Discussion:
"Comedy Drama"?
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J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-06 22:25:57 UTC
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I happened to leave the TV on after the midday (well, 1 pm) news not too
long ago, and got hooked on the dramas they put on then - it's
insidious! There was a series called "The Land Girls", then when I left
on last Monday, "The Indian Doctor" - it's about, well, an Indian doctor
(and his wife), who comes to a small Welsh village as the doctor, after
the existing one dies. (1960s.) (BBC1 13:45 weekdays.)

It actually has a lot in common with both the current situation with
covid (more on that below), and Ambridge: village shop, policeman, pub
... I suppose that's inevitable - standard village characters.
Obviously, there are glaring differences too - the time period, and of
course there's a pit (mine). But there's a lot of common "feel" - IMO,
anyway.

Anyway, being out today, I've just caught up with today's episode from
the BBC website, and was a bit surprised to see it described as a
"Comedy drama set in 1960s Wales." Given that today's episode (and it's
going to continue into at least tomorrow's) is about the arrival of
smallpox in the village, I wouldn't have described it as such. Sure, it
has comic bits, as does Ambridge (some of them painful - "how we
laughed" sort of thing; there's even a lovesick policeman!), but I
wouldn't have called it a comedy drama - unless you could call TA one.

The smallpox thing is very covid-like: closing the shop, pub, and mine;
lockdown (even to the extent of a roadblock - I'm wondering, do we have
them now? In bits of Wales even, as it happens!); six feet (none of your
metres then); a vicar who believes prayer will ...; some vaccines do
come from Cardiff, but only seven, so they have to choose (I'd be
surprised if that doesn't happen with covid - hopefully not for long, if
we're to believe the production facilities they tell us about, but for
the first few ...)

I'm enjoying it; if anyone feels like sharing, I think the first series
from last week (covered his arrival and the predictable culture clashes;
the second series this week is when he's been there a year) is still
available on the website (or you could just join in from tomorrow). It
has a _little_ of Call the Midwife about it.

I presume it's a repeat (I'm guessing originally weekly episodes, though
I don't remember it being on) - I find myself wondering how it was
decided on; did someone think it was just a nice cosy drama for daytime
TV, or was the smallpox handling thought to be a good (and sneaky) way
to, I'm not sure what, an audience who might not take in government
briefings and the like?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Usenet is a way of being annoyed by people you otherwise never would have met."
- John J. Kinyon
Jenny M Benson
2020-10-06 23:58:30 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I presume it's a repeat (I'm guessing originally weekly episodes, though
I don't remember it being on) - I find myself wondering how it was
decided on; did someone think it was just a nice cosy drama for daytime
TV, or was the smallpox handling thought to be a good (and sneaky) way
to, I'm not sure what, an audience who might not take in government
briefings and the like?
I watched the whole series when it was on the first time. Very much
enjoyed it, but definitely not a comedy. I see that Digiguide
(correctly) classifies it as "Drama."
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Vicky Ayech
2020-10-07 06:02:00 UTC
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On Tue, 6 Oct 2020 23:25:57 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I happened to leave the TV on after the midday (well, 1 pm) news not too
long ago, and got hooked on the dramas they put on then - it's
insidious! There was a series called "The Land Girls", then when I left
on last Monday, "The Indian Doctor" - it's about, well, an Indian doctor
(and his wife), who comes to a small Welsh village as the doctor, after
the existing one dies. (1960s.) (BBC1 13:45 weekdays.)
It actually has a lot in common with both the current situation with
covid (more on that below), and Ambridge: village shop, policeman, pub
... I suppose that's inevitable - standard village characters.
Obviously, there are glaring differences too - the time period, and of
course there's a pit (mine). But there's a lot of common "feel" - IMO,
anyway.
Anyway, being out today, I've just caught up with today's episode from
the BBC website, and was a bit surprised to see it described as a
"Comedy drama set in 1960s Wales." Given that today's episode (and it's
going to continue into at least tomorrow's) is about the arrival of
smallpox in the village, I wouldn't have described it as such. Sure, it
has comic bits, as does Ambridge (some of them painful - "how we
laughed" sort of thing; there's even a lovesick policeman!), but I
wouldn't have called it a comedy drama - unless you could call TA one.
The smallpox thing is very covid-like: closing the shop, pub, and mine;
lockdown (even to the extent of a roadblock - I'm wondering, do we have
them now? In bits of Wales even, as it happens!); six feet (none of your
metres then); a vicar who believes prayer will ...; some vaccines do
come from Cardiff, but only seven, so they have to choose (I'd be
surprised if that doesn't happen with covid - hopefully not for long, if
we're to believe the production facilities they tell us about, but for
the first few ...)
I'm enjoying it; if anyone feels like sharing, I think the first series
from last week (covered his arrival and the predictable culture clashes;
the second series this week is when he's been there a year) is still
available on the website (or you could just join in from tomorrow). It
has a _little_ of Call the Midwife about it.
I presume it's a repeat (I'm guessing originally weekly episodes, though
I don't remember it being on) - I find myself wondering how it was
decided on; did someone think it was just a nice cosy drama for daytime
TV, or was the smallpox handling thought to be a good (and sneaky) way
to, I'm not sure what, an audience who might not take in government
briefings and the like?
I watched it and really enjoyed it. I like the Dr actor. He is in a
police series too and anything I've seen him in is good. And so is his
wife :)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-07 12:26:32 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 6 Oct 2020 23:25:57 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I happened to leave the TV on after the midday (well, 1 pm) news not too
long ago, and got hooked on the dramas they put on then - it's
insidious! There was a series called "The Land Girls", then when I left
on last Monday, "The Indian Doctor" - it's about, well, an Indian doctor
(and his wife), who comes to a small Welsh village as the doctor, after
the existing one dies. (1960s.) (BBC1 13:45 weekdays.)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
I watched it and really enjoyed it. I like the Dr actor. He is in a
police series too and anything I've seen him in is good. And so is his
wife :)
And rather beautiful too, to my eyes anyway.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

And every day in Britain, 33 properties are sold for around that price [a
million pounds or so]. - Jane Rackham, RT 2015/4/11-17
krw
2020-10-07 09:56:48 UTC
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a roadblock - I'm wondering, do we have them now?
I see that according to this morning's news that Nicola is thinking that
ensuring no-one crosses Hadrian's wall will save her empire from the
virus, so they should be appearing any time now - and isn't Wales locked
up in parts?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-07 12:33:59 UTC
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Post by krw
a roadblock - I'm wondering, do we have them now?
I see that according to this morning's news that Nicola is thinking
that ensuring no-one crosses Hadrian's wall will save her empire from
the virus, so they should be appearing any time now - and isn't Wales
locked up in parts?
That's what I was wondering; the media tell us that certain areas (I
think only Wales so far) are "nobody in, nobody out", with certain
permitted exceptions. I was just wondering if this is actually being
enforced with roadblocks (or at least checkpoints); if so, this hasn't
been reported (at least I've not heard it so), and certainly not shown.

I don't know if I think it _should_ be or not; I can see strong
arguments on both sides. I presume, since going to work and other things
are justified reasons for crossing the "plague boundary", it isn't
actually practical to do it, at least without use of the military, which
I'm pretty sure _would_ have reached the news.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

And every day in Britain, 33 properties are sold for around that price [a
million pounds or so]. - Jane Rackham, RT 2015/4/11-17
Penny
2020-10-07 22:19:31 UTC
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Permalink
On Wed, 7 Oct 2020 13:33:59 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
a roadblock - I'm wondering, do we have them now?
I see that according to this morning's news that Nicola is thinking
that ensuring no-one crosses Hadrian's wall will save her empire from
the virus, so they should be appearing any time now - and isn't Wales
locked up in parts?
That's what I was wondering; the media tell us that certain areas (I
think only Wales so far) are "nobody in, nobody out", with certain
permitted exceptions. I was just wondering if this is actually being
enforced with roadblocks (or at least checkpoints); if so, this hasn't
been reported (at least I've not heard it so), and certainly not shown.
In our early lockdown in Wales we were not supposed to travel more than 10
miles from home and needed a 'good' reason' to go that far. I still haven't
been out of the town since February but I heard tell of, not road blocks
exactly, but a 'police presence' at the bypass terminal roundabouts turning
local residents back if they tried to travel - the next nearest town in any
direction being at least 12 miles away.

I really should escape somewhere for a day before winter sets in...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-07 23:54:18 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Wed, 7 Oct 2020 13:33:59 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
[]
Post by Penny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
That's what I was wondering; the media tell us that certain areas (I
think only Wales so far) are "nobody in, nobody out", with certain
permitted exceptions. I was just wondering if this is actually being
enforced with roadblocks (or at least checkpoints); if so, this hasn't
been reported (at least I've not heard it so), and certainly not shown.
In our early lockdown in Wales we were not supposed to travel more than 10
miles from home and needed a 'good' reason' to go that far. I still haven't
been out of the town since February but I heard tell of, not road blocks
exactly, but a 'police presence' at the bypass terminal roundabouts turning
local residents back if they tried to travel - the next nearest town in any
direction being at least 12 miles away.
OK, so not roads blocked with an actual physical barrier, but in effect
at least checkpoints - with the same effect as a blockade, for normal
folks: I presume a 'police presence' meant police approach and stop
vehicles.
Post by Penny
I really should escape somewhere for a day before winter sets in...
I'm afraid that would be my feeling too.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I hope you dream a pig.
Vicky Ayech
2020-10-08 08:19:54 UTC
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On Thu, 8 Oct 2020 00:54:18 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
On Wed, 7 Oct 2020 13:33:59 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
[]
Post by Penny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
That's what I was wondering; the media tell us that certain areas (I
think only Wales so far) are "nobody in, nobody out", with certain
permitted exceptions. I was just wondering if this is actually being
enforced with roadblocks (or at least checkpoints); if so, this hasn't
been reported (at least I've not heard it so), and certainly not shown.
In our early lockdown in Wales we were not supposed to travel more than 10
miles from home and needed a 'good' reason' to go that far. I still haven't
been out of the town since February but I heard tell of, not road blocks
exactly, but a 'police presence' at the bypass terminal roundabouts turning
local residents back if they tried to travel - the next nearest town in any
direction being at least 12 miles away.
OK, so not roads blocked with an actual physical barrier, but in effect
at least checkpoints - with the same effect as a blockade, for normal
folks: I presume a 'police presence' meant police approach and stop
vehicles.
Post by Penny
I really should escape somewhere for a day before winter sets in...
I'm afraid that would be my feeling too.
During the time we were very locked down police roamed the area and
did apparently stop people to ask why they were travelling.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-08 08:52:05 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 8 Oct 2020 00:54:18 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
OK, so not roads blocked with an actual physical barrier, but in effect
at least checkpoints - with the same effect as a blockade, for normal
folks: I presume a 'police presence' meant police approach and stop
vehicles.
Post by Penny
I really should escape somewhere for a day before winter sets in...
I'm afraid that would be my feeling too.
During the time we were very locked down police roamed the area and
did apparently stop people to ask why they were travelling.
Which does nothing for public-police relations.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Beatrix Potter was a bunny boiler.
- Patricia Routledge, on "Today" 2016-1-26
John Ashby
2020-10-08 17:11:12 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 8 Oct 2020 00:54:18 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
OK, so not roads blocked with an actual physical barrier, but in effect
at least checkpoints - with the same effect as a blockade, for normal
folks: I presume a 'police presence' meant police approach and stop
vehicles.
Post by Penny
I really should escape somewhere for a day before winter sets in...
I'm afraid that would be my feeling too.
During the time we were very  locked down police roamed the area and
did apparently stop  people to ask why they were travelling.
Which does nothing for public-police relations.
At least Vicky didn't say it was in her neck of the woods.

john
Penny
2020-10-08 09:03:42 UTC
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On Thu, 8 Oct 2020 00:54:18 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
In our early lockdown in Wales we were not supposed to travel more than 10
miles from home and needed a 'good' reason' to go that far. I still haven't
been out of the town since February but I heard tell of, not road blocks
exactly, but a 'police presence' at the bypass terminal roundabouts turning
local residents back if they tried to travel - the next nearest town in any
direction being at least 12 miles away.
OK, so not roads blocked with an actual physical barrier, but in effect
at least checkpoints - with the same effect as a blockade, for normal
folks: I presume a 'police presence' meant police approach and stop
vehicles.
I don't know, I never saw them, I read on facebook of people being stopped
and told to go home. My neighbour tried to visit a garden centre (none
nearby) when they finally opened, was stopped and told to try the
supermarket. They were delighted with what they found there.

It must have been very difficult for the police in some places, like
Llanymynech, where the border runs down the main street. When English pubs
were opened and Welsh ones weren't, I think the Shropshire Star story was
picked up by the nationals
<https://www.shropshirestar.com/entertainment/dining-out/2020/07/01/two-pubs-no-more-than-100m-apart-yet-one-can-open-while-other-must-stay-shut/>
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-08 19:21:06 UTC
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Post by Penny
In our early lockdown in Wales we were not supposed to travel more than 10
miles from home and needed a 'good' reason' to go that far.
Not sure but wasn't it 5 miles?
I still haven't
Post by Penny
been out of the town since February but I heard tell of, not road blocks
exactly, but a 'police presence' at the bypass terminal roundabouts turning
local residents back if they tried to travel - the next nearest town in any
direction being at least 12 miles away.
We're locked into our Local Government area & not permitted to leave it
without one of a small list of good reasons.
However, in this part of S E Wales the areas are pretty small and we get
very little elbow room.
In fact, I can count the number of times I've been into a shop since
March on the fingers of one hand - and have a couple of spare fingers.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2020-10-09 08:08:52 UTC
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On Thu, 8 Oct 2020 20:21:06 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
In our early lockdown in Wales we were not supposed to travel more than 10
miles from home and needed a 'good' reason' to go that far.
Not sure but wasn't it 5 miles?
You're probably right, my memory isn't.
Effectively, with the ends of the bypass as the stopping point it was more
like 3 miles here anyway, although minor roads would probably get you
further. I wasn't even leaving my road, neighbours were shopping for me at
that stage.
Post by Sam Plusnet
We're locked into our Local Government area & not permitted to leave it
without one of a small list of good reasons.
However, in this part of S E Wales the areas are pretty small and we get
very little elbow room.
In fact, I can count the number of times I've been into a shop since
March on the fingers of one hand - and have a couple of spare fingers.
My fridge/freezer became unusable a few weeks back so I ventured out and
found a replacement locally. I think I was one of two customers in the
large showroom, the sales woman was not wearing a mask, saying they were
too uncomfortable to wear all day. It was delivered by two masked men who
took the old one away.

The scariest outings I've made have been to collect meds from the pharmacy
in the supermarket before masks became mandatory. Walking through the
narrow space between the tills and the wall, against the flow of customers.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-09 20:35:39 UTC
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Post by Penny
The scariest outings I've made have been to collect meds from the pharmacy
in the supermarket before masks became mandatory. Walking through the
narrow space between the tills and the wall, against the flow of customers.
Our pharmacy (down in the village - the return walk is good
cardio-vascular exercise) and has had pretty good precautions from the
start.

Max two customers allowed in the shop, with where to stand indicated.
Queueing outside is no problem (in good weather) - provided that the
first queue-ee stands to the right of the door. If they stand to the
left the queue for the pharmacy runs right into the queue for the bus
stop and...
--
Sam Plusnet
the Omrud
2020-10-08 15:37:45 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
a roadblock - I'm wondering, do we have them now?
I see that according to this morning's news that Nicola is thinking
that ensuring no-one crosses Hadrian's wall will save her empire from
the virus, so they should be appearing any time now - and isn't Wales
locked up in parts?
That's what I was wondering; the media tell us that certain areas (I
think only Wales so far) are "nobody in, nobody out", with certain
permitted exceptions. I was just wondering if this is actually being
enforced with roadblocks (or at least checkpoints); if so, this hasn't
been reported (at least I've not heard it so), and certainly not shown.
I don't know if I think it _should_ be or not; I can see strong
arguments on both sides. I presume, since going to work and other things
are justified reasons for crossing the "plague boundary", it isn't
actually practical to do it, at least without use of the military, which
I'm pretty sure _would_ have reached the news.
The word in the North West of England is that you're permitted to cross
the border to the closed counties, provided you are intending to
continue to a non-closed country beyond.
--
David
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-08 16:16:00 UTC
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Permalink
[]
Post by the Omrud
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
That's what I was wondering; the media tell us that certain areas (I
think only Wales so far) are "nobody in, nobody out", with certain
permitted exceptions. I was just wondering if this is actually being
enforced with roadblocks (or at least checkpoints); if so, this hasn't
been reported (at least I've not heard it so), and certainly not shown.
I don't know if I think it _should_ be or not; I can see strong
arguments on both sides. I presume, since going to work and other
things are justified reasons for crossing the "plague boundary", it
isn't actually practical to do it, at least without use of the
military, which I'm pretty sure _would_ have reached the news.
The word in the North West of England is that you're permitted to cross
the border to the closed counties, provided you are intending to
continue to a non-closed country beyond.
I remember during the height of the cold war (I think; would have been
1970s IIRR), going for a family holiday in (west of course!) Berlin,
from where we lived in (west) Germany. You had to get paperwork in
advance to cross east Germany, could only use specified routes (they
were autobahns, though noticeably more shabbily maintained), and had to
take within specified time limits to cross (too fast and they'd do you
for speeding, too slow and you might be picking up stowaways). The
paperwork was inspected by a (very young-looking, IIRR) Russian, rather
than German, border guard. (To whom my Dad spoke in Russian - natural,
as he spoke Russian; Dad told us when he got back in the car something
like "I bet I'm on all their records now", though. [I'm sure he was
anyway.])
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Bother," said Pooh, as Windows crashed into piglet.
Nick Odell
2020-10-09 02:54:42 UTC
Reply
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On Thu, 8 Oct 2020 17:16:00 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by the Omrud
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
That's what I was wondering; the media tell us that certain areas (I
think only Wales so far) are "nobody in, nobody out", with certain
permitted exceptions. I was just wondering if this is actually being
enforced with roadblocks (or at least checkpoints); if so, this hasn't
been reported (at least I've not heard it so), and certainly not shown.
I don't know if I think it _should_ be or not; I can see strong
arguments on both sides. I presume, since going to work and other
things are justified reasons for crossing the "plague boundary", it
isn't actually practical to do it, at least without use of the
military, which I'm pretty sure _would_ have reached the news.
The word in the North West of England is that you're permitted to cross
the border to the closed counties, provided you are intending to
continue to a non-closed country beyond.
I remember during the height of the cold war (I think; would have been
1970s IIRR), going for a family holiday in (west of course!) Berlin,
from where we lived in (west) Germany. You had to get paperwork in
advance to cross east Germany, could only use specified routes (they
were autobahns, though noticeably more shabbily maintained), and had to
take within specified time limits to cross (too fast and they'd do you
for speeding, too slow and you might be picking up stowaways). The
paperwork was inspected by a (very young-looking, IIRR) Russian, rather
than German, border guard. (To whom my Dad spoke in Russian - natural,
as he spoke Russian; Dad told us when he got back in the car something
like "I bet I'm on all their records now", though. [I'm sure he was
anyway.])
I can vouch -second hand - for the buracracy and fastidious
record-keeping on that side of the Iron Curtain.
Back in the 1950s, a friend's now-deceased socialist mother used to
holiday behind the Iron Curtain on tours organised by a communist
coach tour operator. Yes, really.

They would drive by coach through eastern Europe, into the Soviet
Union and see first-hand the Land of Milk and Honey of the propaganda
which had been carefully prepared for them beforehand.

On their way back home one year, one of the passengers had a heart
attack and died. They knew that if if their passenger list deviated in
any way from the version held by the authorities they would be held up
for days, weeks, maybe months, maybe on spying charges, who knows.
Anyway, a solution had to be found.

They wedged the corpse upright on the back seat between two other
passengers and when the border guards came round to check the
paperwork and the passports against the manifest, made out that their
friend had been drinking all night and was sleeping it off. They got
away with it too! The corpse was finally declared after they had
passed through a more friendly border.

Nick
Chris McMillan
2020-10-09 07:34:57 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 8 Oct 2020 17:16:00 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by the Omrud
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
That's what I was wondering; the media tell us that certain areas (I
think only Wales so far) are "nobody in, nobody out", with certain
permitted exceptions. I was just wondering if this is actually being
enforced with roadblocks (or at least checkpoints); if so, this hasn't
been reported (at least I've not heard it so), and certainly not shown.
I don't know if I think it _should_ be or not; I can see strong
arguments on both sides. I presume, since going to work and other
things are justified reasons for crossing the "plague boundary", it
isn't actually practical to do it, at least without use of the
military, which I'm pretty sure _would_ have reached the news.
The word in the North West of England is that you're permitted to cross
the border to the closed counties, provided you are intending to
continue to a non-closed country beyond.
I remember during the height of the cold war (I think; would have been
1970s IIRR), going for a family holiday in (west of course!) Berlin,
from where we lived in (west) Germany. You had to get paperwork in
advance to cross east Germany, could only use specified routes (they
were autobahns, though noticeably more shabbily maintained), and had to
take within specified time limits to cross (too fast and they'd do you
for speeding, too slow and you might be picking up stowaways). The
paperwork was inspected by a (very young-looking, IIRR) Russian, rather
than German, border guard. (To whom my Dad spoke in Russian - natural,
as he spoke Russian; Dad told us when he got back in the car something
like "I bet I'm on all their records now", though. [I'm sure he was
anyway.])
I can vouch -second hand - for the buracracy and fastidious
record-keeping on that side of the Iron Curtain.
Back in the 1950s, a friend's now-deceased socialist mother used to
holiday behind the Iron Curtain on tours organised by a communist
coach tour operator. Yes, really.
They would drive by coach through eastern Europe, into the Soviet
Union and see first-hand the Land of Milk and Honey of the propaganda
which had been carefully prepared for them beforehand.
On their way back home one year, one of the passengers had a heart
attack and died. They knew that if if their passenger list deviated in
any way from the version held by the authorities they would be held up
for days, weeks, maybe months, maybe on spying charges, who knows.
Anyway, a solution had to be found.
They wedged the corpse upright on the back seat between two other
passengers and when the border guards came round to check the
paperwork and the passports against the manifest, made out that their
friend had been drinking all night and was sleeping it off. They got
away with it too! The corpse was finally declared after they had
passed through a more friendly border.
Nick
First enacted by the court of Qin Shin Huangdi when he died unexpectedly
while on a long tour. The ruse was along the lines of the Emperor never
being seen by his populace, to hide the niff of the decomposing body
something equally noxious was used to ‘hide’ that smell. Rotten fish. The
charade had to exist for *two months* till the entourage got back to the
capital, now known as Xi’an.

Sincerely Chris
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-09 20:39:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 8 Oct 2020 17:16:00 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by the Omrud
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
That's what I was wondering; the media tell us that certain areas (I
think only Wales so far) are "nobody in, nobody out", with certain
permitted exceptions. I was just wondering if this is actually being
enforced with roadblocks (or at least checkpoints); if so, this hasn't
been reported (at least I've not heard it so), and certainly not shown.
I don't know if I think it _should_ be or not; I can see strong
arguments on both sides. I presume, since going to work and other
things are justified reasons for crossing the "plague boundary", it
isn't actually practical to do it, at least without use of the
military, which I'm pretty sure _would_ have reached the news.
The word in the North West of England is that you're permitted to cross
the border to the closed counties, provided you are intending to
continue to a non-closed country beyond.
I remember during the height of the cold war (I think; would have been
1970s IIRR), going for a family holiday in (west of course!) Berlin,
from where we lived in (west) Germany. You had to get paperwork in
advance to cross east Germany, could only use specified routes (they
were autobahns, though noticeably more shabbily maintained), and had to
take within specified time limits to cross (too fast and they'd do you
for speeding, too slow and you might be picking up stowaways). The
paperwork was inspected by a (very young-looking, IIRR) Russian, rather
than German, border guard. (To whom my Dad spoke in Russian - natural,
as he spoke Russian; Dad told us when he got back in the car something
like "I bet I'm on all their records now", though. [I'm sure he was
anyway.])
I can vouch -second hand - for the buracracy and fastidious
record-keeping on that side of the Iron Curtain.
Back in the 1950s, a friend's now-deceased socialist mother used to
holiday behind the Iron Curtain on tours organised by a communist
coach tour operator. Yes, really.
They would drive by coach through eastern Europe, into the Soviet
Union and see first-hand the Land of Milk and Honey of the propaganda
which had been carefully prepared for them beforehand.
On their way back home one year, one of the passengers had a heart
attack and died. They knew that if if their passenger list deviated in
any way from the version held by the authorities they would be held up
for days, weeks, maybe months, maybe on spying charges, who knows.
Anyway, a solution had to be found.
They wedged the corpse upright on the back seat between two other
passengers and when the border guards came round to check the
paperwork and the passports against the manifest, made out that their
friend had been drinking all night and was sleeping it off. They got
away with it too! The corpse was finally declared after they had
passed through a more friendly border.
Nick
First enacted by the court of Qin Shin Huangdi when he died unexpectedly
while on a long tour. The ruse was along the lines of the Emperor never
being seen by his populace, to hide the niff of the decomposing body
something equally noxious was used to ‘hide’ that smell. Rotten fish. The
charade had to exist for *two months* till the entourage got back to the
capital, now known as Xi’an.
But his soldiers still keep a stiff upper lip and, indeed, a stiff
everything else.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2020-10-08 19:22:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 8 Oct 2020 16:37:45 +0100, the Omrud <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by the Omrud
The word in the North West of England is that you're permitted to cross
the border to the closed counties, provided you are intending to
continue to a non-closed country beyond.
That seems to be the way it has been working in Europe. A chap I follow on
Instagram, who is ostensibly travelling 'around the world' on his bicycle
with a cat which adopted him en route, recently travelled (by car - he'd
damaged his ankle) from, I think Denmark, via Netherlands, Belgium and
France, to cross the channel to Dover and then home to Scotland recently.
He was told this was fine provided he did not get out of the vehicle in any
of the countries which were locked down at the time. The biggest problem he
faced was in Dover, where they didn't like the cat's Bosnian European
Passport and made him buy a new British (European) pet passport for £100
before letting them in.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2020-10-09 07:30:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by the Omrud
The word in the North West of England is that you're permitted to cross
the border to the closed counties, provided you are intending to
continue to a non-closed country beyond.
That seems to be the way it has been working in Europe. A chap I follow on
Instagram, who is ostensibly travelling 'around the world' on his bicycle
with a cat which adopted him en route, recently travelled (by car - he'd
damaged his ankle) from, I think Denmark, via Netherlands, Belgium and
France, to cross the channel to Dover and then home to Scotland recently.
He was told this was fine provided he did not get out of the vehicle in any
of the countries which were locked down at the time. The biggest problem he
faced was in Dover, where they didn't like the cat's Bosnian European
Passport and made him buy a new British (European) pet passport for £100
before letting them in.
Howls of laughter from here!

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2020-10-07 10:32:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 6 Oct 2020 23:25:57 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I happened to leave the TV on after the midday (well, 1 pm) news not too
long ago, and got hooked on the dramas they put on then - it's
insidious! There was a series called "The Land Girls", then when I left
on last Monday, "The Indian Doctor" - it's about, well, an Indian doctor
(and his wife), who comes to a small Welsh village as the doctor, after
the existing one dies. (1960s.) (BBC1 13:45 weekdays.)
I enjoyed it first time around, not watching the repeats - too much other
'saved' TV to get through.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
It actually has a lot in common with both the current situation with
covid (more on that below), and Ambridge: village shop, policeman, pub
... I suppose that's inevitable - standard village characters.
Obviously, there are glaring differences too - the time period, and of
course there's a pit (mine). But there's a lot of common "feel" - IMO,
anyway.
I hadn't considered that but do see what you mean. It reminded me more of
The Citadel - most recent series was recently broadcast weekdays 10:45.
Young doctors in Wales pre-NHS.

Drama, not comedy.

[...]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
The smallpox thing is very covid-like: closing the shop, pub, and mine;
lockdown (even to the extent of a roadblock - I'm wondering, do we have
them now? In bits of Wales even, as it happens!)
Welsh police have spent a lot of time in the past 7 months trying to keep
the English out of Wales - I blame Boris, who persisted in referring to
'the UK' when he meant England (and the English who don't know Wales is not
in England). The latest problem has apparently been English residents
travelling to Wales from their locally locked-down communities!
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I'm enjoying it;
I'm sure I've said before that the afternoon drama at 13:45 on BBC1 is
often worth a look. It is the usual slot for Doctors which, in normal
times, takes a summer break and would be worthy* of evening transmission.
They have repeated all the Mark Williams Father Brown series, and some good
soaps from Australia and New Zealand.

*I'm not sure why daytime TV is not considered 'worthy'. They've been
repeating 'The Repair Shop' in the early evenings, maybe, if production of
new dramas remains difficult, they will consider reshowing Doctors there,
I'm sure the cast would welcome the royalties.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Peter
2020-10-07 10:47:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
I hadn't considered that but do see what you mean. It reminded me more of
The Citadel
That is yer actual A.J. Cronin who drew on his own experience as a
dockator. /The stars look down/ preceded it
Post by Penny
- most recent series was recently broadcast weekdays 10:45.
Young doctors in Wales pre-NHS.
Drama, not comedy.
--
When, once, reference was made to a statesman almost universally
recognized as one of the villains of this century, in order to
induce him to a negative judgment, he replied: "My situation is
so different from his, that it is not for me to pass judgment".
Ernst Specker on Paul Bernays
Mike
2020-10-07 14:18:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by Penny
I hadn't considered that but do see what you mean. It reminded me more of
The Citadel
That is yer actual A.J. Cronin who drew on his own experience as a
dockator. /The stars look down/ preceded it
Post by Penny
- most recent series was recently broadcast weekdays 10:45.
Young doctors in Wales pre-NHS.
Drama, not comedy.
Dr Cinley’s Facebook is the updated version ;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-07 12:46:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 6 Oct 2020 23:25:57 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
on last Monday, "The Indian Doctor" - it's about, well, an Indian doctor
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
It actually has a lot in common with both the current situation with
covid (more on that below), and Ambridge: village shop, policeman, pub
... I suppose that's inevitable - standard village characters.
Obviously, there are glaring differences too - the time period, and of
course there's a pit (mine). But there's a lot of common "feel" - IMO,
anyway.
I hadn't considered that but do see what you mean. It reminded me more of
The Citadel - most recent series was recently broadcast weekdays 10:45.
Young doctors in Wales pre-NHS.
I caught some of that (though I think it might have been a different
time of day). I agree, very good.
Post by Vicky Ayech
Drama, not comedy.
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I'm enjoying it;
I'm sure I've said before that the afternoon drama at 13:45 on BBC1 is
often worth a look. It is the usual slot for Doctors which, in normal
times, takes a summer break and would be worthy* of evening transmission.
That's good, too.
Post by Vicky Ayech
They have repeated all the Mark Williams Father Brown series, and some good
soaps from Australia and New Zealand.
*I'm not sure why daytime TV is not considered 'worthy'. They've been
I guess - at least before covid - the reason was a combination of the
audience _numbers_ being smaller (and for commercial stations, probably
having less money to spend on things advertised, so advertisers less
interested), and a perception (however unjustified) that the audience is
indolent. The implication that, in the daytime, you should be doing
something productive, even if not for money - gardening, home repairs,
voluntary work, and the like.
Post by Vicky Ayech
repeating 'The Repair Shop' in the early evenings, maybe, if production of
Yes.
Post by Vicky Ayech
new dramas remains difficult, they will consider reshowing Doctors there,
I'm sure the cast would welcome the royalties.
And lots of back-catalogue stuff, from years - even decades - ago, would
IMO benefit from repetition. There seems to be a reluctance (with the
exception, for some reason, of Dad's Army - I've nothing against that,
but YKWIM!) to show old stuff. Lots of stuff from the 60s/70s/80s, even
50s. (And probably 90s.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

And every day in Britain, 33 properties are sold for around that price [a
million pounds or so]. - Jane Rackham, RT 2015/4/11-17
krw
2020-10-07 13:24:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
There seems to be a reluctance (with the exception, for some reason, of
Dad's Army - I've nothing against that, but YKWIM!) to show old stuff.
Lots of stuff from the 60s/70s/80s, even 50s. (And probably 90s.)
Less reluctance I suspect than getting appropriate approvals. The
writers of Dad's Army were around until relatively recently and at least
a few of the cast so approvals may have been written into the contracts
or deals agreed.

Earlier material may well have been wiped by the BBC (ITV have all but
one episode of Coronation Street I believe) - chunks of Dr Who and
others are missing. I believe that they have the complete black and
white Forsyte saga, but refuse to show it because it is in black and white.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-07 15:31:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
There seems to be a reluctance (with the exception, for some reason,
of Dad's Army - I've nothing against that, but YKWIM!) to show old
stuff. Lots of stuff from the 60s/70s/80s, even 50s. (And probably 90s.)
Less reluctance I suspect than getting appropriate approvals. The
writers of Dad's Army were around until relatively recently and at
least a few of the cast so approvals may have been written into the
contracts or deals agreed.
You may be right.
Post by krw
Earlier material may well have been wiped by the BBC (ITV have all but
one episode of Coronation Street I believe) - chunks of Dr Who and
others are missing. I believe that they have the complete black and
white Forsyte saga, but refuse to show it because it is in black and white.
Yes, and before long, they'll also say it's not in HD. But it's a
fallacy to some extent: if the storyline is gripping and the acting fair
or good, I for one don't _notice_ technical shortcomings: the wooden
spaceship in Blake's 7, for example, or the wobbly walls in Cell Block
H.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Wisdom is the ability to cope. - the late (AB of C) Michael Ramsey,
quoted by Stephen Fry (RT 24-30 August 2013)
krw
2020-10-07 15:58:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
or the wobbly walls in Cell Block H.
Surely they make prison breaks easier?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
John Ashby
2020-10-07 17:45:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
or the wobbly walls in Cell Block H.
Surely they make prison breaks easier?
Niche holiday marketing?

john
Mike
2020-10-07 18:01:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by krw
or the wobbly walls in Cell Block H.
Surely they make prison breaks easier?
Niche holiday marketing?
john
Make sure you take your cellphone...
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2020-10-07 19:41:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by krw
or the wobbly walls in Cell Block H.
Surely they make prison breaks easier?
Niche holiday marketing?
Been done...
https://www.mirror.co.uk/travel/news/10-former-prisons-turned-hotels-13985252

Nick
Vicky Ayech
2020-10-07 21:23:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
There seems to be a reluctance (with the exception, for some reason, of
Dad's Army - I've nothing against that, but YKWIM!) to show old stuff.
Lots of stuff from the 60s/70s/80s, even 50s. (And probably 90s.)
Less reluctance I suspect than getting appropriate approvals. The
writers of Dad's Army were around until relatively recently and at least
a few of the cast so approvals may have been written into the contracts
or deals agreed.
Earlier material may well have been wiped by the BBC (ITV have all but
one episode of Coronation Street I believe) - chunks of Dr Who and
others are missing. I believe that they have the complete black and
white Forsyte saga, but refuse to show it because it is in black and white.
UKTV show lots of old series. They can't mostly afford the newest ones
except now they have just begun commisioning some new ones. (Daughter
#2's channels have) There are lots of repeats of older stuff on the
subscription services too: Netflix, Now, Amazon, Britbox. And free on
4 player. That has some good ones.
Nick Odell
2020-10-08 18:45:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 07 Oct 2020 22:23:05 +0100, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by krw
There seems to be a reluctance (with the exception, for some reason, of
Dad's Army - I've nothing against that, but YKWIM!) to show old stuff.
Lots of stuff from the 60s/70s/80s, even 50s. (And probably 90s.)
Less reluctance I suspect than getting appropriate approvals. The
writers of Dad's Army were around until relatively recently and at least
a few of the cast so approvals may have been written into the contracts
or deals agreed.
Earlier material may well have been wiped by the BBC (ITV have all but
one episode of Coronation Street I believe) - chunks of Dr Who and
others are missing. I believe that they have the complete black and
white Forsyte saga, but refuse to show it because it is in black and white.
UKTV show lots of old series. They can't mostly afford the newest ones
except now they have just begun commisioning some new ones. (Daughter
#2's channels have) There are lots of repeats of older stuff on the
subscription services too: Netflix, Now, Amazon, Britbox. And free on
4 player. That has some good ones.
From what I have read elsewhere, your Daughter #2 must be desperately
glad that her channels did not pick up Emily in Paris.

Nick
Tony Bryer
2020-10-07 22:53:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Earlier material may well have been wiped by the BBC (ITV have all but
one episode of Coronation Street I believe) - chunks of Dr Who and
others are missing. I believe that they have the complete black and
white Forsyte saga, but refuse to show it because it is in black and white.
My lockdown project is to watch my entire DVD collection from start to
finish. As I have pointed out to friends on numerous occasions, a look at my
DVDs will show I am a very mixed up person.

Last week's viewing was the Forsyte Saga, all 1295 minutes of it (according
to the box). It is a tragedy that it wasn't made a year or two later in
colour, but in the DVD extras the producer is interviewed and said that the
extra cost of colour couldn't be justified.

By the time I got to the end, I was left wondering whether I had ever watched
it all. Anyone who has seen it it would remember the rape scene, the
arguments between Soames and Bosinney over the cost of the house, the
latter's death and the immediate aftermath, but at that point you're only
something like one third in - the 1920s Fleur/Michael storyline goes on and
on and on.

Still to come are epics in a similar genre: the Pallisers, Clayhanger,
Strangers and Brothers and, of course, Brideshead. With Spiceworld, Dirty
Dancing, Grease and the rest of the G&S canon - I told you I was a mixed-up
person!
--
Tony B, OzRat, Melbourne
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-07 23:47:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 8 Oct 2020 at 09:53:49, Tony Bryer <***@delme.greentram.com>
wrote:
[]
Post by Tony Bryer
Still to come are epics in a similar genre: the Pallisers, Clayhanger,
Strangers and Brothers and, of course, Brideshead. With Spiceworld, Dirty
Dancing, Grease and the rest of the G&S canon - I told you I was a mixed-up
person!
Wow, Gilbert and Sullivan were a lot more versatile than I thought!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I hope you dream a pig.
Vicky Ayech
2020-10-08 08:18:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 08 Oct 2020 09:53:49 +1100, Tony Bryer
Post by Tony Bryer
Post by krw
Earlier material may well have been wiped by the BBC (ITV have all but
one episode of Coronation Street I believe) - chunks of Dr Who and
others are missing. I believe that they have the complete black and
white Forsyte saga, but refuse to show it because it is in black and white.
My lockdown project is to watch my entire DVD collection from start to
finish. As I have pointed out to friends on numerous occasions, a look at my
DVDs will show I am a very mixed up person.
Last week's viewing was the Forsyte Saga, all 1295 minutes of it (according
to the box). It is a tragedy that it wasn't made a year or two later in
colour, but in the DVD extras the producer is interviewed and said that the
extra cost of colour couldn't be justified.
By the time I got to the end, I was left wondering whether I had ever watched
it all. Anyone who has seen it it would remember the rape scene, the
arguments between Soames and Bosinney over the cost of the house, the
latter's death and the immediate aftermath, but at that point you're only
something like one third in - the 1920s Fleur/Michael storyline goes on and
on and on.
Still to come are epics in a similar genre: the Pallisers, Clayhanger,
Strangers and Brothers and, of course, Brideshead. With Spiceworld, Dirty
Dancing, Grease and the rest of the G&S canon - I told you I was a mixed-up
person!
I've not seen any of those. I'm currently up to about season 11 of The
Big Bang Theory and am enjoying ER on the 4 player. I was re-watching
The West Wing for at least the third time but the sound is not good
and no subtitles. We watch Father Browns and Midsommer Murders and
Hetty Wainthrop and re-watch Lewis and Morse. I don't really want to
re-watch Endeavour.
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