Discussion:
Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor
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Nick Odell
2019-05-09 08:11:02 UTC
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It's a secret message to us, innit?

Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.

Nick
Vicky Ayech
2019-05-09 08:43:38 UTC
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On Thu, 9 May 2019 09:11:02 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
Nick
Not the first royal conection for TA. Maybe the new mum will pay a
visit. She does have broadcasting esperience.
Penny
2019-05-09 09:15:55 UTC
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On Thu, 9 May 2019 09:11:02 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
I just assumed the middle name was a sort of Icelandic/Nordic nod - which
seems odd but I like it.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sid Nuncius
2019-05-09 09:20:58 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 9 May 2019 09:11:02 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
I just assumed the middle name was a sort of Icelandic/Nordic nod - which
seems odd but I like it.
I rather like both names. And I rather like the slight sense of
defiance in their choice.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Kate B
2019-05-09 09:39:26 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 9 May 2019 09:11:02 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
I just assumed the middle name was a sort of Icelandic/Nordic nod - which
seems odd but I like it.
I rather like both names.  And I rather like the slight sense of
defiance in their choice.
So do I. Though the same cannot be said for my step-grand-daughter whose
Archie was born at the end of March. She is absolutely furious!
--
Kate B
London
Vicky Ayech
2019-05-09 10:59:52 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 9 May 2019 09:11:02 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
I just assumed the middle name was a sort of Icelandic/Nordic nod - which
seems odd but I like it.
I rather like both names.  And I rather like the slight sense of
defiance in their choice.
So do I. Though the same cannot be said for my step-grand-daughter whose
Archie was born at the end of March. She is absolutely furious!
Tell her to count her blessings. Younger grandson's middle name is
Corbyn! (it means raven-haired and he is blonde like his mum. Also to
do with ravens and his first name is birdie too.)
Vicky Ayech
2019-05-09 10:55:30 UTC
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On Thu, 9 May 2019 10:20:58 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 9 May 2019 09:11:02 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
I just assumed the middle name was a sort of Icelandic/Nordic nod - which
seems odd but I like it.
I rather like both names. And I rather like the slight sense of
defiance in their choice.
Harry's son Harrison
LFS
2019-05-09 11:14:27 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 9 May 2019 09:11:02 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
I just assumed the middle name was a sort of Icelandic/Nordic nod - which
seems odd but I like it.
I rather like both names.  And I rather like the slight sense of
defiance in their choice.
Yes indeed. Good for them.

Swerving as Iceland was mentioned, we saw Woman at War yesterday, a
rather strange Icelandic film but surprisingly gripping and moving.
Highly recommended.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Anne B
2019-06-05 16:39:37 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 9 May 2019 09:11:02 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
I just assumed the middle name was a sort of Icelandic/Nordic nod - which
seems odd but I like it.
I rather like both names. And I rather like the slight sense of
defiance in their choice.
I don't like names which are abbreviations or pet names derived from
real names. Hence I don't like the name Archie.

Anne B
Clive Arthur
2019-06-05 17:28:41 UTC
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On 05/06/2019 17:39, Anne B wrote:

<snipped>
I don't like names which are abbreviations...
Anne B
Fairy nuff Ms B (presumably pronounced 'buh').

Cheers
--
Clive
BrritSki
2019-06-05 19:24:45 UTC
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Post by Anne B
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 9 May 2019 09:11:02 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
I just assumed the middle name was a sort of Icelandic/Nordic nod - which
seems odd but I like it.
I rather like both names.  And I rather like the slight sense of
defiance in their choice.
I don't like names which are abbreviations or pet names derived from
real names. Hence I don't like the name Archie.
Or Ann. :)
DavidK
2019-06-06 06:52:44 UTC
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Post by Anne B
I don't like names which are abbreviations or pet names derived from
real names. Hence I don't like the name Archie.
Anne B
Are Annie, Barry, Carrie, Ernie, Fanny, Fenny, Gary and Harry all on
that list?
Penny
2019-06-06 08:53:02 UTC
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On Thu, 6 Jun 2019 07:52:44 +0100, DavidK <***@invalid.invalid> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Post by Anne B
I don't like names which are abbreviations or pet names derived from
real names. Hence I don't like the name Archie.
Anne B
Are Annie, Barry, Carrie, Ernie, Fanny, Fenny, Gary and Harry all on
that list?
I'm wondering what Barry and Gary are abbreviations of (I think they may be
surnames) and why you missed Penny and Jenny off your list?

I have never liked Penelope, a name used only by headteachers when
addressing me. Two young friends have named their children Penny, rather
than Penelope-known-as-Penny. I approve of this.

Part of the Scottish branches of my family tree have several women called
Maggie. I'd sort of assumed this was short for Margaret and recorded it as
such but many of the official documents show Maggie.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sally Thompson
2019-06-06 09:04:51 UTC
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Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Post by Anne B
I don't like names which are abbreviations or pet names derived from
real names. Hence I don't like the name Archie.
Are Annie, Barry, Carrie, Ernie, Fanny, Fenny, Gary and Harry all on
that list?
I'm wondering what Barry and Gary are abbreviations of (I think they may be
surnames) and why you missed Penny and Jenny off your list?
I have never liked Penelope, a name used only by headteachers when
addressing me. Two young friends have named their children Penny, rather
than Penelope-known-as-Penny. I approve of this.
Gary is presumably short for Gareth.

My middle name is Penelope; it was going to be my first name but my maiden
surname was Licence and my parents thought I'd be teased as "Penny
Licence".
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-06 09:19:45 UTC
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On 6 Jun 2019 09:04:51 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Post by Anne B
I don't like names which are abbreviations or pet names derived from
real names. Hence I don't like the name Archie.
Are Annie, Barry, Carrie, Ernie, Fanny, Fenny, Gary and Harry all on
that list?
I'm wondering what Barry and Gary are abbreviations of (I think they may be
surnames) and why you missed Penny and Jenny off your list?
I have never liked Penelope, a name used only by headteachers when
addressing me. Two young friends have named their children Penny, rather
than Penelope-known-as-Penny. I approve of this.
Gary is presumably short for Gareth.
My middle name is Penelope; it was going to be my first name but my maiden
surname was Licence and my parents thought I'd be teased as "Penny
Licence".
One daughter has a partner called Gareth. We call him that, never
Gary. I like Gareth but not Gary. I suppose I associate the full name
with grandson's dad, who is lovely, and Gary with Glitter.
Nick Odell
2019-06-06 14:20:35 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Post by Anne B
I don't like names which are abbreviations or pet names derived from
real names. Hence I don't like the name Archie.
Are Annie, Barry, Carrie, Ernie, Fanny, Fenny, Gary and Harry all on
that list?
I'm wondering what Barry and Gary are abbreviations of (I think they may be
surnames) and why you missed Penny and Jenny off your list?
I have never liked Penelope, a name used only by headteachers when
addressing me. Two young friends have named their children Penny, rather
than Penelope-known-as-Penny. I approve of this.
Gary is presumably short for Gareth.
My middle name is Penelope; it was going to be my first name but my maiden
surname was Licence and my parents thought I'd be teased as "Penny
Licence".
My sister's first name was going to be Sally but this was 1956 and too
early for my parents to have learned from Harrison Ford and Sean Connery
in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade that it would have been okay to
name their child after the family dog.

Nick
Sally Thompson
2019-06-06 16:21:55 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Post by Anne B
I don't like names which are abbreviations or pet names derived from
real names. Hence I don't like the name Archie.
Are Annie, Barry, Carrie, Ernie, Fanny, Fenny, Gary and Harry all on
that list?
I'm wondering what Barry and Gary are abbreviations of (I think they may be
surnames) and why you missed Penny and Jenny off your list?
I have never liked Penelope, a name used only by headteachers when
addressing me. Two young friends have named their children Penny, rather
than Penelope-known-as-Penny. I approve of this.
Gary is presumably short for Gareth.
My middle name is Penelope; it was going to be my first name but my maiden
surname was Licence and my parents thought I'd be teased as "Penny
Licence".
My sister's first name was going to be Sally but this was 1956 and too
early for my parents to have learned from Harrison Ford and Sean Connery
in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade that it would have been okay to
name their child after the family dog.
I don't think I'm offended by that! Better than calling a boy Rover I
suppose.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Jim Easterbrook
2019-06-06 17:30:41 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Nick Odell
My sister's first name was going to be Sally but this was 1956 and too
early for my parents to have learned from Harrison Ford and Sean
Connery in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade that it would have been
okay to name their child after the family dog.
I don't think I'm offended by that! Better than calling a boy Rover I
suppose.
Surely that's OK if he was previously called Leyland.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Mike
2019-06-06 17:41:41 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Nick Odell
My sister's first name was going to be Sally but this was 1956 and too
early for my parents to have learned from Harrison Ford and Sean
Connery in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade that it would have been
okay to name their child after the family dog.
I don't think I'm offended by that! Better than calling a boy Rover I
suppose.
Surely that's OK if he was previously called Leyland.
Or maybe Jaeger even;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-06 09:18:17 UTC
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Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Post by Anne B
I don't like names which are abbreviations or pet names derived from
real names. Hence I don't like the name Archie.
Anne B
Are Annie, Barry, Carrie, Ernie, Fanny, Fenny, Gary and Harry all on
that list?
I'm wondering what Barry and Gary are abbreviations of (I think they may be
surnames) and why you missed Penny and Jenny off your list?
I have never liked Penelope, a name used only by headteachers when
addressing me. Two young friends have named their children Penny, rather
than Penelope-known-as-Penny. I approve of this.
Part of the Scottish branches of my family tree have several women called
Maggie. I'd sort of assumed this was short for Margaret and recorded it as
such but many of the official documents show Maggie.
.
How do you feel about Vicky? :) My birth certificate says Victoria
but I normally give Vicky as my name,. I don't like being called
Victoria. My passport says Victoria though and when I have to prove my
identify to some places they have a problem with that. And my birth
cert actually says Valerie Victoria, as passport does, so that causes
more difficulties.
Jenny M Benson
2019-06-06 12:20:40 UTC
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Permalink
How do you feel about Vicky?:) My birth certificate says Victoria
but I normally give Vicky as my name,. I don't like being called
Victoria. My passport says Victoria though and when I have to prove my
identify to some places they have a problem with that. And my birth
cert actually says Valerie Victoria, as passport does, so that causes
more difficulties.
I was nearly a Valerie, but I'm glad my parents changed their minds! In
full I am Jennifer Margaret, but I associate being called Jennifer as
being in trouble for something! I do use it for anything "official" and
occasionally have a slight problem because I can't remember whether I
used Jennifer or Jenny in that particular situation. Also have the
occasional problem when writing to someone and can't recall whether they
usually call me Jenny or Jen.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Penny
2019-06-06 17:23:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 6 Jun 2019 13:20:40 +0100, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
I was nearly a Valerie, but I'm glad my parents changed their minds! In
full I am Jennifer Margaret, but I associate being called Jennifer as
being in trouble for something! I do use it for anything "official" and
occasionally have a slight problem because I can't remember whether I
used Jennifer or Jenny in that particular situation. Also have the
occasional problem when writing to someone and can't recall whether they
usually call me Jenny or Jen.
My good friend Val was Christened Ina Valerie. She was named after her
mother who was named after the ship beside which she was found at Chatham
Docks
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Anne B
2019-06-06 22:41:55 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jenny M Benson
How do you feel about Vicky?:) My birth certificate says Victoria
but I normally give Vicky as my name,. I don't like being called
Victoria. My passport says Victoria though and when I have to prove my
identify to some places they have a problem with that. And my birth
cert actually says Valerie Victoria, as passport does, so that causes
more difficulties.
I was nearly a Valerie, but I'm glad my parents changed their minds! In
full I am Jennifer Margaret, but I associate being called Jennifer as
being in trouble for something! I do use it for anything "official" and
occasionally have a slight problem because I can't remember whether I
used Jennifer or Jenny in that particular situation. Also have the
occasional problem when writing to someone and can't recall whether they
usually call me Jenny or Jen.
I had a lucky escape - my mother wanted to call me Felicity Dorothea. Or
Fenella. Fortunately my father put his foot down. Later on my mother
used to say that no new mother should be allowed to bestow a name on a
child until it was at least three months old and her hormones had got
back to normal.

I sometimes wonder if I'd be a different sort of person if I had had a
more fanciful name.

Anne B
Clive Arthur
2019-06-07 06:31:16 UTC
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On 06/06/2019 23:41, Anne B wrote:

<snip>
Post by Anne B
I sometimes wonder if I'd be a different sort of person if I had had a
more fanciful name.
Anne B
I knew this one quite well, no longer with us...

http://www.mayonews.ie/?option=com_content&view=article&id=13663:interview-annie-b-retiring-sweetshop-owner&catid=47:living&Itemid=154

Cheers
--
Clive
Nick Odell
2019-06-07 10:04:06 UTC
Reply
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Post by Clive Arthur
<snip>
Post by Anne B
I sometimes wonder if I'd be a different sort of person if I had had a
more fanciful name.
Anne B
I knew this one quite well, no longer with us...
http://www.mayonews.ie/?option=com_content&view=article&id=13663:interview-annie-b-retiring-sweetshop-owner&catid=47:living&Itemid=154
Were you one of the "“children of a very young age"? I had to read that
line several times before becoming comfortable that both the writer and
the subject were innocent souls from a bygone time.

Nick
LFS
2019-06-07 08:16:00 UTC
Reply
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Post by Anne B
How do you feel about Vicky?:)   My birth certificate  says Victoria
but I normally give Vicky as my name,. I don't like being called
Victoria. My passport says Victoria though and when I have to prove my
identify to some places they have a problem with that. And my birth
cert actually says Valerie Victoria, as passport does,  so that causes
more difficulties.
I was nearly a Valerie, but I'm glad my parents changed their minds!  In
full I am Jennifer Margaret, but I associate being called Jennifer as
being in trouble for something!  I do use it for anything "official" and
occasionally have a slight problem because I can't remember whether I
used Jennifer or Jenny in that particular situation.  Also have the
occasional problem when writing to someone and can't recall whether they
usually call me Jenny or Jen.
I had a lucky escape - my mother wanted to call me Felicity Dorothea. Or
Fenella. Fortunately my father put his foot down. Later on my mother
used to say that no new mother should be allowed to bestow a name on a
child until it was at least three months old and her hormones had got
back to normal.
My grandmother wanted me to be called Pearl. My father announced that he
wanted me to be called Georgina Wilhelmina because I was born on 23
April. Failing that, he said he would compromise on Laura, after Laura
Secord chocolates which he had discovered when he was in Canada during
WW2. My grandmother was not happy but eventually conceded.

AFAIK my mother never had a chance to express an opinion and the entire
debate took place between these two strong personalities.
Post by Anne B
I sometimes wonder if I'd be a different sort of person if I had had a
more fanciful name.
Our baby granddaughter has been given a name that will require constant
explanation and pronunciation correction. I think this is a burden but
Son argues that this means that people will remember her.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-07 08:51:24 UTC
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Post by LFS
My grandmother wanted me to be called Pearl. My father announced that he
wanted me to be called Georgina Wilhelmina because I was born on 23
April. Failing that, he said he would compromise on Laura, after Laura
Secord chocolates which he had discovered when he was in Canada during
WW2. My grandmother was not happy but eventually conceded.
AFAIK my mother never had a chance to express an opinion and the entire
debate took place between these two strong personalities.
Post by Anne B
I sometimes wonder if I'd be a different sort of person if I had had a
more fanciful name.
Our baby granddaughter has been given a name that will require constant
explanation and pronunciation correction. I think this is a burden but
Son argues that this means that people will remember her.
I was not consulted about grandchildren's names. I did suggest some,
which were not used :(. One of them has the middle name Corbyn. It is
a name. Means a raven or raven-haired.His first name is Marlon, which
canmean falcon or little falcon. So generally birdie. And he has
blonde curls :) Obviously that middle name raises eyebrows. His
parents are not supporters of the leader of the Labour party. I'm
hoping the effect will wear off by the time he is old enough to care,
and it is just his middle name.
Mike
2019-06-07 10:38:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by LFS
My grandmother wanted me to be called Pearl. My father announced that he
wanted me to be called Georgina Wilhelmina because I was born on 23
April. Failing that, he said he would compromise on Laura, after Laura
Secord chocolates which he had discovered when he was in Canada during
WW2. My grandmother was not happy but eventually conceded.
AFAIK my mother never had a chance to express an opinion and the entire
debate took place between these two strong personalities.
Post by Anne B
I sometimes wonder if I'd be a different sort of person if I had had a
more fanciful name.
Our baby granddaughter has been given a name that will require constant
explanation and pronunciation correction. I think this is a burden but
Son argues that this means that people will remember her.
I was not consulted about grandchildren's names. I did suggest some,
which were not used :(. One of them has the middle name Corbyn. It is
a name. Means a raven or raven-haired.His first name is Marlon, which
canmean falcon or little falcon. So generally birdie. And he has
blonde curls :) Obviously that middle name raises eyebrows. His
parents are not supporters of the leader of the Labour party. I'm
hoping the effect will wear off by the time he is old enough to care,
and it is just his middle name.
I was often asked if I was related to the PM when at junior school.
--
Toodle Pip
Sid Nuncius
2019-06-08 18:12:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I was not consulted about grandchildren's names. I did suggest some,
which were not used :(. One of them has the middle name Corbyn. It is
a name. Means a raven or raven-haired.
As I was walking all alane,
I heard twa Corbyns making a mane;
The tane unto the t'other did say,
'Where sall we gang and dine to-day?'

Sorry. I'll get me new-slain knight.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2019-06-08 18:33:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I was not consulted about grandchildren's names. I did suggest some,
which were not used :(. One of them has the middle name Corbyn. It is
a name. Means a raven or raven-haired.
I know this word as "corbie".
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-08 18:37:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 8 Jun 2019 19:12:20 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
I was not consulted about grandchildren's names. I did suggest some,
which were not used :(. One of them has the middle name Corbyn. It is
a name. Means a raven or raven-haired.
As I was walking all alane,
I heard twa Corbyns making a mane;
The tane unto the t'other did say,
'Where sall we gang and dine to-day?'
Sorry. I'll get me new-slain knight.
:)
Cheerful!
Nick Odell
2019-06-08 19:26:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 8 Jun 2019 19:12:20 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
I was not consulted about grandchildren's names. I did suggest some,
which were not used :(. One of them has the middle name Corbyn. It is
a name. Means a raven or raven-haired.
As I was walking all alane,
I heard twa Corbyns making a mane;
The tane unto the t'other did say,
'Where sall we gang and dine to-day?'
Sorry. I'll get me new-slain knight.
:)
Cheerful!
Oh, that one gets better as it goes along. Or worse depending on your
point of view. The title is a bit of a spoiler: imagine if, instead of
Dead Weight[1] the latest Val McDermid radio serial had been called "The
Husband Did It" and you'll get the general idea.

Nick
[1]The latest one I've listened to on my .mp3 player so I suppose it
might originally have been broadcast up to five years ago.
Nick Odell
2019-06-08 19:34:43 UTC
Reply
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 8 Jun 2019 19:12:20 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
I was not consulted about grandchildren's names. I did suggest some,
which were not used :(.  One of them has the middle name Corbyn. It is
a name. Means a raven or raven-haired.
As I was walking all alane,
I heard twa Corbyns making a mane;
The tane unto the t'other did say,
'Where sall we gang and dine to-day?'
Sorry.  I'll get me new-slain knight.
:)
Cheerful!
Oh, that one gets better as it goes along. Or worse depending on your
point of view. The title is a bit of a spoiler: imagine if, instead of
Dead Weight[1] the latest Val McDermid radio serial had been called "The
Husband Did It" and you'll get the general idea.
Nick
[1]The latest one I've listened to on my .mp3 player so I suppose it
might originally have been broadcast up to five years ago.
I'm sorry. That's all complete, unmitigated rubbish. I withdraw my
remarks completely.

I don't know what came over me. Probably all that cocaine I
snorted/grass I smoked/motorbikes I pillioned when I was too young to
know what I was doing.

Nick
Mike
2019-06-09 07:28:45 UTC
Reply
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Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 8 Jun 2019 19:12:20 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
I was not consulted about grandchildren's names. I did suggest some,
which were not used :(.  One of them has the middle name Corbyn. It is
a name. Means a raven or raven-haired.
As I was walking all alane,
I heard twa Corbyns making a mane;
The tane unto the t'other did say,
'Where sall we gang and dine to-day?'
Sorry.  I'll get me new-slain knight.
:)
Cheerful!
Oh, that one gets better as it goes along. Or worse depending on your
point of view. The title is a bit of a spoiler: imagine if, instead of
Dead Weight[1] the latest Val McDermid radio serial had been called "The
Husband Did It" and you'll get the general idea.
Nick
[1]The latest one I've listened to on my .mp3 player so I suppose it
might originally have been broadcast up to five years ago.
I'm sorry. That's all complete, unmitigated rubbish. I withdraw my
remarks completely.
I don't know what came over me. Probably all that cocaine I
snorted/grass I smoked/motorbikes I pillioned when I was too young to
know what I was doing.
Nick
I hadn’t realised that the drugs Gove took that impair one’s judgment and
competence would continue to affect him for quite so long...
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2019-06-09 14:40:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 8 Jun 2019 19:12:20 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
I was not consulted about grandchildren's names. I did suggest some,
which were not used :(.  One of them has the middle name Corbyn. It is
a name. Means a raven or raven-haired.
As I was walking all alane,
I heard twa Corbyns making a mane;
The tane unto the t'other did say,
'Where sall we gang and dine to-day?'
Sorry.  I'll get me new-slain knight.
:)
Cheerful!
Oh, that one gets better as it goes along. Or worse depending on your
point of view. The title is a bit of a spoiler: imagine if, instead of
Dead Weight[1] the latest Val McDermid radio serial had been called "The
Husband Did It" and you'll get the general idea.
Nick
[1]The latest one I've listened to on my .mp3 player so I suppose it
might originally have been broadcast up to five years ago.
I'm sorry. That's all complete, unmitigated rubbish. I withdraw my
remarks completely.
I don't know what came over me. Probably all that cocaine I
snorted/grass I smoked/motorbikes I pillioned when I was too young to
know what I was doing.
Nick
I hadn’t realised that the drugs Gove took that impair one’s judgment and
competence would continue to affect him for quite so long...
The 2016 "I think we've all had enough of experts" outburst was probably
a significant clue.

Nick
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-08 20:40:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 8 Jun 2019 20:26:53 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 8 Jun 2019 19:12:20 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
I was not consulted about grandchildren's names. I did suggest some,
which were not used :(. One of them has the middle name Corbyn. It is
a name. Means a raven or raven-haired.
As I was walking all alane,
I heard twa Corbyns making a mane;
The tane unto the t'other did say,
'Where sall we gang and dine to-day?'
Sorry. I'll get me new-slain knight.
:)
Cheerful!
Oh, that one gets better as it goes along. Or worse depending on your
point of view. The title is a bit of a spoiler: imagine if, instead of
Dead Weight[1] the latest Val McDermid radio serial had been called "The
Husband Did It" and you'll get the general idea.
Yes, I googled it :)
Post by Nick Odell
Nick
[1]The latest one I've listened to on my .mp3 player so I suppose it
might originally have been broadcast up to five years ago.
John Ashby
2019-06-08 18:38:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
I was not consulted about grandchildren's names. I did suggest some,
which were not used :(.  One of them has the middle name Corbyn. It is
a name. Means a raven or raven-haired.
As I was walking all alane,
I heard twa Corbyns making a mane;
The tane unto the t'other did say,
'Where sall we gang and dine to-day?'
Sorry.  I'll get me new-slain knight.
Let me be quite clear, we shall make a decision on where to dine when we
judge the time to be right. There is a clear dining policy that was
agreed at conference that our preference is for a menu that includes
all options including a continental breakfast but if that is not on
offer, and only when it is perfectly clear that croissants are off the
table, we will put the choice of restaurant to a vote of [cont'd p94]

john
Sid Nuncius
2019-06-08 18:50:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
I was not consulted about grandchildren's names. I did suggest some,
which were not used :(.  One of them has the middle name Corbyn. It is
a name. Means a raven or raven-haired.
As I was walking all alane,
I heard twa Corbyns making a mane;
The tane unto the t'other did say,
'Where sall we gang and dine to-day?'
Sorry.  I'll get me new-slain knight.
Let me be quite clear, we shall make a decision on where to dine when we
judge the time to be right. There is a clear dining policy that was
agreed at conference that our preference is for a menu that includes
all options including a continental breakfast but if that is not on
offer, and only when it is perfectly clear that croissants are off the
table, we will put the choice of restaurant to a vote of [cont'd p94]
We need a general confection.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike
2019-06-09 07:24:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by John Ashby
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
I was not consulted about grandchildren's names. I did suggest some,
which were not used :(.  One of them has the middle name Corbyn. It is
a name. Means a raven or raven-haired.
As I was walking all alane,
I heard twa Corbyns making a mane;
The tane unto the t'other did say,
'Where sall we gang and dine to-day?'
Sorry.  I'll get me new-slain knight.
Let me be quite clear, we shall make a decision on where to dine when we
judge the time to be right. There is a clear dining policy that was
agreed at conference that our preference is for a menu that includes
all options including a continental breakfast but if that is not on
offer, and only when it is perfectly clear that croissants are off the
table, we will put the choice of restaurant to a vote of [cont'd p94]
We need a general confection.
That would be the icing on the cake...
--
Toodle Pip
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2019-06-08 20:44:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
As I was walking all alane,
I heard twa Corbyns making a mane;
The tane unto the t'other did say,
'Where sall we gang and dine to-day?'
Sorry. I'll get me new-slain knight.
Ah! Steeleye Span.
Sid Nuncius
2019-06-09 05:53:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
Post by Sid Nuncius
As I was walking all alane,
I heard twa Corbyns making a mane;
The tane unto the t'other did say,
'Where sall we gang and dine to-day?'
Sorry. I'll get me new-slain knight.
Ah! Steeleye Span.
Indeed. And if you listen carefully you'll hear the village gathered in
anticipation.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2019-06-10 13:26:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
A lady whom I used to go see whenever I was in England introduced me to Steeleye Span. Multos annos abhinc.
John Ashby
2019-06-10 16:17:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
A lady whom I used to go see whenever I was in England introduced me to Steeleye Span. Multos annos abhinc.
Moltos, moltos annos </CeliaMolestrangler>

john
BrritSki
2019-06-10 16:24:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
A lady whom I used to go see whenever I was in England introduced me
to Steeleye Span. Multos annos abhinc.
Moltos, moltos annos </CeliaMolestrangler>
Binkie: I know.
Celia: I know, you know.
Binkie: I know you know I know.
Celia: I know. Then why can’t you give it to me?
Binkie: It’s not easy Fiona.
Celia: It’s not hard Charles. If you try. And now you’re going.

Binkie: I have to. This is something I should have done a long time ago.
Celie: Is it her? Daphne?
Binkie: Yes, Fiona. I must go. She needs me.
Celia: I need you. Does this mean nothing?
Binkie: Daphne needs me more. Much more. But I shall think of you all
the time I am with her.
Celia: I’ll wait for you Charles. You will come back to me won’t you?
Please say you’ll come back to me.
Binkie: I always come back don’t I? (and takes the dog for a walk).
Nick Odell
2019-06-07 10:21:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
My grandmother wanted me to be called Pearl. My father announced that he
wanted me to be called Georgina Wilhelmina because I was born on 23
April. Failing that, he said he would compromise on Laura, after Laura
Secord chocolates which he had discovered when he was in Canada during
WW2. My grandmother was not happy but eventually conceded.
AFAIK my mother never had a chance to express an opinion and the entire
debate took place between these two strong personalities.
I bear my grandmother's name. Not Madeline or Edith, obviously, but I
was always told that she had chosen it but I never found out why. The
nearest I ever got to finding out what my parents would have called me
was my father's insistence that if I had been born two hours later he
would have called me Guy. And -erme- no: I wasn't in danger of being
born on Friday 25th May 1951.

Nick
Chris McMillan
2019-06-07 09:12:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by Jenny M Benson
How do you feel about Vicky?:) My birth certificate says Victoria
but I normally give Vicky as my name,. I don't like being called
Victoria. My passport says Victoria though and when I have to prove my
identify to some places they have a problem with that. And my birth
cert actually says Valerie Victoria, as passport does, so that causes
more difficulties.
I was nearly a Valerie, but I'm glad my parents changed their minds! In
full I am Jennifer Margaret, but I associate being called Jennifer as
being in trouble for something! I do use it for anything "official" and
occasionally have a slight problem because I can't remember whether I
used Jennifer or Jenny in that particular situation. Also have the
occasional problem when writing to someone and can't recall whether they
usually call me Jenny or Jen.
I had a lucky escape - my mother wanted to call me Felicity Dorothea. Or
Fenella. Fortunately my father put his foot down. Later on my mother
used to say that no new mother should be allowed to bestow a name on a
child until it was at least three months old and her hormones had got
back to normal.
I sometimes wonder if I'd be a different sort of person if I had had a
more fanciful name.
Anne B
If you had Dorothea as your first name, every official would write Dorothy!
When mum was moving into care and learning from when she’d been in a
hospital previously where everyone called her Dorothy, I spelt it out so
everyone knew. When the British born staff still professed ignorance I
mentioned “Middlemarch”: everyone’s got it now!

Sincerely Chris
Nick Odell
2019-06-07 10:26:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Anne B
Post by Jenny M Benson
How do you feel about Vicky?:) My birth certificate says Victoria
but I normally give Vicky as my name,. I don't like being called
Victoria. My passport says Victoria though and when I have to prove my
identify to some places they have a problem with that. And my birth
cert actually says Valerie Victoria, as passport does, so that causes
more difficulties.
I was nearly a Valerie, but I'm glad my parents changed their minds! In
full I am Jennifer Margaret, but I associate being called Jennifer as
being in trouble for something! I do use it for anything "official" and
occasionally have a slight problem because I can't remember whether I
used Jennifer or Jenny in that particular situation. Also have the
occasional problem when writing to someone and can't recall whether they
usually call me Jenny or Jen.
I had a lucky escape - my mother wanted to call me Felicity Dorothea. Or
Fenella. Fortunately my father put his foot down. Later on my mother
used to say that no new mother should be allowed to bestow a name on a
child until it was at least three months old and her hormones had got
back to normal.
I sometimes wonder if I'd be a different sort of person if I had had a
more fanciful name.
Anne B
If you had Dorothea as your first name, every official would write Dorothy!
When mum was moving into care and learning from when she’d been in a
hospital previously where everyone called her Dorothy, I spelt it out so
everyone knew. When the British born staff still professed ignorance I
mentioned “Middlemarch”: everyone’s got it now!
What a well-educated care-home staff. If I had done that around here it
would have resulted in things like, "Come on, Mrs Middlemarch, it's time
for your lunch."

Nick
Mike
2019-06-07 10:42:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Anne B
Post by Jenny M Benson
How do you feel about Vicky?:) My birth certificate says Victoria
but I normally give Vicky as my name,. I don't like being called
Victoria. My passport says Victoria though and when I have to prove my
identify to some places they have a problem with that. And my birth
cert actually says Valerie Victoria, as passport does, so that causes
more difficulties.
I was nearly a Valerie, but I'm glad my parents changed their minds! In
full I am Jennifer Margaret, but I associate being called Jennifer as
being in trouble for something! I do use it for anything "official" and
occasionally have a slight problem because I can't remember whether I
used Jennifer or Jenny in that particular situation. Also have the
occasional problem when writing to someone and can't recall whether they
usually call me Jenny or Jen.
I had a lucky escape - my mother wanted to call me Felicity Dorothea. Or
Fenella. Fortunately my father put his foot down. Later on my mother
used to say that no new mother should be allowed to bestow a name on a
child until it was at least three months old and her hormones had got
back to normal.
I sometimes wonder if I'd be a different sort of person if I had had a
more fanciful name.
Anne B
If you had Dorothea as your first name, every official would write Dorothy!
When mum was moving into care and learning from when she’d been in a
hospital previously where everyone called her Dorothy, I spelt it out so
everyone knew. When the British born staff still professed ignorance I
mentioned “Middlemarch”: everyone’s got it now!
What a well-educated care-home staff. If I had done that around here it
would have resulted in things like, "Come on, Mrs Middlemarch, it's time
for your lunch."
Nick
Mine Dew, I drew the short straw; Damian, fortunately, I had a middle name
and have used Michael for all except ‘legal’ forms since leaving school in
‘63. It is very disturbing how cruel and stupid others can be if they take
exception to one’s name.
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2019-06-07 10:44:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Anne B
Post by Jenny M Benson
How do you feel about Vicky?:) My birth certificate says Victoria
but I normally give Vicky as my name,. I don't like being called
Victoria. My passport says Victoria though and when I have to prove my
identify to some places they have a problem with that. And my birth
cert actually says Valerie Victoria, as passport does, so that causes
more difficulties.
I was nearly a Valerie, but I'm glad my parents changed their minds! In
full I am Jennifer Margaret, but I associate being called Jennifer as
being in trouble for something! I do use it for anything "official" and
occasionally have a slight problem because I can't remember whether I
used Jennifer or Jenny in that particular situation. Also have the
occasional problem when writing to someone and can't recall whether they
usually call me Jenny or Jen.
I had a lucky escape - my mother wanted to call me Felicity Dorothea. Or
Fenella. Fortunately my father put his foot down. Later on my mother
used to say that no new mother should be allowed to bestow a name on a
child until it was at least three months old and her hormones had got
back to normal.
I sometimes wonder if I'd be a different sort of person if I had had a
more fanciful name.
Anne B
If you had Dorothea as your first name, every official would write Dorothy!
When mum was moving into care and learning from when she’d been in a
hospital previously where everyone called her Dorothy, I spelt it out so
everyone knew. When the British born staff still professed ignorance I
mentioned “Middlemarch”: everyone’s got it now!
What a well-educated care-home staff. If I had done that around here it
would have resulted in things like, "Come on, Mrs Middlemarch, it's time
for your lunch."
Nick
They’re all lovely. Everyone has their first names on both wings,. Many
staff know me by sight now too. Except on the odd occasion when she’s in
the loo, everyone knows where in the rambling three houses knocked
seamlessly into one I will find her and as she’s often on a wander
downstairs or on her bedroom floor, its quite a feat.

Data protection act recently forbade residents photos on their doors but to
try and keep mum’s memory for her room as long as they can, the other week
a plaque with Dorothea on it in nice big script across the centre and four
pictures of a generic cat is on the door. But she has forgotten she has to
turn left into a passage to her room now. I have had to chivvy her quite
hard not to keep following her nose at that corner. Only half a dozen of
those on her wing are remotely mobile though, of these none have any
communicating memory. All sorts of odd things are said as I walk past but
am not seen inside their heads.

Sincerely Chris
krw
2019-06-07 10:45:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Data protection act recently forbade residents photos
How does that work?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Chris McMillan
2019-06-07 16:55:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
Data protection act recently forbade residents photos
How does that work?
Apparently each resident’s door used to have a photo of its occupant to
help them recognise their room, and suddenly it was stopped. It was just
about the time when mum went in so I didn’t know about it at their Home.
Have seen a few different versions in other homes I’ve visited over the
past decade.

Sincerely Chris
krw
2019-06-09 22:18:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
Data protection act recently forbade residents photos
How does that work?
Apparently each resident’s door used to have a photo of its occupant to
help them recognise their room, and suddenly it was stopped. It was just
about the time when mum went in so I didn’t know about it at their Home.
Have seen a few different versions in other homes I’ve visited over the
past decade.
Sincerely Chris
What I meant was - how does DPA stop the photo being on the door?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Chris McMillan
2019-06-10 07:58:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
Data protection act recently forbade residents photos
How does that work?
Apparently each resident’s door used to have a photo of its occupant to
help them recognise their room, and suddenly it was stopped. It was just
about the time when mum went in so I didn’t know about it at their Home.
Have seen a few different versions in other homes I’ve visited over the
past decade.
Sincerely Chris
What I meant was - how does DPA stop the photo being on the door?
We, her friends and family, think its Health and Safety gone mad. We
weren’t told the reasoning. It might have bern part of the inspection they
had had not long before I went to look round early last year I suspect.
They got a very decent report as these go.

Sincerely Chris
krw
2019-06-10 10:05:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
Data protection act recently forbade residents photos
How does that work?
Apparently each resident’s door used to have a photo of its occupant to
help them recognise their room, and suddenly it was stopped. It was just
about the time when mum went in so I didn’t know about it at their Home.
Have seen a few different versions in other homes I’ve visited over the
past decade.
Sincerely Chris
What I meant was - how does DPA stop the photo being on the door?
We, her friends and family, think its Health and Safety gone mad. We
weren’t told the reasoning. It might have bern part of the inspection they
had had not long before I went to look round early last year I suspect.
They got a very decent report as these go.
Sincerely Chris
The law of unintended consequences. Someone thinks that keeping
information private is important but it ought to be trumped by the
safety and well being of the individual concerned.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Chris McMillan
2019-06-10 12:49:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by krw
Post by Chris McMillan
Data protection act recently forbade residents photos
How does that work?
Apparently each resident’s door used to have a photo of its occupant to
help them recognise their room, and suddenly it was stopped. It was just
about the time when mum went in so I didn’t know about it at their Home.
Have seen a few different versions in other homes I’ve visited over the
past decade.
Sincerely Chris
What I meant was - how does DPA stop the photo being on the door?
We, her friends and family, think its Health and Safety gone mad. We
weren’t told the reasoning. It might have bern part of the inspection they
had had not long before I went to look round early last year I suspect.
They got a very decent report as these go.
Sincerely Chris
The law of unintended consequences. Someone thinks that keeping
information private is important but it ought to be trumped by the
safety and well being of the individual concerned.
‘Xactly!

Sincerely Chris
Jenny M Benson
2019-06-10 10:17:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
We, her friends and family, think its Health and Safety gone mad.
I can relate an instance of even more "gone mad."

I belong to a group which meets weekly in the Community Room of a
certain large supermarket. Occasionally ladies of the group have been
grandchild-minding and have brought the littlies with them. One of the
grandmothers happens to be CRB-or-whatever-it's-called-now-checked
because she works at a school. That's fine. BUT, another Grannie was
told she couldn't bring her grandson unless the checked lady (or some
other checked person) was present.

WHAT?! For one, he's her grandson and she's in charge of him and always
present with him. For two, why is the Community Room different to the
shopping or café areas of the store where no such restriction applies,
presumably?
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
krw
2019-06-10 10:48:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris McMillan
We, her friends and family, think its Health and Safety gone mad.
I can relate an instance of even more "gone mad."
I belong to a group which meets weekly in the Community Room of a
certain large supermarket.  Occasionally ladies of the group have been
grandchild-minding and have brought the littlies with them.  One of the
grandmothers happens to be CRB-or-whatever-it's-called-now-checked
because she works at a school.  That's fine.  BUT, another Grannie was
told she couldn't bring her grandson unless the checked lady (or some
other checked person) was present.
WHAT?!  For one, he's her grandson and she's in charge of him and always
present with him.  For two, why is the Community Room different to the
shopping or café areas of the store where no such restriction applies,
presumably?
Best practice these days as grandparents are not fit to look after
children as they have not been CRB checked - have you heard of all of
the instances of grandparent abuse of children!
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Nick Odell
2019-06-10 11:26:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris McMillan
We, her friends and family, think its Health and Safety gone mad.
I can relate an instance of even more "gone mad."
I belong to a group which meets weekly in the Community Room of a
certain large supermarket.  Occasionally ladies of the group have been
grandchild-minding and have brought the littlies with them.  One of the
grandmothers happens to be CRB-or-whatever-it's-called-now-checked
because she works at a school.  That's fine.  BUT, another Grannie was
told she couldn't bring her grandson unless the checked lady (or some
other checked person) was present.
WHAT?!  For one, he's her grandson and she's in charge of him and always
present with him.  For two, why is the Community Room different to the
shopping or café areas of the store where no such restriction applies,
presumably?
Because the room is a room? Even if it has glass panels in the door and
windows in the walls, it is a different environment from a store or a
cafe area.

Don't ask about the shenanigans we went through at the music school.
Just don't.

Nick
Mike
2019-06-10 11:38:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Chris McMillan
We, her friends and family, think its Health and Safety gone mad.
I can relate an instance of even more "gone mad."
I belong to a group which meets weekly in the Community Room of a
certain large supermarket.  Occasionally ladies of the group have been
grandchild-minding and have brought the littlies with them.  One of the
grandmothers happens to be CRB-or-whatever-it's-called-now-checked
because she works at a school.  That's fine.  BUT, another Grannie was
told she couldn't bring her grandson unless the checked lady (or some
other checked person) was present.
WHAT?!  For one, he's her grandson and she's in charge of him and always
present with him.  For two, why is the Community Room different to the
shopping or café areas of the store where no such restriction applies,
presumably?
Because the room is a room? Even if it has glass panels in the door and
windows in the walls, it is a different environment from a store or a
cafe area.
Don't ask about the shenanigans we went through at the music school.
Just don't.
Nick
Were you instrumental in plucking up courage to go through the shenanigans
or did you string along with others - or just bow out altogether?
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2019-06-10 13:33:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
Don't ask about the shenanigans we went through at the music school.
Just don't.
Were you instrumental in plucking up courage to go through the shenanigans
or did you string along with others - or just bow out altogether?
He said don't ask. Now you've blown it...
Sid Nuncius
2019-06-10 17:35:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
Don't ask about the shenanigans we went through at the music school.
Just don't.
Were you instrumental in plucking up courage to go through the shenanigans
or did you string along with others - or just bow out altogether?
He said don't ask.  Now you've blown it...
That H&S officer couldn't tell his brass from his oboe.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike
2019-06-06 09:22:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by DavidK
Post by Anne B
I don't like names which are abbreviations or pet names derived from
real names. Hence I don't like the name Archie.
Anne B
Are Annie, Barry, Carrie, Ernie, Fanny, Fenny, Gary and Harry all on
that list?
I'm wondering what Barry and Gary are abbreviations of (I think they may be
surnames) and why you missed Penny and Jenny off your list?
I have never liked Penelope, a name used only by headteachers when
addressing me. Two young friends have named their children Penny, rather
than Penelope-known-as-Penny. I approve of this.
Part of the Scottish branches of my family tree have several women called
Maggie. I'd sort of assumed this was short for Margaret and recorded it as
such but many of the official documents show Maggie.
I. Worked with a ‘Barry’ who is really ‘Barrington’.
--
Toodle Pip
Anne B
2019-06-06 22:36:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DavidK
Post by Anne B
I don't like names which are abbreviations or pet names derived from
real names. Hence I don't like the name Archie.
Anne B
Are Annie, Barry, Carrie, Ernie, Fanny, Fenny, Gary and Harry all on
that list?
Yes. Also Maggie, Billy, Jimmy, Johnny, Sandy, Jenny, Ginny, Nellie,
Willie, Lexie, Hughie, Minnie, Bunty, Cissie, Molly, Polly, Dolly, Jack,
Jackie, Tommy, Davie, Charlie, Andy etc etc etc

I should perhaps clarify that when I say I don't like such names, I mean
that I don't like them being bestowed as a formal name on a birth
certificate.

I have absolutely no problems with abbreviations and pet names being
used informally. If a friend or relative likes being called by one of
those abbreviations or pet names, that is absolutely fine.

Anne B
DavidK
2019-06-07 06:55:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by DavidK
Post by Anne B
I don't like names which are abbreviations or pet names derived from
real names. Hence I don't like the name Archie.
Anne B
Are Annie, Barry, Carrie, Ernie, Fanny, Fenny, Gary and Harry all on
that list?
Yes. Also Maggie, Billy, Jimmy, Johnny, Sandy, Jenny, Ginny, Nellie,
Willie, Lexie, Hughie, Minnie, Bunty, Cissie, Molly, Polly, Dolly, Jack,
Jackie, Tommy, Davie, Charlie, Andy etc etc etc
I should perhaps clarify that when I say I don't like such names, I mean
that I don't like them being bestowed as a formal name on a birth
certificate.
I have absolutely no problems with abbreviations and pet names being
used informally. If a friend or relative likes being called by one of
those abbreviations or pet names, that is absolutely fine.
Anne B
I partially agree, the name on a certificate should be more formal. I
think all the names I listed could nowadays appear on the birth
certificate without causing a single raised eyebrow but are in fact
short versions of something longer.
Anne B
2019-06-07 10:18:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DavidK
Post by Anne B
Post by DavidK
Post by Anne B
I don't like names which are abbreviations or pet names derived from
real names. Hence I don't like the name Archie.
Anne B
Are Annie, Barry, Carrie, Ernie, Fanny, Fenny, Gary and Harry all on
that list?
Yes. Also Maggie, Billy, Jimmy, Johnny, Sandy, Jenny, Ginny, Nellie,
Willie, Lexie, Hughie, Minnie, Bunty, Cissie, Molly, Polly, Dolly,
Jack, Jackie, Tommy, Davie, Charlie, Andy etc etc etc
I should perhaps clarify that when I say I don't like such names, I
mean that I don't like them being bestowed as a formal name on a birth
certificate.
I have absolutely no problems with abbreviations and pet names being
used informally. If a friend or relative likes being called by one of
those abbreviations or pet names, that is absolutely fine.
Anne B
I partially agree, the name on a certificate should be more formal. I
think all the names I listed could nowadays appear on the birth
certificate without causing a single raised eyebrow but are in fact
short versions of something longer.
To my considerable regret, you are absolutely right.

I do remember coming across in the indexes a child whose birth
certificate recorded his name as Archie-Billy-Bob, which IMO was
quadruply unfortunate - three abbreviations plus the hyphens.

If your given name has a hyphen in it, what is your initial? For example
is Kayleigh-Kylie Smith Miss K Smith, or Miss K K Smith, or Miss K-K Smith?

Anne B
DavidK
2019-06-08 09:58:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by DavidK
Post by Anne B
Post by DavidK
Post by Anne B
I don't like names which are abbreviations or pet names derived from
real names. Hence I don't like the name Archie.
Anne B
Are Annie, Barry, Carrie, Ernie, Fanny, Fenny, Gary and Harry all on
that list?
Yes. Also Maggie, Billy, Jimmy, Johnny, Sandy, Jenny, Ginny, Nellie,
Willie, Lexie, Hughie, Minnie, Bunty, Cissie, Molly, Polly, Dolly,
Jack, Jackie, Tommy, Davie, Charlie, Andy etc etc etc
I should perhaps clarify that when I say I don't like such names, I
mean that I don't like them being bestowed as a formal name on a birth
certificate.
I have absolutely no problems with abbreviations and pet names being
used informally. If a friend or relative likes being called by one of
those abbreviations or pet names, that is absolutely fine.
Anne B
I partially agree, the name on a certificate should be more formal. I
think all the names I listed could nowadays appear on the birth
certificate without causing a single raised eyebrow but are in fact
short versions of something longer.
To my considerable regret, you are absolutely right.
I do remember coming across in the indexes a child whose birth
certificate recorded his name as Archie-Billy-Bob, which IMO was
quadruply unfortunate - three abbreviations plus the hyphens.
If your given name has a hyphen in it, what is your initial? For example
is Kayleigh-Kylie Smith Miss K Smith, or Miss K K Smith, or Miss K-K Smith?
Anne B
Hyphens, what about spaces? I believe "St John" (pronounced Sinjen?) is
a valid forename, and Facebook refused to allow a space when I
registered my mother's cat ("Minou Le Chat"). I had to elide the space
and there was already a Minou LeChat.

There is a talk by "Kevlin Henney" ("Seven Ineffective Coding Habits of
Many Programmers"
and at
the start he says how pleased he was that his parents gave him an
internet-unique name and how he did the same for his children.
Fenny
2019-06-08 10:44:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DavidK
he says how pleased he was that his parents gave him an
internet-unique name and how he did the same for his children.
My parents did it for me, but sadly, the males in my family tend to
have fairly common forenames, so they are not unique worldwide.
--
Fenny
Penny
2019-06-08 11:45:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 8 Jun 2019 10:58:19 +0100, DavidK <***@invalid.invalid> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by DavidK
There is a talk by "Kevlin Henney" ("Seven Ineffective Coding Habits of
Many Programmers" http://youtu.be/ZsHMHukIlJY and at
the start he says how pleased he was that his parents gave him an
internet-unique name and how he did the same for his children.
I bet most people spell his name Kelvin though.
<https://www.google.co.uk/search?&q="Kelvin+Henney"&oq="Kelvin+Henney">

I've only just noticed Virginia Woolf has a double 'o'.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-06-08 12:03:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by DavidK
There is a talk by "Kevlin Henney" ("Seven Ineffective Coding Habits of
Many Programmers" http://youtu.be/ZsHMHukIlJY and at
the start he says how pleased he was that his parents gave him an
internet-unique name and how he did the same for his children.
I bet most people spell his name Kelvin though.
<https://www.google.co.uk/search?&q="Kelvin+Henney"&oq="Kelvin+Henney">
I've only just noticed Virginia Woolf has a double 'o'.
Perhaps his parents felt that Fahrenheit was a degree too much!
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2019-06-08 13:50:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by DavidK
There is a talk by "Kevlin Henney" ("Seven Ineffective Coding Habits of
Many Programmers" http://youtu.be/ZsHMHukIlJY and at
the start he says how pleased he was that his parents gave him an
internet-unique name and how he did the same for his children.
I bet most people spell his name Kelvin though.
<https://www.google.co.uk/search?&q="Kelvin+Henney"&oq="Kelvin+Henney">
I've only just noticed Virginia Woolf has a double 'o'.
Perhaps his parents felt that Fahrenheit was a degree too much!
Absolutely.

N.
John Ashby
2019-06-08 14:42:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by DavidK
There is a talk by "Kevlin Henney" ("Seven Ineffective Coding Habits of
Many Programmers" http://youtu.be/ZsHMHukIlJY and at
the start he says how pleased he was that his parents gave him an
internet-unique name and how he did the same for his children.
I bet most people spell his name Kelvin though.
<https://www.google.co.uk/search?&q="Kelvin+Henney"&oq="Kelvin+Henney">
I've only just noticed Virginia Woolf has a double 'o'.
Perhaps his parents felt that Fahrenheit was a degree too much!
Absolutely.
N.
They could have sent a grey despatch to the Registry Office naming him
Ray, a more suitable name.

john
Nick Odell
2019-06-08 13:49:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 08/06/2019 10:58, DavidK wrote:

<snip>
Post by DavidK
There is a talk by "Kevlin Henney" ("Seven Ineffective Coding Habits of
Many Programmers" http://youtu.be/ZsHMHukIlJY and at
the start he says how pleased he was that his parents gave him an
internet-unique name and how he did the same for his children.
It was probably a mistake and they had intended to name him after the
minus 273 degrees chap. But you know how it is: a child is born... wet
the baby's bottom... stagger around to the registry office where you
make an unintentional slip-up on a par with the one nine months earlier
which got you there in the first place.

Nick
Serena Blanchflower
2019-06-09 09:35:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DavidK
There is a talk by "Kevlin Henney" ("Seven Ineffective Coding Habits of
Many Programmers" http://youtu.be/ZsHMHukIlJY and at
the start he says how pleased he was that his parents gave him an
internet-unique name and how he did the same for his children.
That's something I enjoy, as well. I have yet to find any sign of
another Serena Blanchflower around, either on or offline. I know there
has been one other birth registered, in England / Wales, a few years
after me and I know she has, subsequently, married. I assume that,
unlike me, she uses her married name rather than her maiden name. If
there are, or have been, any other Serena Blanchflowers who have been
born elsewhere, or who have married into the Blanchflower family, I've
never come across them.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Christians shouldn't just be pulling people out of the river. We should
be going upstream to find out who's pushing them in. (Desmond Tutu)
Vicky Ayech
2019-06-09 10:21:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 9 Jun 2019 10:35:42 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by DavidK
There is a talk by "Kevlin Henney" ("Seven Ineffective Coding Habits of
Many Programmers" http://youtu.be/ZsHMHukIlJY and at
the start he says how pleased he was that his parents gave him an
internet-unique name and how he did the same for his children.
That's something I enjoy, as well. I have yet to find any sign of
another Serena Blanchflower around, either on or offline. I know there
has been one other birth registered, in England / Wales, a few years
after me and I know she has, subsequently, married. I assume that,
unlike me, she uses her married name rather than her maiden name. If
there are, or have been, any other Serena Blanchflowers who have been
born elsewhere, or who have married into the Blanchflower family, I've
never come across them.
What's in a name?
It is nor hand, nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man.
Kate B
2019-06-09 10:56:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DavidK
There is a talk by "Kevlin Henney" ("Seven Ineffective Coding Habits
of Many Programmers" http://youtu.be/ZsHMHukIlJY
and at the start he says how pleased he was that his parents gave him
an internet-unique name and how he did the same for his children.
That's something I enjoy, as well.  I have yet to find any sign of
another Serena Blanchflower around, either on or offline.  I know there
has been one other birth registered, in England / Wales, a few years
after me and I know she has, subsequently, married.  I assume that,
unlike me, she uses her married name rather than her maiden name.  If
there are, or have been, any other Serena Blanchflowers who have been
born elsewhere, or who have married into the Blanchflower family, I've
never come across them.
Alas, my name is only too common, though I share it with a senator from
Oregon who fortunately seems to have principles with which I mostly
agree. And then I married a man with a vanishingly rare name, in that he
is the last male in his family. I agree with most of his principles too,
luckily.
--
Kate B
London
Jenny M Benson
2019-06-09 14:52:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Alas, my name is only too common, though I share it with a senator from
Oregon who fortunately seems to have principles with which I mostly
agree. And then I married a man with a vanishingly rare name, in that he
is the last male in his family. I agree with most of his principles too,
luckily.
My family's surnames are fairly common, but are not perpetuated beyond
my generation. My patenal grandparents had 2 boys, who begat one boy
each but both begat only daughters. My maternal grandparents had only
one son and his only son died as an infant.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Nick Odell
2019-06-09 14:48:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DavidK
There is a talk by "Kevlin Henney" ("Seven Ineffective Coding Habits
of Many Programmers" http://youtu.be/ZsHMHukIlJY
and at the start he says how pleased he was that his parents gave him
an internet-unique name and how he did the same for his children.
That's something I enjoy, as well.  I have yet to find any sign of
another Serena Blanchflower around, either on or offline.  I know there
has been one other birth registered, in England / Wales, a few years
after me and I know she has, subsequently, married.  I assume that,
unlike me, she uses her married name rather than her maiden name.  If
there are, or have been, any other Serena Blanchflowers who have been
born elsewhere, or who have married into the Blanchflower family, I've
never come across them.
Ever since I discovered a very, very expensive "admission by this
electronic ticket only" entrance to a hockey game in my junk mail a few
months ago, my namesake seems to have been scrupulously careful about
giving people his own email address and not mine.

Nick
krw
2019-05-09 09:41:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 9 May 2019 09:11:02 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
I just assumed the middle name was a sort of Icelandic/Nordic nod - which
seems odd but I like it.
Probably named after Mr Ford.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Sam Plusnet
2019-05-09 21:56:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 9 May 2019 09:11:02 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
I just assumed the middle name was a sort of Icelandic/Nordic nod - which
seems odd but I like it.
Probably named after Mr Ford.
I knew someone would wade in with that sort of comment.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2019-05-10 07:22:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 9 May 2019 09:11:02 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
I just assumed the middle name was a sort of Icelandic/Nordic nod - which
seems odd but I like it.
Probably named after Mr Ford.
I knew someone would wade in with that sort of comment.
There will be a stream of them now...
--
Toodle Pip
krw
2019-05-10 09:12:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by krw
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 9 May 2019 09:11:02 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
I just assumed the middle name was a sort of Icelandic/Nordic nod - which
seems odd but I like it.
Probably named after Mr Ford.
I knew someone would wade in with that sort of comment.
There will be a stream of them now...
Indeed there will probably be a Leach.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Mike
2019-05-09 11:01:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
Nick
And in the ‘tradition’ of names based on geographical place of conception -
is there a place named Mount Batten? ;-))) (or is that an instruction
maybe?)
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2019-05-09 11:18:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
Nick
And in the ‘tradition’ of names based on geographical place of conception -
is there a place named Mount Batten? ;-))) (or is that an instruction
maybe?)
I believe the original family name was Battenburg and they changed it to
avoid confusion with a cake.

Nick
Robin Stevens
2019-05-09 17:50:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
And in the ‘tradition’ of names based on geographical place of
conception - is there a place named Mount Batten? ;-))) (or is that an
instruction maybe?)
I believe the original family name was Battenburg and they changed it to
avoid confusion with a cake.
More likely because for some reason German names were a little out of
fashion.
Anne B
2019-06-05 16:41:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
Nick
And in the ‘tradition’ of names based on geographical place of conception -
is there a place named Mount Batten? ;-))) (or is that an instruction
maybe?)
I believe the original family name was Battenburg and they changed it to
avoid confusion with a cake.
Nick
Battenburg would be 'Batten Castle'. Mountbatten is the anglicised
version of Battenberg. Not sure whether the aforementioned cake is a
castle or a mountain.

Anne B
Sally Thompson
2019-06-05 16:46:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Anne B
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
And in the ‘tradition’ of names based on geographical place of conception -
is there a place named Mount Batten? ;-))) (or is that an instruction
maybe?)
I believe the original family name was Battenburg and they changed it to
avoid confusion with a cake.
Battenburg would be 'Batten Castle'. Mountbatten is the anglicised
version of Battenberg. Not sure whether the aforementioned cake is a
castle or a mountain.
p
I think that depends on the size of your cake tin.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Sam Plusnet
2019-06-05 21:37:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Anne B
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
And in the ‘tradition’ of names based on geographical place of conception -
is there a place named Mount Batten? ;-))) (or is that an instruction
maybe?)
I believe the original family name was Battenburg and they changed it to
avoid confusion with a cake.
Battenburg would be 'Batten Castle'. Mountbatten is the anglicised
version of Battenberg. Not sure whether the aforementioned cake is a
castle or a mountain.
p
I think that depends on the size of your cake tin.
After that answer you'd better Battern down the hatches.
--
Sam Plusnet
BrritSki
2019-05-09 11:21:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
Nick
And in the ‘tradition’ of names based on geographical place of conception -
is there a place named Mount Batten? ;-))) (or is that an instruction
maybe?)
Not UKIP supporters then ?
Mike
2019-05-09 11:37:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Mike
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
Nick
And in the ‘tradition’ of names based on geographical place of conception -
is there a place named Mount Batten? ;-))) (or is that an instruction
maybe?)
Not UKIP supporters then ?
U KIP if you want to...
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-05-09 12:10:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
Nick
_Have_ they explained why they've chosen those names? (The forenames I
mean, not the Battenburg part.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Going to church doesn't make you a Christian anymore than going to a garage
makes you a car." - Laurence J. Peter
krw
2019-05-09 12:23:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
Nick
_Have_ they explained why they've chosen those names? (The forenames I
mean, not the Battenburg part.)
Why should they?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Kate B
2019-05-09 13:12:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
Nick
_Have_ they explained why they've chosen those names? (The forenames I
mean, not the Battenburg part.)
Pedants' corner: Battenberg. It's a mountain, not a stronghold, for both
cake and chap.
--
Kate B
London
Sid Nuncius
2019-05-09 17:38:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
Nick
_Have_ they explained why they've chosen those names? (The forenames I
mean, not the Battenburg part.)
Pedants' corner: Battenberg. It's a mountain, not a stronghold, for both
cake and chap.
Indeed. And who can forget that one of Lorelei's suitors in gentlemen
Prefer Blondes had changed his name to Mr. Mountginz.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike
2019-05-09 17:44:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Nick Odell
It's a secret message to us, innit?
Obviously Harry and Meghan are keen Archiers listeners and their
favourite character is PC Burns.
Nick
_Have_ they explained why they've chosen those names? (The forenames I
mean, not the Battenburg part.)
Pedants' corner: Battenberg. It's a mountain, not a stronghold, for both
cake and chap.
Indeed. And who can forget that one of Lorelei's suitors in gentlemen
Prefer Blondes had changed his name to Mr. Mountginz.
I can’t forget it Sid, but then I didn’t know anyway!
--
Toodle Pip
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