Discussion:
Is it me or....?
(too old to reply)
Mike
2018-12-30 12:48:10 UTC
Permalink
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2018-12-30 13:29:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
Yes.
Steve Hague
2018-12-30 15:37:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
No, it's just you. I'm fine with it.
Steve
Mike
2018-12-30 16:20:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
No, it's just you. I'm fine with it.
Steve
Err....., Sorry Steve, I couldn’t hear what you said, could you turn the
drums down a bit please?
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2018-12-30 17:30:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
I don't often hear TFP and was only half-listening today but was under
the impression that those noises were ambient sound in the environment
where the recording was being made. Should I listen again tomorrow?
Properly, this time?

Nick
Mike
2018-12-30 17:44:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
I don't often hear TFP and was only half-listening today but was under
the impression that those noises were ambient sound in the environment
where the recording was being made. Should I listen again tomorrow?
Properly, this time?
Nick
The music continued behind the continuity sections.
--
Toodle Pip
Dumrat
2018-12-30 18:56:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
Yes. And drama programmes too. R4 is all about the spoken word, isn't it? I am reliably
informed by my nearest and dearest that I am daft (defunct Greek m-i-l's word for deaf,
but applies equally), and background music greatly decreases my chances of understanding
what is going on (incipient dementia aside). Sniffffff.
--
Salaam Alaykum,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Dumrat
BrritSki
2018-12-30 20:01:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dumrat
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often
responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
Yes. And drama programmes too. R4 is all about the spoken word, isn't
it? I am reliably informed by my nearest and dearest that I am daft
(defunct Greek m-i-l's word for deaf, but applies equally), and
background music greatly decreases my chances of understanding what is
going on (incipient dementia aside). Sniffffff.
I have noticed a lot of music on R4 recently, including karaoke of Toady
the other day FFS.
Chris McMillan
2018-12-31 09:55:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Dumrat
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often
responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
Yes. And drama programmes too. R4 is all about the spoken word, isn't
it? I am reliably informed by my nearest and dearest that I am daft
(defunct Greek m-i-l's word for deaf, but applies equally), and
background music greatly decreases my chances of understanding what is
going on (incipient dementia aside). Sniffffff.
I have noticed a lot of music on R4 recently, including karaoke of Toady
the other day FFS.
Not listening to Toady at the moment.

Sincerely Chris
Vicky Ayech
2018-12-30 21:22:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dumrat
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
Yes. And drama programmes too. R4 is all about the spoken word, isn't it? I am reliably
informed by my nearest and dearest that I am daft (defunct Greek m-i-l's word for deaf,
but applies equally), and background music greatly decreases my chances of understanding
what is going on (incipient dementia aside). Sniffffff.
The sound quality and interference is worse on World Service than R 4.
Some of the programmes are on both as R4 becomes WS for some hours
over night but you can getg it by asking Alexa for either station and
the sound quality changes. WS is quieter too. and Alexa herself
speaking is louder than all stations. I think 3E is worst. R5 is
quite good.
Vicky Ayech
2018-12-30 22:42:55 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 21:22:02 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Dumrat
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
Yes. And drama programmes too. R4 is all about the spoken word, isn't it? I am reliably
informed by my nearest and dearest that I am daft (defunct Greek m-i-l's word for deaf,
but applies equally), and background music greatly decreases my chances of understanding
what is going on (incipient dementia aside). Sniffffff.
The sound quality and interference is worse on World Service than R 4.
Some of the programmes are on both as R4 becomes WS for some hours
over night but you can getg it by asking Alexa for either station and
the sound quality changes. WS is quieter too. and Alexa herself
speaking is louder than all stations. I think 3E is worst. R5 is
quite good.
4E not 3E
Mike Ruddock
2018-12-31 08:47:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dumrat
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often
responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
Yes. And drama programmes too. R4 is all about the spoken word, isn't
it? I am reliably informed by my nearest and dearest that I am daft
(defunct Greek m-i-l's word for deaf, but applies equally), and
background music greatly decreases my chances of understanding what is
going on (incipient dementia aside). Sniffffff.
Those that listened to "An Ideal Husband" a week or so back will have
been surprised that there were songs interpolated. I don't know why.

Mike Ruddock
Penny
2018-12-31 09:48:17 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 31 Dec 2018 08:47:42 +0000, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Dumrat
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often
responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
Yes. And drama programmes too. R4 is all about the spoken word, isn't
it? I am reliably informed by my nearest and dearest that I am daft
(defunct Greek m-i-l's word for deaf, but applies equally), and
background music greatly decreases my chances of understanding what is
going on (incipient dementia aside). Sniffffff.
Those that listened to "An Ideal Husband" a week or so back will have
been surprised that there were songs interpolated. I don't know why.
The series of Wilde plays was called 'Born to be Wilde' and included
several rock anthems performed in a 'period' manner. I quite enjoyed them
on 'The Importance of being Ernest', less so on the others.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
John Ashby
2018-12-31 10:10:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Dumrat
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often
responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
Yes. And drama programmes too. R4 is all about the spoken word, isn't
it? I am reliably informed by my nearest and dearest that I am daft
(defunct Greek m-i-l's word for deaf, but applies equally), and
background music greatly decreases my chances of understanding what is
going on (incipient dementia aside). Sniffffff.
Those that listened to "An Ideal Husband" a week or so back will have
been surprised that there were songs interpolated. I don't know why.
Mike Ruddock
Because they needed to "Sell" the programme.

john
Penny
2018-12-30 21:15:57 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 12:48:10 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
I hadn't noticed it recently but thought they had got over that nonsense
some time ago when the feedback audience complained loudly and repeatedly.

Back in April d#1 organised a conference and I saw a promotional video for
it in which she appeared, describing what it was about and what it hoped to
achieve. The musical soundtrack was ridiculously loud and totally
unnecessary.

If the level of annoyance at this practice is largely age-based, maybe they
could put 'music' on which is outside the hearing range of anyone over 30?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Peter Withey
2018-12-31 10:28:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
Yes! I gave up on a series called "How railways changed the world"
shown on the "Quest" channel. I could hardly hear the narrator at
times for the background music. Completely unnecessary.
--
Pete
Fenny
2019-01-02 00:16:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Withey
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
Yes! I gave up on a series called "How railways changed the world"
shown on the "Quest" channel. I could hardly hear the narrator at
times for the background music. Completely unnecessary.
Ma watches "The Chase", so we watched an episode the other evening.
Quite apart from the volume Ma has the telly [1], I had to stick a
finger in my ear to reduce the volume of the ambient noise in the
studio over which the contestants had to be heard. I found the whole
show too overwhelming to be able to take much notice of the actual
quiz. Unlike Pointless, where the non-speaking noise is kept to a
decent level and the crowd don't seem to screech so much at every
opportunity.

[1] She costantly tells me how good her hearing is and complained at
how loud the production of "Kiss Me, Kate" we saw at The Crucilble
last weeek was.
--
Fenny
Kate B
2019-01-02 11:08:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
Ma watches "The Chase", so we watched an episode the other evening.
Quite apart from the volume Ma has the telly [1], I had to stick a
finger in my ear to reduce the volume of the ambient noise in the
studio over which the contestants had to be heard. I found the whole
show too overwhelming to be able to take much notice of the actual
quiz. Unlike Pointless, where the non-speaking noise is kept to a
decent level and the crowd don't seem to screech so much at every
opportunity.
[1] She costantly tells me how good her hearing is and complained at
how loud the production of "Kiss Me, Kate" we saw at The Crucilble
last weeek was.
My husband is very deaf, but he too complains in cinemas and theatres
where voices are amplified, because his hearing loss is primarily in the
higher frequencies, and the usual amplification tendency is to boost the
lower ones. So it actually really hurts his ears, and perhaps it hurts
your mother's ears too?

He has excellent hearing aids and is fine with opera and orchestral
music in the raw, but often has problems with broadcast music, because
it inevitably goes through some kind of manipulation. A recent case was
the R4 radio relay of the Kings Carols, which was clearly being tweaked
on the fly for the much touted Sound-Surround Experience. This was
supposed to be only audible on headphones (we were listening on FM), but
something very weird was going on throughout most of the programme -
sometimes the ambient acoustic was tuned out, sometimes you could only
really hear the boys, sometimes the organ appeared to be playing a
sub-sub-bass 64ft stop that really rattled our usually perfectly
adequate Linn speakers. I wished they'd just put one microphone halfway
down the chapel and leave it at that.

I suppose that's impossible? Mike Toodles would know.
--
Kate B
London
Mike
2019-01-02 11:29:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Fenny
Ma watches "The Chase", so we watched an episode the other evening.
Quite apart from the volume Ma has the telly [1], I had to stick a
finger in my ear to reduce the volume of the ambient noise in the
studio over which the contestants had to be heard. I found the whole
show too overwhelming to be able to take much notice of the actual
quiz. Unlike Pointless, where the non-speaking noise is kept to a
decent level and the crowd don't seem to screech so much at every
opportunity.
[1] She costantly tells me how good her hearing is and complained at
how loud the production of "Kiss Me, Kate" we saw at The Crucilble
last weeek was.
My husband is very deaf, but he too complains in cinemas and theatres
where voices are amplified, because his hearing loss is primarily in the
higher frequencies, and the usual amplification tendency is to boost the
lower ones. So it actually really hurts his ears, and perhaps it hurts
your mother's ears too?
He has excellent hearing aids and is fine with opera and orchestral
music in the raw, but often has problems with broadcast music, because
it inevitably goes through some kind of manipulation. A recent case was
the R4 radio relay of the Kings Carols, which was clearly being tweaked
on the fly for the much touted Sound-Surround Experience. This was
supposed to be only audible on headphones (we were listening on FM), but
something very weird was going on throughout most of the programme -
sometimes the ambient acoustic was tuned out, sometimes you could only
really hear the boys, sometimes the organ appeared to be playing a
sub-sub-bass 64ft stop that really rattled our usually perfectly
adequate Linn speakers. I wished they'd just put one microphone halfway
down the chapel and leave it at that.
I suppose that's impossible? Mike Toodles would know.
Possible, but I doubt it has ever happened since the first sound mixers
were introduced; so we have multiple miking of most events certainly since
the 1940’s if not before. The engineers working for Auntie are probably
recording multi-miked to multiple tracks; from there, they are probably
trying to serve the surround sound service through to much mangled mono
being broadcast on shortwave! When recording events, I tried to produce a
decent balance, a reasonable soundstage with a believable acoustic that
could be listened to on speakers or on headphones - in stereo or mono.
Though I recorded for many years using a binaural pair and occasionally
judiciously added sound from solo mics to the mix, I later adopted using a
mid-side pair for the main sound image plus tweaks provided by solo mics
occasionally. My preferred method works for soloists, small ensembles or
full 100 piece plus orchestras and choir. Having recorded in living rooms,
church halls, small and large theatres, the Royal Albert Hall. St. John’s,
Smith Square, the Festival Hall and many other venues, I can confidently
state that they all have their own ‘features’ and challenges!
--
Toodle Pip
Kate B
2019-01-02 11:38:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Kate B
Post by Fenny
Ma watches "The Chase", so we watched an episode the other evening.
Quite apart from the volume Ma has the telly [1], I had to stick a
finger in my ear to reduce the volume of the ambient noise in the
studio over which the contestants had to be heard. I found the whole
show too overwhelming to be able to take much notice of the actual
quiz. Unlike Pointless, where the non-speaking noise is kept to a
decent level and the crowd don't seem to screech so much at every
opportunity.
[1] She costantly tells me how good her hearing is and complained at
how loud the production of "Kiss Me, Kate" we saw at The Crucilble
last weeek was.
My husband is very deaf, but he too complains in cinemas and theatres
where voices are amplified, because his hearing loss is primarily in the
higher frequencies, and the usual amplification tendency is to boost the
lower ones. So it actually really hurts his ears, and perhaps it hurts
your mother's ears too?
He has excellent hearing aids and is fine with opera and orchestral
music in the raw, but often has problems with broadcast music, because
it inevitably goes through some kind of manipulation. A recent case was
the R4 radio relay of the Kings Carols, which was clearly being tweaked
on the fly for the much touted Sound-Surround Experience. This was
supposed to be only audible on headphones (we were listening on FM), but
something very weird was going on throughout most of the programme -
sometimes the ambient acoustic was tuned out, sometimes you could only
really hear the boys, sometimes the organ appeared to be playing a
sub-sub-bass 64ft stop that really rattled our usually perfectly
adequate Linn speakers. I wished they'd just put one microphone halfway
down the chapel and leave it at that.
I suppose that's impossible? Mike Toodles would know.
Possible, but I doubt it has ever happened since the first sound mixers
were introduced; so we have multiple miking of most events certainly since
the 1940’s if not before. The engineers working for Auntie are probably
recording multi-miked to multiple tracks; from there, they are probably
trying to serve the surround sound service through to much mangled mono
being broadcast on shortwave! When recording events, I tried to produce a
decent balance, a reasonable soundstage with a believable acoustic that
could be listened to on speakers or on headphones - in stereo or mono.
Though I recorded for many years using a binaural pair and occasionally
judiciously added sound from solo mics to the mix, I later adopted using a
mid-side pair for the main sound image plus tweaks provided by solo mics
occasionally. My preferred method works for soloists, small ensembles or
full 100 piece plus orchestras and choir. Having recorded in living rooms,
church halls, small and large theatres, the Royal Albert Hall. St. John’s,
Smith Square, the Festival Hall and many other venues, I can confidently
state that they all have their own ‘features’ and challenges!
Wow. All I can say is, I wish you'd been attending to the King's service
last week!
--
Kate B
London
Chris McMillan
2019-01-02 14:14:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Fenny
Ma watches "The Chase", so we watched an episode the other evening.
Quite apart from the volume Ma has the telly [1], I had to stick a
finger in my ear to reduce the volume of the ambient noise in the
studio over which the contestants had to be heard. I found the whole
show too overwhelming to be able to take much notice of the actual
quiz. Unlike Pointless, where the non-speaking noise is kept to a
decent level and the crowd don't seem to screech so much at every
opportunity.
[1] She costantly tells me how good her hearing is and complained at
how loud the production of "Kiss Me, Kate" we saw at The Crucilble
last weeek was.
My husband is very deaf, but he too complains in cinemas and theatres
where voices are amplified, because his hearing loss is primarily in the
higher frequencies, and the usual amplification tendency is to boost the
lower ones. So it actually really hurts his ears, and perhaps it hurts
your mother's ears too?
He has excellent hearing aids and is fine with opera and orchestral
music in the raw, but often has problems with broadcast music, because
it inevitably goes through some kind of manipulation. A recent case was
the R4 radio relay of the Kings Carols, which was clearly being tweaked
on the fly for the much touted Sound-Surround Experience. This was
supposed to be only audible on headphones (we were listening on FM), but
something very weird was going on throughout most of the programme -
sometimes the ambient acoustic was tuned out, sometimes you could only
really hear the boys, sometimes the organ appeared to be playing a
sub-sub-bass 64ft stop that really rattled our usually perfectly
adequate Linn speakers. I wished they'd just put one microphone halfway
down the chapel and leave it at that.
I suppose that's impossible? Mike Toodles would know.
McT doesn’t do Carols from anywhere but we were at a friends’ flat while it
went out first time and I haven’t listened to it.

Sincerely Chris
krw
2019-01-02 11:34:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
Ma watches "The Chase", so we watched an episode the other evening.
Quite apart from the volume Ma has the telly [1], I had to stick a
finger in my ear to reduce the volume of the ambient noise in the
studio over which the contestants had to be heard.
Are you sure that was "The Chase"? During the rounds the background
noise is pretty limited as Bradley, contestant(s) and chaser need to be
able to hear questions / answers clearly. And I watch some it regularly.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Fenny
2019-01-02 22:21:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Fenny
Ma watches "The Chase", so we watched an episode the other evening.
Quite apart from the volume Ma has the telly [1], I had to stick a
finger in my ear to reduce the volume of the ambient noise in the
studio over which the contestants had to be heard.
Are you sure that was "The Chase"? During the rounds the background
noise is pretty limited as Bradley, contestant(s) and chaser need to be
able to hear questions / answers clearly. And I watch some it regularly.
Yes, I'm sure. And yes, it was incredibly loud.
--
Fenny
krw
2019-01-02 23:05:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
Post by krw
Post by Fenny
Ma watches "The Chase", so we watched an episode the other evening.
Quite apart from the volume Ma has the telly [1], I had to stick a
finger in my ear to reduce the volume of the ambient noise in the
studio over which the contestants had to be heard.
Are you sure that was "The Chase"? During the rounds the background
noise is pretty limited as Bradley, contestant(s) and chaser need to be
able to hear questions / answers clearly. And I watch some it regularly.
Yes, I'm sure. And yes, it was incredibly loud.
I agree that relatively speaking the music and so on when the questions
are not being asked is loud, but typical these days. During the
questions the background noise is definitely limited. Sounds odd to
hear otherwise (speak up I really cannot hear you).
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Tony Bryer
2019-01-05 09:20:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
Before I emigrated, ten years ago, I wrote a letter of complaint to the
producer of World Business Report about just this. How better to make sure
that your listeners don't take in complicated information than playing
obtrusive music as you relay it.
--
Tony B, OzRat, Melbourne
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-06 02:17:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Bryer
Post by Mike
Are otherRats peed orff with the amount of gratuitous music played over
(and often above) information programmes? A programme often responsible for
this crime is the currently running Food Programme. Arrrrrrrggggghhh!
Before I emigrated, ten years ago, I wrote a letter of complaint to the
producer of World Business Report about just this. How better to make sure
that your listeners don't take in complicated information than playing
obtrusive music as you relay it.
A year or two ago, the RT letters page reprinted a letter complaining
about intrusive background music. It was from something like 1923. So I
think there's little chance of change any time soon. (Unless someone can
knock something up out of anti-antidisability-discrimination
legislation, which wasn't so strong back then.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"You realise, Fraser, that what happened between us can never repeat itself.
Unless, of course, the exact same circumstances were to repeat themselves." "By
exact same circumstances, sir, you mean: we would have to be aboard a train
loaded with unconscious Mounties, that had been taken over by terrorists, and
were heading for a nuclear catastrophe?" "Exactly." "Understood."
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