Discussion:
Message for Laura (and Sid)
Add Reply
BrritSki
2018-11-20 08:56:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I have just left this comment on a review by Laura on Goodreads and
wanted to repeat it here, mainly because they both deserve it, and also
because I am not sure about that apostrophe in "book's"...

"Another brilliant review Laura. I really enjoy your analysis of a
book's strengths and failings without giving away too many spoilers. You
and Sid have steered me towards many enjoyable reads. Thankyou both."
Sid Nuncius
2018-11-20 09:06:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
I have just left this comment on a review by Laura on Goodreads and
wanted to repeat it here, mainly because they both deserve it, and also
because I am not sure about that apostrophe in "book's"...
"Another brilliant review Laura. I really enjoy your analysis of a
book's strengths and failings without giving away too many spoilers. You
and Sid have steered me towards many enjoyable reads. Thankyou both."
<blush>

Thank you, Britters. I endeavour to give satisfaction.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
John Ashby
2018-11-20 09:30:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
I have just left this comment on a review by Laura on Goodreads and
wanted to repeat it here, mainly because they both deserve it, and also
because I am not sure about that apostrophe in "book's"...
"Another brilliant review Laura. I really enjoy your analysis of a
book's strengths and failings without giving away too many spoilers. You
and Sid have steered me towards many enjoyable reads. Thankyou both."
The Association of British Greengrocer's despair's of you.

john(yes, it's correct)
Penny
2018-11-20 09:34:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 20 Nov 2018 08:56:02 +0000, BrritSki <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
I am not sure about that apostrophe in "book's"...
Without it it would surely be wrong.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2018-11-20 10:21:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by BrritSki
I am not sure about that apostrophe in "book's"...
Without it it would surely be wrong.
<swerve> It and It reminds me: is there a limit on the number of
consecutive uses of the same word before a sentence becomes impossible
to parse?

The maximum I can think of is five.

A stranger walks up to a signwriter who is working on a pub name.

"Excuse me," he says. "But I don't think you've left enough space
between Pig and And and And and Whistle."

Nick
Jenny M Benson
2018-11-20 11:35:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
<swerve> It and It reminds me: is there a limit on the number of
consecutive uses of the same word before a sentence becomes impossible
to parse?
The maximum I can think of is five.
A stranger walks up to a signwriter who is working on a pub name.
"Excuse me," he says. "But I don't think you've left enough space
between Pig and And and And and Whistle."
Jones, where Smith had had "had had" had had "had"; "had had" had more
weight with the examiners.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Penny
2018-11-20 13:34:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 20 Nov 2018 11:35:51 +0000, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Nick Odell
<swerve> It and It reminds me: is there a limit on the number of
consecutive uses of the same word before a sentence becomes impossible
to parse?
The maximum I can think of is five.
A stranger walks up to a signwriter who is working on a pub name.
"Excuse me," he says. "But I don't think you've left enough space
between Pig and And and And and Whistle."
Jones, where Smith had had "had had" had had "had"; "had had" had more
weight with the examiners.
That's the one which popped into my head but I think you can get 11 into
that sentence:
Jones, where Smith had had "had had" had had "had"; "had had" had had the
examiners' approval.

But it all upsets the spell check in Agent - one of the few which notices
repeated words.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2018-11-20 16:40:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Nick Odell
<swerve> It and It reminds me: is there a limit on the number of
consecutive uses of the same word before a sentence becomes impossible
to parse?
The maximum I can think of is five.
A stranger walks up to a signwriter who is working on a pub name.
"Excuse me," he says. "But I don't think you've left enough space
between Pig and And and And and Whistle."
Jones, where Smith had had "had had" had had "had"; "had had" had more
weight with the examiners.
That's the one which popped into my head but I think you can get 11 into
Jones, where Smith had had "had had" had had "had"; "had had" had had the
examiners' approval.
But it all upsets the spell check in Agent - one of the few which notices
repeated words.
Ten or eleven - blown away my five! I had[1] not heard that one before

Nick
[1]Just the one
Jenny M Benson
2018-11-20 16:49:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Nick Odell
<swerve> It and It reminds me: is there a limit on the number of
consecutive uses of the same word before a sentence becomes impossible
to parse?
The maximum I can think of is five.
A stranger walks up to a signwriter who is working on a pub name.
"Excuse me," he says. "But I don't think you've left enough space
between Pig and And and And and Whistle."
Jones, where Smith had had "had had" had had "had"; "had had" had more
weight with the examiners.
That's the one which popped into my head but I think you can get 11 into
Jones, where Smith had had "had had" had had "had"; "had had" had had the
examiners' approval.
Yes - my missing one was by mistake.

Should I be proud of that or say it was deliberate?!
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Penny
2018-11-20 19:06:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 20 Nov 2018 16:49:07 +0000, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Nick Odell
<swerve> It and It reminds me: is there a limit on the number of
consecutive uses of the same word before a sentence becomes impossible
to parse?
The maximum I can think of is five.
A stranger walks up to a signwriter who is working on a pub name.
"Excuse me," he says. "But I don't think you've left enough space
between Pig and And and And and Whistle."
Jones, where Smith had had "had had" had had "had"; "had had" had more
weight with the examiners.
That's the one which popped into my head but I think you can get 11 into
Jones, where Smith had had "had had" had had "had"; "had had" had had the
examiners' approval.
Yes - my missing one was by mistake.
Should I be proud of that or say it was deliberate?!
I dunno.
About 15 years ago I started taking responsibility (or do I mean 'the
blame'?*) for a lot of things, even stuff I hadn't done. So I would happily
tell someone** who had just admitted to making a mistake that they could
blame me.

It didn't bother me and I hope it made them feel better.

*I think it was a reaction to having the blame for all the wider family
problems piled upon me when I knew it wasn't my fault.
**usually one of my daughters
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
LFS
2018-11-20 10:32:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
I have just left this comment on a review by Laura on Goodreads and
wanted to repeat it here, mainly because they both deserve it, and also
because I am not sure about that apostrophe in "book's"...
"Another brilliant review Laura. I really enjoy your analysis of a
book's strengths and failings without giving away too many spoilers. You
and Sid have steered me towards many enjoyable reads. Thankyou both."
Thank you very much. The apostrophe is fine.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Loading...