Discussion:
Off Topic - Covid-19 jab.
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Peter Withey
2021-01-13 10:56:33 UTC
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This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.

I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.

Appointment time: 12.35.

Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.

Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.

Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.

Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.

Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.

2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
--
Pete
krw
2021-01-13 11:52:39 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
Cheering that someone has been vaccinated and that there is some form of
organisation happening. Around here the rumour is that they are doing
group 1 and ran out vaccine when in the "B" surnames.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Peter Withey
2021-01-13 13:57:22 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
Cheering that someone has been vaccinated and that there is some form of
organisation happening. Around here the rumour is that they are doing
group 1 and ran out vaccine when in the "B" surnames.
I received a letter on Saturday morning saying I was eligible. Went
straight online. I could have got an appointment for Monday - glad I
didn't with the likes of Matt Hancock and the TV cameras around <g>
--
Pete
Peter
2021-01-13 12:16:29 UTC
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Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
What was your starting price?
Post by Peter Withey
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
--
When, once, reference was made to a statesman almost universally
recognized as one of the villains of this century, in order to
induce him to a negative judgment, he replied: "My situation is
so different from his, that it is not for me to pass judgment".
Ernst Specker on Paul Bernays
Vicky Ayech
2021-01-13 12:29:39 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
2 hrs wait??
Gosh.
Was that near home? I have heard a few now drove a while. But it was
supposed to be you could say I want more local.
Peter Withey
2021-01-13 13:51:24 UTC
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On Wed, 13 Jan 2021 12:29:39 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
2 hrs wait??
Gosh.
Was that near home? I have heard a few now drove a while. But it was
supposed to be you could say I want more local.
Approx 11 miles and about 30 minutes depending on traffic.
--
Pete
Philip Hole
2021-01-13 15:32:56 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
2 hrs wait??
Gosh.
Was that near home? I have heard a few now drove a while. But it was
supposed to be you could say I want more local.
Not the British Army?

Phone call today at 15:15.

"Can you come in for a vaccination tomorrow at 11:11?"

"yes"

"Can your wife come too?"

"yes. What time for her?"

"11:11 - same time" [30 second jab (above) seems to be right].

It will be in the Salvation Army hall"

And I was thinking I had got the wrong army.

Anyway - much relieved.
--
Flop
Vicky Ayech
2021-01-13 17:44:15 UTC
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On Wed, 13 Jan 2021 15:32:56 +0000, Philip Hole
Post by Philip Hole
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
2 hrs wait??
Gosh.
Was that near home? I have heard a few now drove a while. But it was
supposed to be you could say I want more local.
Not the British Army?
Phone call today at 15:15.
"Can you come in for a vaccination tomorrow at 11:11?"
"yes"
"Can your wife come too?"
"yes. What time for her?"
"11:11 - same time" [30 second jab (above) seems to be right].
It will be in the Salvation Army hall"
And I was thinking I had got the wrong army.
Anyway - much relieved.
I am a bit worried they asked for volunteers to do the vaccinations
and apparently got 80k of them. I prefer a medically qualified person
do it. B is sure the actual army will be used soon. He thinks for
schools!
Sam Plusnet
2021-01-13 20:39:13 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 13 Jan 2021 15:32:56 +0000, Philip Hole
Post by Philip Hole
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
2 hrs wait??
Gosh.
Was that near home? I have heard a few now drove a while. But it was
supposed to be you could say I want more local.
Not the British Army?
Phone call today at 15:15.
"Can you come in for a vaccination tomorrow at 11:11?"
"yes"
"Can your wife come too?"
"yes. What time for her?"
"11:11 - same time" [30 second jab (above) seems to be right].
It will be in the Salvation Army hall"
And I was thinking I had got the wrong army.
Anyway - much relieved.
I am a bit worried they asked for volunteers to do the vaccinations
and apparently got 80k of them. I prefer a medically qualified person
do it. B is sure the actual army will be used soon. He thinks for
schools!
I assume the volunteers would be there to do marshalling & such like,
not the arm-stabbing.
That would be the common sense way to do it.
--
Sam Plusnet
Joe Kerr
2021-01-13 22:39:55 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 13 Jan 2021 15:32:56 +0000, Philip Hole
Post by Philip Hole
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
2 hrs wait??
Gosh.
Was that near home? I have heard a few now drove a while. But it was
supposed to be you could say I want more local.
Not the British Army?
Phone call today at 15:15.
"Can you come in for a vaccination tomorrow at 11:11?"
    "yes"
"Can your wife come too?"
    "yes. What time for her?"
"11:11 - same time" [30 second jab (above) seems to be right].
It will be in the Salvation Army hall"
  And I was thinking I had got the wrong army.
Anyway - much relieved.
I am a bit worried they asked for volunteers to do the vaccinations
and apparently got 80k of them. I prefer a medically qualified person
do it. B is sure the actual army will be used soon. He thinks for
schools!
I assume the volunteers would be there to do marshalling & such like,
not the arm-stabbing.
That would be the common sense way to do it.
Well, we can rule that out then!
--
Ric
krw
2021-01-13 22:46:25 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
That would be the common sense way to do it.
Under this Government?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Peter Withey
2021-01-14 11:29:03 UTC
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On Wed, 13 Jan 2021 20:39:13 +0000, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> wrote:

Snipped
Post by Sam Plusnet
I assume the volunteers would be there to do marshalling & such like,
not the arm-stabbing.
That would be the common sense way to do it.
At Epsom most of the volunteers were St John Ambulance members, with a
few others in civvies. And yes, they were only doing "marshalling &
such like"
--
Pete
Philip Hole
2021-01-14 13:39:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number.  10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
2 hrs wait??
Gosh.
Was that near home? I have heard a few now drove a while. But it was
supposed to be you could say I want more local.
Salvation Army, Lower Earley.

Arrived in good time.
Parked in ASDA as the SA has a small car park which would probably be full.
Walked to SA, Car park totally empty.

11:22
#1 - clipboard. Couple of questions
#2 - checkin. As at elections.
#3 - Another clipboard.
11:24
Enter SA.
Jacket off. Shirt sleeve rolled up.
Jab
Into holding area.
Out
11:37

Total 15 minutes.

May have been speeded up a bit to avoid a queue outside in the pouring rain.

But no appointment for second vaccination.

==
Flop
Chris
2021-01-15 10:53:22 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Philip Hole
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number.  10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
2 hrs wait??
Gosh.
Was that near home? I have heard a few now drove a while. But it was
supposed to be you could say I want more local.
Salvation Army, Lower Earley.
Arrived in good time.
Parked in ASDA as the SA has a small car park which would probably be full.
Walked to SA, Car park totally empty.
11:22
#1 - clipboard. Couple of questions
#2 - checkin. As at elections.
#3 - Another clipboard.
11:24
Enter SA.
Jacket off. Shirt sleeve rolled up.
Jab
Into holding area.
Out
11:37
Total 15 minutes.
May have been speeded up a bit to avoid a queue outside in the pouring rain.
But no appointment for second vaccination.
==
Flop
A friend of ours was advised first thing her jab was at 14.30 today. She
lives in a care home, at something after 11, while talking to me, she was
asked to go to the big sitting room on the ground floor, jab was at 11.30.
It never came. They were sat eating lunch, Jean had had one mouthful
before she was told the jab was ready! Jab while you eat! And no plaster,
Phil. I specifically asked!

Sincerely Chris
Chris
2021-01-15 11:14:24 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Chris
Post by Philip Hole
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number.  10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
2 hrs wait??
Gosh.
Was that near home? I have heard a few now drove a while. But it was
supposed to be you could say I want more local.
Salvation Army, Lower Earley.
Arrived in good time.
Parked in ASDA as the SA has a small car park which would probably be full.
Walked to SA, Car park totally empty.
11:22
#1 - clipboard. Couple of questions
#2 - checkin. As at elections.
#3 - Another clipboard.
11:24
Enter SA.
Jacket off. Shirt sleeve rolled up.
Jab
Into holding area.
Out
11:37
Total 15 minutes.
May have been speeded up a bit to avoid a queue outside in the pouring rain.
But no appointment for second vaccination.
==
Flop
A friend of ours was advised first thing her jab was at 14.30 today. She
lives in a care home, at something after 11, while talking to me, she was
asked to go to the big sitting room on the ground floor, jab was at 11.30.
It never came. They were sat eating lunch, Jean had had one mouthful
before she was told the jab was ready! Jab while you eat! And no plaster,
Phil. I specifically asked!
Sincerely Chris
Those bbq rats will remember our neighbour, Vicenta. Her GP is based
within Reading’s borders, opposite the hospital but as I understand it from
her incomprehension of a phone call (our neighbour then rings to get the
details cos Vicenta can’t hear most of her phone conversations), she has to
go somewhere which doesn’t have a car park or is on a bus route - the mind
boggles because there is a national online map showing all the places
vaccinations are available - and as of Thurs when the map was published in
our on line newspaper I personally know where all the Reading and Wokingham
ones are, and the Reading ones are GP surgery based. Her surgery is too
small too handle vast crowds and the car parking is rubbish. Our hospital
has already shipped out depts so it’s in no state to take on a vaccination
program. All will be revealed tomorrow. She tells me jabs haven’t begun
in Spain yet - she is not amused!

Sincerely Chris
Nick Odell
2021-01-13 14:02:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
Great to hear it, Peter. Roll on March 31.

The only thing that bothers me is the incorporation of the motor car
into the process. If people like me turn up on foot are they likely to
be turned away?

Nick
krw
2021-01-13 14:52:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
Great to hear it, Peter. Roll on March 31.
The only thing that bothers me is the incorporation of the motor car
into the process. If people like me turn up on foot are they likely to
be turned away?
Nick
Had to go to my local surgery for a blood test last week. They don't
like meeting people. The doors are glass so it was easy to see that the
entire waiting room area (pre-covid at best 50% occupied when doctors
actually saw patients) was completely empty.

Used the intercom to announce myself. Was told to wait in the car and
come back shortly. I pointed out that I did not have a car. You have
to wait outside was the reply.

Can someone please explain the logic of exposing me to the cold for
longer than necessary when if I had any signs of infection I was not
going to be allowed in any way - huge signs telling anyone sick not to
enter.

I think that all common sense has been extinguished and for the life of
me I don't see why I should follow silly rules when they are by
extension complete nonsense. I am not denying the virus exists and is
nasty - but the mentality of nanny knows best has in recent years
completely undermined logic.


Slight rant over.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Vicky Ayech
2021-01-13 17:41:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
Great to hear it, Peter. Roll on March 31.
The only thing that bothers me is the incorporation of the motor car
into the process. If people like me turn up on foot are they likely to
be turned away?
Nick
Had to go to my local surgery for a blood test last week. They don't
like meeting people. The doors are glass so it was easy to see that the
entire waiting room area (pre-covid at best 50% occupied when doctors
actually saw patients) was completely empty.
Used the intercom to announce myself. Was told to wait in the car and
come back shortly. I pointed out that I did not have a car. You have
to wait outside was the reply.
Can someone please explain the logic of exposing me to the cold for
longer than necessary when if I had any signs of infection I was not
going to be allowed in any way - huge signs telling anyone sick not to
enter.
That happened when I went to the dentist before Xmas for the initial
assessment before they did the extraction. The sign on the door said
phone. I had my phone but if not. tough. They said wait till your
time. I was half an hour early but could see it was empty and it was
cold. I walked up and down and sat on a bench in Watford shopping mall
(outdoor) finally. They let me in at the appointment time and then
took 10 mins till they saw me. The actual dentist was very nice but
the receptionist was scary.Unfortunate loud voice and manner. When I
had the extraction last week they were a bit less aggressive.
Post by krw
I think that all common sense has been extinguished and for the life of
me I don't see why I should follow silly rules when they are by
extension complete nonsense. I am not denying the virus exists and is
nasty - but the mentality of nanny knows best has in recent years
completely undermined logic.
Slight rant over.
John Ashby
2021-01-13 18:06:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number.  10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
Great to hear it, Peter. Roll on March 31.
The only thing that bothers me is the incorporation of the motor car
into the process. If people like me turn up on foot are they likely to
be turned away?
Nick
Had to go to my local surgery for a blood test last week.  They don't
like meeting people.  The doors are glass so it was easy to see that the
entire waiting room area (pre-covid at best 50% occupied when doctors
actually saw patients) was completely empty.
Used the intercom to announce myself.  Was told to wait in the car and
come back shortly.  I pointed out that I did not have a car.  You have
to wait outside was the reply.
Can someone please explain the logic of exposing me to the cold for
longer than necessary when if I had any signs of infection I was not
going to be allowed in any way - huge signs telling anyone sick not to
enter.
Pour decourager (ou pas encourager) les autres.

john
Chris
2021-01-13 18:43:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
Great to hear it, Peter. Roll on March 31.
The only thing that bothers me is the incorporation of the motor car
into the process. If people like me turn up on foot are they likely to
be turned away?
Nick
Had to go to my local surgery for a blood test last week. They don't
like meeting people. The doors are glass so it was easy to see that the
entire waiting room area (pre-covid at best 50% occupied when doctors
actually saw patients) was completely empty.
Used the intercom to announce myself. Was told to wait in the car and
come back shortly. I pointed out that I did not have a car. You have
to wait outside was the reply.
Can someone please explain the logic of exposing me to the cold for
longer than necessary when if I had any signs of infection I was not
going to be allowed in any way - huge signs telling anyone sick not to
enter.
I think that all common sense has been extinguished and for the life of
me I don't see why I should follow silly rules when they are by
extension complete nonsense. I am not denying the virus exists and is
nasty - but the mentality of nanny knows best has in recent years
completely undermined logic.
Slight rant over.
But why didn’t you drive? And yes, you do have to stay outside. I sat at
a nearby bus shelter, no one about, until five mins before my time. The
nurse who did my diabetic check up kindly took me to the exit door as,
be,lie e it or not, in 36 years of using the building I’d not noticed the
emergency exit next to the room often used for diabetic checks. Wonder
what they do for those who haven’t a car post vaccination. Will be very
happy if mine is delayed till a warm spring day.

Sincerely Chris
Sid Nuncius
2021-01-13 19:12:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Had to go to my local surgery for a blood test last week.  They don't
like meeting people.  The doors are glass so it was easy to see that the
entire waiting room area (pre-covid at best 50% occupied when doctors
actually saw patients) was completely empty.
Used the intercom to announce myself.  Was told to wait in the car and
come back shortly.  I pointed out that I did not have a car.  You have
to wait outside was the reply.
Can someone please explain the logic of exposing me to the cold for
longer than necessary when if I had any signs of infection I was not
going to be allowed in any way - huge signs telling anyone sick not to
enter.
I think that all common sense has been extinguished and for the life of
me I don't see why I should follow silly rules when they are by
extension complete nonsense.  I am not denying the virus exists and is
nasty - but the mentality of nanny knows best has in recent years
completely undermined logic.
I view this rather differently from you.

We know that many, many asymptomatic people have the virus; some never
develop symptoms, others are in the early stages of infection and will
go on to develop symptoms. Staff at surgeries deserve to be protected
and all of us really, really need them to remain well so they can carry
on looking after us. It seems wholly reasonable to me that people
should not come into the surgery unless absolutely necessary and that
they should be in there for the shortest possible time.

I have had some similar inconveniences at a number of medical
appointments over the last year or so. It's a boodly nuisance but I
absolutely accept their necessity. And in the middle of a public health
crisis in which 1500+ deaths[1] have been reported in the last 24 hours,
I'm more than prepared to put up with a bit of nanny knows best, even if
it can seem over-zealous at times. Frankly, if the government
guidelines had been a bit more apparently over-zealous since March,
significantly fewer people would have died. I really don't like being
cold, but in these circumstances I'm more than willing to put up with it.

YMMV.


[1]That is the entire student population of the last two schools I
worked in. I think of every one of them dead and the number becomes
rather more real for me.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Jim Easterbrook
2021-01-13 19:19:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
We know that many, many asymptomatic people have the virus; some never
develop symptoms, others are in the early stages of infection and will
go on to develop symptoms. Staff at surgeries deserve to be protected
and all of us really, really need them to remain well so they can carry
on looking after us. It seems wholly reasonable to me that people
should not come into the surgery unless absolutely necessary and that
they should be in there for the shortest possible time.
I have had some similar inconveniences at a number of medical
appointments over the last year or so. It's a boodly nuisance but I
absolutely accept their necessity. And in the middle of a public health
crisis in which 1500+ deaths[1] have been reported in the last 24 hours,
I'm more than prepared to put up with a bit of nanny knows best, even if
it can seem over-zealous at times. Frankly, if the government
guidelines had been a bit more apparently over-zealous since March,
significantly fewer people would have died. I really don't like being
cold, but in these circumstances I'm more than willing to put up with it.
I couldn't agree more Sid, and very well expressed as usual.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Mike McMillan
2021-01-14 08:31:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
We know that many, many asymptomatic people have the virus; some never
develop symptoms, others are in the early stages of infection and will
go on to develop symptoms. Staff at surgeries deserve to be protected
and all of us really, really need them to remain well so they can carry
on looking after us. It seems wholly reasonable to me that people
should not come into the surgery unless absolutely necessary and that
they should be in there for the shortest possible time.
I have had some similar inconveniences at a number of medical
appointments over the last year or so. It's a boodly nuisance but I
absolutely accept their necessity. And in the middle of a public health
crisis in which 1500+ deaths[1] have been reported in the last 24 hours,
I'm more than prepared to put up with a bit of nanny knows best, even if
it can seem over-zealous at times. Frankly, if the government
guidelines had been a bit more apparently over-zealous since March,
significantly fewer people would have died. I really don't like being
cold, but in these circumstances I'm more than willing to put up with it.
I couldn't agree more Sid, and very well expressed as usual.
Yup, indeed so, me also as well.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Serena Blanchflower
2021-01-13 20:04:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Had to go to my local surgery for a blood test last week.  They don't
like meeting people.  The doors are glass so it was easy to see that
the entire waiting room area (pre-covid at best 50% occupied when
doctors actually saw patients) was completely empty.
Used the intercom to announce myself.  Was told to wait in the car and
come back shortly.  I pointed out that I did not have a car.  You have
to wait outside was the reply.
Can someone please explain the logic of exposing me to the cold for
longer than necessary when if I had any signs of infection I was not
going to be allowed in any way - huge signs telling anyone sick not to
enter.
I think that all common sense has been extinguished and for the life
of me I don't see why I should follow silly rules when they are by
extension complete nonsense.  I am not denying the virus exists and is
nasty - but the mentality of nanny knows best has in recent years
completely undermined logic.
I view this rather differently from you.
We know that many, many asymptomatic people have the virus; some never
develop symptoms, others are in the early stages of infection and will
go on to develop symptoms.  Staff at surgeries deserve to be protected
and all of us really, really need them to remain well so they can carry
on looking after us.  It seems wholly reasonable to me that people
should not come into the surgery unless absolutely necessary and that
they should be in there for the shortest possible time.
I have had some similar inconveniences at a number of medical
appointments over the last year or so.  It's a boodly nuisance but I
absolutely accept their necessity.  And in the middle of a public health
crisis in which 1500+ deaths[1] have been reported in the last 24 hours,
I'm more than prepared to put up with a bit of nanny knows best, even if
it can seem over-zealous at times.  Frankly, if the government
guidelines had been a bit more apparently over-zealous since March,
significantly fewer people would have died.  I really don't like being
cold, but in these circumstances I'm more than willing to put up with it.
YMMV.
<languid wave>
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1]That is the entire student population of the last two schools I
worked in.  I think of every one of them dead and the number becomes
rather more real for me.
That's a really chilling way of bringing the numbers to life (so to speak).
--
Best wishes, Serena
Dreaming, I dreamt that life was all joy. Waking, I found that life
demands service. Serving, I found that joy is in service.
(Rabindranath Tagore)
Sam Plusnet
2021-01-13 20:44:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
We know that many, many asymptomatic people have the virus; some never
develop symptoms, others are in the early stages of infection and will
go on to develop symptoms.  Staff at surgeries deserve to be protected
and all of us really, really need them to remain well so they can carry
on looking after us.  It seems wholly reasonable to me that people
should not come into the surgery unless absolutely necessary and that
they should be in there for the shortest possible time.
I have had some similar inconveniences at a number of medical
appointments over the last year or so.  It's a boodly nuisance but I
absolutely accept their necessity.  And in the middle of a public health
crisis in which 1500+ deaths[1] have been reported in the last 24 hours,
I'm more than prepared to put up with a bit of nanny knows best, even if
it can seem over-zealous at times.  Frankly, if the government
guidelines had been a bit more apparently over-zealous since March,
significantly fewer people would have died.  I really don't like being
cold, but in these circumstances I'm more than willing to put up with it.
YMMV.
[1]That is the entire student population of the last two schools I
worked in.  I think of every one of them dead and the number becomes
rather more real for me.
Thanks for that Sid. Those numbers do seem to blur after a while and
need to be put into context like this.
--
Sam Plusnet
Sally Thompson
2021-01-13 21:24:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Had to go to my local surgery for a blood test last week.  They don't
like meeting people.  The doors are glass so it was easy to see that the
entire waiting room area (pre-covid at best 50% occupied when doctors
actually saw patients) was completely empty.
Used the intercom to announce myself.  Was told to wait in the car and
come back shortly.  I pointed out that I did not have a car.  You have
to wait outside was the reply.
Can someone please explain the logic of exposing me to the cold for
longer than necessary when if I had any signs of infection I was not
going to be allowed in any way - huge signs telling anyone sick not to
enter.
I think that all common sense has been extinguished and for the life of
me I don't see why I should follow silly rules when they are by
extension complete nonsense.  I am not denying the virus exists and is
nasty - but the mentality of nanny knows best has in recent years
completely undermined logic.
I view this rather differently from you.
We know that many, many asymptomatic people have the virus; some never
develop symptoms, others are in the early stages of infection and will
go on to develop symptoms. Staff at surgeries deserve to be protected
and all of us really, really need them to remain well so they can carry
on looking after us. It seems wholly reasonable to me that people
should not come into the surgery unless absolutely necessary and that
they should be in there for the shortest possible time.
I have had some similar inconveniences at a number of medical
appointments over the last year or so. It's a boodly nuisance but I
absolutely accept their necessity. And in the middle of a public health
crisis in which 1500+ deaths[1] have been reported in the last 24 hours,
I'm more than prepared to put up with a bit of nanny knows best, even if
it can seem over-zealous at times. Frankly, if the government
guidelines had been a bit more apparently over-zealous since March,
significantly fewer people would have died. I really don't like being
cold, but in these circumstances I'm more than willing to put up with it.
YMMV.
[1]That is the entire student population of the last two schools I
worked in. I think of every one of them dead and the number becomes
rather more real for me.
Absobloominglutely Sid
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Min
2021-01-13 23:28:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Had to go to my local surgery for a blood test last week. They don't
like meeting people. The doors are glass so it was easy to see that the
entire waiting room area (pre-covid at best 50% occupied when doctors
actually saw patients) was completely empty.
Used the intercom to announce myself. Was told to wait in the car and
come back shortly. I pointed out that I did not have a car. You have
to wait outside was the reply.
Can someone please explain the logic of exposing me to the cold for
longer than necessary when if I had any signs of infection I was not
going to be allowed in any way - huge signs telling anyone sick not to
enter.
I think that all common sense has been extinguished and for the life of
me I don't see why I should follow silly rules when they are by
extension complete nonsense. I am not denying the virus exists and is
nasty - but the mentality of nanny knows best has in recent years
completely undermined logic.
I view this rather differently from you.
We know that many, many asymptomatic people have the virus; some never
develop symptoms, others are in the early stages of infection and will
go on to develop symptoms. Staff at surgeries deserve to be protected
and all of us really, really need them to remain well so they can carry
on looking after us. It seems wholly reasonable to me that people
should not come into the surgery unless absolutely necessary and that
they should be in there for the shortest possible time.
I have had some similar inconveniences at a number of medical
appointments over the last year or so. It's a boodly nuisance but I
absolutely accept their necessity. And in the middle of a public health
crisis in which 1500+ deaths[1] have been reported in the last 24 hours,
I'm more than prepared to put up with a bit of nanny knows best, even if
it can seem over-zealous at times. Frankly, if the government
guidelines had been a bit more apparently over-zealous since March,
significantly fewer people would have died. I really don't like being
cold, but in these circumstances I'm more than willing to put up with it.
YMMV.
[1]That is the entire student population of the last two schools I
worked in. I think of every one of them dead and the number becomes
rather more real for me.
<LW>
When I had my carpal tunnel surgery, having got there by bus.
I had similar treatment. Fine By Me - and it was a Nasty Cold Day....
--
Min
steve hague
2021-01-14 09:07:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Had to go to my local surgery for a blood test last week.  They don't
like meeting people.  The doors are glass so it was easy to see that
the entire waiting room area (pre-covid at best 50% occupied when
doctors actually saw patients) was completely empty.
Used the intercom to announce myself.  Was told to wait in the car and
come back shortly.  I pointed out that I did not have a car.  You have
to wait outside was the reply.
Can someone please explain the logic of exposing me to the cold for
longer than necessary when if I had any signs of infection I was not
going to be allowed in any way - huge signs telling anyone sick not to
enter.
I think that all common sense has been extinguished and for the life
of me I don't see why I should follow silly rules when they are by
extension complete nonsense.  I am not denying the virus exists and is
nasty - but the mentality of nanny knows best has in recent years
completely undermined logic.
I view this rather differently from you.
We know that many, many asymptomatic people have the virus; some never
develop symptoms, others are in the early stages of infection and will
go on to develop symptoms.  Staff at surgeries deserve to be protected
and all of us really, really need them to remain well so they can carry
on looking after us.  It seems wholly reasonable to me that people
should not come into the surgery unless absolutely necessary and that
they should be in there for the shortest possible time.
I have had some similar inconveniences at a number of medical
appointments over the last year or so.  It's a boodly nuisance but I
absolutely accept their necessity.  And in the middle of a public health
crisis in which 1500+ deaths[1] have been reported in the last 24 hours,
I'm more than prepared to put up with a bit of nanny knows best, even if
it can seem over-zealous at times.  Frankly, if the government
guidelines had been a bit more apparently over-zealous since March,
significantly fewer people would have died.  I really don't like being
cold, but in these circumstances I'm more than willing to put up with it.
YMMV.
[1]That is the entire student population of the last two schools I
worked in.  I think of every one of them dead and the number becomes
rather more real for me.
I agree absolutely, Sid. I'm still concerned about who gets the jab as a
priority though. I went for a blood test last night at our local
surgery. The practice nurse who took my blood is an old friend, and we
chatted for a few minutes, not having seen each other since last March.
She told me that no- one at the surgery had been innoculated, and no
appointments had been arranged. These are front line NHS workers.
Steve
Chris J Dixon
2021-01-13 15:13:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Peter Withey
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
The only thing that bothers me is the incorporation of the motor car
into the process. If people like me turn up on foot are they likely to
be turned away?
They were talking to a chap on BBC News who had turned up in his
car, was told to wait, but there was some sort of delay, and
nothing was happening. After some hours, he noticed that a
pedestrian queue seemed to be moving, so joined it and was dealt
with. IIRC he was on site for over 4 hours.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Nick Odell
2021-01-14 17:23:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Peter Withey
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
The only thing that bothers me is the incorporation of the motor car
into the process. If people like me turn up on foot are they likely to
be turned away?
They were talking to a chap on BBC News who had turned up in his
car, was told to wait, but there was some sort of delay, and
nothing was happening. After some hours, he noticed that a
pedestrian queue seemed to be moving, so joined it and was dealt
with. IIRC he was on site for over 4 hours.
Thanks for that, Chris. At the moment, word on the street is that
candidates in my locality who are eligible are being sent to a mass
vaccination centre in Manchester - a little beyond my comfortable
walking range. But by the time my turn comes around vaccination ought
to become available more locally.

Nick
Chris
2021-01-15 10:53:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Peter Withey
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
The only thing that bothers me is the incorporation of the motor car
into the process. If people like me turn up on foot are they likely to
be turned away?
They were talking to a chap on BBC News who had turned up in his
car, was told to wait, but there was some sort of delay, and
nothing was happening. After some hours, he noticed that a
pedestrian queue seemed to be moving, so joined it and was dealt
with. IIRC he was on site for over 4 hours.
Thanks for that, Chris. At the moment, word on the street is that
candidates in my locality who are eligible are being sent to a mass
vaccination centre in Manchester - a little beyond my comfortable
walking range. But by the time my turn comes around vaccination ought
to become available more locally.
Nick
LOL.

Sincerely Chris
Chris
2021-01-13 18:43:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
Great to hear it, Peter. Roll on March 31.
The only thing that bothers me is the incorporation of the motor car
into the process. If people like me turn up on foot are they likely to
be turned away?
Nick
We’ll be walking or using a bus. We’re always the odd ones. Can you ride
a bike, Nick? Assuming you could fine one you were allowed to use of
course.

Sincerely Chris
Nick Odell
2021-01-14 17:28:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
Great to hear it, Peter. Roll on March 31.
The only thing that bothers me is the incorporation of the motor car
into the process. If people like me turn up on foot are they likely to
be turned away?
Nick
We’ll be walking or using a bus. We’re always the odd ones. Can you ride
a bike, Nick? Assuming you could fine one you were allowed to use of
course.
Probably not. I used to be an enthusiastic cyclist but I don't own one
any more. Given my propensity for falling over, I've probably lost my
sense of balance and even if I did have a bike I'm not sure I'd want
to test out my sense of balance on this 1-in-4 hill in the snow!

Nick
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-01-15 03:33:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 at 17:28:24, Nick Odell
<***@themusicworkshop.plus.com> wrote (my responses usually follow
points raised):
[]
Post by Nick Odell
Probably not. I used to be an enthusiastic cyclist but I don't own one
any more.
[]
You are Philip umbrella AICMFP ...
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

When I'm good, I'm very good. But when I'm bad - I'm better! (Mae West)
Chris
2021-01-15 11:09:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
Great to hear it, Peter. Roll on March 31.
The only thing that bothers me is the incorporation of the motor car
into the process. If people like me turn up on foot are they likely to
be turned away?
Nick
We’ll be walking or using a bus. We’re always the odd ones. Can you ride
a bike, Nick? Assuming you could fine one you were allowed to use of
course.
Probably not. I used to be an enthusiastic cyclist but I don't own one
any more. Given my propensity for falling over, I've probably lost my
sense of balance and even if I did have a bike I'm not sure I'd want
to test out my sense of balance on this 1-in-4 hill in the snow!
Nick
Apparently, somewhere yesterday, snow brought vaccinations to a halt. Can’t
remember where.

Sincerely Chris
Peter Withey
2021-01-14 12:42:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
rOn Wed, 13 Jan 2021 14:02:17 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
Great to hear it, Peter. Roll on March 31.
The only thing that bothers me is the incorporation of the motor car
into the process. If people like me turn up on foot are they likely to
be turned away?
Nick
https://www.getsurrey.co.uk/news/surrey-news/gallery/pictures-inside-epsom-downs-racecourse-19602690

or https://tinyurl.com/yxfxg46r

Unless arrangements changed between Monday and Tuesday, those arriving
by car on Tuesday were ask to remain their cars and when called went
straight into the centre. I'm guessing photos 4 & 5 show those who
arrived on foot or public transport.

Things must have been better organise on Tueday as I can't remember
seeing queues like that either on arrival or on leaving.
--
Pete
Nick Odell
2021-01-14 17:27:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Withey
rOn Wed, 13 Jan 2021 14:02:17 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
Great to hear it, Peter. Roll on March 31.
The only thing that bothers me is the incorporation of the motor car
into the process. If people like me turn up on foot are they likely to
be turned away?
Nick
https://www.getsurrey.co.uk/news/surrey-news/gallery/pictures-inside-epsom-downs-racecourse-19602690
or https://tinyurl.com/yxfxg46r
Unless arrangements changed between Monday and Tuesday, those arriving
by car on Tuesday were ask to remain their cars and when called went
straight into the centre. I'm guessing photos 4 & 5 show those who
arrived on foot or public transport.
Things must have been better organise on Tueday as I can't remember
seeing queues like that either on arrival or on leaving.
Thanks Peter

N.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-01-13 23:06:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
[Interesting account snipped. Sounds like I'll get through some of my
back-issue pile of Radio Timeses.]
Post by Peter Withey
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
(https://www.omnicalculator.com/health/vaccine-queue-uk says I'll get my
first one in May, second in August.)

Meanwhile, I got a letter today inviting me for a 'flu jab, which I
could have at my local surgery or a pharmacy (which would be the same
place anyway). I rang up, and got 26 Jan - which is fine by me.

A couple of points slightly surprised me:

1. "You are being contacted because you are age 50-64 years and are
therefore eligible for a free flu vaccination." I'm 60, and have been
here (and registered with the same surgery, though that's probably
irrelevant - the letter came from London) since 2007, but this is the
first such communication I've received. I'm not _really_ complaining,
just a _little_ surprised. (Not greatly so: I only got my first ever
colon-cancer test kit in the last few months, whereas AIUI they send
them out to people [maybe only men? But I am one] over either 50 or 55.
[I got the results - I'm OK for now.]) I'm also puzzled by "free"; as
one born in 1960 and lucky enough to have had little need for the NHS,
so am still in the mindset from the golden age of everything being free;
I also wonder what happens after age 64.

2. The letter was dated 31 Dec.; I got it on 13 Jan.. I know the post
office have some problems at the moment, and realise the New Year period
was included, but still it seems _rather_ a long time. It doesn't
_matter_ (in this case).

I don't think I usually get the 'flu - not badly, in most years, anyway;
I sometimes get something, but where you draw the line between it and "a
cold", I don't know. In terms of something that really made me feel
rotten (and/or people told me to stay off work when I was working), I'd
say less than one year in three, possibly a lot less. I think I have had
it this season, about 27/28/29 December - didn't feel miserable, quite
cheerful actually, but had symptoms - though I'll still go for the jab.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

After all is said and done, usually more is said.
krw
2021-01-13 23:21:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
1. "You are being contacted because you are age 50-64 years and are
therefore eligible for a free flu vaccination." I'm 60,
This is the first year in which the lower age limit has been reduced - I
believe it was previously 60 and you weren't - so you would not have had
the letter!
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Jim Easterbrook
2021-01-14 09:12:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
1. "You are being contacted because you are age 50-64 years and are
therefore eligible for a free flu vaccination." I'm 60,
This is the first year in which the lower age limit has been reduced - I
believe it was previously 60 and you weren't - so you would not have had
the letter!
I turned 60 in March 2019 and have also had my first ever flu vaccine
invitation letter this week.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Serena Blanchflower
2021-01-14 13:04:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
1. "You are being contacted because you are age 50-64 years and are
therefore eligible for a free flu vaccination." I'm 60,
This is the first year in which the lower age limit has been reduced - I
believe it was previously 60 and you weren't - so you would not have had
the letter!
It was previously 65, so this was the first year that I've been invited
for one too. Those of us who are between 50 and 64 were invited as a
second tranche, once the over 65s had been vaccinated. I think this was
being done to reduce the risk of the NHS being hit by a flu epidemic,
when already struggling to cope with Covid.

I think the colon cancer tests (aka poo sticks) are only people over 60,
not younger, which is why you've just had your first one.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I haven't lost my mind; it's backed up on tape somewhere.
Mike McMillan
2021-01-14 13:43:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
1. "You are being contacted because you are age 50-64 years and are
therefore eligible for a free flu vaccination." I'm 60,
This is the first year in which the lower age limit has been reduced - I
believe it was previously 60 and you weren't - so you would not have had
the letter!
It was previously 65, so this was the first year that I've been invited
for one too. Those of us who are between 50 and 64 were invited as a
second tranche, once the over 65s had been vaccinated. I think this was
being done to reduce the risk of the NHS being hit by a flu epidemic,
when already struggling to cope with Covid.
I think the colon cancer tests (aka poo sticks) are only people over 60,
not younger, which is why you've just had your first one.
I have had the ‘pleasure’ of undergoing such tests for some years and I
noted in the last (quite recent) one that the process has changed and is no
longer three ‘samples from different days but just one involving the use of
a ridged plastic stick. Before you worry or start having Umratic fun with
that, the stick is dipped into a sample not up .....
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Penny
2021-01-14 14:28:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 13:04:07 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
<***@blanchflower.me.uk> scrawled in the dust...
Flu jabs
Post by Serena Blanchflower
It was previously 65, so this was the first year that I've been invited
for one too. Those of us who are between 50 and 64 were invited as a
second tranche, once the over 65s had been vaccinated.
In what way were you 'invited'?
I ask because I recall receiving a letter in previous years - though my GP
surgery tells me they stopped sending letters a few years back and they
just put it on repeat prescription forms (attached to prescriptions) now. I
now recall I dropped in for one in 2018 because we'd been discussing them
at the 'oldie' art group I attend.

The problem with this being, before they started a building refurb, I used
to collect my script from the surgery and take it to the pharmacy next door
so had the opportunity to read any messages - not that I always did. I've
ordered my repeats online, since I realised some years back that the
organisation of Boots collection service made no sense* and often meant I
would run out of meds.

During the refurb, the surgery in house dispensary (for out-lying patients
only**) was closed and when ordering we had to nominate a pharmacy for
collection, after a couple of months or parking difficulties I switched to
Morrisons (this was ignored the first month), where parking is much easier
than either Boots or the Lloyds next to the surgery. Morrisons retain the
repeat form unless I specifically remember to request it, which, having
braved the walk past all the people at the tills to get there at this time
of Covid, I often forget. Consequently, last year I missed requests, on
different occasions, to make appointments for a drug review (so I could no
longer order repeats) and a flu jab.

As they do use the online emis system, it surely couldn't be too difficult
to repeat such information there?

*They took the date of _collection_ rather than date of _ordering_ as the
base from which to calculate the date to order meds 4 weeks later -
ignoring the fact that one of my meds only provides 24 days of use if taken
as directed and the other 30 days.

**I've never understood that either, since the pharmacy next door has
existed for many years.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2021-01-14 14:50:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
I ask because I recall receiving a letter in previous years - though my GP
surgery tells me they stopped sending letters a few years back and they
just put it on repeat prescription forms (attached to prescriptions) now. I
now recall I dropped in for one in 2018 because we'd been discussing them
at the 'oldie' art group I attend.
My surgery rings me up to invite me for my 'flu jab. I'm fairly sure
that for my last diabetic check they rang to invite me, thought I think
previously there has either been a letter or I've been seing the Dr or
Nurse for some reason and he/she has made an appointment.

I'm in the process of trying to register for online prescription
requests. Receptionist rang to get my e-mail address and said she'd
e-mail and I had to respond within 24 hours. About 20 hours later I
rang ... took me another hour to get through ... and told her of the
absence. Another 20-ish hours later I've just put a note in the surgery
mailbox to say I still haven't had the e-mail and repeating my e-mail
address.
--
Jenny M Benson
Vicky Ayech
2021-01-14 17:45:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 14:50:57 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I ask because I recall receiving a letter in previous years - though my GP
surgery tells me they stopped sending letters a few years back and they
just put it on repeat prescription forms (attached to prescriptions) now. I
now recall I dropped in for one in 2018 because we'd been discussing them
at the 'oldie' art group I attend.
My surgery rings me up to invite me for my 'flu jab. I'm fairly sure
that for my last diabetic check they rang to invite me, thought I think
previously there has either been a letter or I've been seing the Dr or
Nurse for some reason and he/she has made an appointment.
I'm in the process of trying to register for online prescription
requests. Receptionist rang to get my e-mail address and said she'd
e-mail and I had to respond within 24 hours. About 20 hours later I
rang ... took me another hour to get through ... and told her of the
absence. Another 20-ish hours later I've just put a note in the surgery
mailbox to say I still haven't had the e-mail and repeating my e-mail
address.
We've had the online prescription requests for a while now and a
chemist who delivers. So far nothing bad has happened and if they do
not arrive in time (once they rang the bell while I was walking the
dog and B sleeping) they say sorry and fix it.

I get texts about flu vaccinations now that no letters are sent.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-01-14 14:49:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 13:04:07 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Flu jabs
Post by Serena Blanchflower
It was previously 65, so this was the first year that I've been invited
for one too. Those of us who are between 50 and 64 were invited as a
second tranche, once the over 65s had been vaccinated.
In what way were you 'invited'?
I ask because I recall receiving a letter in previous years - though my GP
surgery tells me they stopped sending letters a few years back and they
just put it on repeat prescription forms (attached to prescriptions) now. I
now recall I dropped in for one in 2018 because we'd been discussing them
at the 'oldie' art group I attend.
[]
My flu jab invite came by letter; the wording is "I'd like to remind yo
that it's not too late [letter is dated 31 Dec] to get a flu
vaccination. ... You might have already been invited by your General
Practice ..." [I hadn't]. The letter came from "NHS England and NHS
Improvement" at an address in London.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

It is important to write so that you can be understood. It is far more
important to write so that you cannot be misunderstood.
John Ashby
2021-01-14 15:28:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 14/01/2021 14:28, Penny wrote:

Sorry, this caught my eye and...
Post by Penny
During the refurb, the surgery in house dispensary (for out-lying patients
only**)
Unconscious malingerers?

john
Chris J Dixon
2021-01-14 16:04:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
*They took the date of _collection_ rather than date of _ordering_ as the
base from which to calculate the date to order meds 4 weeks later -
ignoring the fact that one of my meds only provides 24 days of use if taken
as directed and the other 30 days.
I can never understand how pack sizes are chosen. I now have a
couple of prescriptions, one lasts 30 days, the other 28. I have
been ordering both together, but I suppose sometime soon I will
have to just order one of the smaller pack.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
krw
2021-01-14 16:11:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
*They took the date of _collection_ rather than date of _ordering_ as the
base from which to calculate the date to order meds 4 weeks later -
ignoring the fact that one of my meds only provides 24 days of use if taken
as directed and the other 30 days.
I can never understand how pack sizes are chosen. I now have a
couple of prescriptions, one lasts 30 days, the other 28. I have
been ordering both together, but I suppose sometime soon I will
have to just order one of the smaller pack.
Chris
We used to be able to order 3 off for 28 days - so close to three months.

"They" thought it was a good idea to limit this to 2 off of 28 days. So
I have to go 50% more than before.

Everything on listing comes in some multiple of 7 except for the insulin
which lasts about 30 days on current consumption.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Sam Plusnet
2021-01-14 22:24:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
We used to be able to order 3 off for 28 days - so close to three months.
"They" thought it was a good idea to limit this to 2 off of 28 days.  So
I have to go 50% more than before.
Everything on listing comes in some multiple of 7 except for the insulin
which lasts about 30 days on current consumption.
Our Area Health Authority only allow 28 days prescription to be issued
at a time. We would be happy to suffer your arrangement.
--
Sam Plusnet
Jenny M Benson
2021-01-14 16:35:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
I can never understand how pack sizes are chosen. I now have a
couple of prescriptions, one lasts 30 days, the other 28. I have
been ordering both together, but I suppose sometime soon I will
have to just order one of the smaller pack.
I used to be prescribed 2 months' supply at a time of all the various
medications I take, so it was a simple process to re-order everthing at
once ever 2 months. Then the chemist couldn't get hold of one thing,
causing a delay when I was without that drug for a few days. Then again
they couldn't get it and this time the replacement 'script (take 4 of a
smaller tab instead of 2 of the usual) was for only 1 month. Then I
started a new drug and that was only prescribed for one month at a time.
Now everything is only prescribed for one month at a time (do they
think I won't live long enough to be worth 2 months' supply?) but all
hopelessly out of sync, so I seem to be putting in prescription requests
every few days.
--
Jenny M Benson
Joe Kerr
2021-01-14 17:00:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris J Dixon
I can never understand how pack sizes are chosen. I now have a
couple of prescriptions, one lasts 30 days, the other 28. I have
been ordering both together, but I suppose sometime soon I will
have to just order one of the smaller pack.
I used to be prescribed 2 months' supply at a time of all the various
medications I take, so it was a simple process to re-order everthing at
once ever 2 months.  Then the chemist couldn't get hold of one thing,
causing a delay when I was without that drug for a few days.  Then again
they couldn't get it and this time the replacement 'script (take 4 of a
smaller tab instead of 2 of the usual) was for only 1 month.  Then I
started a new drug and that was only prescribed for one month at a time.
 Now everything is only prescribed for one month at a time (do they
think I won't live long enough to be worth 2 months' supply?) but all
hopelessly out of sync, so I seem to be putting in prescription requests
every few days.
I think that if you talk to your doctor they should rationalise it.
After all it is wasting their time as well as yours and the pharmacist's.
--
Ric
Mike McMillan
2021-01-14 17:17:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris J Dixon
I can never understand how pack sizes are chosen. I now have a
couple of prescriptions, one lasts 30 days, the other 28. I have
been ordering both together, but I suppose sometime soon I will
have to just order one of the smaller pack.
I used to be prescribed 2 months' supply at a time of all the various
medications I take, so it was a simple process to re-order everthing at
once ever 2 months. Then the chemist couldn't get hold of one thing,
causing a delay when I was without that drug for a few days. Then again
they couldn't get it and this time the replacement 'script (take 4 of a
smaller tab instead of 2 of the usual) was for only 1 month. Then I
started a new drug and that was only prescribed for one month at a time.
Now everything is only prescribed for one month at a time (do they
think I won't live long enough to be worth 2 months' supply?) but all
hopelessly out of sync, so I seem to be putting in prescription requests
every few days.
Might this be an appropriate point for me to mention I only have one tablet
a day now (statin)? I finished my 18 month treatment with daily
Bicalutamide tablets last weekend. I look forward to the side effects
wearing off and await a request from the horsepiddal Cancer Care Unit to
provide another blood sample for PSA analysis to see what my prostate is
now doing.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Vicky Ayech
2021-01-14 17:59:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 17:17:33 GMT, Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
J
Might this be an appropriate point for me to mention I only have one tablet
a day now (statin)? I finished my 18 month treatment with daily
Bicalutamide tablets last weekend. I look forward to the side effects
wearing off and await a request from the horsepiddal Cancer Care Unit to
provide another blood sample for PSA analysis to see what my prostate is
now doing.
That's really excellent news! Congratulations.
Penny
2021-01-14 23:11:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 17:17:33 GMT, Mike McMillan <***@ntlworld.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike McMillan
Might this be an appropriate point for me to mention I only have one tablet
a day now (statin)? I finished my 18 month treatment with daily
Bicalutamide tablets last weekend. I look forward to the side effects
wearing off and await a request from the horsepiddal Cancer Care Unit to
provide another blood sample for PSA analysis to see what my prostate is
now doing.
Sounds like good news :)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sid Nuncius
2021-01-14 19:09:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
I used to be prescribed 2 months' supply at a time of all the various
medications I take, so it was a simple process to re-order everthing at
once ever 2 months.  Then the chemist couldn't get hold of one thing,
causing a delay when I was without that drug for a few days.  Then again
they couldn't get it and this time the replacement 'script (take 4 of a
smaller tab instead of 2 of the usual) was for only 1 month.  Then I
started a new drug and that was only prescribed for one month at a time.
 Now everything is only prescribed for one month at a time (do they
think I won't live long enough to be worth 2 months' supply?) but all
hopelessly out of sync, so I seem to be putting in prescription requests
every few days.
Two months is the norm at my surgery. However, I've been on the same
eye drops for several years now and I spoke to the practice pharmacist
about it. He's a very sensible, pragmatic chap and is happy to give me
repeat prescriptions for six months' suppply, which saves both of us -
and the dispensing pharmacy - a lot of time and effort.

It may be worth having a chat to the appropriate person at your surgery.
They may be bound by inflexible rules, but you won't have lost anything
and you may be able to come to a more sensible arrangement.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sam Plusnet
2021-01-14 22:27:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
I used to be prescribed 2 months' supply at a time of all the various
medications I take, so it was a simple process to re-order everthing
at once ever 2 months.  Then the chemist couldn't get hold of one
thing, causing a delay when I was without that drug for a few days.
Then again they couldn't get it and this time the replacement 'script
(take 4 of a smaller tab instead of 2 of the usual) was for only 1
month.  Then I started a new drug and that was only prescribed for one
month at a time.   Now everything is only prescribed for one month at
a time (do they think I won't live long enough to be worth 2 months'
supply?) but all hopelessly out of sync, so I seem to be putting in
prescription requests every few days.
Two months is the norm at my surgery.  However, I've been on the same
eye drops for several years now and I spoke to the practice pharmacist
about it.  He's a very sensible, pragmatic chap and is happy to give me
repeat prescriptions for six months' suppply, which saves both of us -
and the dispensing pharmacy - a lot of time and effort.
It may be worth having a chat to the appropriate person at your surgery.
They may be bound by inflexible rules, but you won't have lost anything
and you may be able to come to a more sensible arrangement.
Here we get 28 days worth at a time.
Trying to get another helping too soon after the last one, is against
the rules & doomed to failure - unless you can offer a really good
excuse on a note from Mum.
--
Sam Plusnet
krw
2021-01-14 20:12:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
but all hopelessly out of sync, so I seem to be putting in prescription
requests every few days.
If I get something out of sync I re-order early and throw the leftovers
in the drawer in case of a later emergency which can be bridged. In
current circumstances I am not keen on visiting the pharmacy and was
particularly pleased this time to be able to get the insulin (which is
monthly) at the same juncture as the main medication (every two months)
and some needles which are packaged in much larger numbers and so cannot
be sure when they will fall due.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Jenny M Benson
2021-01-14 21:31:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
If I get something out of sync I re-order early and throw the leftovers
in the drawer in case of a later emergency which can be bridged.  In
current circumstances I am not keen on visiting the pharmacy and was
particularly pleased this time to be able to get the insulin (which is
monthly) at the same juncture as the main medication (every two months)
and some needles which are packaged in much larger numbers and so cannot
be sure when they will fall due.
Not allowed to re-order early here.

When most of my drugs were still being prescribed 2 months at a time I
put in a repeat list on which I'd written a request that the one-month
item be increased to 2 months and that the drug I was no longer taking
be removed from the list. Both requests were ignored.
--
Jenny M Benson
krw
2021-01-14 22:47:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by krw
If I get something out of sync I re-order early and throw the
leftovers in the drawer in case of a later emergency which can be
bridged.  In current circumstances I am not keen on visiting the
pharmacy and was particularly pleased this time to be able to get the
insulin (which is monthly) at the same juncture as the main medication
(every two months) and some needles which are packaged in much larger
numbers and so cannot be sure when they will fall due.
Not allowed to re-order early here.
When most of my drugs were still being prescribed 2 months at a time I
put in a repeat list on which I'd written a request that the one-month
item be increased to 2 months and that the drug I was no longer taking
be removed from the list.  Both requests were ignored.
I write polite letters to my doctor asking for such changes and they
usually get actioned. Indeed after one of the letters the front desk
team rang up to thank me on behalf of the doctor for laying it out so
clearly.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Joe Kerr
2021-01-14 16:48:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
I can never understand how pack sizes are chosen. I now have a
couple of prescriptions, one lasts 30 days, the other 28. I have
been ordering both together, but I suppose sometime soon I will
have to just order one of the smaller pack.
Chris
I did that once and some bright spark took the one I didn't order off
the prescription so I couldn't order it the next time. Much faffing ensued.
--
Ric
Vicky Ayech
2021-01-14 17:49:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Chris J Dixon
I can never understand how pack sizes are chosen. I now have a
couple of prescriptions, one lasts 30 days, the other 28. I have
been ordering both together, but I suppose sometime soon I will
have to just order one of the smaller pack.
Chris
I did that once and some bright spark took the one I didn't order off
the prescription so I couldn't order it the next time. Much faffing ensued.
They took one of mine off and we had some ..intense
conversations..about it. It was replaced eventually. But one I have
not used for 2 or 3 years is still on. ANd there was one I should have
had as it gave protextion against one of the others, and not having it
caused problems, and they said I had had it for 10 years. I had now
and had previous paper re-order forms to show that, but having a fight
with your surgery is A Bad Idea as you are then down as a Difficult
Patient.
Vicky Ayech
2021-01-14 21:22:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 17:49:41 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Chris J Dixon
I can never understand how pack sizes are chosen. I now have a
couple of prescriptions, one lasts 30 days, the other 28. I have
been ordering both together, but I suppose sometime soon I will
have to just order one of the smaller pack.
Chris
I did that once and some bright spark took the one I didn't order off
the prescription so I couldn't order it the next time. Much faffing ensued.
They took one of mine off and we had some ..intense
conversations..about it. It was replaced eventually. But one I have
not used for 2 or 3 years is still on. ANd there was one I should have
had as it gave protextion against one of the others, and not having it
caused problems, and they said I had had it for 10 years. I had now
I had not
Post by Vicky Ayech
and had previous paper re-order forms to show that, but having a fight
with your surgery is A Bad Idea as you are then down as a Difficult
Patient.
Penny
2021-01-14 23:03:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 16:04:47 +0000, Chris J Dixon <***@cdixon.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
*They took the date of _collection_ rather than date of _ordering_ as the
base from which to calculate the date to order meds 4 weeks later -
ignoring the fact that one of my meds only provides 24 days of use if taken
as directed and the other 30 days.
I can never understand how pack sizes are chosen. I now have a
couple of prescriptions, one lasts 30 days, the other 28. I have
been ordering both together, but I suppose sometime soon I will
have to just order one of the smaller pack.
I quite like calendar packs for pills, it's easy to see if you've missed a
day, even when the days of the week are not shown but there are 4 rows of
7. However, I figured out that getting a free pack of 28 mini-aspirin from
the NHS every 4 weeks was a gross misuse of their money, considering all
the people who had to administer it, when I could buy a pack of 100 for
about £1. Of course a pack of 100 does not come in sheets of 28...

My other meds are inhalers dispensing measured doses. The simple one I can
only assess by weighing on a sensitive scale, the others I've had have had
gloriously complex dispensers which are fun to dismantle for recycling but
must cost a fortune, before the cost of the drug :(

Yes, when I was ordering one of each every month, there always came a point
when I didn't need the 30 day one because I had one unopened.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-01-15 03:44:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 at 23:03:40, Penny <***@labyrinth.freeuk.com> wrote
(my responses usually follow points raised):
[]
Post by Penny
I quite like calendar packs for pills, it's easy to see if you've missed a
day, even when the days of the week are not shown but there are 4 rows of
7. However, I figured out that getting a free pack of 28 mini-aspirin from
the NHS every 4 weeks was a gross misuse of their money, considering all
the people who had to administer it, when I could buy a pack of 100 for
about £1. Of course a pack of 100 does not come in sheets of 28...
You can buy packs of 100? I thought you couldn't, these days, buy more
than - I forget, but something like two packs of 16 - of more or less
any drug these days. (I remember buying a _bottle_ of 100 paracetamol
from Boots - not in foil packs, either, just loose in the little
bottle.) The reason for the limit is always given as to make suicide
more difficult - but that always seemed daft to me, as anyone determined
could go round several chemists. I always thought it was - at the time
of the introduction, anyway - a combination of an excuse to up the
price, and pressure from the pill-_packaging_ industry (boxes of 16 or
less are _always_ foil-packed or similar).
[]
Post by Penny
Yes, when I was ordering one of each every month, there always came a point
when I didn't need the 30 day one because I had one unopened.
Presumably after 14 or 15 months or so.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

When I'm good, I'm very good. But when I'm bad - I'm better! (Mae West)
Jim Easterbrook
2021-01-15 07:58:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I remember buying a _bottle_ of 100 paracetamol
from Boots - not in foil packs, either, just loose in the little
bottle.)
I remember going into Boots and asking for a bottle of 100 paracetamol
and getting some very odd looks. One of the more experienced members of
staff explained that they'd been limited to packs of 16 for years. I said
it shows I wasn't taking them too often then.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Sally Thompson
2021-01-15 08:52:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I remember buying a _bottle_ of 100 paracetamol
from Boots - not in foil packs, either, just loose in the little
bottle.)
I remember going into Boots and asking for a bottle of 100 paracetamol
and getting some very odd looks. One of the more experienced members of
staff explained that they'd been limited to packs of 16 for years. I said
it shows I wasn't taking them too often then.
I take codydramol as needed (very strong). I always get a prescription for
100, though they are in blister packs of 10 inside the box. I think it's
different if it's on prescription.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Vicky Ayech
2021-01-15 09:28:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 15 Jan 2021 08:52:22 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I remember buying a _bottle_ of 100 paracetamol
from Boots - not in foil packs, either, just loose in the little
bottle.)
I remember going into Boots and asking for a bottle of 100 paracetamol
and getting some very odd looks. One of the more experienced members of
staff explained that they'd been limited to packs of 16 for years. I said
it shows I wasn't taking them too often then.
I take codydramol as needed (very strong). I always get a prescription for
100, though they are in blister packs of 10 inside the box. I think it's
different if it's on prescription.
I take both Paracetamol and Ibuprofen. The latter can cause stomach
damage and did give me ulcers as you are supposed to be on a
medication to protext against that, which they didn't offer me, but
then said I'd been on for 10 years when I got the ulcers! I am on
that too now. The Paracetamol and Ibuprofen come in blister packs of
varying sizes, and the pills can vary too. The repeats of Ibuprofen
are now carefully monitored, It's either a month or two months, I
forget which, but that only happened after the ulcers about 18 months
ago. I seem to be able to get plenty of Paracetamol.
Nick Odell
2021-01-15 10:16:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 15 Jan 2021 07:58:13 GMT, Jim Easterbrook
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I remember buying a _bottle_ of 100 paracetamol
from Boots - not in foil packs, either, just loose in the little
bottle.)
I remember going into Boots and asking for a bottle of 100 paracetamol
and getting some very odd looks. One of the more experienced members of
staff explained that they'd been limited to packs of 16 for years. I said
it shows I wasn't taking them too often then.
I still have a little Boots Asprin bottle marked "100 Tablets" though
you can get 140 in there if you are careful. DAMHIKT. Oh, alright, do.
Because when I am off to forn pars I find it much more convenient to
have one dinky little bottle of 140 than a suitcase full of boxes of
16. So I pop all the little blisters (yuck!) and decant the tablets
into the old bottle.

Nick
krw
2021-01-15 10:30:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
So I pop all the little blisters (yuck!) and decant the tablets
into the old bottle.
I do something similar with a bottle which contains a mix of ibuprofen
and paracetamol. I find that certain types of pain do not respond to
one or the other (often after taking the wrong one). Although since
retirement pain killer supplies last me a long time and I give away more
to other members of the family than I consume.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
krw
2021-01-15 10:28:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I remember buying a _bottle_ of 100 paracetamol
from Boots - not in foil packs, either, just loose in the little
bottle.)
I remember going into Boots and asking for a bottle of 100 paracetamol
and getting some very odd looks. One of the more experienced members of
staff explained that they'd been limited to packs of 16 for years. I said
it shows I wasn't taking them too often then.
I can certainly buy 32 packs of parrots' ate 'em all providing the
pharmacist is on duty and 96 of ibuprofen. But there are lower limits
in supermarkets.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Penny
2021-01-15 11:32:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 15 Jan 2021 03:44:10 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Penny
I quite like calendar packs for pills, it's easy to see if you've missed a
day, even when the days of the week are not shown but there are 4 rows of
7. However, I figured out that getting a free pack of 28 mini-aspirin from
the NHS every 4 weeks was a gross misuse of their money, considering all
the people who had to administer it, when I could buy a pack of 100 for
about £1. Of course a pack of 100 does not come in sheets of 28...
You can buy packs of 100? I thought you couldn't, these days, buy more
than - I forget, but something like two packs of 16 - of more or less
any drug these days.
These are mini (75mg) dispersible aspirin. Boots used to do them loose in a
little pot but didn't have those when I last asked. Morrisons have them in
boxes of bubble sheets.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I remember buying a _bottle_ of 100 paracetamol
from Boots - not in foil packs, either, just loose in the little
bottle.)
In my childhood we had a big glass bottle of pink aspirin (500mg) in the
medicine cupboard - must have held at least 500. My mother called them
'pink pills for pale people'.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
The reason for the limit is always given as to make suicide
more difficult - but that always seemed daft to me, as anyone determined
could go round several chemists. I always thought it was - at the time
of the introduction, anyway - a combination of an excuse to up the
price, and pressure from the pill-_packaging_ industry (boxes of 16 or
less are _always_ foil-packed or similar).
I think the idea behind it was genuine concern about suicide rates
(paracetamol does a lot of damage if it fails to kill you) but it made no
sense. The adult dose of paracetamol is up to 2 tablets 4 times a day. If
you were suffering from a fever lasting more than a couple of days, in
theory you'd have to drag yourself off to the shops in your sick state to
buy more. In practice you could stock up by buying 32 from every shop that
sold them. And yes, the cost was higher. It seems to have rocketed this
last year, a year ago I could find them for 21p in the supermarket, now the
cheapest are 45p.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike McMillan
2021-01-15 11:53:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Fri, 15 Jan 2021 03:44:10 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Penny
I quite like calendar packs for pills, it's easy to see if you've missed a
day, even when the days of the week are not shown but there are 4 rows of
7. However, I figured out that getting a free pack of 28 mini-aspirin from
the NHS every 4 weeks was a gross misuse of their money, considering all
the people who had to administer it, when I could buy a pack of 100 for
about £1. Of course a pack of 100 does not come in sheets of 28...
You can buy packs of 100? I thought you couldn't, these days, buy more
than - I forget, but something like two packs of 16 - of more or less
any drug these days.
These are mini (75mg) dispersible aspirin. Boots used to do them loose in a
little pot but didn't have those when I last asked. Morrisons have them in
boxes of bubble sheets.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(I remember buying a _bottle_ of 100 paracetamol
from Boots - not in foil packs, either, just loose in the little
bottle.)
In my childhood we had a big glass bottle of pink aspirin (500mg) in the
medicine cupboard - must have held at least 500. My mother called them
'pink pills for pale people'.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
The reason for the limit is always given as to make suicide
more difficult - but that always seemed daft to me, as anyone determined
could go round several chemists. I always thought it was - at the time
of the introduction, anyway - a combination of an excuse to up the
price, and pressure from the pill-_packaging_ industry (boxes of 16 or
less are _always_ foil-packed or similar).
I think the idea behind it was genuine concern about suicide rates
(paracetamol does a lot of damage if it fails to kill you) but it made no
sense. The adult dose of paracetamol is up to 2 tablets 4 times a day. If
you were suffering from a fever lasting more than a couple of days, in
theory you'd have to drag yourself off to the shops in your sick state to
buy more. In practice you could stock up by buying 32 from every shop that
sold them. And yes, the cost was higher. It seems to have rocketed this
last year, a year ago I could find them for 21p in the supermarket, now the
cheapest are 45p.
‘Market Rates Luv’ Parrots have more money.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Serena Blanchflower
2021-01-14 17:04:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 13:04:07 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Flu jabs
Post by Serena Blanchflower
It was previously 65, so this was the first year that I've been invited
for one too. Those of us who are between 50 and 64 were invited as a
second tranche, once the over 65s had been vaccinated.
In what way were you 'invited'?
I ask because I recall receiving a letter in previous years - though my GP
surgery tells me they stopped sending letters a few years back and they
just put it on repeat prescription forms (attached to prescriptions) now. I
now recall I dropped in for one in 2018 because we'd been discussing them
at the 'oldie' art group I attend.
Initially, I had a text from the surgery, inviting me to make an
appointment. Since then, I had a letter from my NHS Trust, reminding me
that I was eligible for one.
--
Best wishes, Serena
You cannot prevent the birds of sadness from flying overhead, but you
can prevent them from nesting in your hair. (Chinese proverb)
Vicky Ayech
2021-01-14 17:39:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 13:04:07 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Flu jabs
Post by Serena Blanchflower
It was previously 65, so this was the first year that I've been invited
for one too. Those of us who are between 50 and 64 were invited as a
second tranche, once the over 65s had been vaccinated.
In what way were you 'invited'?
I ask because I recall receiving a letter in previous years - though my GP
surgery tells me they stopped sending letters a few years back and they
just put it on repeat prescription forms (attached to prescriptions) now. I
now recall I dropped in for one in 2018 because we'd been discussing them
at the 'oldie' art group I attend.
The problem with this being, before they started a building refurb, I used
to collect my script from the surgery and take it to the pharmacy next door
so had the opportunity to read any messages - not that I always did. I've
ordered my repeats online, since I realised some years back that the
organisation of Boots collection service made no sense* and often meant I
would run out of meds.
During the refurb, the surgery in house dispensary (for out-lying patients
only**) was closed and when ordering we had to nominate a pharmacy for
collection, after a couple of months or parking difficulties I switched to
Morrisons (this was ignored the first month), where parking is much easier
than either Boots or the Lloyds next to the surgery. Morrisons retain the
repeat form unless I specifically remember to request it, which, having
braved the walk past all the people at the tills to get there at this time
of Covid, I often forget. Consequently, last year I missed requests, on
different occasions, to make appointments for a drug review (so I could no
longer order repeats) and a flu jab.
As they do use the online emis system, it surely couldn't be too difficult
to repeat such information there?
*They took the date of _collection_ rather than date of _ordering_ as the
base from which to calculate the date to order meds 4 weeks later -
ignoring the fact that one of my meds only provides 24 days of use if taken
as directed and the other 30 days.
**I've never understood that either, since the pharmacy next door has
existed for many years.
B has always had problems with the duration of the medication too and
with asthma inhalers all asthmatics report they are being cut down,
which is kind of a death sentence.
Penny
2021-01-13 23:40:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 13 Jan 2021 23:06:51 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I got a letter today inviting me for a 'flu jab, which I
could have at my local surgery or a pharmacy (which would be the same
place anyway). I rang up, and got 26 Jan - which is fine by me.
1. "You are being contacted because you are age 50-64 years and are
therefore eligible for a free flu vaccination." I'm 60, and have been
here (and registered with the same surgery, though that's probably
irrelevant - the letter came from London) since 2007, but this is the
first such communication I've received.
I think they broadened the age range they offer it to this year. I'm not
sure what the range was last year - I've been getting flu jabs for years
but I fall the group of 'underlying conditions', offered it earlier.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Not greatly so: I only got my first ever
colon-cancer test kit in the last few months, whereas AIUI they send
them out to people [maybe only men? But I am one] over either 50 or 55.
I think I got my first one of those at 60.
Just done another one - slightly different system. Not sure they send them
every year.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I don't think I usually get the 'flu - not badly, in most years, anyway;
I sometimes get something, but where you draw the line between it and "a
cold", I don't know.
I'd say a cold can be very unpleasant and miserable for a day or six, not
usually accompanied by a fever - it won't kill you.
Flu wipes you out for a day or six, usually accompanied by a fever - it can
kill you.

In my youth, while flat-sharing, a young woman who hadn't been with us very
long, collapsed in the kitchen. I had zero experience of caring for sick
people so I called the doctors, told them, when asked, she was 18, and they
said the doctor would call in on his rounds. He seemed very put out when he
arrived. He'd been told she was 80. Anyway, he diagnosed flu, gave us basic
care instructions, said to call again if she got worse in the next 24 hours
or so and went away.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In terms of something that really made me feel
rotten (and/or people told me to stay off work when I was working), I'd
say less than one year in three, possibly a lot less. I think I have had
it this season, about 27/28/29 December - didn't feel miserable, quite
cheerful actually, but had symptoms - though I'll still go for the jab.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
carolet
2021-01-14 15:41:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 13 Jan 2021 23:06:51 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I got a letter today inviting me for a 'flu jab, which I
could have at my local surgery or a pharmacy (which would be the same
place anyway). I rang up, and got 26 Jan - which is fine by me.
1. "You are being contacted because you are age 50-64 years and are
therefore eligible for a free flu vaccination." I'm 60, and have been
here (and registered with the same surgery, though that's probably
irrelevant - the letter came from London) since 2007, but this is the
first such communication I've received.
I think they broadened the age range they offer it to this year. I'm not
sure what the range was last year - I've been getting flu jabs for years
but I fall the group of 'underlying conditions', offered it earlier.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Not greatly so: I only got my first ever
colon-cancer test kit in the last few months, whereas AIUI they send
them out to people [maybe only men? But I am one] over either 50 or 55.
I think I got my first one of those at 60.
Just done another one - slightly different system. Not sure they send them
every year.
They are sent out every other year.
--
CaroleT
Clive Arthur
2021-01-14 16:32:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
<snip>
Post by carolet
Post by Penny
I think they broadened the age range they offer it to this year. I'm not
sure what the range was last year - I've been getting flu jabs for years
but I fall the group of 'underlying conditions', offered it earlier.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Not greatly so: I only got my first ever
colon-cancer test kit in the last few months, whereas AIUI they send
them out to people [maybe only men? But I am one] over either 50 or 55.
I think I got my first one of those at 60.
Just done another one - slightly different system. Not sure they send them
every year.
They are sent out every other year.
In normal times they are, but at the moment there's a bit of a backlog.

(Over to you, Mike.)
--
Cheers
Clive
Mike McMillan
2021-01-14 17:12:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
<snip>
Post by carolet
Post by Penny
I think they broadened the age range they offer it to this year. I'm not
sure what the range was last year - I've been getting flu jabs for years
but I fall the group of 'underlying conditions', offered it earlier.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Not greatly so: I only got my first ever
colon-cancer test kit in the last few months, whereas AIUI they send
them out to people [maybe only men? But I am one] over either 50 or 55.
I think I got my first one of those at 60.
Just done another one - slightly different system. Not sure they send them
every year.
They are sent out every other year.
In normal times they are, but at the moment there's a bit of a backlog.
(Over to you, Mike.)
They probably have a spreadsheet* to work out the distribution of kits
based on resources available and the result is on the bottom line.

*With appropriate perforations of course.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Sid Nuncius
2021-01-14 19:11:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
<snip>
Post by carolet
Post by Penny
I think they broadened the age range they offer it to this year. I'm not
sure what the range was last year - I've been getting flu jabs for years
but I fall the group of 'underlying conditions', offered it earlier.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Not greatly so: I only got my first ever
colon-cancer test kit in the last few months, whereas AIUI they send
them out to people [maybe only men? But I am one] over either 50 or 55.
I think I got my first one of those at 60.
Just done another one - slightly different system. Not sure they send them
every year.
They are sent out every other year.
In normal times they are, but at the moment there's a bit of a backlog.
To be fair to them, it's a big job.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Joe Kerr
2021-01-14 20:36:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Clive Arthur
<snip>
Post by carolet
Post by Penny
I think they broadened the age range they offer it to this year. I'm not
sure what the range was last year - I've been getting flu jabs for years
but I fall the group of 'underlying conditions', offered it earlier.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Not greatly so: I only got my first ever
colon-cancer test kit in the last few months, whereas AIUI they send
them out to people [maybe only men? But I am one] over either 50 or 55.
I think I got my first one of those at 60.
Just done another one - slightly different system. Not sure they send them
every year.
They are sent out every other year.
In normal times they are, but at the moment there's a bit of a backlog.
To be fair to them, it's a big job.
Can't they delegate it to a number 2?
--
Ric
Nick Odell
2021-01-14 21:30:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Clive Arthur
<snip>
Post by carolet
Post by Penny
I think they broadened the age range they offer it to this year. I'm not
sure what the range was last year - I've been getting flu jabs for years
but I fall the group of 'underlying conditions', offered it earlier.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Not greatly so: I only got my first ever
colon-cancer test kit in the last few months, whereas AIUI they send
them out to people [maybe only men? But I am one] over either 50 or 55.
I think I got my first one of those at 60.
Just done another one - slightly different system. Not sure they send them
every year.
They are sent out every other year.
In normal times they are, but at the moment there's a bit of a backlog.
To be fair to them, it's a big job.
Can't they delegate it to a number 2?
Do you mean, dump the (t)issue on somebody else?

Nick
BrritSki
2021-01-14 20:42:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Clive Arthur
<snip>
Post by carolet
Post by Penny
I think they broadened the age range they offer it to this year. I'm not
sure what the range was last year - I've been getting flu jabs for years
but I fall the group of 'underlying conditions', offered it earlier.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Not greatly so: I only got my first ever
colon-cancer test kit in the last few months, whereas AIUI they send
them out to people [maybe only men? But I am one] over either 50 or 55.
I think I got my first one of those at 60.
Just done another one - slightly different system. Not sure they send them
every year.
They are sent out every other year.
In normal times they are, but at the moment there's a bit of a backlog.
To be fair to them, it's a big job.
Especially with all the paperwork.
Mike McMillan
2021-01-15 08:31:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Clive Arthur
<snip>
Post by carolet
Post by Penny
I think they broadened the age range they offer it to this year. I'm not
sure what the range was last year - I've been getting flu jabs for years
but I fall the group of 'underlying conditions', offered it earlier.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Not greatly so: I only got my first ever
colon-cancer test kit in the last few months, whereas AIUI they send
them out to people [maybe only men? But I am one] over either 50 or 55.
I think I got my first one of those at 60.
Just done another one - slightly different system. Not sure they send them
every year.
They are sent out every other year.
In normal times they are, but at the moment there's a bit of a backlog.
To be fair to them, it's a big job.
That’s all that fibre.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Joe Kerr
2021-01-14 00:07:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 13/01/2021 23:06, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
)
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Meanwhile, I got a letter today inviting me for a 'flu jab, which I
could have at my local surgery or a pharmacy (which would be the same
place anyway). I rang up, and got 26 Jan - which is fine by me.
1. "You are being contacted because you are age 50-64 years and are
therefore eligible for a free flu vaccination." I'm 60, and have been
here (and registered with the same surgery, though that's probably
irrelevant - the letter came from London) since 2007, but this is the
first such communication I've received. I'm not _really_ complaining,
just a _little_ surprised. (Not greatly so: I only got my first ever
colon-cancer test kit in the last few months, whereas AIUI they send
them out to people [maybe only men? But I am one] over either 50 or 55.
[I got the results - I'm OK for now.]) I'm also puzzled by "free"; as
one born in 1960 and lucky enough to have had little need for the NHS,
so am still in the mindset from the golden age of everything being free;
I also wonder what happens after age 64.
If you were so inclined you could have gone to a pharmacy or similar
location and paid for a flu jab. If the NHS consider it appropriate due
to age, health or some other reason they will do you for free. I've been
getting them for several years - probably because I am registered with
my GP as a carer. Over 64 you keep getting the jabs for free (if you
want them).

Bowel cancer tests, I think, are between age 60 and 75 unless the lower
age has been reduced recently. There has been quite a campaign in recent
years to have the age lowered. I understand it is an overlooked cancer
that is a big killer but easily treated if caught in the in the early
stages.

I found a letter recently inviting my mother for a flu jab dated the end
of September. She thinks she had the jab. I spoke to the surgery and
they say she hasn't. They are sending a nurse round tomorrow to do it in
the porch.

My mother also had a letter today inviting her for a covid jab. It was
all a bit vague, but doing a spot of research and talking to the surgery
it appears there is a choice of getting it done at an impossible to get
to hub in town or at more accessible local centre. If we ignore it and
wait a couple of weeks her own GP expects to have the vaccine and I'm
hoping we can get them to send a nurse round so as to avoid the travel.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
2. The letter was dated 31 Dec.; I got it on 13 Jan.. I know the post
office have some problems at the moment, and realise the New Year period
was included, but still it seems _rather_ a long time. It doesn't
_matter_ (in this case).
I don't think I usually get the 'flu - not badly, in most years, anyway;
I sometimes get something, but where you draw the line between it and "a
cold", I don't know. In terms of something that really made me feel
rotten (and/or people told me to stay off work when I was working), I'd
say less than one year in three, possibly a lot less. I think I have had
it this season, about 27/28/29 December - didn't feel miserable, quite
cheerful actually, but had symptoms - though I'll still go for the jab.
I don't think that was flu. They have different symptoms. There is a
comparison chart somewhere on the BBC site for flu, covid and cold. Aha!
Specifically it is
Loading Image...
--
Ric
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-01-14 02:22:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 at 00:07:00, Joe Kerr <***@cheerful.com> wrote
(my responses usually follow points raised):
[]
Post by Joe Kerr
If you were so inclined you could have gone to a pharmacy or similar
location and paid for a flu jab. If the NHS consider it appropriate due
What do they cost?
[]
Post by Joe Kerr
Bowel cancer tests, I think, are between age 60 and 75 unless the lower
60 to 74, every two years.
Post by Joe Kerr
age has been reduced recently. There has been quite a campaign in
recent years to have the age lowered. I understand it is an overlooked
cancer that is a big killer but easily treated if caught in the in the
early stages.
Yes, it got my Dad. By the time it was found, it had spread to the
liver, and wasn't curable.
Post by Joe Kerr
I found a letter recently inviting my mother for a flu jab dated the
end of September. She thinks she had the jab. I spoke to the surgery
and they say she hasn't. They are sending a nurse round tomorrow to do
it in the porch.
Isn't it usually done in the arm? (Sorry.)
[]
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I don't think I usually get the 'flu - not badly, in most years,
anyway; I sometimes get something, but where you draw the line
between it and "a cold", I don't know. In terms of something that
really made me feel rotten (and/or people told me to stay off work
when I was working), I'd say less than one year in three, possibly a
lot less. I think I have had it this season, about 27/28/29 December
- didn't feel miserable, quite cheerful actually, but had symptoms -
though I'll still go for the jab.
I don't think that was flu. They have different symptoms. There is a
comparison chart somewhere on the BBC site for flu, covid and cold.
Aha! Specifically it is
https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/976/cpsprodpb/120FC/production/_114408937_
symptomchart.png
I didn't have any change to sense of taste or of smell, don't _think_ I
had a temperature (I don't have a thermometer) (I don't use the word
fever to mean just [elevated] temperature), and in particular, I had no
difficulty breathing whatsoever. So I don't _think_ it was CoViD; if it
was, fine (though I'll still have the jab[s] when offered).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Although I may disagree with what you say, I will defend to the death your
right to hear me tell you how wrong you are.
Joe Kerr
2021-01-14 09:19:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Joe Kerr
If you were so inclined you could have gone to a pharmacy or similar
location and paid for a flu jab. If the NHS consider it appropriate due
What do they cost?
[]
I think about £20 (at Boots). As I qualify for a free "doing" I didn't
pay much attention to the emails.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Joe Kerr
Bowel cancer tests, I think, are between age 60 and 75 unless the lower
60 to 74, every two years.
Post by Joe Kerr
age has been reduced recently. There has been quite a campaign in
recent years to have the age lowered. I understand it is an overlooked
cancer that is a big killer but easily treated if caught in the in the
early stages.
Yes, it got my Dad. By the time it was found, it had spread to the
liver, and wasn't curable.
Mine too (apart from the liver bit).
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Joe Kerr
I found a letter recently inviting my mother for a flu jab dated the
end of September. She thinks she had the jab. I spoke to the surgery
and they say she hasn't. They are sending a nurse round tomorrow to do
it in the porch.
Isn't it usually done in the arm? (Sorry.)
[]
I decided not to rephrase that bit as a test of umra's imagination.
--
Ric
Mike McMillan
2021-01-14 10:08:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Joe Kerr
If you were so inclined you could have gone to a pharmacy or similar
location and paid for a flu jab. If the NHS consider it appropriate due
What do they cost?
[]
I think about £20 (at Boots). As I qualify for a free "doing" I didn't
pay much attention to the emails.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Joe Kerr
Bowel cancer tests, I think, are between age 60 and 75 unless the lower
60 to 74, every two years.
Post by Joe Kerr
age has been reduced recently. There has been quite a campaign in
recent years to have the age lowered. I understand it is an overlooked
cancer that is a big killer but easily treated if caught in the in the
early stages.
Yes, it got my Dad. By the time it was found, it had spread to the
liver, and wasn't curable.
Mine too (apart from the liver bit).
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Joe Kerr
I found a letter recently inviting my mother for a flu jab dated the
end of September. She thinks she had the jab. I spoke to the surgery
and they say she hasn't. They are sending a nurse round tomorrow to do
it in the porch.
Isn't it usually done in the arm? (Sorry.)
[]
I decided not to rephrase that bit as a test of umra's imagination.
Not everyone can afford a Porsche .... errrr, maybe I should re-read that
posting.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Joe Kerr
2021-01-14 16:53:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Joe Kerr
If you were so inclined you could have gone to a pharmacy or similar
location and paid for a flu jab. If the NHS consider it appropriate due
What do they cost?
[]
I think about £20 (at Boots). As I qualify for a free "doing" I didn't
pay much attention to the emails.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Joe Kerr
Bowel cancer tests, I think, are between age 60 and 75 unless the lower
60 to 74, every two years.
Post by Joe Kerr
age has been reduced recently. There has been quite a campaign in
recent years to have the age lowered. I understand it is an overlooked
cancer that is a big killer but easily treated if caught in the in the
early stages.
Yes, it got my Dad. By the time it was found, it had spread to the
liver, and wasn't curable.
Mine too (apart from the liver bit).
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Joe Kerr
I found a letter recently inviting my mother for a flu jab dated the
end of September. She thinks she had the jab. I spoke to the surgery
and they say she hasn't. They are sending a nurse round tomorrow to do
it in the porch.
Isn't it usually done in the arm? (Sorry.)
[]
I decided not to rephrase that bit as a test of umra's imagination.
Not everyone can afford a Porsche .... errrr, maybe I should re-read that
posting.
That's the spirit, Mike. If she can't do a jab in the porch you might
get a little prick in the passage.

Actually the nurse phoned and said she didn't do flu jabs at home and we
should ask the District Nurse, so we did, and we're waiting for a response.
--
Ric
Vicky Ayech
2021-01-14 17:52:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Joe Kerr
If you were so inclined you could have gone to a pharmacy or similar
location and paid for a flu jab. If the NHS consider it appropriate due
What do they cost?
[]
I think about £20 (at Boots). As I qualify for a free "doing" I didn't
pay much attention to the emails.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Joe Kerr
Bowel cancer tests, I think, are between age 60 and 75 unless the lower
I found a letter recently inviting my mother for a flu jab dated the
end of September. She thinks she had the jab. I spoke to the surgery
and they say she hasn't. They are sending a nurse round tomorrow to do
it in the porch.
Isn't it usually done in the arm? (Sorry.)
[]
I decided not to rephrase that bit as a test of umra's imagination.
Not everyone can afford a Porsche .... errrr, maybe I should re-read that
posting.
That's the spirit, Mike. If she can't do a jab in the porch you might
get a little prick in the passage.
Actually the nurse phoned and said she didn't do flu jabs at home and we
should ask the District Nurse, so we did, and we're waiting for a response.
I can't remember if I've already posted this.
Never mind the home flu jab, Capt Ex got a home visit from his GP! He
had a leg that hurt for a while.Snet a photo and she looked at it,
went to visit and said it was an infection and prescribed for it. Our
GPs are never seen home or surgery. Even the nurse did the flu jabs in
the car park.
Serena Blanchflower
2021-01-14 13:07:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
I found a letter recently inviting my mother for a flu jab dated the end
of September. She thinks she had the jab. I spoke to the surgery and
they say she hasn't. They are sending a nurse round tomorrow to do it in
the porch.
My mother also had a letter today inviting her for a covid jab. It was
all a bit vague, but doing a spot of research and talking to the surgery
it appears there is a choice of getting it done at an impossible to get
to hub in town or at more accessible local centre. If we ignore it and
wait a couple of weeks her own GP expects to have the vaccine and I'm
hoping we can get them to send a nurse round so as to avoid the travel.
When the district nurse came round, earlier this week, to do my flu jab
(she ventured into the house and did it in the warm), she commented that
you have to have at least a couple of weeks between having a flu jab and
the covid one. That's another factor to consider in choosing which
option to go for.

For me, that isn't a problem, as I don't expect to get an invitation for
a covid jab for at least a couple of months.
--
Best wishes, Serena
War is cowardly escape from the problems of peace. (Thomas Mann)
Penny
2021-01-14 14:31:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 13:07:42 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I don't expect to get an invitation for
a covid jab for at least a couple of months.
And will you have one?
I remember d#2's ME specialist warning her off vaccines, particularly
tetanus. I asked why and he spoke of the experiences of several of his
other patients.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2021-01-14 17:19:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 13:07:42 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I don't expect to get an invitation for
a covid jab for at least a couple of months.
And will you have one?
I remember d#2's ME specialist warning her off vaccines, particularly
tetanus. I asked why and he spoke of the experiences of several of his
other patients.
Yes. That is, assuming nothing changes in the advice given by the ME
Association, and other ME groups, between now and then.

When my ME came back, nearly 25 years ago, the MEA advised me not to
have a flu jab, which OH at work had suggested, because they thought the
risks of the jab causing problems was too high to be worth it. That was
when it was a live vaccine though and they've changed their advice since
then and don't seem to think the current vaccine is so risky.

As far as the Covid jab goes, and assuming that no horror stories
emerge, over the next month or so, of it causing massive ME crashes, I
think the risk is almost certainly much lower than the risks from Covid.
From what I hear, the vast majority of people with ME who have caught
it have had their ME significantly worsened by it.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I must have a prodigious quantity of mind; it takes me as much as a
week, sometimes, to make it up. (Mark Twain)
Nick Odell
2021-01-14 21:34:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 17:19:44 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 13:07:42 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I don't expect to get an invitation for
a covid jab for at least a couple of months.
And will you have one?
I remember d#2's ME specialist warning her off vaccines, particularly
tetanus. I asked why and he spoke of the experiences of several of his
other patients.
Yes. That is, assuming nothing changes in the advice given by the ME
Association, and other ME groups, between now and then.
When my ME came back, nearly 25 years ago, the MEA advised me not to
have a flu jab, which OH at work had suggested, because they thought the
risks of the jab causing problems was too high to be worth it. That was
when it was a live vaccine though and they've changed their advice since
then and don't seem to think the current vaccine is so risky.
As far as the Covid jab goes, and assuming that no horror stories
emerge, over the next month or so, of it causing massive ME crashes, I
think the risk is almost certainly much lower than the risks from Covid.
From what I hear, the vast majority of people with ME who have caught
it have had their ME significantly worsened by it.
I expect you've already seen this and/or other similar articles...
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/nov/19/long-covid-overlap-emerges-with-me-including-debate-over-treatment

Nick
Serena Blanchflower
2021-01-14 21:54:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 17:19:44 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 13:07:42 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I don't expect to get an invitation for
a covid jab for at least a couple of months.
And will you have one?
I remember d#2's ME specialist warning her off vaccines, particularly
tetanus. I asked why and he spoke of the experiences of several of his
other patients.
Yes. That is, assuming nothing changes in the advice given by the ME
Association, and other ME groups, between now and then.
When my ME came back, nearly 25 years ago, the MEA advised me not to
have a flu jab, which OH at work had suggested, because they thought the
risks of the jab causing problems was too high to be worth it. That was
when it was a live vaccine though and they've changed their advice since
then and don't seem to think the current vaccine is so risky.
As far as the Covid jab goes, and assuming that no horror stories
emerge, over the next month or so, of it causing massive ME crashes, I
think the risk is almost certainly much lower than the risks from Covid.
From what I hear, the vast majority of people with ME who have caught
it have had their ME significantly worsened by it.
I expect you've already seen this and/or other similar articles...
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/nov/19/long-covid-overlap-emerges-with-me-including-debate-over-treatment
Yes, there's been considerable discussion about it, since about last
summer, when it started to become clear both that all too many people
were failing to recover after Covid and that, for a proportion of them,
their symptoms look awfully like ME. Of course, as it's been clear for
a long time that ME is frequently triggered by viral infections (with
some viruses being a higher risk than others), it shouldn't have come as
too much of a surprise to anyone.

It's going to be very interesting to see what this means for ME
treatment protocols in future. It's been particularly notable that
there are a number of medical professionals who have developed
long-covid and who are very unimpressed by the treatments on offer for
ME type symptoms (and by the attitudes of some doctors to people with
ME)...
--
Best wishes, Serena
What can you draw with an Escher-Sketch?
Penny
2021-01-14 23:22:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 21:54:41 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 17:19:44 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Yes. That is, assuming nothing changes in the advice given by the ME
Association, and other ME groups, between now and then.
When my ME came back, nearly 25 years ago, the MEA advised me not to
have a flu jab, which OH at work had suggested, because they thought the
risks of the jab causing problems was too high to be worth it. That was
when it was a live vaccine though and they've changed their advice since
then and don't seem to think the current vaccine is so risky.
Thanks for that. AIUI none of the Covid vaccines is a 'live' virus.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
As far as the Covid jab goes, and assuming that no horror stories
emerge, over the next month or so, of it causing massive ME crashes, I
think the risk is almost certainly much lower than the risks from Covid.
From what I hear, the vast majority of people with ME who have caught
it have had their ME significantly worsened by it.
I expect you've already seen this and/or other similar articles...
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/nov/19/long-covid-overlap-emerges-with-me-including-debate-over-treatment
Yes, there's been considerable discussion about it, since about last
summer, when it started to become clear both that all too many people
were failing to recover after Covid and that, for a proportion of them,
their symptoms look awfully like ME. Of course, as it's been clear for
a long time that ME is frequently triggered by viral infections (with
some viruses being a higher risk than others), it shouldn't have come as
too much of a surprise to anyone.
It's going to be very interesting to see what this means for ME
treatment protocols in future. It's been particularly notable that
there are a number of medical professionals who have developed
long-covid and who are very unimpressed by the treatments on offer for
ME type symptoms (and by the attitudes of some doctors to people with
ME)...
The similarities seemed plain to me. While wishing nobody the illness, I
hope it leads to more funding into research and better understanding from
GPs (and NICE) about suitable treatment and recovery schemes.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2021-01-15 08:34:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 21:54:41 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 17:19:44 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Yes. That is, assuming nothing changes in the advice given by the ME
Association, and other ME groups, between now and then.
When my ME came back, nearly 25 years ago, the MEA advised me not to
have a flu jab, which OH at work had suggested, because they thought the
risks of the jab causing problems was too high to be worth it. That was
when it was a live vaccine though and they've changed their advice since
then and don't seem to think the current vaccine is so risky.
Thanks for that. AIUI none of the Covid vaccines is a 'live' virus.
No, they aren't. I should have included the link before but you can see
the latest MEA advice at
<https://meassociation.org.uk/2021/01/free-leaflet-covid-19-vaccine-update-by-dr-charles-shepherd/>
Post by Penny
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Serena Blanchflower
As far as the Covid jab goes, and assuming that no horror stories
emerge, over the next month or so, of it causing massive ME crashes, I
think the risk is almost certainly much lower than the risks from Covid.
From what I hear, the vast majority of people with ME who have caught
it have had their ME significantly worsened by it.
I expect you've already seen this and/or other similar articles...
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/nov/19/long-covid-overlap-emerges-with-me-including-debate-over-treatment
Yes, there's been considerable discussion about it, since about last
summer, when it started to become clear both that all too many people
were failing to recover after Covid and that, for a proportion of them,
their symptoms look awfully like ME. Of course, as it's been clear for
a long time that ME is frequently triggered by viral infections (with
some viruses being a higher risk than others), it shouldn't have come as
too much of a surprise to anyone.
It's going to be very interesting to see what this means for ME
treatment protocols in future. It's been particularly notable that
there are a number of medical professionals who have developed
long-covid and who are very unimpressed by the treatments on offer for
ME type symptoms (and by the attitudes of some doctors to people with
ME)...
The similarities seemed plain to me. While wishing nobody the illness, I
hope it leads to more funding into research and better understanding from
GPs (and NICE) about suitable treatment and recovery schemes.
So do I. I think that some researchers are hoping to be able to study
long-covid patients and to watch ME develop in them and hope that may
unlock some of the currently unanswered questions.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I wish life has a scroll back buffer.
Vicky Ayech
2021-01-14 17:42:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 13:07:42 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I don't expect to get an invitation for
a covid jab for at least a couple of months.
And will you have one?
I remember d#2's ME specialist warning her off vaccines, particularly
tetanus. I asked why and he spoke of the experiences of several of his
other patients.
We're a bit nervous too as auto-immune systems might respond badly. Of
course they do not have much data yet. We'd be providing it.
Compliance is preferred
https://www.rt.com/uk/512450-hsbc-threatens-bank-accounts-masks/
And Pimlico Plumbers are changing employment contracts to say no
vaccine, no job. I suppose those who need a medical exception will
have to make a case or should not be out at all.
Peter Withey
2021-01-15 10:09:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 Jan 2021 13:07:42 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Joe Kerr
I found a letter recently inviting my mother for a flu jab dated the end
of September. She thinks she had the jab. I spoke to the surgery and
they say she hasn't. They are sending a nurse round tomorrow to do it in
the porch.
My mother also had a letter today inviting her for a covid jab. It was
all a bit vague, but doing a spot of research and talking to the surgery
it appears there is a choice of getting it done at an impossible to get
to hub in town or at more accessible local centre. If we ignore it and
wait a couple of weeks her own GP expects to have the vaccine and I'm
hoping we can get them to send a nurse round so as to avoid the travel.
When the district nurse came round, earlier this week, to do my flu jab
(she ventured into the house and did it in the warm), she commented that
you have to have at least a couple of weeks between having a flu jab and
the covid one. That's another factor to consider in choosing which
option to go for.
That was one of the questions ask when I had my 1st covid jab. As I'd
had the Flu jab back in October last year it wasn't a problem.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
For me, that isn't a problem, as I don't expect to get an invitation for
a covid jab for at least a couple of months.
--
Pete
Peter
2021-01-14 11:09:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Withey
This may be of interest, or not. My experience as a driver.
I had my first dose of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine yesterday at the
Epsom Racecourse centre.
Appointment time: 12.35.
Arrived at 12.10. Handed a number (310, in my case) shown where to
park and asked to wait in the car until called into the centre. Called
into the centre after approx 45 minutes. Then more waiting. Arrived
at the vaccination booth at 13.50.
If you turn up more than two hours late for an appointment, they'll
cancel it. It is usual the case that people who make rules don't abide
by them themselves.
Post by Peter Withey
Questions and answers. Phone number, email address. Emergency
contact number. 10 minutes max.
Swab arm, inject vaccine and apply plaster. 30 seconds max.
Waited 15 minutes or so after the injection in case of side effects
before being allowed to leave at 14.25.
Plenty of time spent hanging about but very happy to have had it.
2nd dose scheduled for March 31st.
--
When, once, reference was made to a statesman almost universally
recognized as one of the villains of this century, in order to
induce him to a negative judgment, he replied: "My situation is
so different from his, that it is not for me to pass judgment".
Ernst Specker on Paul Bernays
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