Discussion:
Ask EU ... the celery joke
(too old to reply)
DavidK
2019-01-08 14:18:17 UTC
Permalink
I have just finished "Lies Sleeping" by Ben Aaronovitch again.

To quote*:

This particular lot had worked with us before and had taken to wearing a
sprig of mistletoe on their Metvests, presumably because a bulb of
garlic would look stupid. TSG officers spend a lot of time waiting
around in the backs of Sprinter vans and so are prone to violent
practical jokes and moments of whimsy. Seawoll had suggested celery, but
nobody but me got the joke.

I don't either; can anyrat explain?

*quote will never, ever be a noun to me.
Serena Blanchflower
2019-01-08 14:35:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by DavidK
I have just finished "Lies Sleeping" by Ben Aaronovitch again.
This particular lot had worked with us before and had taken to wearing a
sprig of mistletoe on their Metvests, presumably because a bulb of
garlic would look stupid. TSG officers spend a lot of time waiting
around in the backs of Sprinter vans and so are prone to violent
practical jokes and moments of whimsy. Seawoll had suggested celery, but
nobody but me got the joke.
I don't either; can anyrat explain?
*quote will never, ever be a noun to me.
I think it may be a reference to <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunnicula>.

I admit to having had some help from Google for this. I'd had a vague
feeling that I might have heard of some spoof vampire story where
someone tried to kill a vampire with a stick of celery and was looking
to see if I could find a reference to it. I failed, but a vampire
rabbit sounds a better bet.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I'm reading a book about anti-gravity. I just can't put it down.
Mike
2019-01-08 14:41:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
I have just finished "Lies Sleeping" by Ben Aaronovitch again.
This particular lot had worked with us before and had taken to wearing a
sprig of mistletoe on their Metvests, presumably because a bulb of
garlic would look stupid. TSG officers spend a lot of time waiting
around in the backs of Sprinter vans and so are prone to violent
practical jokes and moments of whimsy. Seawoll had suggested celery, but
nobody but me got the joke.
I don't either; can anyrat explain?
*quote will never, ever be a noun to me.
I think it may be a reference to <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunnicula>.
I admit to having had some help from Google for this. I'd had a vague
feeling that I might have heard of some spoof vampire story where
someone tried to kill a vampire with a stick of celery and was looking
to see if I could find a reference to it. I failed, but a vampire
rabbit sounds a better bet.
Who’d ‘av thought that a stick of celery could start that whole article
off!
--
Toodle Pip
DavidK
2019-01-08 16:24:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
I have just finished "Lies Sleeping" by Ben Aaronovitch again.
This particular lot had worked with us before and had taken to wearing a
sprig of mistletoe on their Metvests, presumably because a bulb of
garlic would look stupid. TSG officers spend a lot of time waiting
around in the backs of Sprinter vans and so are prone to violent
practical jokes and moments of whimsy. Seawoll had suggested celery, but
nobody but me got the joke.
I don't either; can anyrat explain?
*quote will never, ever be a noun to me.
I think it may be a reference to <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunnicula>.
I admit to having had some help from Google for this. I'd had a vague
feeling that I might have heard of some spoof vampire story where
someone tried to kill a vampire with a stick of celery and was looking
to see if I could find a reference to it. I failed, but a vampire
rabbit sounds a better bet.
Who’d ‘av thought that a stick of celery could start that whole article
off!
You may be right, but Peter Grant was 25 in the first book, Rivers of
London, and it was published in 2011 so Bunnicula was published in 11
years before he was born. Your suggestion made me think of Wallace and
Grommit and the Were-Rabbit but there is little mention of celery in this.
Serena Blanchflower
2019-01-09 20:26:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by DavidK
Post by Mike
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
I have just finished "Lies Sleeping" by Ben Aaronovitch again.
This particular lot had worked with us before and had taken to wearing a
sprig of mistletoe on their Metvests, presumably because a bulb of
garlic would look stupid. TSG officers spend a lot of time waiting
around in the backs of Sprinter vans and so are prone to violent
practical jokes and moments of whimsy. Seawoll had suggested celery, but
nobody but me got the joke.
I don't either; can anyrat explain?
*quote will never, ever be a noun to me.
I think it may be a reference to
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunnicula>.
I admit to having had some help from Google for this.  I'd had a vague
feeling that I might have heard of some spoof vampire story where
someone tried to kill a vampire with a stick of celery and was looking
to see if I could find a reference to it.  I failed, but a vampire
rabbit sounds a better bet.
Who’d ‘av thought that a stick of celery could start that whole article
off!
You may be right, but Peter Grant was 25 in the first book, Rivers of
London, and it was published in 2011 so Bunnicula was published in 11
years before he was born. Your suggestion made me think of Wallace and
Grommit and the Were-Rabbit but there is little mention of celery in this.
The events described in the Rivers of London books happened a few years
ago. There have been a few references in the books which make it clear
they took place getting on for a decade ago. In particular, there was a
reference in, I think, "Lies Sleeping" to the London Olympics happening
at around the same time. IIRC, there were concerns about security and
potential Folly involvement in this.

It doesn't seem too unlikely to me that Peter Grant would have been
aware of a children's book written in the decade or so before he was born.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Don't take life too seriously; you'll never get out of it alive. (Elbert
Hubbard)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-01-08 18:00:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
I have just finished "Lies Sleeping" by Ben Aaronovitch again.
This particular lot had worked with us before and had taken to
wearing a sprig of mistletoe on their Metvests, presumably because a
bulb of garlic would look stupid. TSG officers spend a lot of time
waiting around in the backs of Sprinter vans and so are prone to
violent practical jokes and moments of whimsy. Seawoll had suggested
celery, but nobody but me got the joke.
I don't either; can anyrat explain?
*quote will never, ever be a noun to me.
(Oh dear - another case where you're right, but I'd accepted the usage.
I suppose the noun ought to be "quotation".)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I think it may be a reference to <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunnicula>.
I admit to having had some help from Google for this. I'd had a vague
feeling that I might have heard of some spoof vampire story where
someone tried to kill a vampire with a stick of celery and was looking
to see if I could find a reference to it. I failed, but a vampire
rabbit sounds a better bet.
There's a scene in some movie - I think it might be "Love at first bite"
- where someone holds out a star of David, only for the vampire to say
with a grin, "Oy Vey, have you got the wrong vampire". I remember
nothing else of the plot (it's a comedy anyway), but that scene stuck in
my mind.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Have the courage to be ordinary - people make themselves so desperately unhappy
trying to be clever and totally original. (Robbie Coltrane, RT 8-14 Nov. 1997.)
Nick Odell
2019-01-08 18:33:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
I have just finished "Lies Sleeping" by Ben Aaronovitch again.
 This particular lot had worked with us before and had taken to
wearing a  sprig of mistletoe on their Metvests, presumably because a
bulb of  garlic would look stupid. TSG officers spend a lot of time
waiting  around in the backs of Sprinter vans and so are prone to
violent  practical jokes and moments of whimsy. Seawoll had suggested
celery, but  nobody but me got the joke.
 I don't either; can anyrat explain?
 *quote will never, ever be a noun to me.
(Oh dear - another case where you're right, but I'd accepted the usage.
I suppose the noun ought to be "quotation".)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I think it may be a reference to
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunnicula>.
I admit to having had some help from Google for this.  I'd had a vague
feeling that I might have heard of some spoof vampire story where
someone tried to kill a vampire with a stick of celery and was looking
to see if I could find a reference to it.  I failed, but a vampire
rabbit sounds a better bet.
There's a scene in some movie - I think it might be "Love at first bite"
- where someone holds out a star of David, only for the vampire to say
with a grin, "Oy Vey, have you got the wrong vampire". I remember
nothing else of the plot (it's a comedy anyway), but that scene stuck in
my mind.
No, NO and yes.
It was Roman Polanski's Dance of the Vampires
A Christian Cross
A Jewish vampire

HTH
HAND etc

Mind you, I'm just as bad with Mel Brookes' Young Frankenstein. All I
remember (apart from Puttin' on the Ritz) is Gene Wilder's awe at the
big, bold, brass door furniture upon his arrival at Castle Fronkensteen

"What magnificent knockers," gasps Wilder.
"Why thank you, sir" responds Terri Garr.


Nick
Sid Nuncius
2019-01-08 18:54:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
I have just finished "Lies Sleeping" by Ben Aaronovitch again.
 This particular lot had worked with us before and had taken to
wearing a  sprig of mistletoe on their Metvests, presumably because
a bulb of  garlic would look stupid. TSG officers spend a lot of
time waiting  around in the backs of Sprinter vans and so are prone
to violent  practical jokes and moments of whimsy. Seawoll had
suggested celery, but  nobody but me got the joke.
 I don't either; can anyrat explain?
 *quote will never, ever be a noun to me.
(Oh dear - another case where you're right, but I'd accepted the
usage. I suppose the noun ought to be "quotation".)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I think it may be a reference to
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunnicula>.
I admit to having had some help from Google for this.  I'd had a
vague feeling that I might have heard of some spoof vampire story
where someone tried to kill a vampire with a stick of celery and was
looking to see if I could find a reference to it.  I failed, but a
vampire rabbit sounds a better bet.
There's a scene in some movie - I think it might be "Love at first
bite" - where someone holds out a star of David, only for the vampire
to say with a grin, "Oy Vey, have you got the wrong vampire". I
remember nothing else of the plot (it's a comedy anyway), but that
scene stuck in my mind.
No, NO and yes.
It was Roman Polanski's Dance of the Vampires
A Christian Cross
A Jewish vampire
HTH
HAND etc
Mind you, I'm just as bad with Mel Brookes' Young Frankenstein. All I
remember (apart from Puttin' on the Ritz) is Gene Wilder's awe at the
big, bold, brass door furniture upon his arrival at Castle Fronkensteen
"What magnificent knockers," gasps Wilder.
"Why thank you, sir" responds Terri Garr.
Simon Groom on Blue Peter, anyone? I can't find the unadorned clip, but
it's the first bit of this:


I am prompted, most immodestly, to post a limerick of mine which was
read out on TMS some years ago[1]. England had used a twelfth man named
Klokker, originally from Denmark, as wicketkeeper. Limericks were
solicited; this was mine:

That fine Danish keeper called Klokker
Has never been known as a blocker
Agricultural heaves,
There is nothing he leaves -
But in Denmark they like a big knocker.[2]

Aythengyeou.


[1]May 2004, during a Test Match against New Zealand at Lord's, Google
informs me.

[2]Aggers once asked the producer, on air, whether he could read out my
hilarious Waqar limerick and was given a very firm "No", so I'm a little
surprised that one got through.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2019-01-08 21:50:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
[2]Aggers once asked the producer, on air, whether he could read out my
hilarious Waqar limerick and was given a very firm "No", so I'm a little
surprised that one got through.
Well don't leave us hanging, we need that one now...
Sid Nuncius
2019-01-09 06:12:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
[2]Aggers once asked the producer, on air, whether he could read out
my hilarious Waqar limerick and was given a very firm "No", so I'm a
little surprised that one got through.
Well don't leave us hanging, we need that one now...
<ahem>
<adopts declamatory pose>
"There's a hostile fast bowler called Waquar
Whose deliveries certainly pack a
Remarkable punch
When they land with a crunch
In your box and dislodge your left...er...

On second thoughts, perhaps I'll just wait quietly for the start of play."

An oddly censorious decision. There was once speculation that the
sports correspondent Emma Udwin wasn't on TMS because Brian Johnston
would have called her "Udders." I emailed to ask whether the same
consideration explained the absence on TMS of the former Japanese Prime
Minister, Mr Nakasone. They read that one out with some relish (and had
to explain it to Sir Viv Richards).

That's enough TMS innuendo stories - Ed.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2019-01-09 08:38:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
[2]Aggers once asked the producer, on air, whether he could read out
my hilarious Waqar limerick and was given a very firm "No", so I'm a
little surprised that one got through.
Well don't leave us hanging, we need that one now...
<ahem>
<adopts declamatory pose>
"There's a hostile fast bowler called Waquar
Whose deliveries certainly pack a
Remarkable punch
When they land with a crunch
In your box and dislodge your left...er...
On second thoughts, perhaps I'll just wait quietly for the start of play."
An oddly censorious decision.  There was once speculation that the
sports correspondent Emma Udwin wasn't on TMS because Brian Johnston
would have called her "Udders."  I emailed to ask whether the same
consideration explained the absence on TMS of the former Japanese Prime
Minister, Mr Nakasone.  They read that one out with some relish (and had
to explain it to Sir Viv Richards).
That's enough TMS innuendo stories - Ed.
<applause>
John Ashby
2019-01-08 19:32:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
I have just finished "Lies Sleeping" by Ben Aaronovitch again.
 This particular lot had worked with us before and had taken to
wearing a  sprig of mistletoe on their Metvests, presumably because
a bulb of  garlic would look stupid. TSG officers spend a lot of
time waiting  around in the backs of Sprinter vans and so are prone
to violent  practical jokes and moments of whimsy. Seawoll had
suggested celery, but  nobody but me got the joke.
 I don't either; can anyrat explain?
 *quote will never, ever be a noun to me.
(Oh dear - another case where you're right, but I'd accepted the
usage. I suppose the noun ought to be "quotation".)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I think it may be a reference to
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunnicula>.
I admit to having had some help from Google for this.  I'd had a
vague feeling that I might have heard of some spoof vampire story
where someone tried to kill a vampire with a stick of celery and was
looking to see if I could find a reference to it.  I failed, but a
vampire rabbit sounds a better bet.
There's a scene in some movie - I think it might be "Love at first
bite" - where someone holds out a star of David, only for the vampire
to say with a grin, "Oy Vey, have you got the wrong vampire". I
remember nothing else of the plot (it's a comedy anyway), but that
scene stuck in my mind.
No, NO and yes.
It was Roman Polanski's Dance of the Vampires
A Christian Cross
A Jewish vampire
HTH
HAND etc
Mind you, I'm just as bad with Mel Brookes' Young Frankenstein. All I
remember (apart from Puttin' on the Ritz) is Gene Wilder's awe at the
big, bold, brass door furniture upon his arrival at Castle Fronkensteen
"What magnificent knockers," gasps Wilder.
"Why thank you, sir" responds Terri Garr.
Nick
Igor, give me a hand with the bags.

Certainly, sir. You take the blonde and I'll bring the brunette.

john
LFS
2019-01-09 06:16:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Mind you, I'm just as bad with Mel Brookes' Young Frankenstein. All I
remember (apart from Puttin' on the Ritz) is Gene Wilder's awe at the
big, bold, brass door furniture upon his arrival at Castle Fronkensteen
"What magnificent knockers," gasps Wilder.
"Why thank you, sir" responds Terri Garr.
Our children gave us tickets to see the stage version last year. Just
before the show opened, we had attended a screening of the film
presented by Brooks himself. Having been reminded of how good it is, we
were a bit apprehensive about seeing the new version but it was quite
brilliant. And even ruder.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
DavidK
2019-07-24 11:33:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by DavidK
I have just finished "Lies Sleeping" by Ben Aaronovitch again.
This particular lot had worked with us before and had taken to wearing a
sprig of mistletoe on their Metvests, presumably because a bulb of
garlic would look stupid. TSG officers spend a lot of time waiting
around in the backs of Sprinter vans and so are prone to violent
practical jokes and moments of whimsy. Seawoll had suggested celery, but
nobody but me got the joke.
I don't either; can anyrat explain?
*quote will never, ever be a noun to me.
Oh dear, I've just finished it yet again, wondered about the celery
reference, looked on t'internet, and top of the hits was my question by
me. I had completely forgotten that I had asked it.

However, #2 hit was a reverence to Peter Davison's Doctor Who,
<Loading Image...>, and that seems a better answer
than last time.

Loading...