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Old Internet People
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Kate B
2019-10-04 09:35:13 UTC
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This was in the Times a couple of days ago, and reminded me very much of
us. I post very irregularly, I know, and if I fall too far behind then I
tend to employ Mr Mark Read. But you know, once an umrat...

The other tribes were Pre-Internet People, Semi-Internet People, Full
Internet People, and Post-Internet People. None of them fitted the bill,
and then I read this (first reaction: what do you mean 'ONCE familiar to
you'?)

Old internet people
● You got online before many of the people around you had seen the point
of this whole “internet” thing
● You first went online to connect with strangers from around the world
● Topic-based platforms such as Usenet, Internet Relay Chat, bulletin
board systems, Multi-User Dungeons, Listservs and forums were once
familiar to you
● Getting online was truly difficult when you started doing it, so you
picked up a lot of tech skills along the way (the idea of viewing the
source code behind a website doesn’t seem strange to you)
● You can’t even imagine navigating without your keyboard shortcuts and
browser extensions
● You’ve registered your own domain name at some point, and the idea of
trusting a third-party website provider to generate a homepage for you
seems faintly suspicious
● You often type memorised urls to get to websites directly, rather than
go through a search engine or social media
● You have a longstanding online pseudonym that you register on every site
● You know about the Jargon File. (It’s a live index of slang maintained
since 1975 by a series of volunteer editors affiliated with the computer
science departments at MIT, Stanford and a few other universities)
● You have a preferred set of social acronyms and/or text-based
emoticons that you’ve been using for decades, even if some of them now
seem obscure to other people
--
Kate B
London
BrritSki
2019-10-04 10:04:14 UTC
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Post by Kate B
This was in the Times a couple of days ago, and reminded me very much of
us. I post very irregularly, I know, and if I fall too far behind then I
tend to employ Mr Mark Read. But you know, once an umrat...
The other tribes were Pre-Internet People, Semi-Internet People, Full
Internet People, and Post-Internet People. None of them fitted the bill,
and then I read this (first reaction: what do you mean 'ONCE familiar to
you'?)
Old internet people
● You got online before many of the people around you had seen the point
of this whole “internet” thing
● You first went online to connect with strangers from around the world
● Topic-based platforms such as Usenet, Internet Relay Chat, bulletin
board systems, Multi-User Dungeons, Listservs and forums were once
familiar to you
● Getting online was truly difficult when you started doing it, so you
picked up a lot of tech skills along the way (the idea of viewing the
source code behind a website doesn’t seem strange to you)
● You can’t even imagine navigating without your keyboard shortcuts and
browser extensions
● You’ve registered your own domain name at some point, and the idea of
trusting a third-party website provider to generate a homepage for you
seems faintly suspicious
● You often type memorised urls to get to websites directly, rather than
go through a search engine or social media
● You have a longstanding online pseudonym that you register on every site
● You know about the Jargon File. (It’s a live index of slang maintained
since 1975 by a series of volunteer editors affiliated with the computer
science departments at MIT, Stanford and a few other universities)
● You have a preferred set of social acronyms and/or text-based
emoticons that you’ve been using for decades, even if some of them now
seem obscure to other people
That is absolutely spot on...
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-04 10:13:37 UTC
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Post by Kate B
This was in the Times a couple of days ago, and reminded me very much
of us. I post very irregularly, I know, and if I fall too far behind
then I tend to employ Mr Mark Read. But you know, once an umrat...
The other tribes were Pre-Internet People, Semi-Internet People, Full
Internet People, and Post-Internet People. None of them fitted the
bill, and then I read this (first reaction: what do you mean 'ONCE
familiar to you'?)
This is very me! (Well, I never used a MUD. Though I did play
Adventure.)
Post by Kate B
Old internet people
? You got online before many of the people around you had seen the
point of this whole “internet” thing
I was a Demon customer ...
Post by Kate B
? You first went online to connect with strangers from around the world
Not sure I'd agree with that one. I can't _remember_ why I first went
online, to be honest! To get information, and to find like-minded
people, I think; I suppose they might have been strangers, but didn't
seem so.
Post by Kate B
? Topic-based platforms such as Usenet, Internet Relay Chat, bulletin
board systems, Multi-User Dungeons, Listservs and forums were once
familiar to you
A little. Not so much from home, as the cost of 'phone time (even local)
was a constant inhibitor; I'd been keen when at uni, though.
Post by Kate B
? Getting online was truly difficult when you started doing it, so you
picked up a lot of tech skills along the way (the idea of viewing the
Yes (many of which are now of no use)
Post by Kate B
source code behind a website doesn’t seem strange to you)
? You can’t even imagine navigating without your keyboard shortcuts
and browser extensions
Very true!
Post by Kate B
? You’ve registered your own domain name at some point, and the idea
of
Yup ...
Post by Kate B
trusting a third-party website provider to generate a homepage for you
seems faintly suspicious
Well, inefficient at least.
Post by Kate B
? You often type memorised urls to get to websites directly, rather
than go through a search engine or social media
Of course! I continue to be surprised how many people never type in the
address bar. (I had a colleague at work who even if given a URL, would
put it into Google. I gave up trying to explain to him in the end.)
Post by Kate B
? You have a longstanding online pseudonym that you register on every site
Well, the amateur radio callsign is handy for that; it's mostly unique
to me (though when as a relative latecomer to Twitter [February this
year], I was surprised to find it taken).
Post by Kate B
? You know about the Jargon File. (It’s a live index of slang
maintained since 1975 by a series of volunteer editors affiliated with
the computer science departments at MIT, Stanford and a few other
universities)
Well, there is the UMRA geek code!
Post by Kate B
? You have a preferred set of social acronyms and/or text-based
emoticons that you’ve been using for decades, even if some of them
now seem obscure to other people
I've been using left-handed smileys for many years - with few people
ever commenting.
(-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I don't like activity holidays. I like /inactivity/ holidays.
- Miriam Margolyes, RT 2017/4/15-21
Sam Plusnet
2019-10-04 22:09:30 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Of course! I continue to be surprised how many people never type in the
address bar. (I had a colleague at work who even if given a URL, would
put it into Google. I gave up trying to explain to him in the end.
My browser will redirect (the contents of the address bar) to Google -
if it has even the slightest difficulty in parsing that address.
--
Sam Plusnet
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-05 00:43:12 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Of course! I continue to be surprised how many people never type in
the address bar. (I had a colleague at work who even if given a URL,
would put it into Google. I gave up trying to explain to him in the end.
My browser will redirect (the contents of the address bar) to Google -
if it has even the slightest difficulty in parsing that address.
Firefox? There used to be a setting where you could stop it doing that;
I don't know if still in current versions. (If Chrome, not surprising,
as that is _made_ by Google, more or less.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

War doesn't determine who's right. War determines who's left.
Sam Plusnet
2019-10-06 19:51:02 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sam Plusnet
 Of course! I continue to be surprised how many people never type in
the  address bar. (I had a colleague at work who even if given a URL,
would  put it into Google. I gave up trying to explain to him in the
end.
My browser will redirect (the contents of the address bar) to Google -
if it has even the slightest difficulty in parsing that address.
Firefox? There used to be a setting where you could stop it doing that;
I don't know if still in current versions. (If Chrome, not surprising,
as that is _made_ by Google, more or less.)
Opera certainly, but I'm pretty sure Firefox does the same.

(Both would be in the default "Out of the Box" state for this behaviour.)
--
Sam Plusnet
BrritSki
2019-10-05 06:36:40 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Of course! I continue to be surprised how many people never type in
the address bar. (I had a colleague at work who even if given a URL,
would put it into Google. I gave up trying to explain to him in the end.
My browser will redirect (the contents of the address bar) to Google -
if it has even the slightest difficulty in parsing that address.
My Chrome session has several tabs open permanently for Gmail (mine and
waife's), FB, Messenger etc that I just refresh when I want to.
Then under the url box there is a row of buttons for various other sites
such as Dilbert, DT, Times, Weather etc that I look at at least once a
day. Less frequently visited sites are in the "other bookmarks" dropdown
on the right of this, and in there things are well organised in folders
e.g. for banking.
There are some sites like Amazon that are not in any of these places,
but just typing A in the url box lists it first in the suggested sites
so at that point I just press enter.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-05 12:30:54 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Of course! I continue to be surprised how many people never type in
the address bar. (I had a colleague at work who even if given a URL,
would put it into Google. I gave up trying to explain to him in the end.
My browser will redirect (the contents of the address bar) to Google
- if it has even the slightest difficulty in parsing that address.
I think Sam (and I) were talking about the tendency for browsers to take
what you put in the address bar/box as search terms, rather than
addresses, given the slightest excuse.
Post by BrritSki
My Chrome session has several tabs open permanently for Gmail (mine and
waife's), FB, Messenger etc that I just refresh when I want to.
I have 20: a lot to do with genealogy (several each of FindMyPast and
Ancestry), Google Maps, a few ebay, ONS, Traffic Penalty Tribunal,
Twitter ... but I have an extension called The Great Suspender, which
stops them taking memory (or as much) if I don't look at them for - it's
settable, I currently have it set to half an hour. As a side effect, it
also stops the ones that constantly do things from doing them. (To get
one back, I just click it; if it's gone into suspension, it may take a
noticeable moment to reload.)
Post by BrritSki
Then under the url box there is a row of buttons for various other
sites such as Dilbert, DT, Times, Weather etc that I look at at least
The "Bookmarks bar".
Post by BrritSki
once a day. Less frequently visited sites are in the "other bookmarks"
dropdown on the right of this, and in there things are well organised
in folders e.g. for banking.
Me too - well, in Firefox where I keep most of my bookmarks, though I do
have a few in Chrome too (currently hardware and genealogy).
Post by BrritSki
There are some sites like Amazon that are not in any of these places,
but just typing A in the url box lists it first in the suggested sites
so at that point I just press enter.
Presumably gets it from your recently-visited history.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

... the pleasure of the mind is an amazing thing. My life has been driven by
the satisfaction of curiosity. - Jeremy Paxman (being interviewed by Anne
Widdecombe), Radio Times, 2-8 July 2011.
krw
2019-10-04 10:32:59 UTC
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Post by Kate B
This was in the Times a couple of days ago, and reminded me very much of
us. I post very irregularly, I know, and if I fall too far behind then I
tend to employ Mr Mark Read. But you know, once an umrat...
The other tribes were Pre-Internet People, Semi-Internet People, Full
Internet People, and Post-Internet People. None of them fitted the bill,
and then I read this (first reaction: what do you mean 'ONCE familiar to
you'?)
Old internet people
● You got online before many of the people around you had seen the point
of this whole “internet” thing
Probably
Post by Kate B
● You first went online to connect with strangers from around the world
Seems likely
Post by Kate B
● Topic-based platforms such as Usenet, Internet Relay Chat, bulletin
board systems, Multi-User Dungeons, Listservs and forums were once
familiar to you
Only usenet - what are these other strange things of which you speak?
Post by Kate B
● Getting online was truly difficult when you started doing it, so you
picked up a lot of tech skills along the way (the idea of viewing the
source code behind a website doesn’t seem strange to you)
It was
Post by Kate B
● You can’t even imagine navigating without your keyboard shortcuts and
browser extensions
Not particularly
Post by Kate B
● You’ve registered your own domain name at some point, and the idea of
trusting a third-party website provider to generate a homepage for you
seems faintly suspicious
True
Post by Kate B
● You often type memorised urls to get to websites directly, rather than
go through a search engine or social media
Rare but a few
Post by Kate B
● You have a longstanding online pseudonym that you register on every site
Yes but not allowed or registered in many places
Post by Kate B
● You know about the Jargon File. (It’s a live index of slang maintained
since 1975 by a series of volunteer editors affiliated with the computer
science departments at MIT, Stanford and a few other universities)
No
Post by Kate B
● You have a preferred set of social acronyms and/or text-based
emoticons that you’ve been using for decades, even if some of them now
seem obscure to other people
Not particularly
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-04 14:24:15 UTC
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Post by Kate B
? You’ve registered your own domain name at some point, and the idea of
trusting a third-party website provider to generate a homepage for you
seems faintly suspicious
I haven't registered a domain name but did have one or the early web
pages. A friend showed me how to make one. There were no editor
programmes then. You typed it and at least three different people gave
me room on their systems to have a page. One of my pages called Demon
the Ratners of communications, although i had several friends who
worked there. :)
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-04 10:53:45 UTC
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Post by Kate B
This was in the Times a couple of days ago, and reminded me very much of
us. I post very irregularly, I know, and if I fall too far behind then I
tend to employ Mr Mark Read. But you know, once an umrat...
The other tribes were Pre-Internet People, Semi-Internet People, Full
Internet People, and Post-Internet People. None of them fitted the bill,
and then I read this (first reaction: what do you mean 'ONCE familiar to
you'?)
Old internet people
? You got online before many of the people around you had seen the point
of this whole “internet” thing
? You first went online to connect with strangers from around the world
? Topic-based platforms such as Usenet, Internet Relay Chat, bulletin
board systems, Multi-User Dungeons, Listservs and forums were once
familiar to you
? Getting online was truly difficult when you started doing it, so you
picked up a lot of tech skills along the way (the idea of viewing the
source code behind a website doesn’t seem strange to you)
? You can’t even imagine navigating without your keyboard shortcuts and
browser extensions
? You’ve registered your own domain name at some point, and the idea of
trusting a third-party website provider to generate a homepage for you
seems faintly suspicious
? You often type memorised urls to get to websites directly, rather than
go through a search engine or social media
? You have a longstanding online pseudonym that you register on every site
? You know about the Jargon File. (It’s a live index of slang maintained
since 1975 by a series of volunteer editors affiliated with the computer
science departments at MIT, Stanford and a few other universities)
? You have a preferred set of social acronyms and/or text-based
emoticons that you’ve been using for decades, even if some of them now
seem obscure to other people
One thing was getting online and using groups before WWW, wasn't it?
Was usenet pre WWW? I recall using IRC and various places got
chat/news feeds. The Templar's Rest took some American groups. Demon
customers had KA9Q and I am trying to recall how I got groups with
that.....

I got online to use Telex to talk to Capt Ex when he was at sea.
Prestel. Amstrad 6128. How did I move to Demon...? Was that when I
got the PC? Google says Demon opened in 1992.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-04 11:25:21 UTC
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In message <***@4ax.com>, Vicky Ayech
<***@gmail.com> writes:
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
One thing was getting online and using groups before WWW, wasn't it?
Was usenet pre WWW?
Before the web, yes. Mainly in academia (and probably the military).
Post by Vicky Ayech
I recall using IRC and various places got
chat/news feeds. The Templar's Rest took some American groups. Demon
customers had KA9Q and I am trying to recall how I got groups with
that.....
There was a news client in the suite - I think it might have been pine.
Post by Vicky Ayech
I got online to use Telex to talk to Capt Ex when he was at sea.
Ah, special circumstances.
Post by Vicky Ayech
Prestel. Amstrad 6128. How did I move to Demon...? Was that when I
got the PC? Google says Demon opened in 1992.
Wow. I have memories of using DOS for some time (I had Windows, but
mostly only used it to use the web - it was slow), but I have things in
Turnpike from 1995 (such as UMRA!), and that's Windows only, so my
memory must be wrong (again).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

More people watch live theatre every year than Premier League football
matches. - Libby Purves, RT 2017/9/30-10/6
John Ashby
2019-10-04 14:37:16 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
One thing was getting online and using groups before WWW, wasn't it?
Was usenet pre WWW?
Before the web, yes. Mainly in academia (and probably the military).
Post by Vicky Ayech
I recall using IRC and various places got
chat/news feeds. The Templar's Rest took some American groups.  Demon
customers had KA9Q and I am trying to recall how I got groups with
that.....
There was a news client in the suite - I think it might have been pine.
pine was from the same stable as elm (ELectronic Mail)

john
steveski
2019-10-04 16:15:41 UTC
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Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
One thing was getting online and using groups before WWW, wasn't it?
Was usenet pre WWW?
Before the web, yes. Mainly in academia (and probably the military).
Post by Vicky Ayech
I recall using IRC and various places got chat/news feeds. The
Templar's Rest took some American groups.  Demon customers had KA9Q
and I am trying to recall how I got groups with that.....
There was a news client in the suite - I think it might have been pine.
pine was from the same stable as elm (ELectronic Mail)
This might be female grandparent and ovoids but did you realise that PINE
is an acronym for Pine Is Not Elm? :-) Similarly, WINE (on Linux) stands
for Wine Is Not Emulation.
--
Steveski
DavidK
2019-10-04 16:28:37 UTC
Reply
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Post by steveski
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
One thing was getting online and using groups before WWW, wasn't it?
Was usenet pre WWW?
Before the web, yes. Mainly in academia (and probably the military).
Post by Vicky Ayech
I recall using IRC and various places got chat/news feeds. The
Templar's Rest took some American groups.  Demon customers had KA9Q
and I am trying to recall how I got groups with that.....
There was a news client in the suite - I think it might have been pine.
pine was from the same stable as elm (ELectronic Mail)
This might be female grandparent and ovoids but did you realise that PINE
is an acronym for Pine Is Not Elm? :-) Similarly, WINE (on Linux) stands
for Wine Is Not Emulation.
never heard of either, but wasn't there a question on Only Connect about
self-referential acronyms?

now i'll have to go and look
Mike
2019-10-04 16:40:02 UTC
Reply
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Post by steveski
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
One thing was getting online and using groups before WWW, wasn't it?
Was usenet pre WWW?
Before the web, yes. Mainly in academia (and probably the military).
Post by Vicky Ayech
I recall using IRC and various places got chat/news feeds. The
Templar's Rest took some American groups.  Demon customers had KA9Q
and I am trying to recall how I got groups with that.....
There was a news client in the suite - I think it might have been pine.
pine was from the same stable as elm (ELectronic Mail)
This might be female grandparent and ovoids but did you realise that PINE
is an acronym for Pine Is Not Elm? :-) Similarly, WINE (on Linux) stands
for Wine Is Not Emulation.
Yeap, now you mention it, I do; Pine was the default agent at Uni of
Reading for a while.
--
Toodle Pip
John Ashby
2019-10-04 18:47:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
One thing was getting online and using groups before WWW, wasn't it?
Was usenet pre WWW?
Before the web, yes. Mainly in academia (and probably the military).
Post by Vicky Ayech
I recall using IRC and various places got chat/news feeds. The
Templar's Rest took some American groups.  Demon customers had KA9Q
and I am trying to recall how I got groups with that.....
There was a news client in the suite - I think it might have been pine.
pine was from the same stable as elm (ELectronic Mail)
This might be female grandparent and ovoids but did you realise that PINE
is an acronym for Pine Is Not Elm? :-) Similarly, WINE (on Linux) stands
for Wine Is Not Emulation.
And Gnu's Not Unix.

john
Penny
2019-10-04 22:48:41 UTC
Reply
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On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 10:35:13 +0100, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Old internet people
---8<---

I can relate to much of that but I first went online (in various libraries)
to find the answers to a fiendish snail-mail monthly quiz which I could not
find in books in the library (or my ever-growing home library of obscure
'fact' books on a wide range of subjects).

I found usenet because, after several months of quiz research in the
library, I acquired my first Windows PC and took a short evening course in
"The Internet" at a local college. Usenet was one of the things we learnt
about - £10 well spent, that :)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
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