Discussion:
Gemüsehändler Apostroph
(too old to reply)
Jim Easterbrook
2018-08-05 08:48:55 UTC
Permalink
Somerats might be amused that greengrocers' apostrophes are to be found
in German signs.
https://flic.kr/p/28J9Myb
https://flic.kr/p/274KRRY
https://flic.kr/p/L4Ewet

ObTA: These photos are screen grabs from "Frag doch mal die Maus", a spin
off quiz from the children's programme "Die Sendung mit der Maus". Long
standing listeners will remember that when Ruari returned from Germany he
was missing his Maus toy and Sebastien told us about Die Sendung. Since I
got a satellite receiver capable of receiving German broadcasts I've been
an avid viewer.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Chris McMillan
2018-08-05 12:50:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Somerats might be amused that greengrocers' apostrophes are to be found
in German signs.
https://flic.kr/p/28J9Myb
https://flic.kr/p/274KRRY
https://flic.kr/p/L4Ewet
ObTA: These photos are screen grabs from "Frag doch mal die Maus", a spin
off quiz from the children's programme "Die Sendung mit der Maus". Long
standing listeners will remember that when Ruari returned from Germany he
was missing his Maus toy and Sebastien told us about Die Sendung. Since I
got a satellite receiver capable of receiving German broadcasts I've been
an avid viewer.
LOL, Jim!

Sincerely Chris
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2018-08-05 13:30:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Somerats might be amused that greengrocers' apostrophes are to be found
in German signs.
https://flic.kr/p/28J9Myb
https://flic.kr/p/274KRRY
https://flic.kr/p/L4Ewet
Also, I think, Scots Gaelic. The signs saying "Welcome to Oban" as one arrives by car and as one arrives by train differed only in an apostrophe when I was there several years ago.
Nick Odell
2018-08-05 13:50:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Somerats might be amused that greengrocers' apostrophes are to be found
in German signs.
https://flic.kr/p/28J9Myb
https://flic.kr/p/274KRRY
https://flic.kr/p/L4Ewet
Also, I think, Scots Gaelic. The signs saying "Welcome to Oban" as one arrives by car and as one arrives by train differed only in an apostrophe when I was there several years ago.
I rather liked the sign reportedly displayed on a North Wales road which
read something along the lines of "There's nobody in the office right
now but we'll get back to you as soon as we can." In Welsh.

Nick
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2018-08-05 14:26:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Somerats might be amused that greengrocers' apostrophes are to be found
in German signs.
https://flic.kr/p/28J9Myb
https://flic.kr/p/274KRRY
https://flic.kr/p/L4Ewet
Also, I think, Scots Gaelic. The signs saying "Welcome to Oban" as one arrives by car and as one arrives by train differed only in an apostrophe when I was there several years ago.
I rather liked the sign reportedly displayed on a North Wales road which
read something along the lines of "There's nobody in the office right
now but we'll get back to you as soon as we can." In Welsh.
Nick
I've heard that ascribed to "near Swansea"
RC Mitchell
2018-08-08 22:49:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Somerats might be amused that greengrocers' apostrophes are to be found
in German signs.
https://flic.kr/p/28J9Myb
https://flic.kr/p/274KRRY
https://flic.kr/p/L4Ewet
Also, I think, Scots Gaelic. The signs saying "Welcome to Oban" as one
arrives by car and as one arrives by train differed only in an
apostrophe when I was there several years ago.
An t-Òban. Not sure where an apostrophe goes.

RnT
Penny
2018-08-09 09:37:14 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 08 Aug 2018 23:49:01 +0100, RC Mitchell <***@phonecoop.coop>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by RC Mitchell
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
Also, I think, Scots Gaelic. The signs saying "Welcome to Oban" as one
arrives by car and as one arrives by train differed only in an
apostrophe when I was there several years ago.
An t-Òban. Not sure where an apostrophe goes.
Ignoring accents the road sign says
Failte an t-Oban https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4713138

The ferry terminal says
Failte gu Ionad Aiseig' Obain https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1520033
I think that which resembles an apostrophe is actually some sort of
diacritic. Although Ionad is centre, Aseig is ferry so perhaps it does
actually indicate possession? It sometimes appears on other Scottish ferry
terminals but not always so I suppose it could be a gender thing - do
places have gender?
Gourock https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2662014
other examples https://goo.gl/8W1dfC

One at the station says
Failte don Oban
Loading Image...
another says
Failte gu An t-Oban https://flic.kr/p/znBVtj

I find it odd that the word for welcome in Irish and Scots Gaelic is Failte
(though the diacritics are different) but in Welsh it is Croeso which seems
to have closer links to hospitable (croesawus).
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
RC Mitchell
2018-08-09 09:59:07 UTC
Permalink
Madainn mhath, a Phenigh!
Post by Penny
The ferry terminal says
Failte gu Ionad Aiseig' Obain https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1520033
I think that which resembles an apostrophe is actually some sort of
diacritic. Although Ionad is centre, Aseig is ferry so perhaps it does
actually indicate possession?
No, the possession in this case is indicated by the genitive case: Obain
rather than Oban. The extra i isn't pronounced but 'slenderises' the n –
that's something that's easier to explain if you know something about
hard and soft consonants in Slavic languages, which I have observed
Gàidhlig has some things in common with. Like adding the soft sign ь in
Russian or putting a diacritic over the ń as in Polish. Makes it more
'ny' with the y barely vocalised than just plain n.


It sometimes appears on other Scottish ferry
Post by Penny
terminals but not always so I suppose it could be a gender thing - do
places have gender?
Yes, all nouns are gendered.

I'm really not sure what the apostrophe is doing in the Oban sign. They
do occasionally appear in Gaelic and usually represent elision. It's not
in the Gourock sign.
Post by Penny
I find it odd that the word for welcome in Irish and Scots Gaelic is Failte
(though the diacritics are different) but in Welsh it is Croeso which seems
to have closer links to hospitable (croesawus).
Brythonic and Goidelic languages aren't all that close.

RnT
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2018-08-09 10:24:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by RC Mitchell
Madainn mhath, a Phenigh!
Post by Penny
The ferry terminal says
Failte gu Ionad Aiseig' Obain https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1520033
I think that which resembles an apostrophe is actually some sort of
diacritic. Although Ionad is centre, Aseig is ferry so perhaps it does
actually indicate possession?
No, the possession in this case is indicated by the genitive case: Obain
rather than Oban. The extra i isn't pronounced but 'slenderises' the n –
that's something that's easier to explain if you know something about
hard and soft consonants in Slavic languages, which I have observed
Gàidhlig has some things in common with. Like adding the soft sign ь in
Russian or putting a diacritic over the ń as in Polish. Makes it more
'ny' with the y barely vocalised than just plain n.
It sometimes appears on other Scottish ferry
Post by Penny
terminals but not always so I suppose it could be a gender thing - do
places have gender?
Yes, all nouns are gendered.
I'm really not sure what the apostrophe is doing in the Oban sign. They
do occasionally appear in Gaelic and usually represent elision. It's not
in the Gourock sign.
Post by Penny
I find it odd that the word for welcome in Irish and Scots Gaelic is Failte
(though the diacritics are different) but in Welsh it is Croeso which seems
to have closer links to hospitable (croesawus).
Brythonic and Goidelic languages aren't all that close.
RnT
Might "don" (to the) ever be "do'n"?
Kate B
2018-08-09 10:59:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by RC Mitchell
Madainn mhath, a Phenigh!
Post by Penny
The ferry terminal says
Failte gu Ionad Aiseig' Obain https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1520033
I think that which resembles an apostrophe is actually some sort of
diacritic. Although Ionad is centre, Aseig is ferry so perhaps it does
actually indicate possession?
No, the possession in this case is indicated by the genitive case: Obain
rather than Oban. The extra i isn't pronounced but 'slenderises' the n –
that's something that's easier to explain if you know something about
hard and soft consonants in Slavic languages, which I have observed
Gàidhlig has some things in common with. Like adding the soft sign ь in
Russian or putting a diacritic over the ń as in Polish. Makes it more
'ny' with the y barely vocalised than just plain n.
It sometimes appears on other Scottish ferry
Post by Penny
terminals but not always so I suppose it could be a gender thing - do
places have gender?
Yes, all nouns are gendered.
I'm really not sure what the apostrophe is doing in the Oban sign. They
do occasionally appear in Gaelic and usually represent elision. It's not
in the Gourock sign.
Post by Penny
I find it odd that the word for welcome in Irish and Scots Gaelic is Failte
(though the diacritics are different) but in Welsh it is Croeso which seems
to have closer links to hospitable (croesawus).
Brythonic and Goidelic languages aren't all that close.
RnT
One needs to mind one's Ps and Qs.
--
Kate B
London
Mike
2018-08-09 11:00:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by RC Mitchell
Madainn mhath, a Phenigh!
Post by Penny
The ferry terminal says
Failte gu Ionad Aiseig' Obain https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1520033
I think that which resembles an apostrophe is actually some sort of
diacritic. Although Ionad is centre, Aseig is ferry so perhaps it does
actually indicate possession?
No, the possession in this case is indicated by the genitive case: Obain
rather than Oban. The extra i isn't pronounced but 'slenderises' the n –
that's something that's easier to explain if you know something about
hard and soft consonants in Slavic languages, which I have observed
Gàidhlig has some things in common with. Like adding the soft sign ь in
Russian or putting a diacritic over the ń as in Polish. Makes it more
'ny' with the y barely vocalised than just plain n.
It sometimes appears on other Scottish ferry
Post by Penny
terminals but not always so I suppose it could be a gender thing - do
places have gender?
Yes, all nouns are gendered.
I'm really not sure what the apostrophe is doing in the Oban sign. They
do occasionally appear in Gaelic and usually represent elision. It's not
in the Gourock sign.
Post by Penny
I find it odd that the word for welcome in Irish and Scots Gaelic is Failte
(though the diacritics are different) but in Welsh it is Croeso which seems
to have closer links to hospitable (croesawus).
Brythonic and Goidelic languages aren't all that close.
RnT
One needs to mind one's Ps and Qs.
Whilst one q’s to p?
--
Toodle Pip
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2018-08-09 11:10:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by RC Mitchell
Madainn mhath, a Phenigh!
I initially though you were addressing Fenny. Presumably "a" governs what I know of in Welsh as a "spirant mutation"
RC Mitchell
2018-08-09 11:31:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
Post by RC Mitchell
Madainn mhath, a Phenigh!
I initially though you were addressing Fenny. Presumably "a" governs
what I know of in Welsh as a "spirant mutation"
It's the vocative case, which is formed by the particle 'a' which forces
lenition (same as Welsh soft mutation) of the initial
consonant. Lenition in Gaelic is always indicated by an h after the
consonant. So Mary in Gaelic is Mairi (MAHree) but if I call out to her
she is a Mhairi (a VAHree). And Penigh (or more likely Penidh) becomes
Phenigh or Phenidh, which is pronounced 'Fenny'.

That's as far as it goes with feminine names, but masculine names also
lenite the final consonant in the vocative.

So Seumas, the Gaelic equivalent of James pronounced as Irish Séamus,
becomes a Sheaumais in the vocative. It's pronounced 'Hamish'. So (James)
Hamish Stewart, one-time frontman of my favourite Dundee Funk band, is
in fact a tautology.

RnT
Penny
2018-08-09 14:04:03 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 09 Aug 2018 10:59:07 +0100, RC Mitchell <***@phonecoop.coop>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by RC Mitchell
Brythonic and Goidelic languages aren't all that close.
They do have a fair number of words in common - I blame the Scots (who came
from Ireland) although the French (not the Nor(se)mans) seem to have sent
some along with Christianity, or maybe that was the Romans.

I suspect sasennach (saesneg) basically means foreigner - as welsh does -
although a dictionary will say it means English(man).
Curiously Welsh translates as Gaeilge (Irish) and Gàidhlig (Scots Gaelic)
according to google.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Kate B
2018-08-09 14:47:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by RC Mitchell
Brythonic and Goidelic languages aren't all that close.
They do have a fair number of words in common - I blame the Scots (who came
from Ireland) although the French (not the Nor(se)mans) seem to have sent
some along with Christianity, or maybe that was the Romans.
I suspect sasennach (saesneg) basically means foreigner - as welsh does -
although a dictionary will say it means English(man).
Curiously Welsh translates as Gaeilge (Irish) and Gàidhlig (Scots Gaelic)
according to google.
Sassenach and its variants actually means 'Saxon', so applied by all
British Celts to the Low Germanic invaders (I don't think
Sassenach/Saesnag applies to Vikings, though can't remember offhand if
there's another name for the Scandinavian invaders)

'Gael' 'Gall', and 'Wal' are all cognate, and derive from the old
Germanic word for 'foreigner', so applying to the Welsh, the Gauls, the
Irish, the Portuguese, and even the Italians, depending on which border
you were on.

The term is still used in German - I remember in Switzerland, somewhere
up from Brig or Visp, towards the watershed with Italy, remarking on a
very picturesque bit of a village, unlike most Swiss villages not
scrubbed and primped and tidy, but rather romantically unrestored. Oh
*there*, said the tidy villagers, 'that's the Welsch bit'.
--
Kate B
London
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2018-08-10 07:28:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Sassenach and its variants actually means 'Saxon', so applied by all
British Celts to the Low Germanic invaders (I don't think
Sassenach/Saesnag applies to Vikings, though can't remember offhand if
there's another name for the Scandinavian invaders)
Lochlannach in Irish Gaelic.
Penny
2018-08-10 09:38:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
Post by Kate B
Sassenach and its variants actually means 'Saxon', so applied by all
British Celts to the Low Germanic invaders (I don't think
Sassenach/Saesnag applies to Vikings, though can't remember offhand if
there's another name for the Scandinavian invaders)
Lochlannach in Irish Gaelic.
Or naisiunach?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Rosalind Mitchell
2018-08-09 21:51:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
Curiously Welsh translates as Gaeilge (Irish) and Gàidhlig (Scots Gaelic)
according to google.
And in French, Wales is le pays des Galles, and they speak gallois.

RnT
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2018-08-09 09:57:17 UTC
Permalink
An t-Òban. Not sure where an apostrophe goes.
RnT
After a bit of googling I find it is "fáilte don Oban" at the station, but the sign google can find for the road I do not recognise. Maybe I entered on a different road.
Penny
2018-08-09 14:08:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by RC Mitchell
An t-Òban. Not sure where an apostrophe goes.
RnT
After a bit of googling I find it is "fáilte don Oban" at the station, but the sign google can find for the road I do not recognise. Maybe I entered on a different road.
If you followed my link to the road sign you'd see the position on the map.
https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4713138
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-06 10:10:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Somerats might be amused that greengrocers' apostrophes are to be found
in German signs.
https://flic.kr/p/28J9Myb
https://flic.kr/p/274KRRY
https://flic.kr/p/L4Ewet
[]
(The first one's particularly odd, as it's a backwards apostrophe.)
I see from the website quoted below at least the third one that they
call them "deppenapostroph"; my German's not good enough to work out
what that means.

*** KLAXON FOR (some) UMRATS - YOU KNOW WHAT I'VE DONE HERE. TIME FOR
YOU TO KILLFILE ME. *** (Others may agree with me that the spirit of the
two is similar - even to having a virtual pub; just one has a colada and
the other has Shires.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"The wish of the lazy to allow unsupervised access [to the internet] to their
children should not reduce all adults browsing to the level of suitability for a
five-year-old." Yaman Akdeniz, quoted in Inter//face (The Times, 1999-2-10): p12
Jim Easterbrook
2018-08-06 10:25:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Somerats might be amused that greengrocers' apostrophes are to be found
in German signs.
https://flic.kr/p/28J9Myb https://flic.kr/p/274KRRY
https://flic.kr/p/L4Ewet
[]
(The first one's particularly odd, as it's a backwards apostrophe.)
I see from the website quoted below at least the third one that they
call them "deppenapostroph"; my German's not good enough to work out
what that means.
A native German speaker of my acquaintance tells me it's "idiot's
apostrophe".

Cross posting carefully removed. Just don't do it John. House rules.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-06 10:44:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Somerats might be amused that greengrocers' apostrophes are to be found
in German signs.
https://flic.kr/p/28J9Myb https://flic.kr/p/274KRRY
https://flic.kr/p/L4Ewet
[]
(The first one's particularly odd, as it's a backwards apostrophe.)
I see from the website quoted below at least the third one that they
call them "deppenapostroph"; my German's not good enough to work out
what that means.
A native German speaker of my acquaintance tells me it's "idiot's
apostrophe".
Interesting! They're very down-to-earth, sometimes. Maybe we should use
that instead!
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Cross posting carefully removed. Just don't do it John. House rules.
It's an open house. I'm considering killfiling those who object - just
for a while - to see who's left, though I haven't done it. I understand
the desire not to get into something like the Radio 4 newsgroup, which
can be a little political (as can UMRA for that matter, but does so with
less heat), but APIHNA is so very like us - and, this post is most
definitely on-topic for there. (And, is probably the first post at all
there, for months!) More so than here, in fact!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"The wish of the lazy to allow unsupervised access [to the internet] to their
children should not reduce all adults browsing to the level of suitability for a
five-year-old." Yaman Akdeniz, quoted in Inter//face (The Times, 1999-2-10): p12
Nick Odell
2018-08-06 21:36:03 UTC
Permalink
On 06/08/18 11:44, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
..... but APIHNA is so very like us.....

Balderdash

If they were really so very much like us they would have a
no-crossposting rule and get very annoyed with individuals who
flagrantly ignored it.

Nick
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-07 02:44:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
..... but APIHNA is so very like us.....
Balderdash
If they were really so very much like us they would have a
no-crossposting rule and get very annoyed with individuals who
flagrantly ignored it.
Nick
(-:

OK. But it still saddens me that I can't (without much opprobrium)
introduce two groups of my friends to each other. Especially when the
subject is so very appropriate to one of them (and, arguably, not to the
other!).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than
to those attending too small a degree of it. -Thomas Jefferson, 3rd US
president, architect and author (1743-1826)
John Ashby
2018-08-07 05:51:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
..... but APIHNA is so very like us.....
Balderdash
If they were really so very much like us they would have a
no-crossposting rule and get very annoyed with individuals who
flagrantly ignored it.
Nick
OK. But it still saddens me that I can't (without much opprobrium)
introduce two groups of my friends to each other. Especially when the
subject is so very appropriate to one of them (and, arguably, not to the
other!).
You can. The way to do it is to repost the original in apihna with a
note saying "This appeared in umra, you might like to go over there and
check out the group because I think you have a lot in common [insert
more explanation if you like]. They don't appreciate cross-posting so
I'm introducing you to each other this way."

john
Mike
2018-08-07 07:46:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
..... but APIHNA is so very like us.....
Balderdash
If they were really so very much like us they would have a
no-crossposting rule and get very annoyed with individuals who
flagrantly ignored it.
Nick
OK. But it still saddens me that I can't (without much opprobrium)
introduce two groups of my friends to each other. Especially when the
subject is so very appropriate to one of them (and, arguably, not to the
other!).
Sorry Jpeg, one sorry for many to be happy is the more elegant solution in
my view too.
--
Toodle Pip
Fenny
2018-08-07 17:20:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
..... but APIHNA is so very like us.....
Balderdash
If they were really so very much like us they would have a
no-crossposting rule and get very annoyed with individuals who
flagrantly ignored it.
Nick
OK. But it still saddens me that I can't (without much opprobrium)
introduce two groups of my friends to each other. Especially when the
subject is so very appropriate to one of them (and, arguably, not to the
other!).
Sorry Jpeg, one sorry for many to be happy is the more elegant solution in
my view too.
Or, to quote one of the best movies of my lifetime - "The needs of the
many outweigh the needs of the one".

If umra and apihna are so similar, we'd all be members over there. For
those of us who choose not to be, like those of them who choose not to
be, we know where to go if we choose to be.

As I regularly point out to my bank, I don't need them to keep sending
me adverts for services I don't need. I know what services they offer
and am perfectly capable of getting in touch if I want to avail myself
of them. As I did at the weekend when I switched my mortgage to a 10
year fixed rate lower than my new rate following last week's BoE rate
increase.
--
Fenny
Jenny M Benson
2018-08-07 18:30:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
As I regularly point out to my bank, I don't need them to keep sending
me adverts for services I don't need. I know what services they offer
and am perfectly capable of getting in touch if I want to avail myself
of them.
I'm always amazed by the people who apparently only realise they want -
to take but one example - Sky television when they are stopped in the
street by a salesman.

(The thought just occurs to me that apart from chuggers, I've never been
stopped in the street like that by a saleswoman.)
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Nick Odell
2018-08-07 20:55:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
..... but APIHNA is so very like us.....
Balderdash
If they were really so very much like us they would have a
no-crossposting rule and get very annoyed with individuals who
flagrantly ignored it.
Nick
OK. But it still saddens me that I can't (without much opprobrium)
introduce two groups of my friends to each other. Especially when the
subject is so very appropriate to one of them (and, arguably, not to the
other!).
Sorry Jpeg, one sorry for many to be happy is the more elegant solution in
my view too.
Or, to quote one of the best movies of my lifetime - "The needs of the
many outweigh the needs of the one".
If umra and apihna are so similar, we'd all be members over there. For
those of us who choose not to be, like those of them who choose not to
be, we know where to go if we choose to be.
As I regularly point out to my bank, I don't need them to keep sending
me adverts for services I don't need. I know what services they offer
and am perfectly capable of getting in touch if I want to avail myself
of them. As I did at the weekend when I switched my mortgage to a 10
year fixed rate lower than my new rate following last week's BoE rate
increase.
<impressed>

N.
Fenny
2018-08-07 21:50:05 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 7 Aug 2018 21:55:35 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Fenny
As I regularly point out to my bank, I don't need them to keep sending
me adverts for services I don't need. I know what services they offer
and am perfectly capable of getting in touch if I want to avail myself
of them. As I did at the weekend when I switched my mortgage to a 10
year fixed rate lower than my new rate following last week's BoE rate
increase.
<impressed>
When I had to switch mortgages 5 years ago, I had a look at what my
bank offered to existing customers, worked out what I wanted, what I
was currently paying and what I could afford. Knowing that I had an
endowment policy that would mature in a few years time, I wanted to
initially extend the period of the loan past the original 25 years,
overpay on a monthly basis, then pay off a chunk to bring it back
within the timespan.

I made an appointment to see the mortgage advisor, took in my
workings, said "I'd like one of your morgages, this is what I want to
do", he had a look, agreed it was possible and we'd got it all sorted
within half an hour. After the valuation had happened, the most
complicated bit was the legal transfer of funds, which took 3 phone
calls and a couple of emails over about 3 weeks. And the bank paid
the legal fees!

The only other time I bother the bank for something is when I need the
form for my overseas dividends witnessed.

OTOH, banking for Pa is a different business, but much easier now I'm
a joint account holder and I don't have to get him to a branch during
working hours.
--
Fenny
Kate B
2018-08-06 10:38:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Somerats might be amused that greengrocers' apostrophes are to be found
in German signs.
https://flic.kr/p/28J9Myb
https://flic.kr/p/274KRRY
https://flic.kr/p/L4Ewet
[]
(The first one's particularly odd, as it's a backwards apostrophe.)
I see from the website quoted below at least the third one that they
call them "deppenapostroph"; my German's not good enough to work out
what that means.
*** KLAXON FOR (some) UMRATS - YOU KNOW WHAT I'VE DONE HERE. TIME FOR
YOU TO KILLFILE ME. *** (Others may agree with me that the spirit of the
two is similar - even to having a virtual pub; just one has a colada and
the other has Shires.)
'Deppen' is short for 'debile', ie deeply moronic. Highly appropriate in
this case.

'Colada' actually means washed out, implying they drink dishwater. Dear
oh dear.

Crossposting removed. You're heading for the killfile, jpeg.
--
Kate B
London
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