Discussion:
Deliveries
(too old to reply)
krw
2019-01-05 11:34:42 UTC
Permalink
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery man
wanted my first name. I refused (never keen on using such names). He
then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.

I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.

Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
LFS
2019-01-05 11:46:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery man
wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).  He
then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Over the holiday period we have often been the only householders at home
in our close of seven houses. Delivery people of all sorts, including
Amazon, have knocked at our door and asked us to take things in for our
neighbours. No-one has asked for a signature.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-05 13:42:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery man
wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).  He
then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Over the holiday period we have often been the only householders at home
in our close of seven houses. Delivery people of all sorts, including
Amazon, have knocked at our door and asked us to take things in for our
neighbours. No-one has asked for a signature.
There are different levels of post. Just a stamp, signed for, tracked
delivery. That is the PO. Amazon have other rules.
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2019-01-05 13:51:24 UTC
Permalink
Post office called while I was out and popped a foreign "tracked" packet through the letter box.
Penny
2019-01-05 17:02:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
Post office called while I was out and popped a foreign "tracked" packet through the letter box.
I ordered many small things from a Chinese website the other day. They were
promised 'by 28 Jan' and 'by 1 Feb' and as I don't need them until mid-Feb
that was fine by me. The website claims to offer tracking. Everything is
currently marked as 'shipping' yet three items have already arrived (in
individually shipped packets). No signature required.

Royal Mail tracking it pretty good these days and they do seem to be able
to track the packets but as they get here pretty quickly once in the RM
system it's not that useful.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Clive Arthur
2019-01-05 15:29:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such
names).  He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Over the holiday period we have often been the only householders at home
in our close of seven houses. Delivery people of all sorts, including
Amazon, have knocked at our door and asked us to take things in for our
neighbours. No-one has asked for a signature.
I had a signed-for delivery while I was on holiday, and the signature
was there on the delivery company's tracking page. Actually, it wasn't
bad, but not mine of course.

When I got home, there was the package. I'm quite happy that the
delivery person forged a signature.

Cheers
--
Clive
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-05 11:46:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery man
wanted my first name. I refused (never keen on using such names). He
then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Never been asked but B is saying it is because you could be the
visiting plumber. I take parcels in and sign. Nobody could read my
signature.
Mike
2019-01-05 13:55:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery man
wanted my first name. I refused (never keen on using such names). He
then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
If your company has any connection with Amazon, Google or Micro$coff, it
would appear you can do just whatever you bloody well like - you are above
the law and the taxman too. (I can’t help but remember the one about the
curvaceous lady who when refused a service by a jobsworth, declaimed that
she ‘Has a divine right!’ To which the jobsworth retorted ‘Your left is
pretty good too, but the answer is still “No”.’
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-06 02:30:57 UTC
Permalink
In message <AH2YD.16520$***@fx07.am4>, Mike
<***@ntlworld.com> writes:
[]
Post by Mike
the law and the taxman too. (I can’t help but remember the one about the
curvaceous lady who when refused a service by a jobsworth, declaimed that
she ‘Has a divine right!’ To which the jobsworth retorted ‘Your left is
pretty good too, but the answer is still “No”.’
A variation on knocking him out, saying "and I have a perfect left".
[]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"You realise, Fraser, that what happened between us can never repeat itself.
Unless, of course, the exact same circumstances were to repeat themselves." "By
exact same circumstances, sir, you mean: we would have to be aboard a train
loaded with unconscious Mounties, that had been taken over by terrorists, and
were heading for a nuclear catastrophe?" "Exactly." "Understood."
Nick Odell
2019-01-05 13:56:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery man
wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).  He
then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Anything "interesting" in the package? Guns? Knives? Explosives?
Poisons? 18+ videos? Something that they need to prove was not left in
the hands of a child?

Nick
Mike
2019-01-05 14:15:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery man
wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).  He
then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Anything "interesting" in the package? Guns? Knives? Explosives?
Poisons? 18+ videos? Something that they need to prove was not left in
the hands of a child?
Nick
ITYM high sugar content drinks, sweets or chocolate!
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2019-01-06 11:45:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such
names).  He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Anything "interesting" in the package? Guns? Knives? Explosives?
Poisons? 18+ videos? Something that they need to prove was not left in
the hands of a child?
Nick
Apparently something to do with something called vaping of which I have
no knowledge and I would have to as m'learned friend to explain it to me.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Sid Nuncius
2019-01-05 17:59:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery man
wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).  He
then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Don't tell him, Pike!
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Fenny
2019-01-05 19:44:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery man
wanted my first name. I refused (never keen on using such names). He
then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Whilst waiting at the sorting office to pick up a parcel [1], a chap
was asked for a signature for his package. He signed "not my name"
and claimed he wasn't letting anyone have an electronic copy of his
signature. No argument from the RM chap.

RM chap knows me and never bothers asking for ID. I only ever have to
provide it when someone else is on the front desk.

[1] Must bring both the delivery card and proof of ID
--
Fenny
Nick Leverton
2019-01-05 20:11:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery man
wanted my first name. I refused (never keen on using such names). He
then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Whilst waiting at the sorting office to pick up a parcel [1], a chap
was asked for a signature for his package. He signed "not my name"
and claimed he wasn't letting anyone have an electronic copy of his
signature. No argument from the RM chap.
I just scribble a random squiggle if asked to "sign" anything electronically.

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Nick Odell
2019-01-05 21:46:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Fenny
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery man
wanted my first name. I refused (never keen on using such names). He
then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Whilst waiting at the sorting office to pick up a parcel [1], a chap
was asked for a signature for his package. He signed "not my name"
and claimed he wasn't letting anyone have an electronic copy of his
signature. No argument from the RM chap.
I just scribble a random squiggle if asked to "sign" anything electronically.
I still haven't mastered the art of writing anything intelligible on
those devices.

Nick
Sam Plusnet
2019-01-05 22:44:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Fenny
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery man
wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).  He
then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Whilst waiting at the sorting office to pick up a parcel [1], a chap
was asked for a signature for his package.  He signed "not my name"
and claimed he wasn't letting anyone have an electronic copy of his
signature.  No argument from the RM chap.
I just scribble a random squiggle if asked to "sign" anything
electronically.
I still haven't mastered the art of writing anything intelligible on
those devices.
Has anyone?
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Leverton
2019-01-05 23:36:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Fenny
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery man
wanted my first name. I refused (never keen on using such names). He
then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Whilst waiting at the sorting office to pick up a parcel [1], a chap
was asked for a signature for his package. He signed "not my name"
and claimed he wasn't letting anyone have an electronic copy of his
signature. No argument from the RM chap.
I just scribble a random squiggle if asked to "sign" anything electronically.
I still haven't mastered the art of writing anything intelligible on
those devices.
Me neither, so why waste effort trying ? :)

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Chris McMillan
2019-01-06 13:38:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Fenny
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery man
wanted my first name. I refused (never keen on using such names). He
then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Whilst waiting at the sorting office to pick up a parcel [1], a chap
was asked for a signature for his package. He signed "not my name"
and claimed he wasn't letting anyone have an electronic copy of his
signature. No argument from the RM chap.
I just scribble a random squiggle if asked to "sign" anything electronically.
I still haven't mastered the art of writing anything intelligible on
those devices.
Nick
And I never will. I can’t hold the pen upright, my natural hold is with
hand on page.

Um, what ID proof does one need for parcel collection? Not we have need so
far, we just do re-deliver, but one every knows these days ... would it be
passport or driving licence?

Sincerely Chris
Jenny M Benson
2019-01-06 13:48:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Um, what ID proof does one need for parcel collection? Not we have need so
far, we just do re-deliver, but one every knows these days ... would it be
passport or driving licence?
Here in Wrecsam they accept my Bus Pass as ID, but it's not on their
official list and I don't know whether every Office would accept it. It
does have an appalling photo of me, but not my address.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Chris McMillan
2019-01-06 19:18:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris McMillan
Um, what ID proof does one need for parcel collection? Not we have need so
far, we just do re-deliver, but one every knows these days ... would it be
passport or driving licence?
Here in Wrecsam they accept my Bus Pass as ID, but it's not on their
official list and I don't know whether every Office would accept it. It
does have an appalling photo of me, but not my address.
Suspect a big place like Reading would.

Sincerely Chris
Sam Plusnet
2019-01-06 20:49:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Um, what ID proof does one need for parcel collection? Not we have need so
far, we just do re-deliver, but one every knows these days ... would it be
passport or driving licence?
Take along all four grandparents, each with their passports & copies of
two utility bills, and they can vouch for you.
--
Sam Plusnet
Chris McMillan
2019-01-07 09:26:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Chris McMillan
Um, what ID proof does one need for parcel collection? Not we have need so
far, we just do re-deliver, but one every knows these days ... would it be
passport or driving licence?
Take along all four grandparents, each with their passports & copies of
two utility bills, and they can vouch for you.
Bit difficult that one! :). And one grandad never knew me anyway!

Sincerely Chris
Nick Leverton
2019-01-06 21:00:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Leverton
I just scribble a random squiggle if asked to "sign" anything electronically.
I still haven't mastered the art of writing anything intelligible on
those devices.
Nick
And I never will. I can’t hold the pen upright, my natural hold is with
hand on page.
Um, what ID proof does one need for parcel collection? Not we have need so
far, we just do re-deliver, but one every knows these days ... would it be
passport or driving licence?
They will do, but it can be just a bank card or a bus pass.
<https://personal.help.royalmail.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/146/~/ive-missed-my-delivery-and-youve-left-a-red-card---what-do-i-need-to-do%3F>
has a full list.

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Chris McMillan
2019-01-07 09:26:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Leverton
I just scribble a random squiggle if asked to "sign" anything electronically.
I still haven't mastered the art of writing anything intelligible on
those devices.
Nick
And I never will. I can’t hold the pen upright, my natural hold is with
hand on page.
Um, what ID proof does one need for parcel collection? Not we have need so
far, we just do re-deliver, but one every knows these days ... would it be
passport or driving licence?
They will do, but it can be just a bank card or a bus pass.
<https://personal.help.royalmail.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/146/~/ive-missed-my-delivery-and-youve-left-a-red-card---what-do-i-need-to-do%3F>
has a full list.
Nick
Oh thanks for that!

Sincerely Chris
Serena Blanchflower
2019-01-07 10:04:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Leverton
I just scribble a random squiggle if asked to "sign" anything electronically.
I still haven't mastered the art of writing anything intelligible on
those devices.
Nick
And I never will. I can’t hold the pen upright, my natural hold is with
hand on page.
Um, what ID proof does one need for parcel collection? Not we have need so
far, we just do re-deliver, but one every knows these days ... would it be
passport or driving licence?
They will do, but it can be just a bank card or a bus pass.
<https://personal.help.royalmail.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/146/~/ive-missed-my-delivery-and-youve-left-a-red-card---what-do-i-need-to-do%3F>
has a full list.
A list which caused some consternation to a friend of mine recently.
Her adult daughter had ordered something and, because she wouldn't be at
home, had arranged for it to be delivered to her mother's house. It
arrived while Mum was out and needed to be collected from the sorting
office.

When my friend checked what ID was needed, she foresaw a problem. Her
name didn't match the name on the parcel, although her address matched
OK. If it was left till daughter could collect it, daughter's name
would be fine but the address wouldn't match...

Fortunately, when my friend went to collect it, they didn't bother to
check her ID at all.
--
Best wishes, Serena
If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Then quit. There's no
point in being a damn fool about it (W. C. Fields)
Penny
2019-01-07 10:32:58 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 7 Jan 2019 10:04:07 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Leverton
I just scribble a random squiggle if asked to "sign" anything electronically.
I still haven't mastered the art of writing anything intelligible on
those devices.
Nick
And I never will. I can’t hold the pen upright, my natural hold is with
hand on page.
Um, what ID proof does one need for parcel collection? Not we have need so
far, we just do re-deliver, but one every knows these days ... would it be
passport or driving licence?
They will do, but it can be just a bank card or a bus pass.
<https://personal.help.royalmail.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/146/~/ive-missed-my-delivery-and-youve-left-a-red-card---what-do-i-need-to-do%3F>
has a full list.
A list which caused some consternation to a friend of mine recently.
Her adult daughter had ordered something and, because she wouldn't be at
home, had arranged for it to be delivered to her mother's house. It
arrived while Mum was out and needed to be collected from the sorting
office.
When my friend checked what ID was needed, she foresaw a problem. Her
name didn't match the name on the parcel, although her address matched
OK. If it was left till daughter could collect it, daughter's name
would be fine but the address wouldn't match...
Fortunately, when my friend went to collect it, they didn't bother to
check her ID at all.
There used to be a place on the left parcel form for the intended recipient
to fill in the name of the person who was collecting the parcel for them.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Penny
2019-01-07 15:57:04 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 07 Jan 2019 10:32:58 +0000, Penny <***@labyrinth.freeuk.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
There used to be a place on the left parcel form for the intended recipient
to fill in the name of the person who was collecting the parcel for them.
My impatient postman didn't even ring the doorbell this morning (though he
may have tapped on the door) but put two parcels somewhere sensible and
left me a card.

Struggling to find the English version (I hate it when they run these
things together) I see it says,
"If someone else is collecting, you must give them your ID and this card"

Suggested ID on the card are:
valid passport
debit/credit card
driving licence

I imagine lots of people will have none of those things and may change my
habit of sending parcels to grandchildren addressed to the child...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2019-01-07 16:00:24 UTC
Permalink
Avoid nicknames too. I was in our sorting office when someone was refused an item as he had no ID with his nickname on it.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-06 02:37:17 UTC
Permalink
In message <q0r30k$ud6$***@leverton.org>, Nick Leverton
<***@leverton.org> writes:
[]
Post by Nick Leverton
I just scribble a random squiggle if asked to "sign" anything electronically.
Nick
My signature is just a squiggle anyway, but what ends up on those
electronic things looks little like it - not that I'm _trying_ to be
deceitful, just that the dynamics of those devices result in something
that doesn't look like my normal squiggle.

They seem rather pointless anyway: so far, I don't think any delivery
person will have had a copy of my signature to compare to, so it isn't
much of a check that the person receiving is me. And if it's not
intended for that but just to have a record of who _did_ sign, then
surely anyone deliberately receiving fraudulently would use other than
their normal anyway.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"You realise, Fraser, that what happened between us can never repeat itself.
Unless, of course, the exact same circumstances were to repeat themselves." "By
exact same circumstances, sir, you mean: we would have to be aboard a train
loaded with unconscious Mounties, that had been taken over by terrorists, and
were heading for a nuclear catastrophe?" "Exactly." "Understood."
Mike
2019-01-06 09:00:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Nick Leverton
I just scribble a random squiggle if asked to "sign" anything electronically.
Nick
My signature is just a squiggle anyway, but what ends up on those
electronic things looks little like it - not that I'm _trying_ to be
deceitful, just that the dynamics of those devices result in something
that doesn't look like my normal squiggle.
They seem rather pointless anyway: so far, I don't think any delivery
person will have had a copy of my signature to compare to, so it isn't
much of a check that the person receiving is me. And if it's not
intended for that but just to have a record of who _did_ sign, then
surely anyone deliberately receiving fraudulently would use other than
their normal anyway.
At work,for years, I signed ‘Winston Churchill’ no objections were ever
muttered.
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2019-01-06 20:50:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Nick Leverton
I just scribble a random squiggle if asked to "sign" anything electronically.
Nick
My signature is just a squiggle anyway, but what ends up on those
electronic things looks little like it - not that I'm _trying_ to be
deceitful, just that the dynamics of those devices result in something
that doesn't look like my normal squiggle.
They seem rather pointless anyway: so far, I don't think any delivery
person will have had a copy of my signature to compare to, so it isn't
much of a check that the person receiving is me. And if it's not
intended for that but just to have a record of who _did_ sign, then
surely anyone deliberately receiving fraudulently would use other than
their normal anyway.
At work,for years, I signed ‘Winston Churchill’ no objections were ever
muttered.
I thought it was new born babies who looked like Winston?
--
Sam Plusnet
Kate B
2019-01-07 14:28:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Nick Leverton
I just scribble a random squiggle if asked to "sign" anything
electronically.
Nick
My signature is just a squiggle anyway, but what ends up on those
electronic things looks little like it - not that I'm _trying_ to be
deceitful, just that the dynamics of those devices result in something
that doesn't look like my normal squiggle.
They seem rather pointless anyway: so far, I don't think any delivery
person will have had a copy of my signature to compare to, so it isn't
much of a check that the person receiving is me. And if it's not
intended for that but just to have a record of who _did_ sign, then
surely anyone deliberately receiving fraudulently would use other than
their normal anyway.
I think it's simply to prove (FCVOP) that it was given to a person at
the address. When sending 'signed-for' letters that I need to know have
got to their destination, I'm quite glad to see the squiggle on the
tracking page, as it can be used to show official receipt.
--
Kate B
London
Fred
2019-01-06 09:05:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
Whilst waiting at the sorting office to pick up a parcel [1], a chap
was asked for a signature for his package. He signed "not my name"
and claimed he wasn't letting anyone have an electronic copy of his
signature. No argument from the RM chap.
Some years ago I read that in Leftpondians never check the signature on card purchases (long before chip'n'dale) so I spent a very happy holiday in the States signing my receipts as, "Not my name", "This isn't me" and "Don't accept this signature".
At one point I asked the cashier about it and he said that the card company paid regardless, so what was the point of checking.
All transactions went through without a hitch.

Fred
Flop
2019-01-06 11:56:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fred
Post by Fenny
Whilst waiting at the sorting office to pick up a parcel [1], a chap
was asked for a signature for his package. He signed "not my name"
and claimed he wasn't letting anyone have an electronic copy of his
signature. No argument from the RM chap.
Some years ago I read that in Leftpondians never check the signature on card purchases (long before chip'n'dale) so I spent a very happy holiday in the States signing my receipts as, "Not my name", "This isn't me" and "Don't accept this signature".
At one point I asked the cashier about it and he said that the card company paid regardless, so what was the point of checking.
All transactions went through without a hitch.
Fred
Often they would check signatures [1] for paper validation [2] but the
signature on the back of a card is as reliable as the one on a RM
'signed for' machine.

So... the card company paid the retailer and charged the card holder.
This made fraud an open offer. Just steal a card and you are unstoppable.

What many people did was to write 'CID' instead of a signature.

[1] I am informed that signatures should be compared upside down.
Looking at them the correct way up tends to compare words (names).
Upside down compares patterns.

[2] The old hand held printer. Put the card on the platen; cover with
the payslip containing a carbon sheet; roll and print; then get the
receipt signed.
--
Flop

I want to re-marry my ex.
She thinks I am after my money.
Penny
2019-01-06 12:47:02 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 11:56:04 +0000, Flop <***@flop.knot.me.uk> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Flop
Post by Fred
Post by Fenny
Whilst waiting at the sorting office to pick up a parcel [1], a chap
was asked for a signature for his package. He signed "not my name"
and claimed he wasn't letting anyone have an electronic copy of his
signature. No argument from the RM chap.
Some years ago I read that in Leftpondians never check the signature on card purchases (long before chip'n'dale) so I spent a very happy holiday in the States signing my receipts as, "Not my name", "This isn't me" and "Don't accept this signature".
At one point I asked the cashier about it and he said that the card company paid regardless, so what was the point of checking.
All transactions went through without a hitch.
Fred
Often they would check signatures [1] for paper validation [2] but the
signature on the back of a card is as reliable as the one on a RM
'signed for' machine.
So... the card company paid the retailer and charged the card holder.
This made fraud an open offer. Just steal a card and you are unstoppable.
What many people did was to write 'CID' instead of a signature.
[1] I am informed that signatures should be compared upside down.
Looking at them the correct way up tends to compare words (names).
Upside down compares patterns.
[2] The old hand held printer. Put the card on the platen; cover with
the payslip containing a carbon sheet; roll and print; then get the
receipt signed.
It became very clear to me, after a burglary in which cheque books and
cards from two different accounts were stolen, that neither shops nor banks
were checking account numbers, let alone signatures, properly.

I'd informed the bank of the stolen cheque numbers but the one cheque which
subsequently appeared on my statement had been 'validated' by the card from
the other account. Not only that, but the cheque had been destroyed once it
was logged onto the system so no fingerprints were available from it.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2019-01-06 15:55:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by Flop
Post by Fred
Post by Fenny
Whilst waiting at the sorting office to pick up a parcel [1], a chap
was asked for a signature for his package. He signed "not my name"
and claimed he wasn't letting anyone have an electronic copy of his
signature. No argument from the RM chap.
Some years ago I read that in Leftpondians never check the signature on card purchases (long before chip'n'dale) so I spent a very happy holiday in the States signing my receipts as, "Not my name", "This isn't me" and "Don't accept this signature".
At one point I asked the cashier about it and he said that the card company paid regardless, so what was the point of checking.
All transactions went through without a hitch.
Fred
Often they would check signatures [1] for paper validation [2] but the
signature on the back of a card is as reliable as the one on a RM
'signed for' machine.
So... the card company paid the retailer and charged the card holder.
This made fraud an open offer. Just steal a card and you are unstoppable.
What many people did was to write 'CID' instead of a signature.
[1] I am informed that signatures should be compared upside down.
Looking at them the correct way up tends to compare words (names).
Upside down compares patterns.
[2] The old hand held printer. Put the card on the platen; cover with
the payslip containing a carbon sheet; roll and print; then get the
receipt signed.
It became very clear to me, after a burglary in which cheque books and
cards from two different accounts were stolen, that neither shops nor banks
were checking account numbers, let alone signatures, properly.
I'd informed the bank of the stolen cheque numbers but the one cheque which
subsequently appeared on my statement had been 'validated' by the card from
the other account. Not only that, but the cheque had been destroyed once it
was logged onto the system so no fingerprints were available from it.
Many years ago, in the days when banks printed your details into a new
cheque book semi-manually, my parents in law were sent a new cheque book
on husbad's and my account, rather than their own[1]. The surnames were
the same, as were the number of initials. The actual initials were
different though, as were the account numbers.

Parents in law didn't notice for a week or two and neither did anyone in
any of the shops they had bought stuff from. When we thought about it,
afterwards we realised that, when checking the cheque details, the shop
assistant never had both the cheque and cheque card right way up at the
same time. While looking at the face of the cheque card, they'd have
the cheque face down, so they could copy the card details onto the back.
They'd then turn both over[3] and compare the signatures which, of
course, matched nicely.

When parents in law realised what had happened, Bankleys didn't cover
themselves with glory. They seemed extremely unconcerned and just told
us to sort it out between ourselves. Fortunately, on one hand, we were
on good terms with one another and, on the other hand, it must have been
at the right end of the month so it hadn't made us overdrawn, so we were
able to do this but none of us were very impressed by their attitude.



[1] We all banked at the same branch of the same bank. We think that
they must have requested their new cheque book at the same time we had
requested one, and the bank failed to notice that they hadn't changed to
a new block[2] between printing the two books.
[2] Or whatever the blocks used for printing were called.
[3] Or vice versa
--
Best wishes, Serena
People are forever calling me a hypochondriac and, let me tell you, that
makes me sick.
Jenny M Benson
2019-01-06 17:51:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Many years ago, in the days when banks printed your details into a new
cheque book semi-manually, my parents in law were sent a new cheque book
on husbad's and my account, rather than their own[1].  The surnames were
the same, as were the number of initials.  The actual initials were
different though, as were the account numbers.
Parents in law didn't notice for a week or two and neither did anyone in
any of the shops they had bought stuff from.  When we thought about it,
afterwards we realised that, when checking the cheque details, the shop
assistant never had both the cheque and cheque card right way up at the
same time.  While looking at the face of the cheque card, they'd have
the cheque face down, so they could copy the card details onto the back.
 They'd then turn both over[3] and compare the signatures which, of
course, matched nicely.
When parents in law realised what had happened, Bankleys didn't cover
themselves with glory.  They seemed extremely unconcerned and just told
us to sort it out between ourselves.  Fortunately, on one hand, we were
on good terms with one another and, on the other hand, it must have been
at the right end of the month so it hadn't made us overdrawn, so we were
able to do this but none of us were very impressed by their attitude.
I may have mentioned before that I wasn't impressed when Barclay's lost
a deposit of mine between my local branch when I paid it in and the
office where it should have been credited to my account. When I was
complaining about this they thought it must be the other branch which
was at fault because they "weren't that much down that night." I'd
always imagine no one would be allowed to leave until the books balanced.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Mike
2019-01-06 18:25:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Many years ago, in the days when banks printed your details into a new
cheque book semi-manually, my parents in law were sent a new cheque book
on husbad's and my account, rather than their own[1].  The surnames were
the same, as were the number of initials.  The actual initials were
different though, as were the account numbers.
Parents in law didn't notice for a week or two and neither did anyone in
any of the shops they had bought stuff from.  When we thought about it,
afterwards we realised that, when checking the cheque details, the shop
assistant never had both the cheque and cheque card right way up at the
same time.  While looking at the face of the cheque card, they'd have
the cheque face down, so they could copy the card details onto the back.
 They'd then turn both over[3] and compare the signatures which, of
course, matched nicely.
When parents in law realised what had happened, Bankleys didn't cover
themselves with glory.  They seemed extremely unconcerned and just told
us to sort it out between ourselves.  Fortunately, on one hand, we were
on good terms with one another and, on the other hand, it must have been
at the right end of the month so it hadn't made us overdrawn, so we were
able to do this but none of us were very impressed by their attitude.
I may have mentioned before that I wasn't impressed when Barclay's lost
a deposit of mine between my local branch when I paid it in and the
office where it should have been credited to my account. When I was
complaining about this they thought it must be the other branch which
was at fault because they "weren't that much down that night." I'd
always imagine no one would be allowed to leave until the books balanced.
AIUI, banks keep a ‘slush fund’ these days so that they erhem, ‘adjust’
minor discrepancies up or down, thus enabling staff to nugger off at the
end of the working day.
--
Toodle Pip
John Ashby
2019-01-06 19:05:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Many years ago, in the days when banks printed your details into a new
cheque book semi-manually, my parents in law were sent a new cheque book
on husbad's and my account, rather than their own[1].  The surnames were
the same, as were the number of initials.  The actual initials were
different though, as were the account numbers.
Parents in law didn't notice for a week or two and neither did anyone in
any of the shops they had bought stuff from.  When we thought about it,
afterwards we realised that, when checking the cheque details, the shop
assistant never had both the cheque and cheque card right way up at the
same time.  While looking at the face of the cheque card, they'd have
the cheque face down, so they could copy the card details onto the back.
 They'd then turn both over[3] and compare the signatures which, of
course, matched nicely.
When parents in law realised what had happened, Bankleys didn't cover
themselves with glory.  They seemed extremely unconcerned and just told
us to sort it out between ourselves.  Fortunately, on one hand, we were
on good terms with one another and, on the other hand, it must have been
at the right end of the month so it hadn't made us overdrawn, so we were
able to do this but none of us were very impressed by their attitude.
I may have mentioned before that I wasn't impressed when Barclay's lost
a deposit of mine between my local branch when I paid it in and the
office where it should have been credited to my account. When I was
complaining about this they thought it must be the other branch which
was at fault because they "weren't that much down that night." I'd
always imagine no one would be allowed to leave until the books balanced.
AIUI, banks keep a ‘slush fund’ these days so that they erhem, ‘adjust’
minor discrepancies up or down, thus enabling staff to nugger off at the
end of the working day.
There was once one amongst us who could have confirmed or denied this
from personal experience. Ou sont les umrats d'antan?

john
Chris McMillan
2019-01-07 09:26:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Many years ago, in the days when banks printed your details into a new
cheque book semi-manually, my parents in law were sent a new cheque book
on husbad's and my account, rather than their own[1].  The surnames were
the same, as were the number of initials.  The actual initials were
different though, as were the account numbers.
Parents in law didn't notice for a week or two and neither did anyone in
any of the shops they had bought stuff from.  When we thought about it,
afterwards we realised that, when checking the cheque details, the shop
assistant never had both the cheque and cheque card right way up at the
same time.  While looking at the face of the cheque card, they'd have
the cheque face down, so they could copy the card details onto the back.
 They'd then turn both over[3] and compare the signatures which, of
course, matched nicely.
When parents in law realised what had happened, Bankleys didn't cover
themselves with glory.  They seemed extremely unconcerned and just told
us to sort it out between ourselves.  Fortunately, on one hand, we were
on good terms with one another and, on the other hand, it must have been
at the right end of the month so it hadn't made us overdrawn, so we were
able to do this but none of us were very impressed by their attitude.
I may have mentioned before that I wasn't impressed when Barclay's lost
a deposit of mine between my local branch when I paid it in and the
office where it should have been credited to my account. When I was
complaining about this they thought it must be the other branch which
was at fault because they "weren't that much down that night." I'd
always imagine no one would be allowed to leave until the books balanced.
Can’t speak for post computing, but I was always told by employees they had
to stay till the books balanced.

Sincerely Chris
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-06 02:29:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name. I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".

But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to
them.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"You realise, Fraser, that what happened between us can never repeat itself.
Unless, of course, the exact same circumstances were to repeat themselves." "By
exact same circumstances, sir, you mean: we would have to be aboard a train
loaded with unconscious Mounties, that had been taken over by terrorists, and
were heading for a nuclear catastrophe?" "Exactly." "Understood."
Nick Odell
2019-01-06 02:39:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to them.
No, John. (May I call you John?) It's their "tactful" way of telling you
that you are the one mispronouncing it. Trust me: as an Odell, I know this.

N. Odell
Penny
2019-01-06 11:04:30 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 02:39:14 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's their "tactful" way of telling you
that you are the one mispronouncing it. Trust me: as an Odell, I know this.
Oh dear, have I been mispronouncing that all these years?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2019-01-06 11:17:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 02:39:14 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's their "tactful" way of telling you
that you are the one mispronouncing it. Trust me: as an Odell, I know this.
Oh dear, have I been mispronouncing that all these years?
Odelly enough, I think several of us might have been doing so.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Nick Odell
2019-01-06 12:53:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 02:39:14 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's their "tactful" way of telling you
that you are the one mispronouncing it. Trust me: as an Odell, I know this.
Oh dear, have I been mispronouncing that all these years?
Odelly enough, I think several of us might have been doing so.
Yes, many people pronounce it the odd way as in Glenn.

The village, near Newport Pagnell where the name originated (it has its
own castle, don't you know?) goes for Owe-dll.

In order to persuade people to pronounce it correctly, my father's
"stage name" as a singer was Kenneth O'Dell.

But I answer to practically anything.

Nick
Fenny
2019-01-06 18:00:19 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 02:39:14 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to them.
No, John. (May I call you John?) It's their "tactful" way of telling you
that you are the one mispronouncing it. Trust me: as an Odell, I know this.
N. Odell
I, OTOH, dislike the requirement to fill in a compulsory title field,
especially where the only options are Mr, Mrs, Miss or Ms. I don't
wish to pick any of those.

On sites where they are a bit more enlightened, I am variously Admiral
or Rt Hon. Nobody has queried any of these and it's great to receive
items addressed to Admiral. It's only what I would have been if they
didn't have stupid rules about women not joining the RN when I was the
right age.
--
Fenny
Chris McMillan
2019-01-07 09:26:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 02:39:14 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to them.
No, John. (May I call you John?) It's their "tactful" way of telling you
that you are the one mispronouncing it. Trust me: as an Odell, I know this.
N. Odell
I, OTOH, dislike the requirement to fill in a compulsory title field,
especially where the only options are Mr, Mrs, Miss or Ms. I don't
wish to pick any of those.
On sites where they are a bit more enlightened, I am variously Admiral
or Rt Hon. Nobody has queried any of these and it's great to receive
items addressed to Admiral. It's only what I would have been if they
didn't have stupid rules about women not joining the RN when I was the
right age.
Rotflmao.

Sincerely Chris
Sally Thompson
2019-01-07 09:31:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 02:39:14 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to them.
No, John. (May I call you John?) It's their "tactful" way of telling you
that you are the one mispronouncing it. Trust me: as an Odell, I know this.
N. Odell
I, OTOH, dislike the requirement to fill in a compulsory title field,
especially where the only options are Mr, Mrs, Miss or Ms. I don't
wish to pick any of those.
On sites where they are a bit more enlightened, I am variously Admiral
or Rt Hon. Nobody has queried any of these and it's great to receive
items addressed to Admiral. It's only what I would have been if they
didn't have stupid rules about women not joining the RN when I was the
right age.
Is it not possible to choose Dame? It has a certain ring I feel.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Nick Odell
2019-01-07 09:41:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 02:39:14 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to them.
No, John. (May I call you John?) It's their "tactful" way of telling you
that you are the one mispronouncing it. Trust me: as an Odell, I know this.
N. Odell
I, OTOH, dislike the requirement to fill in a compulsory title field,
especially where the only options are Mr, Mrs, Miss or Ms. I don't
wish to pick any of those.
On sites where they are a bit more enlightened, I am variously Admiral
or Rt Hon. Nobody has queried any of these and it's great to receive
items addressed to Admiral. It's only what I would have been if they
didn't have stupid rules about women not joining the RN when I was the
right age.
Is it not possible to choose Dame? It has a certain ring I feel.
I suspect Dame might ruffle a few feathers with the Honours Committee.
But I don't think there is a UK honorary title of Count or Countess, is
there?

Nick
Serena Blanchflower
2019-01-07 09:52:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
I suspect Dame might ruffle a few feathers with the Honours Committee.
But I don't think there is a UK honorary title of Count or Countess, is
there?
The wife of an Earl is a Countess
--
Best wishes, Serena
No man is a failure who is enjoying life (William Feather)
Nick Odell
2019-01-07 10:04:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
I suspect Dame might ruffle a few feathers with the Honours Committee.
But I don't think there is a UK honorary title of Count or Countess,
is there?
The wife of an Earl is a Countess
Drat!

N.
Mike
2019-01-07 10:50:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
I suspect Dame might ruffle a few feathers with the Honours Committee.
But I don't think there is a UK honorary title of Count or Countess,
is there?
The wife of an Earl is a Countess
Drat!
N.
Countess Dratula?!
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-07 11:45:03 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 7 Jan 2019 10:04:52 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
I suspect Dame might ruffle a few feathers with the Honours Committee.
But I don't think there is a UK honorary title of Count or Countess,
is there?
The wife of an Earl is a Countess
Drat!
N.
What about Mistress? Mistress Blanchflower.
Sally Thompson
2019-01-07 11:54:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
I suspect Dame might ruffle a few feathers with the Honours Committee.
But I don't think there is a UK honorary title of Count or Countess, is
there?
The wife of an Earl is a Countess
My secret is out:-)
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
BrritSki
2019-01-07 12:00:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
I suspect Dame might ruffle a few feathers with the Honours Committee.
But I don't think there is a UK honorary title of Count or Countess, is
there?
The wife of an Earl is a Countess
My secret is out:-)
Is this you ?

<https://fineartamerica.com/featured/sally-walker-thompson-granger.html>
Sally Thompson
2019-01-07 16:49:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
I suspect Dame might ruffle a few feathers with the Honours Committee.
But I don't think there is a UK honorary title of Count or Countess, is
there?
The wife of an Earl is a Countess
My secret is out:-)
Is this you ?
<https://fineartamerica.com/featured/sally-walker-thompson-granger.html>
I couldn't possibly comment:-)
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Mike
2019-01-07 10:47:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 02:39:14 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to them.
No, John. (May I call you John?) It's their "tactful" way of telling you
that you are the one mispronouncing it. Trust me: as an Odell, I know this.
N. Odell
I, OTOH, dislike the requirement to fill in a compulsory title field,
especially where the only options are Mr, Mrs, Miss or Ms. I don't
wish to pick any of those.
On sites where they are a bit more enlightened, I am variously Admiral
or Rt Hon. Nobody has queried any of these and it's great to receive
items addressed to Admiral. It's only what I would have been if they
didn't have stupid rules about women not joining the RN when I was the
right age.
Is it not possible to choose Dame? It has a certain ring I feel.
I suspect Dame might ruffle a few feathers with the Honours Committee.
But I don't think there is a UK honorary title of Count or Countess, is
there?
Nick
Direct that question to Arthur....;-)))
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2019-01-06 11:47:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to them.
Of course if it is anything like last time my visit to hospital in a
week or so will be blessed throughout by use of my first name. No
courtesy or respect and because I don't actually use my first name I
don't respond when called. Much better using my surname.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Penny
2019-01-06 11:57:36 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 11:47:56 +0000, krw <***@whitnet.uk> scrawled in the
dust...
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to them.
Of course if it is anything like last time my visit to hospital in a
week or so will be blessed throughout by use of my first name. No
courtesy or respect and because I don't actually use my first name I
don't respond when called. Much better using my surname.
Some time in the late '60s my cousin's little boy, aged 3 or 4, was in
hospital. His first name was the formal version of his father's name,
Bernard. Neither he nor his father was ever called by that name so it was
entirely foreign to the child. In spite of the fact my cousin told them the
boy was always called by his middle name - the hospital only ever addressed
him as Bernard :(
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2019-01-06 12:59:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
dust...
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to them.
Of course if it is anything like last time my visit to hospital in a
week or so will be blessed throughout by use of my first name. No
courtesy or respect and because I don't actually use my first name I
don't respond when called. Much better using my surname.
Some time in the late '60s my cousin's little boy, aged 3 or 4, was in
hospital. His first name was the formal version of his father's name,
Bernard. Neither he nor his father was ever called by that name so it was
entirely foreign to the child. In spite of the fact my cousin told them the
boy was always called by his middle name - the hospital only ever addressed
him as Bernard :(
I wonder if a patient conducting an individual campaign of calling
members of hospital staff random names like "Bertie" or "Sylvia" might
help? When they respond,"But that isn't my name" the way is opened to
say WTTEO "and Nicholas isn't my name either."

Nick
Jenny M Benson
2019-01-06 13:54:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
Some time in the late '60s my cousin's little boy, aged 3 or 4, was in
hospital. His first name was the formal version of his father's name,
Bernard. Neither he nor his father was ever called by that name so it was
entirely foreign to the child. In spite of the fact my cousin told them the
boy was always called by his middle name - the hospital only ever addressed
him as Bernard:(
My son started school at the same time as a little boy whose parents
only every addressed him by an abbreviated version of his first name,
but they neglected to tell the school about this. He was distraught all
the first day because the teacher called him by "the wrong name."
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Penny
2019-01-07 09:27:12 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 13:54:52 +0000, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
Some time in the late '60s my cousin's little boy, aged 3 or 4, was in
hospital. His first name was the formal version of his father's name,
Bernard. Neither he nor his father was ever called by that name so it was
entirely foreign to the child. In spite of the fact my cousin told them the
boy was always called by his middle name - the hospital only ever addressed
him as Bernard:(
My son started school at the same time as a little boy whose parents
only every addressed him by an abbreviated version of his first name,
but they neglected to tell the school about this. He was distraught all
the first day because the teacher called him by "the wrong name."
These things do get better, we had a space on the school registers (and on
enrolment forms) for 'preferred name'.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sid Nuncius
2019-01-06 19:35:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
Some time in the late '60s my cousin's little boy, aged 3 or 4, was in
hospital. His first name was the formal version of his father's name,
Bernard. Neither he nor his father was ever called by that name so it was
entirely foreign to the child. In spite of the fact my cousin told them the
boy was always called by his middle name - the hospital only ever addressed
him as Bernard :(
When I was in hospital a couple of months ago I was impressed that when
I was admitted to the ward they asked me what I would like them to call
me and then wrote "Preferred name: ...." on the whiteboard above my bed.
Everyone stuck to it. (Just for the record, I was happy for them to
use my first name, but I was pleased to be asked.)

They did this for every patient, and it was just one aspect of the
excellent care and respect they showed to everyone.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Serena Blanchflower
2019-01-06 19:47:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
Some time in the late '60s my cousin's little boy, aged 3 or 4, was in
hospital. His first name was the formal version of his father's name,
Bernard. Neither he nor his father was ever called by that name so it was
entirely foreign to the child. In spite of the fact my cousin told them the
boy was always called by his middle name - the hospital only ever addressed
him as Bernard :(
When I was in hospital a couple of months ago I was impressed that when
I was admitted to the ward they asked me what I would like them to call
me and then wrote "Preferred name: ...." on the whiteboard above my bed.
 Everyone stuck to it.  (Just for the record, I was happy for them to
use my first name, but I was pleased to be asked.)
They did this for every patient, and it was just one aspect of the
excellent care and respect they showed to everyone.
Someone I know has had both his hips replaced, in different hospitals,
which both followed this process. In both cases, he gave his preferred
name as, IIRC, Warthog[1]. In the first hospital, the local NHS one,
they ignored this and used his more conventional first name throughout.
The second hip was done in the local private hospital, although still
NHS funded, and there, it worked just as he'd hoped and provoked all
sorts of discussions and chats with his carers.

[1] It was certainly some African animal of this kind and had been a
family nickname for him, when his children were young.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I don't feel old. I don't feel anything until noon. Then it's time for
my nap. (Bob Hope)
SODAM
2019-01-07 01:11:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
Some time in the late '60s my cousin's little boy, aged 3 or 4, was in
hospital. His first name was the formal version of his father's name,
Bernard. Neither he nor his father was ever called by that name so it was
entirely foreign to the child. In spite of the fact my cousin told them the
boy was always called by his middle name - the hospital only ever addressed
him as Bernard :(
When I was in hospital a couple of months ago I was impressed that when
I was admitted to the ward they asked me what I would like them to call
me and then wrote "Preferred name: ...." on the whiteboard above my bed.
Everyone stuck to it. (Just for the record, I was happy for them to
use my first name, but I was pleased to be asked.)
They did this for every patient, and it was just one aspect of the
excellent care and respect they showed to everyone.
I do wish this system was followed more generally. A close friend, named
Robert A Blank was in hospital recently following a severe stroke. He had
lost the power of speech, so couldn’t correct staff when they called him
Robert, even though he had always been known by his middle name. I informed
staff about this every time I visited but was told that patients had to be
called by the name on their notes. Some staff, being friendly, even called
him Bob. In the end I altered the name on his whiteboard myself, with a
marker I took in for the purpose.

Similarly, my late mother, in her last days, was called by the wrong name
even though I corrected hospital staff repeatedly, every day. In the end I
had to cause a scene in order to get her named rightly. Although she was
comatose, staff spoke to her to reassure her before they performed any
service or procedure. It can’t have been very reassuring to be called by
the wrong name. Why are staff so resistant to naming patients as they are
generally known?
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-07 09:27:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Similarly, my late mother, in her last days, was called by the wrong name
even though I corrected hospital staff repeatedly, every day. In the end I
had to cause a scene in order to get her named rightly. Although she was
comatose, staff spoke to her to reassure her before they performed any
service or procedure. It can’t have been very reassuring to be called by
the wrong name. Why are staff so resistant to naming patients as they are
generally known?
That sounds horrific. Imagine being unable to speak or move and being
called the wrong name and told you were having something done.
Thinking it is the wrong thing as you are not that name. Victoria is
actually my middle name. I am down some places as that but almost
never as my real first name and anyway many places as Vicky and called
that. My mother was never known by her full neam, only the short
form, and was called the full name in hospital and care home. I think
she'd have expected Mrs XXX but things were settled early on and there
was less care about that sort of thing then. Calling old people by
their first name seems disrespectful and patronising to me.
Sally Thompson
2019-01-07 09:38:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by SODAM
Similarly, my late mother, in her last days, was called by the wrong name
even though I corrected hospital staff repeatedly, every day. In the end I
had to cause a scene in order to get her named rightly. Although she was
comatose, staff spoke to her to reassure her before they performed any
service or procedure. It can’t have been very reassuring to be called by
the wrong name. Why are staff so resistant to naming patients as they are
generally known?
That sounds horrific. Imagine being unable to speak or move and being
called the wrong name and told you were having something done.
Thinking it is the wrong thing as you are not that name. Victoria is
actually my middle name. I am down some places as that but almost
never as my real first name and anyway many places as Vicky and called
that. My mother was never known by her full neam, only the short
form, and was called the full name in hospital and care home. I think
she'd have expected Mrs XXX but things were settled early on and there
was less care about that sort of thing then. Calling old people by
their first name seems disrespectful and patronising to me.
Not necessarily Vicky (may I call you Vicky? <g>). When my parents moved
into sheltered housing, the person I was dealing with commented that as
people get older, they lose their friends of the same age group and end up
relying on family, who of course don't usually call them by their first
name. In a care situation, the staff are very often the only people who
call them by their first name and it's something that they miss otherwise.
However I do think there should be a choice and I get very frosty with
total strangers phoning me up about appointments and calling me by my first
name uninvited.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Rosemary Miskin
2019-01-07 10:29:12 UTC
Permalink
Sally wrote s if a callrr
 I get very frosty with total strangers phoning me up about appointments
and calling me by my first name uninvited. 
I have always used my middle name - it's only the middle one because if it had been
first, the initials would have been unpleasant. It's quite useful, as if a
caller addresses me by my first name, I know it's not a genuine call, and hang up.

Rosemary
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2019-01-07 14:34:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Sally wrote s if a callrr
 I get very frosty with total strangers phoning me up about appointments
and calling me by my first name uninvited. 
I have always used my middle name - it's only the middle one because if it had been
first, the initials would have been unpleasant.
<snipped>

And I suppose that was a constraint on surnames of acceptable suitors.
Rosemary Miskin
2019-01-07 17:50:58 UTC
Permalink
And I suppose that was a constraint on surnames of acceptable suitors. 
I didn't think of that at the time.

Rosemary
Penny
2019-01-07 10:44:23 UTC
Permalink
On 7 Jan 2019 09:38:14 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
However I do think there should be a choice and I get very frosty with
total strangers phoning me up about appointments and calling me by my first
name uninvited.
Although it can be irritating in those pushy conversations where my first
name is used in every sentence, I don't mind it too much. However, most
total strangers who ring me up call me Sir.

I do email support on a website. If an email comes in with a first name
that's what I use in my reply. If it is just initials and a surname I tend
not to use a salutation at all - better than getting the gender wrong.

A colleague, in correspondence with a solicitor who had emailed in a
complaint, failed to notice the Kaur in her name (or didn't understand its
significance) and addressed her as Mr [solicitor] - but I dare say she's
used to that :(
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2019-01-07 10:55:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On 7 Jan 2019 09:38:14 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
However I do think there should be a choice and I get very frosty with
total strangers phoning me up about appointments and calling me by my first
name uninvited.
Although it can be irritating in those pushy conversations where my first
name is used in every sentence, I don't mind it too much. However, most
total strangers who ring me up call me Sir.
I do email support on a website. If an email comes in with a first name
that's what I use in my reply. If it is just initials and a surname I tend
not to use a salutation at all - better than getting the gender wrong.
A colleague, in correspondence with a solicitor who had emailed in a
complaint, failed to notice the Kaur in her name (or didn't understand its
significance) and addressed her as Mr [solicitor] - but I dare say she's
used to that :(
n those circumstances I get around the gender question by writing the
name in full. Dear Rowan Ashwood, etc.

Nick
Mike
2019-01-07 11:13:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
On 7 Jan 2019 09:38:14 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
However I do think there should be a choice and I get very frosty with
total strangers phoning me up about appointments and calling me by my first
name uninvited.
Although it can be irritating in those pushy conversations where my first
name is used in every sentence, I don't mind it too much. However, most
total strangers who ring me up call me Sir.
I do email support on a website. If an email comes in with a first name
that's what I use in my reply. If it is just initials and a surname I tend
not to use a salutation at all - better than getting the gender wrong.
A colleague, in correspondence with a solicitor who had emailed in a
complaint, failed to notice the Kaur in her name (or didn't understand its
significance) and addressed her as Mr [solicitor] - but I dare say she's
used to that :(
n those circumstances I get around the gender question by writing the
name in full. Dear Rowan Ashwood, etc.
Nick
.... and send a copy to every branch?
--
Toodle Pip
steveski
2019-01-07 12:54:40 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 07 Jan 2019 10:44:23 +0000, Penny wrote:

[]
Post by Penny
I do email support on a website. If an email comes in with a first name
that's what I use in my reply. If it is just initials and a surname I
tend not to use a salutation at all - better than getting the gender
wrong.
A colleague, in correspondence with a solicitor who had emailed in a
complaint, failed to notice the Kaur in her name (or didn't understand
its significance) and addressed her as Mr [solicitor] - but I dare say
she's used to that :(
In the 70s I did some temping for Brook Street (at that time nearly all
female temps and contractors) and my first pay packet was addressed to
'Stephanie'.

It must have been the Janet Reger underwear . . .
--
Steveski
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-07 11:41:13 UTC
Permalink
On 7 Jan 2019 09:38:14 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Not necessarily Vicky (may I call you Vicky? <g>).
You may :)
Post by Sally Thompson
When my parents moved
into sheltered housing, the person I was dealing with commented that as
people get older, they lose their friends of the same age group and end up
relying on family, who of course don't usually call them by their first
name. In a care situation, the staff are very often the only people who
call them by their first name and it's something that they miss otherwise.
I hadn't thought of that. Well, she might have liked being called by
the short form that was always used, but not the full name.
Post by Sally Thompson
However I do think there should be a choice and I get very frosty with
total strangers phoning me up about appointments and calling me by my first
name uninvited.
--
MTAAW
krw
2019-01-07 16:22:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Calling old people by
their first name seems disrespectful and patronising to me.
With which I entirely agree.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
John Ashby
2019-01-07 17:41:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
Calling old people by
their first name seems disrespectful and patronising to me.
With which I entirely agree.
How do you feel about the following? Back when I was working I
complained about the practice of referring to me by just my surname in
my annual appraisal. The organisation had vestiges of strict hierarchy
taken over from the Civil Service, but also a sense of equal esteem as
we were all (more or less) equally well-educated. The use of "Ashby has
done..." rather than "Dr Ashby has done... or "John has done..." had
(for me) a belittling quality I associated with school.

john
Nick Odell
2019-01-07 18:17:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
Calling old people by
their first name seems disrespectful and patronising to me.
With which I entirely agree.
How do you feel about the following? Back when I was working I
complained about the practice of referring to me by just my surname in
my annual appraisal. The organisation had vestiges of strict hierarchy
taken over from the Civil Service, but also a sense of equal esteem as
we were all (more or less) equally well-educated. The use of "Ashby has
done..." rather than "Dr Ashby has done... or "John has done..." had
(for me) a belittling quality I associated with school.
I have a longstanding friend in Buenos Aires[1] who always calls me
Odell. I'm far more comfortable with that than anybody calling me by my
full first name which I associate with primary school and suffixes like
"Don't do that" and the incorporation of my complete name into an
admonishing phrase. When they did that I knew I was really in trouble.

The Argentines tend to pronounce my preferred short version of my first
name like Knee with a cough at the end of it. Perhaps she feels she
manages better saying Odell.

Nick
[1]The one I always contact if I have a question about use of English:
she understands my language far better than I do.
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-07 18:46:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
Calling old people by
their first name seems disrespectful and patronising to me.
With which I entirely agree.
How do you feel about the following? Back when I was working I
complained about the practice of referring to me by just my surname in
my annual appraisal. The organisation had vestiges of strict hierarchy
taken over from the Civil Service, but also a sense of equal esteem as
we were all (more or less) equally well-educated. The use of "Ashby has
done..." rather than "Dr Ashby has done... or "John has done..." had
(for me) a belittling quality I associated with school.
john
I do think so, I agree it is. Do schools still do that?

Chris McMillan
2019-01-07 09:41:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
Some time in the late '60s my cousin's little boy, aged 3 or 4, was in
hospital. His first name was the formal version of his father's name,
Bernard. Neither he nor his father was ever called by that name so it was
entirely foreign to the child. In spite of the fact my cousin told them the
boy was always called by his middle name - the hospital only ever addressed
him as Bernard :(
When I was in hospital a couple of months ago I was impressed that when
I was admitted to the ward they asked me what I would like them to call
me and then wrote "Preferred name: ...." on the whiteboard above my bed.
Everyone stuck to it. (Just for the record, I was happy for them to
use my first name, but I was pleased to be asked.)
They did this for every patient, and it was just one aspect of the
excellent care and respect they showed to everyone.
I do wish this system was followed more generally. A close friend, named
Robert A Blank was in hospital recently following a severe stroke. He had
lost the power of speech, so couldn’t correct staff when they called him
Robert, even though he had always been known by his middle name. I informed
staff about this every time I visited but was told that patients had to be
called by the name on their notes. Some staff, being friendly, even called
him Bob. In the end I altered the name on his whiteboard myself, with a
marker I took in for the purpose.
Similarly, my late mother, in her last days, was called by the wrong name
even though I corrected hospital staff repeatedly, every day. In the end I
had to cause a scene in order to get her named rightly. Although she was
comatose, staff spoke to her to reassure her before they performed any
service or procedure. It can’t have been very reassuring to be called by
the wrong name. Why are staff so resistant to naming patients as they are
generally known?
Or making the effort at all. Having discovered many years ago the name
Dorothea isn’t even known, when step ma was taken ill in 2017, I started to
pronounce it *very* slowly, and would spell it given a chance. Same when
she went into care as they too were repeating it as ‘Dorothy’. I even went
so far as to find which English literature/drama had such a heroine.
(Middlemarch). It’s worked, everyone can say it to the best of their
linguistic ability. Now I can’t remember how she came by the name as it was
a parental compromise around other favourites. (Glad it’s not Bertha, her
middle name though)!

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2019-01-07 10:49:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by SODAM
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
Some time in the late '60s my cousin's little boy, aged 3 or 4, was in
hospital. His first name was the formal version of his father's name,
Bernard. Neither he nor his father was ever called by that name so it was
entirely foreign to the child. In spite of the fact my cousin told them the
boy was always called by his middle name - the hospital only ever addressed
him as Bernard :(
When I was in hospital a couple of months ago I was impressed that when
I was admitted to the ward they asked me what I would like them to call
me and then wrote "Preferred name: ...." on the whiteboard above my bed.
Everyone stuck to it. (Just for the record, I was happy for them to
use my first name, but I was pleased to be asked.)
They did this for every patient, and it was just one aspect of the
excellent care and respect they showed to everyone.
I do wish this system was followed more generally. A close friend, named
Robert A Blank was in hospital recently following a severe stroke. He had
lost the power of speech, so couldn’t correct staff when they called him
Robert, even though he had always been known by his middle name. I informed
staff about this every time I visited but was told that patients had to be
called by the name on their notes. Some staff, being friendly, even called
him Bob. In the end I altered the name on his whiteboard myself, with a
marker I took in for the purpose.
Similarly, my late mother, in her last days, was called by the wrong name
even though I corrected hospital staff repeatedly, every day. In the end I
had to cause a scene in order to get her named rightly. Although she was
comatose, staff spoke to her to reassure her before they performed any
service or procedure. It can’t have been very reassuring to be called by
the wrong name. Why are staff so resistant to naming patients as they are
generally known?
Or making the effort at all. Having discovered many years ago the name
Dorothea isn’t even known, when step ma was taken ill in 2017, I started to
pronounce it *very* slowly, and would spell it given a chance. Same when
she went into care as they too were repeating it as ‘Dorothy’. I even went
so far as to find which English literature/drama had such a heroine.
(Middlemarch). It’s worked, everyone can say it to the best of their
linguistic ability. Now I can’t remember how she came by the name as it was
a parental compromise around other favourites. (Glad it’s not Bertha, her
middle name though)!
Sincerely Chris
No, that would have involved the big guns.
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2019-01-07 16:21:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
I altered the name on his whiteboard myself, with a
marker I took in for the purpose.
I really hoped you used a permanent marker pen for added emphasis.
Post by SODAM
Similarly, my late mother, in her last days, was called by the wrong name
even though I corrected hospital staff repeatedly, every day. In the end I
had to cause a scene in order to get her named rightly. Although she was
comatose, staff spoke to her to reassure her before they performed any
service or procedure. It can’t have been very reassuring to be called by
the wrong name. Why are staff so resistant to naming patients as they are
generally known?
In her last few months my mother was in a care home organised by my
sister and moved direct there from hospital. We had a visit or two and
eventually when she was not at all well we were summoned to an
inevitable meeting. I made clear that hey did not seem to care much
about their patients as the surname on her door was as wrong (several
weeks after her arrival) as it had been on my earlier visits. Somehow
this seemed to mark me out as the difficult child!
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
LFS
2019-01-07 11:19:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
Some time in the late '60s my cousin's little boy, aged 3 or 4, was in
hospital. His first name was the formal version of his father's name,
Bernard. Neither he nor his father was ever called by that name so it was
entirely foreign to the child. In spite of the fact my cousin told them the
boy was always called by his middle name - the hospital only ever addressed
him as Bernard :(
When I was in hospital a couple of months ago I was impressed that when
I was admitted to the ward they asked me what I would like them to call
me and then wrote "Preferred name: ...." on the whiteboard above my bed.
 Everyone stuck to it.  (Just for the record, I was happy for them to
use my first name, but I was pleased to be asked.)
They did this for every patient, and it was just one aspect of the
excellent care and respect they showed to everyone.
I think this has been general practice for quite some time. When Mum was
admitted to hospital in 2007 she couldn't communicate but I was asked
how I thought she would like to be addressed. But I remember my aunt
being very angry sometime in the 1980s when the nursing staff used her
first name without asking.

On the rare occasions when I've used my credit card in Selfridges in
recent years, the till assistants have used my first name in wishing me
a nice day, which I find deeply irritating. My current credit cards only
have my initials and surname.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
krw
2019-01-07 16:17:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
Some time in the late '60s my cousin's little boy, aged 3 or 4, was in
hospital. His first name was the formal version of his father's name,
Bernard. Neither he nor his father was ever called by that name so it was
entirely foreign to the child. In spite of the fact my cousin told them the
boy was always called by his middle name - the hospital only ever addressed
him as Bernard :(
When I was in hospital a couple of months ago I was impressed that when
I was admitted to the ward they asked me what I would like them to call
me and then wrote "Preferred name: ...." on the whiteboard above my bed.
 Everyone stuck to it.  (Just for the record, I was happy for them to
use my first name, but I was pleased to be asked.)
They did this for every patient, and it was just one aspect of the
excellent care and respect they showed to everyone.
Well I will be interested to see if that happens next week, but somehow
I doubt it.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-06 13:39:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to them.
Of course if it is anything like last time my visit to hospital in a
week or so will be blessed throughout by use of my first name. No
courtesy or respect and because I don't actually use my first name I
don't respond when called. Much better using my surname.
I feel annoyed when people call me by my first name in those
situations, or commercial ones. And they say Victoria. I want to be
Mrs Ayech but it seems rude to correct them. My dentist, a young man,
began calling me Vicky 2 visits ago. I don't like to annoy the
dentist by correcting him.
Chris McMillan
2019-01-06 13:55:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to them.
Of course if it is anything like last time my visit to hospital in a
week or so will be blessed throughout by use of my first name. No
courtesy or respect and because I don't actually use my first name I
don't respond when called. Much better using my surname.
I feel annoyed when people call me by my first name in those
situations, or commercial ones. And they say Victoria. I want to be
Mrs Ayech but it seems rude to correct them. My dentist, a young man,
began calling me Vicky 2 visits ago. I don't like to annoy the
dentist by correcting him.
Few people would know how to pronounce your surname, Vicky, that’s one good
reason

Sincerely Chris
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-06 22:06:23 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 06 Jan 2019 13:55:04 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to them.
Of course if it is anything like last time my visit to hospital in a
week or so will be blessed throughout by use of my first name. No
courtesy or respect and because I don't actually use my first name I
don't respond when called. Much better using my surname.
I feel annoyed when people call me by my first name in those
situations, or commercial ones. And they say Victoria. I want to be
Mrs Ayech but it seems rude to correct them. My dentist, a young man,
began calling me Vicky 2 visits ago. I don't like to annoy the
dentist by correcting him.
Few people would know how to pronounce your surname, Vicky, that’s one good
reason
Sincerely Chris
I've been going there for ages and the dentist and others there are
Indian so do know. I am pretty sure I was Mrs Ayech up to the time
before last.
Sally Thompson
2019-01-06 19:26:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to them.
Of course if it is anything like last time my visit to hospital in a
week or so will be blessed throughout by use of my first name. No
courtesy or respect and because I don't actually use my first name I
don't respond when called. Much better using my surname.
I thought they normally asked these days?
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-07 00:41:21 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by krw
Of course if it is anything like last time my visit to hospital in a
week or so will be blessed throughout by use of my first name. No
courtesy or respect and because I don't actually use my first name I
don't respond when called. Much better using my surname.
I thought they normally asked these days?
That's probably laid down in a procedure now. The more important
question is not whether they ask, but whether they give any heed to the
answer they get.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

... "Peter and out." ... "Kevin and out." (Link episode)
Chris McMillan
2019-01-06 13:38:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name. I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the package
(my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to
them.
Too many people with a common surname. Having been given wrong
prescriptions for someone with the exact same name, I’m very happy to give
both - and spelling.

Sincerely Chris
Jenny M Benson
2019-01-06 13:58:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Too many people with a common surname. Having been given wrong
prescriptions for someone with the exact same name, I’m very happy to give
both - and spelling.
The pharmacy here always asks for the address before handing over the
prescription.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Flop
2019-01-06 17:32:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Too many people with a common surname.  Having been given wrong
prescriptions for someone with the exact same name, I’m very happy to give
both - and spelling.
The pharmacy here always asks for the address before handing over the
prescription.
Typical security measures.

How do they know what to make up ....- you give them the prescription form.

What is on the prescription form ...- your name and address.

So they are asking you for information that you have just given them.

Why not just ask if you have stolen the prescription form?
--
Flop

I want to re-marry my ex.
She thinks I am after my money.
Jenny M Benson
2019-01-06 17:47:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Flop
Post by Jenny M Benson
Too many people with a common surname.  Having been given wrong
prescriptions for someone with the exact same name, I’m very happy to give
both - and spelling.
The pharmacy here always asks for the address before handing over the
prescription.
Typical security measures.
How do they know what to make up ....- you give them the prescription form.
What is on the prescription form ...- your name and address.
So they are asking you for information that you have just given them.
Why not just ask if you have stolen the prescription form?
In a lot of cases (including mine) the prescription has been collected
by the pharmacy from the doctor's surgery next door so there is no
connection between the physical me saying "prescription for Jennifer
Benson, please" and the bag of pills with the paper with my name and
address on. (Unless the assistant recognizes me, which they might do,
but always check the address I give against the address on the bag, anyway.)
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
krw
2019-01-07 16:26:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
In a lot of cases (including mine) the prescription has been collected
by the pharmacy from the doctor's surgery next door
I leave the surgery and walk next door and ask them to download it as
the doctor sends it direct.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Chris McMillan
2019-01-06 19:18:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris McMillan
Too many people with a common surname. Having been given wrong
prescriptions for someone with the exact same name, I’m very happy to give
both - and spelling.
The pharmacy here always asks for the address before handing over the
prescription.
I forget if our lot did, it was some years ago now, but I knew when they
handed it to me it was wrong. The pharmacist legged it across the road to
our surgery to see to it.

Sincerely Chris
Vicky Ayech
2019-01-06 22:06:55 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 13:58:11 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris McMillan
Too many people with a common surname. Having been given wrong
prescriptions for someone with the exact same name, I’m very happy to give
both - and spelling.
The pharmacy here always asks for the address before handing over the
prescription.
Yes, ours too. And the surgery asks date of birth.
Chris McMillan
2019-01-07 09:26:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sun, 6 Jan 2019 13:58:11 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris McMillan
Too many people with a common surname. Having been given wrong
prescriptions for someone with the exact same name, I’m very happy to give
both - and spelling.
The pharmacy here always asks for the address before handing over the
prescription.
Yes, ours too. And the surgery asks date of birth.
Some twerp at our surgery once got me mixed up with our Hazel. She was
about 8 or 10 from memory. We do not share birthdays.

Sincerely Chris
LFS
2019-01-06 14:30:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
An amazon delivery has just arrived for my daughter and the delivery
man wanted my first name.  I refused (never keen on using such names).
He then claimed he needed age id and proof of identity.
I said I am happy to sign, so he typed in the first name on the
package (my daughter's obviously) and I signed with initials and surname.
Since when is anyone entitled to ask for first names?
Oh GOOD - someone else who objects to that! I was beginning to think I
was very old-fashioned. Not so much face-to-face - I don't remember the
last time that happened (and am not sure if I could make myself say
"it's Mr.", as in various films and plays), but in online forms. I
always fill them in with "J. P."; quite frequently the form won't accept
that, so I them try "J P"; sometimes it won't accept that either, so I
give "JP", though knowing I'll then from that company receive emails to
"Dear Jp".
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par with
people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it to them.
They may be hard of hearing. I sometimes have to have a couple of goes
at getting a name right, however hard I listen.

John shouldn't be difficult, though...
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-06 16:52:05 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by LFS
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
But yes, I do object to the demanding of first name. It's on a par
with people who mispronounce my name immediately after I've spoken it
to them.
They may be hard of hearing. I sometimes have to have a couple of goes
at getting a name right, however hard I listen.
John shouldn't be difficult, though...
(-: It's the "Gilliver": we pronounce the G as in gin, not gift. I don't
think hard-of hearing explains people echoing that wrong.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Dook, that was great but I think the line needs
awe. Can you do it again, giving it just a little awe?"

"Sure, George," said Wayne and looking up at the cross said:
"Aw, truly this man is the son of God."
(recounted in Radio Times, 30 March-5 April 2013.)
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