metal embedded
in the plastic.
I have a combination microwave oven, and it has the usual oven
open metal shelf. The only design feature of interest is that the
bars are unevenly spaced. No apparent attempt to prevent closed
loop effects.
Nugger. That doesfer that theory then.
Nick
I think it induces high currents in anything conductive; if that's
something substantial, like a piece of cutlery or Chris's shelf, that
can carry the current without getting hot. If it's very thin, like gold
decoration on pottery/china, or thin metallic foil packaging (especially
if evaporated onto a flammable plastic, as many "foil"s are nowadays) -
or, indeed, something with high (but not infinite) resistance, like much
food itself or those metallized cards that come with some microwavable
foods such as pizza, it will get hot.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

You'll need to have this fish in your ear. (First series, fit the first.)
Penny
2020-03-25 15:02:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 25 Mar 2020 00:31:30 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Joe Kerr
I was always a little confused by "Never put anything metal in a
microwave" and "If something small (like a fish tail) is cooking too
fast, cover it foil" so I have always played safe. A long time ago I put
something in in a silvery plastic sachet in the microwave. Hindsight
says the silvery quality probably came from a metal content. There was a
mini November 5th with bangs and flashes all over the place and it
blasted a hole in the glass turntable. I've never done that again.
As a general rule of thumb, I find that a general lump or shape or
form of metal has no effect other than to bounce the microwaves around
a bit much as the paddles do. Anything that approximates a coil or a
loop or a ring of metal becomes energised in much the same way as a
coiled extension lead connected to a three bar electric fire (Do NOT
try that at home!)
Apart from the odd CD-ROM put into the microwave oven for effect and
the discovery that the gold ring on the edge of a fine tea cup
conducts electrickery too,
My mug with a gold rim only crackled the first time I put it in the
microwave, no fireworks since.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jim Easterbrook
2020-03-25 15:42:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
My mug with a gold rim only crackled the first time I put it in the
microwave, no fireworks since.
Yes, you can only burn away the gold once.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Penny
2020-03-25 23:11:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 25 Mar 2020 15:42:54 GMT, Jim Easterbrook <***@jim-easterbrook.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Penny
My mug with a gold rim only crackled the first time I put it in the
microwave, no fireworks since.
Yes, you can only burn away the gold once.
It still retains the colour and shine.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jim Easterbrook
2020-03-26 08:02:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Penny
My mug with a gold rim only crackled the first time I put it in the
microwave, no fireworks since.
Yes, you can only burn away the gold once.
It still retains the colour and shine.
Yeah, I didn't mean burning away all of it, just enough to create gaps
and break the circuit.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Sam Plusnet
2020-03-25 22:01:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
My mug with a gold rim only crackled the first time I put it in the
microwave, no fireworks since.
We have a number of jugs, and we had to go through a learning experience
to discover which has metallic glazes & hence weren't suitable for the
microwave.
It's not always evident just by looking at them.
--
Sam Plusnet
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-03-24 16:33:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 at 11:37:03, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
wrote:
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
If one gets a takeaway now, say Indian, or whatever, how big is the
danger from the Corona virus?
I'm SURE you didn't mean anything, but in case that were to get into the
wrong hands - the question applies whether it's Indian, Chinese, or fish
and chips.

It's an interesting question! I don't know the answer: I would _hope_
that normal food hygiene regulations would mean it _should_ be safe, but
if you have a local curry house/chippy/burger van whose reputation for
cleanliness isn't particularly great, perhaps avoid them more than you
normally would.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The best way to achieve immortality is by not dying.
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-24 18:39:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 16:33:02 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
If one gets a takeaway now, say Indian, or whatever, how big is the
danger from the Corona virus?
I'm SURE you didn't mean anything, but in case that were to get into the
wrong hands - the question applies whether it's Indian, Chinese, or fish
and chips.
I said SAY Indian or whatever! I meant that to mean otehr takeaways
too. Surely that is what it says?
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-03-24 19:45:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 16:33:02 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
If one gets a takeaway now, say Indian, or whatever, how big is the
danger from the Corona virus?
I'm SURE you didn't mean anything, but in case that were to get into the
wrong hands - the question applies whether it's Indian, Chinese, or fish
and chips.
I said SAY Indian or whatever! I meant that to mean otehr takeaways
too. Surely that is what it says?
Indeed you did. Sorry.

(I suppose I could say that the sort of person who might deliberately
misuse it wouldn't get such nuances.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

At the age of 7, Julia Elizabeth Wells could sing notes only dogs could hear.
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-24 11:34:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 09:29:07 +0000, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
<snip sausage roll discussion, but observing that Greggs ARE the best, but rarely hot enough in the shop>
... What I want to find is a nice pie
with pastry the same as his sausage rolls. Pie pastry is differnt. And
the filling to be not meat I think. Potato and..cheese? cabbage?
Not for breakfast but for supper. Pies I have tried have fallen
short.
I usually make my own with bought ready-roll pastry [1], but Pukka Pies
are usually pretty good. Only meat fillings I think though...
[1] Thinks: must finish off Christmas with that frozen turkey and ham in
a pie :)
Pukka do a cheese and umbrella one but it was nothing special. B likes
the chicken and the steak ones.
BrritSki
2020-03-24 11:44:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 09:29:07 +0000, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
<snip sausage roll discussion, but observing that Greggs ARE the best, but rarely hot enough in the shop>
... What I want to find is a nice pie
with pastry the same as his sausage rolls. Pie pastry is differnt. And
the filling to be not meat I think. Potato and..cheese? cabbage?
Not for breakfast but for supper. Pies I have tried have fallen
short.
I usually make my own with bought ready-roll pastry [1], but Pukka Pies
are usually pretty good. Only meat fillings I think though...
[1] Thinks: must finish off Christmas with that frozen turkey and ham in
a pie :)
Pukka do a cheese and umbrella one but it was nothing special. B likes
the chicken and the steak ones.
Me too...
Jenny M Benson
2020-03-24 09:57:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Oh I love pastry.
When I was a child, whenever my mother made pastry for a tart or a pie
she would gather the left-over bits into a wodge and cook it (1) along
with the main dish. Because it was a wodge rather than a flattish
piece, it was slightly under-cooked in the centre and we ate it, still
warm and slathered with golden syrup. Food of the gods and then some!

(1) Having placed it on the wrapping from margarine or butter, which she
always kept in a green and white striped dish with a lid.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
steve hague
2020-03-24 10:13:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Sam Plusnet
I think there are two types of people.
One group are particular about pastry, and want the texture and taste to
be just right,
The second group think of pastry as edible packaging.
Oh I love pastry. It is the best part of the item and the right ratio
of it to filling is important. A generous amount of pasty is ideal. B
has a Ginster sausage roll for breakfast daily. He prefers Greggs but
there is none near by. Wall's is no longer acceptable. He puts it in
the oven and then turns the oven on and takes it out after it has
warmed through and it smells wonderful. Pastry is not WW compliant
really. And I am not that keen on sausage rolls, especially for
breakfast, when porridge is best. What I want to find is a nice pie
with pastry the same as his sausage rolls. Pie pastry is differnt. And
the filling to be not meat I think. Potato and..cheese? cabbage?
Not for breakfast but for supper. Pies I have tried have fallen
short.
Ginster is a swear word hereabouts.
Steve
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-24 11:35:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 10:13:06 +0000, steve hague
Post by steve hague
Ginster is a swear word hereabouts.
Which sausage rolls do you prefer? Greggs?
Anne B
2020-03-24 12:07:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Sam Plusnet
I think there are two types of people.
One group are particular about pastry, and want the texture and taste to
be just right,
The second group think of pastry as edible packaging.
Oh I love pastry. It is the best part of the item and the right ratio
of it to filling is important. A generous amount of pasty is ideal. B
has a Ginster sausage roll for breakfast daily. He prefers Greggs but
there is none near by. Wall's is no longer acceptable.  He puts it in
the oven and then turns the oven on and takes it out after it has
warmed through and it smells wonderful.   Pastry is not WW compliant
really. And I am not that keen on sausage rolls, especially for
breakfast, when porridge is best.  What I want to find is a nice pie
with pastry the same as his sausage rolls. Pie pastry is differnt. And
the filling to be not meat I think. Potato and..cheese? cabbage?
Not for breakfast but for supper.  Pies I have tried have fallen
short.
Ginster is a swear word hereabouts.
Steve
Why?

I know it's the German word for whin/gorse/furze, but that hardly seems
to warrant its use as a swearword.

Anne B
BrritSki
2020-03-24 12:45:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by steve hague
Ginster is a swear word hereabouts.
Steve
Why?
I know it's the German word for whin/gorse/furze, but that hardly seems
to warrant its use as a swearword.
Because of the conditions in the Ginsters pasty factories in Kernow...
Mike
2020-03-24 12:49:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Anne B
Post by steve hague
Ginster is a swear word hereabouts.
Steve
Why?
I know it's the German word for whin/gorse/furze, but that hardly seems
to warrant its use as a swearword.
Because of the conditions in the Ginsters pasty factories in Kernow...
I tasted a Ginsters pie, once, never again!
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2020-03-24 13:14:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by Anne B
Post by steve hague
Ginster is a swear word hereabouts.
Steve
Why?
I know it's the German word for whin/gorse/furze, but that hardly seems
to warrant its use as a swearword.
Because of the conditions in the Ginsters pasty factories in Kernow...
I tasted a Ginsters pie, once, never again!
Oh they're not THAT bad, but I prefer the real thing [1] - that's
increasingly hard to find these days ime...

[1] as the Bishop said to the blow-up doll.
Anne B
2020-03-24 14:06:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Anne B
Post by steve hague
Ginster is a swear word hereabouts.
Steve
Why?
I know it's the German word for whin/gorse/furze, but that hardly
seems to warrant its use as a swearword.
Because of the conditions in the Ginsters pasty factories in Kernow...
Ah, I see.

Food hygiene or over-exploitation of staff?

Anne
steve hague
2020-03-24 15:36:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by steve hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Sam Plusnet
I think there are two types of people.
One group are particular about pastry, and want the texture and taste to
be just right,
The second group think of pastry as edible packaging.
Oh I love pastry. It is the best part of the item and the right ratio
of it to filling is important. A generous amount of pasty is ideal. B
has a Ginster sausage roll for breakfast daily. He prefers Greggs but
there is none near by. Wall's is no longer acceptable.  He puts it in
the oven and then turns the oven on and takes it out after it has
warmed through and it smells wonderful.   Pastry is not WW compliant
really. And I am not that keen on sausage rolls, especially for
breakfast, when porridge is best.  What I want to find is a nice pie
with pastry the same as his sausage rolls. Pie pastry is differnt. And
the filling to be not meat I think. Potato and..cheese? cabbage?
Not for breakfast but for supper.  Pies I have tried have fallen
short.
Ginster is a swear word hereabouts.
Steve
Why?
I know it's the German word for whin/gorse/furze, but that hardly seems
to warrant its use as a swearword.
Anne B
Because they make a travesty of a Cornish pasty. I don't know what their
sausage rolls are like, but on the evidence of their pasties, I'm not
going to find out.
Steve
Sam Plusnet
2020-03-24 22:15:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Anne B
Post by steve hague
Ginster is a swear word hereabouts.
Steve
Why?
I know it's the German word for whin/gorse/furze, but that hardly
seems to warrant its use as a swearword.
Anne B
Because they make a travesty of a Cornish pasty. I don't know what their
sausage rolls are like, but on the evidence of their pasties, I'm not
going to find out.
Anything less than a Philps is not really a Cornish pasty, in my very
biased opinion.
--
Sam Plusnet
Chris McMillan
2020-03-24 16:50:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steve hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Sam Plusnet
I think there are two types of people.
One group are particular about pastry, and want the texture and taste to
be just right,
The second group think of pastry as edible packaging.
Oh I love pastry. It is the best part of the item and the right ratio
of it to filling is important. A generous amount of pasty is ideal. B
has a Ginster sausage roll for breakfast daily. He prefers Greggs but
there is none near by. Wall's is no longer acceptable. He puts it in
the oven and then turns the oven on and takes it out after it has
warmed through and it smells wonderful. Pastry is not WW compliant
really. And I am not that keen on sausage rolls, especially for
breakfast, when porridge is best. What I want to find is a nice pie
with pastry the same as his sausage rolls. Pie pastry is differnt. And
the filling to be not meat I think. Potato and..cheese? cabbage?
Not for breakfast but for supper. Pies I have tried have fallen
short.
Ginster is a swear word hereabouts.
Steve
LOL. We have friends who live in said village.

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2020-03-23 09:21:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 23 Mar 2020 02:41:17 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I have recently developed a liking for "slices" - little pastry pillows,
that come in cheese and onion, steak, and chicken and mushroom - bit
like pies I suppose perhaps. (Lidl and Morrisons sell them - probably
they say "not suitable for microwave cooking", but they've obviously
been cooked anyway (the pastry is browned, not uncooked pastry), so I
just warm them up - but some (I think the Morrisons ones) said "not
suitable for microwave heating", so I wondered why. (I will admit I
_have_ been doing, and haven't experienced any ill effects so far.)
At a guess, partly because the pastry will be soggy rather than crisp as
intended. Also, while I believe it is possible to cook raw puff pastry in
the microwave to the expected texture* (it won't look right), the filling,
depending what it is, should probably be heated more thoroughly to ensure
safety, by which time the pastry will probably have caught fire.

*or am I thinking of papadoms and** marshmallows?
** not together
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-03-23 10:22:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Mon, 23 Mar 2020 02:41:17 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I have recently developed a liking for "slices" - little pastry pillows,
that come in cheese and onion, steak, and chicken and mushroom - bit
like pies I suppose perhaps. (Lidl and Morrisons sell them - probably
they say "not suitable for microwave cooking", but they've obviously
been cooked anyway (the pastry is browned, not uncooked pastry), so I
just warm them up - but some (I think the Morrisons ones) said "not
suitable for microwave heating", so I wondered why. (I will admit I
_have_ been doing, and haven't experienced any ill effects so far.)
At a guess, partly because the pastry will be soggy rather than crisp as
And Serena said the same. Thanks both. I find about a minute (one slice,
"700W" oven) warms them adequately. Yes, not ultra-crisp, but OK. (They
come on plastic trays in a plastic bag, but I take them out of and off
both - I put it on a plate.)
Post by Penny
intended. Also, while I believe it is possible to cook raw puff pastry in
the microwave to the expected texture* (it won't look right), the filling,
depending what it is, should probably be heated more thoroughly to ensure
safety, by which time the pastry will probably have caught fire.
These slices aren't raw - as looked at when bought, the pastry has
browned bits, so they've been cooked in some way already. (IIRR the
packaging says they can be eaten warm or cold which also suggests that.)
Post by Penny
*or am I thinking of papadoms and** marshmallows?
** not together
I've found a raw poppadom cooks fine in a microwave - about ten seconds
either side; either the expensive and inferior Patak or Sharwood type
(cardboard box containing plastic bag), or the better type that comes in
just the thin plastic bag from assorted real Indian companies such as
Lijjat. They're actually quite interesting as you can see the
distribution of the microwave energy (dead spots for example).

I've not tried to warm a marshmallow in the microwave; I don't think I
ever buy them, though I don't dislike them. I can imagine they might be
catastrophic - might be OK if zapped for a second or two?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Once you've started swinging, chimp-like, through the branches of your family
tree, you might easily end up anywhere. - Alexander Armstrong, RT 2014/8/23-29
Penny
2020-03-23 12:44:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 23 Mar 2020 10:22:30 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I've not tried to warm a marshmallow in the microwave; I don't think I
ever buy them, though I don't dislike them. I can imagine they might be
catastrophic - might be OK if zapped for a second or two?
It's a variation on the left-pondian Graham crackers with chocolate and
toasted marshmallows - camp fire food. Put digestive biscuit on plate, add
some grated chocolate or dots or buttons, top with a marshmallow and
microwave for a few seconds. Fun to watch them puff up, like the pappadoms.

I developed a version which I cooked in individual ramekins. Crumbled
digestive, butter, chocolate and marshmallow (or not). D#1, aged about 4,
set fire to the microwave when trying to make one for me in a plastic
yoghurt pot - she couldn't reach the ramekins.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
krw
2020-03-23 16:34:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sun, 22 Mar 2020 19:47:15 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 07:16:06 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
I guess he knew when to fold 'em.
I saw him live in Wembly some years ago and have been a fan of his
music and C&W so enjoyed it very much. One of my favourite songs is
Bobby McGee and I think his was the second of the many versions I've
heard and one of the good ones.
Come on umrats! Does nobody else care?
Yes, I do. The trouble is, I'm so concerned about how I'm going to feed
the two of us and spending so much time trying to organise it that poor
old Kenny isn't getting the attention he would otherwise deserve.
Oh dear. I hope your energy levels improve. I do know how that feels
as we often can't do more than put ready meals in the oven or
microwave.
Vicky I apologise for not following up and posting much recently.

Some of you may be aware that I am a little involved with a charity
running a Community Transport minibus and much of last week was spent
trying to find ways of providing some sort of service. However with
most drivers over 70 and then the lack of supplies in supermarket every
idea hit a dead end. Not for the want of trying. So I get behind last
week and although I am catching up today I am never very keen on posting
some days behind - I really feel there ought to be a name for that - so
have been a little limited in making comments.

I am not that keen on that strain of C&W being more of the Emmylou
Harris persuasion but it is always sad when a decent singer departs.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
BrritSki
2020-03-23 16:49:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Some of you may be aware that I am a little involved with a charity
running a Community Transport minibus and much of last week was spent
trying to find ways of providing some sort of service.  However with
most drivers over 70 and then the lack of supplies in supermarket every
idea hit a dead end.  Not for the want of trying.  So I get behind last
week and although I am catching up today I am never very keen on posting
some days behind - I really feel there ought to be a name for that..
There is. Umbrella.
Mike
2020-03-23 17:09:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sun, 22 Mar 2020 19:47:15 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 07:16:06 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
I guess he knew when to fold 'em.
I saw him live in Wembly some years ago and have been a fan of his
music and C&W so enjoyed it very much. One of my favourite songs is
Bobby McGee and I think his was the second of the many versions I've
heard and one of the good ones.
Come on umrats! Does nobody else care?
Yes, I do. The trouble is, I'm so concerned about how I'm going to feed
the two of us and spending so much time trying to organise it that poor
old Kenny isn't getting the attention he would otherwise deserve.
Oh dear. I hope your energy levels improve. I do know how that feels
as we often can't do more than put ready meals in the oven or
microwave.
Vicky I apologise for not following up and posting much recently.
Some of you may be aware that I am a little involved with a charity
running a Community Transport minibus and much of last week was spent
trying to find ways of providing some sort of service. However with
most drivers over 70 and then the lack of supplies in supermarket every
idea hit a dead end. Not for the want of trying. So I get behind last
week and although I am catching up today I am never very keen on posting
some days behind - I really feel there ought to be a name for that - so
have been a little limited in making comments.
I am not that keen on that strain of C&W being more of the Emmylou
Harris persuasion but it is always sad when a decent singer departs.
‘You picked a fountain to relieve me loose eel.’
--
Toodle Pip
Kate B
2020-03-23 21:18:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sun, 22 Mar 2020 19:47:15 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 21 Mar 2020 07:16:06 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
I guess he knew when to fold 'em.
I saw him live in Wembly some years ago and have been a fan of his
music and C&W so enjoyed it very much.  One of my favourite songs is
Bobby McGee and I think his was the second of the many versions I've
heard and one of the good ones.
Come on umrats! Does nobody else care?
Yes, I do.  The trouble is, I'm so concerned about how I'm going to feed
the two of us and spending so much time trying to organise it that poor
old Kenny isn't getting the attention he would otherwise deserve.
Oh dear. I hope your energy levels improve. I do know how that feels
as we often can't do more than put ready meals in the oven or
microwave.
Vicky I apologise for not following up and posting much recently.
Some of you may be aware that I am a little involved with a charity
running a Community Transport minibus and much of last week was spent
trying to find ways of providing some sort of service.  However with
most drivers over 70 and then the lack of supplies in supermarket every
idea hit a dead end.  Not for the want of trying.  So I get behind last
week and although I am catching up today I am never very keen on posting
some days behind - I really feel there ought to be a name for that - so
have been a little limited in making comments.
an antigilliverist, are you?
--
Kate B
London
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-03-24 16:26:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
Post by Kate B
Post by krw
Vicky I apologise for not following up and posting much recently.
Some of you may be aware that I am a little involved with a charity
running a Community Transport minibus and much of last week was spent
trying to find ways of providing some sort of service.  However with
Kudos to you, krw.
Post by Kate B
Post by krw
most drivers over 70 and then the lack of supplies in supermarket
every idea hit a dead end.  Not for the want of trying.  So I get
behind last week and although I am catching up today I am never very
keen on posting some days behind - I really feel there ought to be a
name for that - so have been a little limited in making comments.
an antigilliverist, are you?
(-:

I mostly cured it by shortening my expire time, for UMRA at least, to
one day: meaning my news software deleted posts a day after I downloaded
them, whether I'd read them or not. It dates from when disc space didn't
come by the tanker-ful; I don't know if modern news clients have an
expire setting at all.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The best way to achieve immortality is by not dying.
Mike
2020-03-24 16:58:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Post by krw
Vicky I apologise for not following up and posting much recently.
Some of you may be aware that I am a little involved with a charity
running a Community Transport minibus and much of last week was spent
trying to find ways of providing some sort of service.  However with
Kudos to you, krw.
Post by Kate B
Post by krw
most drivers over 70 and then the lack of supplies in supermarket
every idea hit a dead end.  Not for the want of trying.  So I get
behind last week and although I am catching up today I am never very
keen on posting some days behind - I really feel there ought to be a
name for that - so have been a little limited in making comments.
an antigilliverist, are you?
I mostly cured it by shortening my expire time, for UMRA at least, to
one day: meaning my news software deleted posts a day after I downloaded
them, whether I'd read them or not. It dates from when disc space didn't
come by the tanker-ful; I don't know if modern news clients have an
expire setting at all.
News Tap does.
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2020-03-25 03:34:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 16:26:52 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Post by krw
Vicky I apologise for not following up and posting much recently.
Some of you may be aware that I am a little involved with a charity
running a Community Transport minibus and much of last week was spent
trying to find ways of providing some sort of service.  However with
Kudos to you, krw.
Post by Kate B
Post by krw
most drivers over 70 and then the lack of supplies in supermarket
every idea hit a dead end.  Not for the want of trying.  So I get
behind last week and although I am catching up today I am never very
keen on posting some days behind - I really feel there ought to be a
name for that - so have been a little limited in making comments.
an antigilliverist, are you?
I mostly cured it by shortening my expire time, for UMRA at least, to
one day: meaning my news software deleted posts a day after I downloaded
them, whether I'd read them or not. It dates from when disc space didn't
come by the tanker-ful; I don't know if modern news clients have an
expire setting at all.
Please sir, what is a modern news client?

(Agent 4.2 2007)

Nick
Loading...