Discussion:
Peggy
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Mike Ruddock
2019-06-11 07:33:29 UTC
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Did anyone else hear the segment in Today where June Spence spoke about
her career as Peggy? (Didn't she play Elsie Catcher, the school teacher
too at one point?) She also spoke of her husband's Alzheimer's. It seems
that the consultation that was spoken about when Jack Woolley was about
to be visited with that condition was more of as "do you mind if we do
this to a fictional character bearing in mind that for you it is real?"
There was talk of trying to get her made a Dame.

Mike Ruddock
Peter Withey
2019-06-11 08:25:30 UTC
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On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 08:33:29 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Did anyone else hear the segment in Today where June Spence spoke about
her career as Peggy? (Didn't she play Elsie Catcher, the school teacher
too at one point?) She also spoke of her husband's Alzheimer's. It seems
that the consultation that was spoken about when Jack Woolley was about
to be visited with that condition was more of as "do you mind if we do
this to a fictional character bearing in mind that for you it is real?"
There was talk of trying to get her made a Dame.
Mike Ruddock
She certainly played Rita Flynn. Mary Wimbush played Elsie Catcher.
(Google is my friend <g>)

Yes, for once I switched on Today before 8 am. Pleased I did, June was
well worth listening to. I'm sure it will be available on "catch-up"
if you missed it.
--
Pete
Mike
2019-06-11 09:01:25 UTC
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Post by Peter Withey
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 08:33:29 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Did anyone else hear the segment in Today where June Spence spoke about
her career as Peggy? (Didn't she play Elsie Catcher, the school teacher
too at one point?) She also spoke of her husband's Alzheimer's. It seems
that the consultation that was spoken about when Jack Woolley was about
to be visited with that condition was more of as "do you mind if we do
this to a fictional character bearing in mind that for you it is real?"
There was talk of trying to get her made a Dame.
Mike Ruddock
She certainly played Rita Flynn. Mary Wimbush played Elsie Catcher.
(Google is my friend <g>)
Yes, for once I switched on Today before 8 am. Pleased I did, June was
well worth listening to. I'm sure it will be available on "catch-up"
if you missed it.
Tend not to listen to Toady on Radio Brexit but, Peggoi used the experience
of her real husband’s illness to assist in the story line for Jack Wooley.
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2019-06-11 09:38:43 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Peter Withey
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 08:33:29 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Did anyone else hear the segment in Today where June Spence spoke about
her career as Peggy? (Didn't she play Elsie Catcher, the school teacher
too at one point?) She also spoke of her husband's Alzheimer's. It seems
that the consultation that was spoken about when Jack Woolley was about
to be visited with that condition was more of as "do you mind if we do
this to a fictional character bearing in mind that for you it is real?"
There was talk of trying to get her made a Dame.
Mike Ruddock
She certainly played Rita Flynn. Mary Wimbush played Elsie Catcher.
(Google is my friend <g>)
Yes, for once I switched on Today before 8 am. Pleased I did, June was
well worth listening to. I'm sure it will be available on "catch-up"
if you missed it.
Tend not to listen to Toady on Radio Brexit but, Peggoi used the experience
of her real husband’s illness to assist in the story line for Jack Wooley.
For those who didn’t hear the 10am news either, June Spencer is ONE HUNDRED
today!! I had no idea she was that old. It’s some years since her
autobiography was published.

Sincerely Chris
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-11 09:58:02 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Mike
Post by Peter Withey
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 08:33:29 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Did anyone else hear the segment in Today where June Spence spoke about
her career as Peggy? (Didn't she play Elsie Catcher, the school teacher
too at one point?) She also spoke of her husband's Alzheimer's. It seems
that the consultation that was spoken about when Jack Woolley was about
to be visited with that condition was more of as "do you mind if we do
this to a fictional character bearing in mind that for you it is real?"
There was talk of trying to get her made a Dame.
Mike Ruddock
She certainly played Rita Flynn. Mary Wimbush played Elsie Catcher.
(Google is my friend <g>)
Yes, for once I switched on Today before 8 am. Pleased I did, June was
well worth listening to. I'm sure it will be available on "catch-up"
if you missed it.
Tend not to listen to Toady on Radio Brexit but, Peggoi used the experience
of her real husband’s illness to assist in the story line for Jack Wooley.
For those who didn’t hear the 10am news either, June Spencer is ONE HUNDRED
today!! I had no idea she was that old. It’s some years since her
autobiography was published.
Her birthday isn't actually till Friday. I assume that they are
planning something special for Peggy for Friday, and that her trip out
with a glamorous stranger, yesterday, as well as the invitations that
various family members have received, are to do with this.
--
Best wishes, Serena
If at first you don't succeed, don't try sky-diving.
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-11 10:08:45 UTC
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On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 10:58:02 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Mike
Post by Peter Withey
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 08:33:29 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Did anyone else hear the segment in Today where June Spence spoke about
her career as Peggy? (Didn't she play Elsie Catcher, the school teacher
too at one point?) She also spoke of her husband's Alzheimer's. It seems
that the consultation that was spoken about when Jack Woolley was about
to be visited with that condition was more of as "do you mind if we do
this to a fictional character bearing in mind that for you it is real?"
There was talk of trying to get her made a Dame.
Mike Ruddock
She certainly played Rita Flynn. Mary Wimbush played Elsie Catcher.
(Google is my friend <g>)
Yes, for once I switched on Today before 8 am. Pleased I did, June was
well worth listening to. I'm sure it will be available on "catch-up"
if you missed it.
Tend not to listen to Toady on Radio Brexit but, Peggoi used the experience
of her real husband’s illness to assist in the story line for Jack Wooley.
For those who didn’t hear the 10am news either, June Spencer is ONE HUNDRED
today!! I had no idea she was that old. It’s some years since her
autobiography was published.
Her birthday isn't actually till Friday. I assume that they are
planning something special for Peggy for Friday, and that her trip out
with a glamorous stranger, yesterday, as well as the invitations that
various family members have received, are to do with this.
Hang on. June is going to be 100 but you think the SWs have a special
outing planned for Peggy to celebrate?
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-11 10:45:44 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 10:58:02 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Mike
Post by Peter Withey
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 08:33:29 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Did anyone else hear the segment in Today where June Spence spoke about
her career as Peggy? (Didn't she play Elsie Catcher, the school teacher
too at one point?) She also spoke of her husband's Alzheimer's. It seems
that the consultation that was spoken about when Jack Woolley was about
to be visited with that condition was more of as "do you mind if we do
this to a fictional character bearing in mind that for you it is real?"
There was talk of trying to get her made a Dame.
Mike Ruddock
She certainly played Rita Flynn. Mary Wimbush played Elsie Catcher.
(Google is my friend <g>)
Yes, for once I switched on Today before 8 am. Pleased I did, June was
well worth listening to. I'm sure it will be available on "catch-up"
if you missed it.
Tend not to listen to Toady on Radio Brexit but, Peggoi used the experience
of her real husband’s illness to assist in the story line for Jack Wooley.
For those who didn’t hear the 10am news either, June Spencer is ONE HUNDRED
today!! I had no idea she was that old. It’s some years since her
autobiography was published.
Her birthday isn't actually till Friday. I assume that they are
planning something special for Peggy for Friday, and that her trip out
with a glamorous stranger, yesterday, as well as the invitations that
various family members have received, are to do with this.
Hang on. June is going to be 100 but you think the SWs have a special
outing planned for Peggy to celebrate?
Yes, I think they've got something special planned for her. They
couldn't *not* celebrate June's birthday in any way and, of course, it
isn't Peggy's birthday, but I'm sure they're going to allow her some
fun, to mark it.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Insert witty sig here
Mike
2019-06-11 10:50:26 UTC
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Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 10:58:02 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Mike
Post by Peter Withey
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 08:33:29 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Did anyone else hear the segment in Today where June Spence spoke about
her career as Peggy? (Didn't she play Elsie Catcher, the school teacher
too at one point?) She also spoke of her husband's Alzheimer's. It seems
that the consultation that was spoken about when Jack Woolley was about
to be visited with that condition was more of as "do you mind if we do
this to a fictional character bearing in mind that for you it is real?"
There was talk of trying to get her made a Dame.
Mike Ruddock
She certainly played Rita Flynn. Mary Wimbush played Elsie Catcher.
(Google is my friend <g>)
Yes, for once I switched on Today before 8 am. Pleased I did, June was
well worth listening to. I'm sure it will be available on "catch-up"
if you missed it.
Tend not to listen to Toady on Radio Brexit but, Peggoi used the experience
of her real husband’s illness to assist in the story line for Jack Wooley.
For those who didn’t hear the 10am news either, June Spencer is ONE HUNDRED
today!! I had no idea she was that old. It’s some years since her
autobiography was published.
Her birthday isn't actually till Friday. I assume that they are
planning something special for Peggy for Friday, and that her trip out
with a glamorous stranger, yesterday, as well as the invitations that
various family members have received, are to do with this.
Hang on. June is going to be 100 but you think the SWs have a special
outing planned for Peggy to celebrate?
Yes, I think they've got something special planned for her. They
couldn't *not* celebrate June's birthday in any way and, of course, it
isn't Peggy's birthday, but I'm sure they're going to allow her some
fun, to mark it.
Maybe that Peggoi has invited everyone to come and meet her friend June who
is 100 today...
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2019-06-11 11:11:43 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 10:58:02 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Mike
Post by Peter Withey
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 08:33:29 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Did anyone else hear the segment in Today where June Spence spoke about
her career as Peggy? (Didn't she play Elsie Catcher, the school teacher
too at one point?) She also spoke of her husband's Alzheimer's. It seems
that the consultation that was spoken about when Jack Woolley was about
to be visited with that condition was more of as "do you mind if we do
this to a fictional character bearing in mind that for you it is real?"
There was talk of trying to get her made a Dame.
Mike Ruddock
She certainly played Rita Flynn. Mary Wimbush played Elsie Catcher.
(Google is my friend <g>)
Yes, for once I switched on Today before 8 am. Pleased I did, June was
well worth listening to. I'm sure it will be available on "catch-up"
if you missed it.
Tend not to listen to Toady on Radio Brexit but, Peggoi used the experience
of her real husband’s illness to assist in the story line for Jack Wooley.
For those who didn’t hear the 10am news either, June Spencer is ONE HUNDRED
today!! I had no idea she was that old. It’s some years since her
autobiography was published.
Her birthday isn't actually till Friday. I assume that they are
planning something special for Peggy for Friday, and that her trip out
with a glamorous stranger, yesterday, as well as the invitations that
various family members have received, are to do with this.
Hang on. June is going to be 100 but you think the SWs have a special
outing planned for Peggy to celebrate?
Yes, I think they've got something special planned for her. They
couldn't *not* celebrate June's birthday in any way and, of course, it
isn't Peggy's birthday, but I'm sure they're going to allow her some
fun, to mark it.
Maybe that Peggoi has invited everyone to come and meet her friend June who
is 100 today...
Can you break the fourth wall on radio where there are no walls?

Nick
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-06-11 15:59:50 UTC
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Permalink
[]
[]
[]
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Peter Withey
Yes, for once I switched on Today before 8 am. Pleased I did, June was
well worth listening to. I'm sure it will be available on "catch-up"
if you missed it.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m0005t81 . Pity they don't subdivide;
I've had to plough through to find it - including hearing some idiot
from Scottish Power (and another person) who thinks a battery's capacity
is in megawatts. There's an extract - few seconds - of June in the
headlines at the start; then at 1:44:18 or so is the main feature.
Lovely RP accents in the oldest clip! About 6 minutes in all. Ends with
a bit more of the music than VW's legacy has left us with on the
episodes (sound quality different, too - Mike, if you hear it, was it
the old recording, the current, or some other?).
[]
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Chris McMillan
For those who didn’t hear the 10am news either, June Spencer is ONE HUNDRED
today!! I had no idea she was that old. It’s some years since her
autobiography was published.
And she sounds completely together! I hope I'm as good.
[]
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Maybe that Peggoi has invited everyone to come and meet her friend June who
is 100 today...
Her friend would have to be a silent character!
Post by Nick Odell
Can you break the fourth wall on radio where there are no walls?
Nick
Interesting question! I can't remember the last time I saw it done even
on TV (in drama anyway); I can't remember ever hearing it done on radio.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

... the greatest musical festival in the world that doesn't involve mud.
- Eddie Mair, RT 2014/8/16-22
Penny
2019-06-12 07:42:13 UTC
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On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 16:59:50 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
Can you break the fourth wall on radio where there are no walls?
Interesting question! I can't remember the last time I saw it done even
on TV (in drama anyway);
You've not watched Fleabag or Gentleman Jack then?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike Ruddock
2019-06-12 11:55:42 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 16:59:50 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
Can you break the fourth wall on radio where there are no walls?
Interesting question! I can't remember the last time I saw it done even
on TV (in drama anyway);
You've not watched Fleabag or Gentleman Jack then?
Both tv dramas. The original question related to radio drama. I can
conceive of a way of doing it and I am sure that it has been done.

Mike Ruddock
Penny
2019-06-12 15:26:47 UTC
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On Wed, 12 Jun 2019 12:55:42 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Penny
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 16:59:50 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
Can you break the fourth wall on radio where there are no walls?
Interesting question! I can't remember the last time I saw it done even
on TV (in drama anyway);
You've not watched Fleabag or Gentleman Jack then?
Both tv dramas.
I'm aware of that which is why I trimmed to John's specific statement.
Post by Mike Ruddock
The original question related to radio drama. I can
conceive of a way of doing it and I am sure that it has been done.
It happens in Vanity Fair all the time - more obvious in a radio production
than a TV one because a 'narrator' is not 'seen' on screen anyway. When
it's all sound the narrator's voice amongst other voices is less 'apart'
but is always talking directly to the audience.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2019-06-12 16:04:58 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Wed, 12 Jun 2019 12:55:42 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Penny
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 16:59:50 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
Can you break the fourth wall on radio where there are no walls?
Interesting question! I can't remember the last time I saw it done even
on TV (in drama anyway);
You've not watched Fleabag or Gentleman Jack then?
Both tv dramas.
I'm aware of that which is why I trimmed to John's specific statement.
Post by Mike Ruddock
The original question related to radio drama. I can
conceive of a way of doing it and I am sure that it has been done.
It happens in Vanity Fair all the time - more obvious in a radio production
than a TV one because a 'narrator' is not 'seen' on screen anyway. When
it's all sound the narrator's voice amongst other voices is less 'apart'
but is always talking directly to the audience.
I've not heard that much of Vanity Fair yet though I'm recording it for
later but when he makes an aside to the audience, isn't he still
maintaining the character of the narrator and confiding narratory things
to the audience? I know that's a common interpretation of breaking the
fourth wall but - and especially since we are talking about Peggy and
June on the radio - I'm thinking of the usage to describe the actor
stepping out of character and addressing the audience as the actor then
stepping back in and continuing.

IMO that's what Frankie Howerd used to do in Up Pompeii but the visuals
were very important for indicating whether Frankie Howerd or Lurcio were
speaking.

Nick
John Ashby
2019-06-12 18:53:31 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
On Wed, 12 Jun 2019 12:55:42 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Penny
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 16:59:50 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
Can you break the fourth wall on radio where there are no walls?
Interesting question! I can't remember the last time I saw it done even
on TV (in drama anyway);
You've not watched Fleabag or Gentleman Jack then?
Both tv dramas.
I'm aware of that which is why I trimmed to  John's specific statement.
Post by Mike Ruddock
The original question related to radio drama. I can
conceive of a way of doing it and I am sure that it has been done.
It happens in Vanity Fair all the time - more obvious in a radio production
than a TV one because a 'narrator' is not 'seen' on screen anyway. When
it's all sound the narrator's voice amongst other voices is less 'apart'
but is always talking directly to the audience.
I've not heard that much of Vanity Fair yet though I'm recording it for
later but when he makes an aside to the audience, isn't he still
maintaining the character of the narrator and confiding narratory things
to the audience? I know that's a common interpretation of breaking the
fourth wall but - and especially since we are talking about Peggy and
June on the radio - I'm thinking of the usage to describe the actor
stepping out of character and addressing the audience as the actor then
stepping back in and continuing.
IMO that's what Frankie Howerd used to do in Up Pompeii but the visuals
were very important for indicating whether Frankie Howerd or Lurcio were
speaking.
Nick
There's a hard and soft breaking of the fourth wall. In the soft version
Lurcio acknowledges that there is an audience, but it's still Lurcio
trying to speak The Prologue. Similarly Francis Urquhart, not Ian
Richardson, explains his motives to the audience. Fleabag and Gentleman
Jack are similar, the character speaks through the fourth wall to the
audience directly.
A hard breaking is harder to find examples of, where the actor steps
right out of character and comments as him or herself. Perhaps because
even when it is done, there is an ambiguity about whether it it the
actor or a character of an actor playing the main character. Some
Theatre of the Absurd (e.g. NF Simpson) plays with this.
A narrator is not the same, unless the narrator is also a character in
the narrated action. Though again, the narrator is not the actor.

john
Mike
2019-06-12 17:21:25 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 12 Jun 2019 12:55:42 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Penny
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 16:59:50 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
Can you break the fourth wall on radio where there are no walls?
Interesting question! I can't remember the last time I saw it done even
on TV (in drama anyway);
You've not watched Fleabag or Gentleman Jack then?
Both tv dramas.
I'm aware of that which is why I trimmed to John's specific statement.
Post by Mike Ruddock
The original question related to radio drama. I can
conceive of a way of doing it and I am sure that it has been done.
It happens in Vanity Fair all the time - more obvious in a radio production
than a TV one because a 'narrator' is not 'seen' on screen anyway. When
it's all sound the narrator's voice amongst other voices is less 'apart'
but is always talking directly to the audience.
And the usual technique used for narration on radio is a fairly dry
acoustic (normally) free of ambient sounds and by this means will set the
voice apart from the ‘actors’.
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-12 12:12:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Tue, 11 Jun 2019 16:59:50 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
Can you break the fourth wall on radio where there are no walls?
Interesting question! I can't remember the last time I saw it done even
on TV (in drama anyway);
You've not watched Fleabag or Gentleman Jack then?
I watched the first Gentleman Jack but didn't much like it. Not keen
on her. Didn't fancy Fleabag. We are really enjoying Good Omens and
Chernobyl is good but not exactly enjoyable.
Nick Odell
2019-06-12 15:41:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 12/06/2019 13:12, Vicky Ayech wrote:
<snip>
Post by Vicky Ayech
Chernobyl is good but not exactly enjoyable.
Not enjoyable? People dropping dead from radiation poisoning: what's not
to like? There hasn't been a really good irradiation scene
on British TV since Joe Don Baker brought together those plutonium bars
in Edge of Darkness in 1985.

Nick
Mike
2019-06-12 17:22:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
<snip>
Post by Vicky Ayech
Chernobyl is good but not exactly enjoyable.
Not enjoyable? People dropping dead from radiation poisoning: what's not
to like? There hasn't been a really good irradiation scene
on British TV since Joe Don Baker brought together those plutonium bars
in Edge of Darkness in 1985.
Nick
Ever seen the American version? Hardly even the same story!
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2019-06-12 21:11:03 UTC
Reply
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Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
<snip>
Post by Vicky Ayech
Chernobyl is good but not exactly enjoyable.
Not enjoyable? People dropping dead from radiation poisoning: what's not
to like? There hasn't been a really good irradiation scene
on British TV since Joe Don Baker brought together those plutonium bars
in Edge of Darkness in 1985.
Nick
Ever seen the American version? Hardly even the same story!
No, I haven't seen the American one. Both projects had the same director
but that seems to be where the similarities end. No credit for Eric
Clapton in the music either so I suppose that was different too.

I used to like Eric Clapton a lot when he played ninety million notes a
second blues breaks but from Edge of Darkness I'd concede that his
nickname "God" was entirely appropriate. I'd even call him the Samuel
Beckett of the guitar: the notes were important but the spaces between
the notes even more so.

Nick
steveski
2019-06-12 23:41:09 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
<snip>
Post by Vicky Ayech
Chernobyl is good but not exactly enjoyable.
Not enjoyable? People dropping dead from radiation poisoning: what's
not to like? There hasn't been a really good irradiation scene on
British TV since Joe Don Baker brought together those plutonium bars
in Edge of Darkness in 1985.
Nick
Ever seen the American version? Hardly even the same story!
No, I haven't seen the American one. Both projects had the same director
but that seems to be where the similarities end. No credit for Eric
Clapton in the music either so I suppose that was different too.
I used to like Eric Clapton a lot when he played ninety million notes a
second blues breaks but from Edge of Darkness I'd concede that his
nickname "God" was entirely appropriate. I'd even call him the Samuel
Beckett of the guitar: the notes were important but the spaces between
the notes even more so.
And he nicked a lot of his stuff from others e.g. J.J. Cale . . .
--
Steveski (Faintly bitter) :-)
krw
2019-06-13 08:31:39 UTC
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Post by steveski
e.g. J.J. Cale . . .
Who seems to have been getting a lot of airtime recently.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
BrritSki
2019-06-13 09:15:06 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by steveski
e.g. J.J. Cale . . .
Who seems to have been getting a lot of airtime recently.
I prefer Kavolo Nero...

(No, not his horse, or Caligula's Ford)
Mike
2019-06-13 10:45:32 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by krw
Post by steveski
e.g. J.J. Cale . . .
Who seems to have been getting a lot of airtime recently.
I prefer Kavolo Nero...
(No, not his horse, or Caligula's Ford)
They had cars in Rome back then?!
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2019-06-13 10:50:47 UTC
Reply
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Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by krw
Post by steveski
e.g. J.J. Cale . . .
Who seems to have been getting a lot of airtime recently.
I prefer Kavolo Nero...
(No, not his horse, or Caligula's Ford)
They had cars in Rome back then?!
Yeah, Consuls.
John Ashby
2019-06-13 12:43:30 UTC
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Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by krw
Post by steveski
e.g. J.J. Cale . . .
Who seems to have been getting a lot of airtime recently.
I prefer Kavolo Nero...
(No, not his horse, or Caligula's Ford)
They had cars in Rome back then?!
Yeah, Consuls.
And probably a fair number of Corsairs off the coast of Capri.

john
Mike
2019-06-13 12:53:13 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by BrritSki
Post by Mike
Post by BrritSki
Post by krw
Post by steveski
e.g. J.J. Cale . . .
Who seems to have been getting a lot of airtime recently.
I prefer Kavolo Nero...
(No, not his horse, or Caligula's Ford)
They had cars in Rome back then?!
Yeah, Consuls.
And probably a fair number of Corsairs off the coast of Capri.
john
Isle have to take your word for that!
--
Toodle Pip
Sid Nuncius
2019-06-15 05:43:10 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by Nick Odell
I used to like Eric Clapton a lot when he played ninety million notes a
second blues breaks but from Edge of Darkness I'd concede that his
nickname "God" was entirely appropriate. I'd even call him the Samuel
Beckett of the guitar: the notes were important but the spaces between
the notes even more so.
And he nicked a lot of his stuff from others e.g. J.J. Cale . . .
"Nicked" is a tad harsh, I'd say. J.J. said that he was about to give
up when Clapton recorded Cocaine which revived interest in him (J.J.)
and allowed him to continue. Clapton was a good friend to J.J. too, and
organised a (largely very good) tribute album to him when he died.

I agree with Nick (to coin a phrase) but EC's last few albums have
been...well, variable, shall we say[1]. Nonetheless, I am convinced
that he remains a major deity and he's someone I'm deeply glad to have
seen live.

Speaking of which, I have agreed to go with a couple of friends tomorrow
to a chamber concert tomorrow. The first half is Mozart's E-flat
Divertimento K563 which I love and is why I said yes. The second half is
Schoenberg. Yes, Schoenberg. What *have* I done? It's Verklärte Nacht
which, from the few snippets I know, doesn't seem quite as Schoenbergy
as it might be but I'm still braced...

Sorry. Rambling now.


[1]If anyone wants to read a very pained review of Old Sock, mine is
here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/customer-reviews/R1YZ6BBMAUWT3H
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Chris McMillan
2019-06-15 12:23:25 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Post by Nick Odell
I used to like Eric Clapton a lot when he played ninety million notes a
second blues breaks but from Edge of Darkness I'd concede that his
nickname "God" was entirely appropriate. I'd even call him the Samuel
Beckett of the guitar: the notes were important but the spaces between
the notes even more so.
And he nicked a lot of his stuff from others e.g. J.J. Cale . . .
"Nicked" is a tad harsh, I'd say. J.J. said that he was about to give
up when Clapton recorded Cocaine which revived interest in him (J.J.)
and allowed him to continue. Clapton was a good friend to J.J. too, and
organised a (largely very good) tribute album to him when he died.
I agree with Nick (to coin a phrase) but EC's last few albums have
been...well, variable, shall we say[1]. Nonetheless, I am convinced
that he remains a major deity and he's someone I'm deeply glad to have
seen live.
Speaking of which, I have agreed to go with a couple of friends tomorrow
to a chamber concert tomorrow. The first half is Mozart's E-flat
Divertimento K563 which I love and is why I said yes. The second half is
Schoenberg. Yes, Schoenberg. What *have* I done? It's Verklärte Nacht
which, from the few snippets I know, doesn't seem quite as Schoenbergy
as it might be but I'm still braced...
Sorry. Rambling now.
[1]If anyone wants to read a very pained review of Old Sock, mine is
here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/customer-reviews/R1YZ6BBMAUWT3H
You brave (maybe foolish) man. *Enjoy* may not be the right word. :)

Sincerely Chris
John Ashby
2019-06-15 16:44:29 UTC
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Post by steveski
Post by Nick Odell
I used to like Eric Clapton a lot when he played ninety million notes a
second blues breaks but from Edge of Darkness I'd concede that his
nickname "God" was entirely appropriate. I'd even call him the Samuel
Beckett of the guitar: the notes were important but the spaces between
the notes even more so.
And he nicked a lot of his stuff from others e.g. J.J. Cale . . .
"Nicked" is a tad harsh, I'd say.  J.J. said that he was about to give
up when Clapton recorded Cocaine which revived interest in him (J.J.)
and allowed him to continue.  Clapton was a good friend to J.J. too, and
organised a (largely very good) tribute album to him when he died.
I agree with Nick (to coin a phrase) but EC's last few albums have
been...well, variable, shall we say[1].  Nonetheless, I am convinced
that he remains a major deity and he's someone I'm deeply glad to have
seen live.
Speaking of which, I have agreed to go with a couple of friends tomorrow
to a chamber concert tomorrow.  The first half is Mozart's E-flat
Divertimento K563 which I love and is why I said yes. The second half is
Schoenberg.  Yes, Schoenberg.  What *have* I done?  It's Verklärte Nacht
which, from the few snippets I know, doesn't seem quite as Schoenbergy
as it might be but I'm still braced...
Sorry.  Rambling now.
[1]If anyone wants to read a very pained review of Old Sock, mine is
here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/customer-reviews/R1YZ6BBMAUWT3H
The thing about Schoenberg is that he thoroughly understood (and wrote a
highly regarded book on) the rules of harmony before he went off and
broke them, so even at his most Schoenbergy he is much more listenable
to than his less talented followers.

john

krw
2019-06-12 08:50:08 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Interesting question! I can't remember the last time I saw it done even
on TV (in drama anyway);
Fleabag very recently.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Dumrat
2019-06-11 16:51:02 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
For those who didn’t hear the 10am news either, June Spencer is ONE HUNDRED
today!!  I had no idea she was that old. It’s some years since her
autobiography was published.
Her birthday isn't actually till Friday.  I assume that they are planning something
special for Peggy for Friday, and that her trip out with a glamorous stranger, yesterday,
as well as the invitations that various family members have received, are to do with this.
But Peggy's "only" 95 this year, and her birthday is not until November, in any case. I
don't understand why the Toady prog didn't broadcast that article on Friday, anyway? All
this advance analysis and speculation about news which hasn't happened yet really gets my
goat!
--
Salaam Alaykum,
Anne, Exceptionally Traditionally-built Dumrat
Mike
2019-06-11 17:19:46 UTC
Reply
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Post by Dumrat
Post by Chris McMillan
For those who didn’t hear the 10am news either, June Spencer is ONE HUNDRED
today!!  I had no idea she was that old. It’s some years since her
autobiography was published.
Her birthday isn't actually till Friday.  I assume that they are planning something
special for Peggy for Friday, and that her trip out with a glamorous stranger, yesterday,
as well as the invitations that various family members have received, are to do with this.
But Peggy's "only" 95 this year, and her birthday is not until November, in any case. I
don't understand why the Toady prog didn't broadcast that article on Friday, anyway? All
this advance analysis and speculation about news which hasn't happened yet really gets my
goat!
You must be ‘kidding’!
--
Toodle Pip
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-11 18:25:47 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Dumrat
Post by Chris McMillan
For those who didn’t hear the 10am news either, June Spencer is ONE HUNDRED
today!!  I had no idea she was that old. It’s some years since her
autobiography was published.
Her birthday isn't actually till Friday.  I assume that they are
planning something special for Peggy for Friday, and that her trip out
with a glamorous stranger, yesterday, as well as the invitations that
various family members have received, are to do with this.
But Peggy's "only" 95 this year, and her birthday is not until November,
in any case. I don't understand why the Toady prog didn't broadcast that
article on Friday, anyway? All this advance analysis and speculation
about  news which hasn't happened yet really gets my goat!
I get the impression that they had a recording session, including June
Spencer, today and that this was the nearest day to her actual birthday
that she'd be available.

What they have planned for Peggy, on Friday will be separate from what
they had lined up for June today. It sounds as if they're making sure
though that Peggy will be in the centre of some surprise on Friday
though, as a nod to June.
--
Best wishes, Serena
The truth is rarely pure and never simple. (Oscar Wilde)
Chris J Dixon
2019-06-12 07:31:00 UTC
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Post by Peter Withey
Yes, for once I switched on Today before 8 am. Pleased I did, June was
well worth listening to. I'm sure it will be available on "catch-up"
if you missed it.
It also featured on BBC News channels bulletins during the day.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
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