Discussion:
Spoiler 2/2/20
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Penny
2020-02-02 20:15:51 UTC
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Fresh mint from the garden in January?!
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sally Thompson
2020-02-02 20:45:28 UTC
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Post by Penny
Fresh mint from the garden in January?!
<nitpick mode>It's February. </nitpick mode>
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Penny
2020-02-02 21:11:45 UTC
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On 2 Feb 2020 20:45:28 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
Fresh mint from the garden in January?!
<nitpick mode>It's February. </nitpick mode>
I haven't caught up with that yet - it seemed to be Saturday at Kirsty's
house.

Anyway, much too early for mint.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
carolet
2020-02-03 10:45:27 UTC
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Post by Penny
On 2 Feb 2020 20:45:28 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
Fresh mint from the garden in January?!
<nitpick mode>It's February. </nitpick mode>
I haven't caught up with that yet - it seemed to be Saturday at Kirsty's
house.
Anyway, much too early for mint.
Weren't they making Sunday lunch?
--
CaroleT
DavidK
2020-02-03 11:10:26 UTC
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Post by carolet
Post by Penny
On 2 Feb 2020 20:45:28 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
Fresh mint from the garden in January?!
<nitpick mode>It's February. </nitpick mode>
I haven't caught up with that yet - it seemed to be Saturday at Kirsty's
house.
Anyway, much too early for mint.
Weren't they making Sunday lunch?
Yes,

  Philip: Early start tomorrow
  Gavin: Dad! It's Sunday, I've got other things to worry about!
Penny
2020-02-03 19:33:10 UTC
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On Mon, 3 Feb 2020 11:10:26 +0000, DavidK <***@invalid.invalid> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by carolet
Post by Penny
On 2 Feb 2020 20:45:28 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
Fresh mint from the garden in January?!
<nitpick mode>It's February. </nitpick mode>
I haven't caught up with that yet - it seemed to be Saturday at Kirsty's
house.
Anyway, much too early for mint.
Weren't they making Sunday lunch?
Yes,
They were roasting lamb - is that only allowed on Sunday?
? Philip: Early start tomorrow
? Gavin: Dad! It's Sunday, I've got other things to worry about!
Ah, I misheard then, could have sworn he said Saturday.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jim Easterbrook
2020-02-03 22:27:00 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by carolet
Weren't they making Sunday lunch?
They were roasting lamb - is that only allowed on Sunday?
Yes, didn't you get the memo? Roast meat on any other day is a foreign
practice and no longer allowed.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-02-03 23:36:29 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by carolet
Weren't they making Sunday lunch?
They were roasting lamb - is that only allowed on Sunday?
Yes, didn't you get the memo? Roast meat on any other day is a foreign
practice and no longer allowed.
Any trace of pink in the middle is henceforth to be deplored. Garlic is
to be classed as a Category A drug and possession or trafficking, along
with the heathen practice of making slits in the meat to insert pieces
of garlic in them, are to be defined as capital offences under the new
Criminal Justice Bill.

R
steveski
2020-02-04 00:37:05 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by carolet
Weren't they making Sunday lunch?
They were roasting lamb - is that only allowed on Sunday?
Yes, didn't you get the memo? Roast meat on any other day is a foreign
practice and no longer allowed.
Any trace of pink in the middle is henceforth to be deplored. Garlic is
to be classed as a Category A drug and possession or trafficking, along
with the heathen practice of making slits in the meat to insert pieces
of garlic in them, are to be defined as capital offences under the new
Criminal Justice Bill.
And all vegetables are to be put on to boil at least three months in
advance.
--
Steveski
Sid Nuncius
2020-02-04 06:36:57 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by carolet
Weren't they making Sunday lunch?
They were roasting lamb - is that only allowed on Sunday?
Yes, didn't you get the memo? Roast meat on any other day is a foreign
practice and no longer allowed.
Any trace of pink in the middle is henceforth to be deplored. Garlic is
to be classed as a Category A drug and possession or trafficking, along
with the heathen practice of making slits in the meat to insert pieces
of garlic in them, are to be defined as capital offences under the new
Criminal Justice Bill.
:o))
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Penny
2020-02-04 09:34:29 UTC
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On 3 Feb 2020 22:27:00 GMT, Jim Easterbrook <***@jim-easterbrook.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by carolet
Weren't they making Sunday lunch?
They were roasting lamb - is that only allowed on Sunday?
Yes, didn't you get the memo? Roast meat on any other day is a foreign
practice and no longer allowed.
I never know what day it is.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2020-02-04 09:43:36 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by carolet
Weren't they making Sunday lunch?
They were roasting lamb - is that only allowed on Sunday?
Yes, didn't you get the memo? Roast meat on any other day is a foreign
practice and no longer allowed.
I never know what day it is.
But can you you tell your lamb from your beef from your pork from your
chicken from your fish from your veggie burger?!
--
Toodle Pip
Jenny M Benson
2020-02-04 09:54:35 UTC
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Post by Penny
I never know what day it is.
I don't know how I managed before I had a computer which would tell me.
I mean, calendars were no good unless you already knew. (Same with
dictionaries and spelling.) I do remember getting up and dashing off to
work one day, only to realise when I was on the bus that it was Saturday
and I only worked Mon-Fri. I also remember going to the hairdresser one
Friday for a Thursday appointment - I never did find out where the
missing day went that week. (I did get my hair cut, though.)
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
krw
2020-02-04 09:58:37 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I never know what day it is.
I don't know how I managed before I had a computer which would tell me.
I mean, calendars were no good unless you already knew.  (Same with
dictionaries and spelling.)  I do remember getting up and dashing off to
work one day, only to realise when I was on the bus that it was Saturday
and I only worked Mon-Fri.  I also remember going to the hairdresser one
Friday for a Thursday appointment - I never did find out where the
missing day went that week.  (I did get my hair cut, though.)
Some years ago I was taking my daughter for her usual Saturday morning
music lessons and the silly chap on the radio and his sidekick were
telling me it was Friday and all about the traffic jams.

Of course it was Saturday 1 April (and I was going to work as it was
year end) and Chris Tarrant was playin an April Fool!
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
BrritSki
2020-02-04 09:59:41 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I never know what day it is.
I don't know how I managed before I had a computer which would tell me.
I mean, calendars were no good unless you already knew.
We always had a paper delivered before breakfast in the old days...
krw
2020-02-04 10:12:18 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I never know what day it is.
I don't know how I managed before I had a computer which would tell
me. I mean, calendars were no good unless you already knew.
We always had a paper delivered before breakfast in the old days...
We still do. Milk is a different matter however.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
BrritSki
2020-02-04 10:16:55 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I never know what day it is.
I don't know how I managed before I had a computer which would tell
me. I mean, calendars were no good unless you already knew.
We always had a paper delivered before breakfast in the old days...
We still do.  Milk is a different matter however.
Difficult for the newsprint to dry on milk.
Penny
2020-02-04 17:08:18 UTC
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On Tue, 4 Feb 2020 09:54:35 +0000, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I never know what day it is.
I don't know how I managed before I had a computer which would tell me.
I mean, calendars were no good unless you already knew. (Same with
dictionaries and spelling.) I do remember getting up and dashing off to
work one day, only to realise when I was on the bus that it was Saturday
and I only worked Mon-Fri. I also remember going to the hairdresser one
Friday for a Thursday appointment - I never did find out where the
missing day went that week. (I did get my hair cut, though.)
Sadly, computers are only as good as the operator.
Last week I made an appointment for 11am today. I fully intended to set up
reminders from my google calendar and maybe also an alarm on my phone as it
makes sense to walk into town on a market day.

My phone rang at 11:15 asking if I was coming - I've made an appointment
for Thursday and have set up reminders.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
krw
2020-02-05 00:22:28 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I never know what day it is.
I don't know how I managed before I had a computer which would tell me.
I mean, calendars were no good unless you already knew. (Same with
dictionaries and spelling.) I do remember getting up and dashing off to
work one day, only to realise when I was on the bus that it was Saturday
and I only worked Mon-Fri. I also remember going to the hairdresser one
Friday for a Thursday appointment - I never did find out where the
missing day went that week. (I did get my hair cut, though.)
Sadly, computers are only as good as the operator.
Last week I made an appointment for 11am today. I fully intended to set up
reminders from my google calendar and maybe also an alarm on my phone as it
makes sense to walk into town on a market day.
My phone rang at 11:15 asking if I was coming - I've made an appointment
for Thursday and have set up reminders.
Today the house cakemaker was baking a cake and came into the study and
told me to set an alarm for 12:00 as the cake would be baked. I did as
I was told. I wondered at the sense of this as the cake maker also
makes lunch at 12:00 so would be in the kitchen boiling a kettle and so
on ready for luncheon.

At 11:00 the lunch maker announced that the luncheon was now ready for
consumption so I joined her in the living room wondering why we were
eating an hour early but for the sake of my ears did not feel I should
question the wisdom of the cake / lunch maker.

She sat down opposite the clock in the living room and observed that it
was 11:00 and why were we eating in lunch. I said I did not know but
assumed she was keen to finish her baking before the numerous visitors
for the tea party this afternoon.

She then looked at the clock again and her watch and rushed into the
kitchen to extract the baking cake from the baking oven. Apparently the
clock on the cooker containing the said oven is still on summer time
because she does not know how to change it (and nor do I). All of which
meant I ate lunch an hour early and by the time the alarm went off the
cake had been baked and been cooling for an hour.

Everyday life once retired! Beware.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Sally Thompson
2020-02-05 08:20:17 UTC
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krw <***@whitnet.uk> wrote:

<snippety snip>
Post by krw
She then looked at the clock again and her watch and rushed into the
kitchen to extract the baking cake from the baking oven. Apparently the
clock on the cooker containing the said oven is still on summer time
because she does not know how to change it (and nor do I). All of which
meant I ate lunch an hour early and by the time the alarm went off the
cake had been baked and been cooling for an hour.
Everyday life once retired! Beware.
Serious practical solution. Go to the search engine of your choice and find
the manual for your cooker. Look up how to change the clock. Voila.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Mike
2020-02-05 08:45:27 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
<snippety snip>
Post by krw
She then looked at the clock again and her watch and rushed into the
kitchen to extract the baking cake from the baking oven. Apparently the
clock on the cooker containing the said oven is still on summer time
because she does not know how to change it (and nor do I). All of which
meant I ate lunch an hour early and by the time the alarm went off the
cake had been baked and been cooling for an hour.
Everyday life once retired! Beware.
Serious practical solution. Go to the search engine of your choice and find
the manual for your cooker. Look up how to change the clock. Voila.
‘Hours is not to reason “Why”?...’
--
Toodle Pip
Anne B
2020-02-07 14:22:51 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
<snippety snip>
Post by krw
She then looked at the clock again and her watch and rushed into the
kitchen to extract the baking cake from the baking oven. Apparently the
clock on the cooker containing the said oven is still on summer time
because she does not know how to change it (and nor do I). All of which
meant I ate lunch an hour early and by the time the alarm went off the
cake had been baked and been cooling for an hour.
Everyday life once retired! Beware.
Serious practical solution. Go to the search engine of your choice and find
the manual for your cooker. Look up how to change the clock. Voila.
I have the original manual including how to set the clock. I still can't
do it, even with the manual open at the right page and clutched in my
left hand while I try to follow the instructions using my right hand.

Anne B
Flop
2020-02-05 09:04:30 UTC
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Post by krw
Today the house cakemaker was baking a cake and came into the study and
told me to set an alarm for 12:00 as the cake would be baked.  I did as
I was told.  I wondered at the sense of this as the cake maker also
makes lunch at 12:00 so would be in the kitchen boiling a kettle and so
on ready for luncheon.
At 11:00 the lunch maker announced that the luncheon was now ready for
consumption so I joined her in the living room wondering why we were
eating an hour early but for the sake of my ears did not feel I should
question the wisdom of the cake / lunch maker.
She sat down opposite the clock in the living room and observed that it
was 11:00 and why were we eating in lunch.  I said I did not know but
assumed she was keen to finish her baking before the numerous visitors
for the tea party this afternoon.
She then looked at the clock again and her watch and rushed into the
kitchen to extract the baking cake from the baking oven.  Apparently the
clock on the cooker containing the said oven is still on summer time
because she does not know how to change it (and nor do I).  All of which
meant I ate lunch an hour early and by the time the alarm went off the
cake had been baked and been cooling for an hour.
Everyday life once retired!  Beware.
It is very difficult trying to beware of the unknown and illogical.

Partners have had years to develop patterns not appreciated by the
unsuspecting.

Typically:

"Dont put it there"

"Well, where should I put it?"

"Anywhere - but not there"

"Dont put it there either - find somewhere else"


And more specifically - milk!

"Dont put it there" (in the fridge).

"Why not?"

"That's not my system"

"Well, what is your system?"

"I haven't got one but it's not there"
--
Flop

Truly the Good Lord gave us computers that we might learn patience
Chris J Dixon
2020-02-05 09:34:21 UTC
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Post by Flop
Partners have had years to develop patterns not appreciated by the
unsuspecting.
And more specifically - milk!
"Dont put it there" (in the fridge).
"Why not?"
"That's not my system"
"Well, what is your system?"
"I haven't got one but it's not there"
As any fule kno, the oldest bottle must be placed exactly...
there.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Mike
2020-02-05 12:03:35 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Flop
Partners have had years to develop patterns not appreciated by the
unsuspecting.
And more specifically - milk!
"Dont put it there" (in the fridge).
"Why not?"
"That's not my system"
"Well, what is your system?"
"I haven't got one but it's not there"
As any fule kno, the oldest bottle must be placed exactly...
there.
Chris
Freshest milk nearest the hinge - milk to use first nearest door handle.
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2020-02-05 12:19:57 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Flop
Partners have had years to develop patterns not appreciated by the
unsuspecting.
And more specifically - milk!
"Dont put it there" (in the fridge).
"Why not?"
"That's not my system"
"Well, what is your system?"
"I haven't got one but it's not there"
As any fule kno, the oldest bottle must be placed exactly...
there.
Chris
Freshest milk nearest the hinge - milk to use first nearest door handle.
I'd better not tell you what IRTA ;/
Mike
2020-02-05 12:28:57 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Mike
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Flop
Partners have had years to develop patterns not appreciated by the
unsuspecting.
And more specifically - milk!
"Dont put it there" (in the fridge).
"Why not?"
"That's not my system"
"Well, what is your system?"
"I haven't got one but it's not there"
As any fule kno, the oldest bottle must be placed exactly...
there.
Chris
Freshest milk nearest the hinge - milk to use first nearest door handle.
I'd better not tell you what IRTA ;/
Sorry BrritSki, I’m a Knight of the Garter...
--
Toodle Pip
SODAM
2020-02-05 13:13:32 UTC
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Post by Mike
Freshest milk nearest the hinge - milk to use first nearest door handle.
Yep! That’s my system, too. Logical.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Mike
2020-02-05 16:31:01 UTC
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Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Freshest milk nearest the hinge - milk to use first nearest door handle.
Yep! That’s my system, too. Logical.
The only way to do it - ‘That’s the way to do it!’
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2020-02-05 21:34:41 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Mike
Freshest milk nearest the hinge - milk to use first nearest door handle.
Yep! That’s my system, too. Logical.
The only way to do it - ‘That’s the way to do it!’
And... If there are two bottles of milk, one whole milk and one
semi-skimmed?

I have a system.
Wofe on the other hand has no systematic approach to this and rejects
any systems not of her making.
--
Sam Plusnet
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-02-05 23:28:16 UTC
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Our two milks used to be semi and 1% but the Sainsbury's within walking distance has no 2% nowadays.
Sam Plusnet
2020-02-06 20:26:51 UTC
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Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
Our two milks used to be semi and 1% but the Sainsbury's within walking distance has no 2% nowadays.
'Tis sad to note that the UMRA convention on supermarket chirality is in
desuetude.
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Odell
2020-02-05 23:59:03 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Freshest milk nearest the hinge - milk to use first nearest door handle.
Yep! That’s my system, too. Logical.
The only way to do it - ‘That’s the way to do it!’
And... If there are two bottles of milk, one whole milk and one
semi-skimmed?
...which is the configuration at Odell Towers. The system here is
Heaviest nearest the Hinge. And what if (I hear someone ask) both
bottles are full and unopened? Heaviest nearest the Hinge. Which will
be the semi-skimmed, of course.

Nick
Mike
2020-02-05 18:24:21 UTC
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Freshest milk nearest the hinge - milk to use first nearest door handle. 
Where else?
Rosemary
Quite!
--
Toodle Pip
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-02-05 19:01:36 UTC
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On Wednesday, 5 February 2020 12:03:36 UTC, Mike wrote:

<snipped>
Post by Mike
Freshest milk nearest the hinge - milk to use first nearest door handle.
We keep other things as well as milk in the door - juices, wine, etc.,
so I think of this as a mechanical issue. Heaviest item nearest the hinge to ease torque on the door.
Penny
2020-02-05 19:30:16 UTC
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On Wed, 5 Feb 2020 11:01:36 -0800 (PST), Tony Smith Gloucestershire
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
<snipped>
Post by Mike
Freshest milk nearest the hinge - milk to use first nearest door handle.
We keep other things as well as milk in the door - juices, wine, etc.,
so I think of this as a mechanical issue. Heaviest item nearest the hinge to ease torque on the door.
That's my logic too but it's many years since I regularly bought wet milk.
I think Ray expected it to be nearest the handle so it obviously wasn't
something he applied his engineering knowledge to.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-05 23:01:22 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Wed, 5 Feb 2020 11:01:36 -0800 (PST), Tony Smith Gloucestershire
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
<snipped>
Post by Mike
Freshest milk nearest the hinge - milk to use first nearest door handle.
Yes, I do that. My mum used to do it nearest-the-hinge-first: when I
thought about it I decided that furthest from the hinge would come to
hand more easily, so I do that.
Post by Penny
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
We keep other things as well as milk in the door - juices, wine, etc.,
so I think of this as a mechanical issue. Heaviest item nearest the
hinge to ease torque on the door.
As in, the one furthest from the hinge is the part-empty one.

Though I keep my cache in the freezer; semi-skimmed milk IME freezes
perfectly fine. (You've got to remember to get the next one out when the
current one is _approaching_ its end mind!) I believe full milk
_doesn't_ freeze well (tends to separate); I presume skimmed would, but
that's too watery for my taste.
Post by Penny
That's my logic too but it's many years since I regularly bought wet milk.
Mum used to keep a "bottle" (it came in a bottle-shaped container) of
powdered milk in case she ran out. I keep one of UHT ("long life") [and
have to use it when it approaches its sell-by date - usually a year or
so].
Post by Penny
I think Ray expected it to be nearest the handle so it obviously wasn't
something he applied his engineering knowledge to.
(-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If you want to make people angry, lie to them. If you want to make them
absolutely livid, then tell 'em the truth.
Penny
2020-02-06 09:51:35 UTC
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On Wed, 5 Feb 2020 23:01:22 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Though I keep my cache in the freezer; semi-skimmed milk IME freezes
perfectly fine. (You've got to remember to get the next one out when the
current one is _approaching_ its end mind!) I believe full milk
_doesn't_ freeze well (tends to separate); I presume skimmed would, but
that's too watery for my taste.
Milk from the supermarket is all homogenised these days so will freeze (for
a while*) without separating. Milk in glass bottles from the milkman is not
- it separates in the bottle and you can skim off the top-of-the-milk
yourself if you so desire.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
That's my logic too but it's many years since I regularly bought wet milk.
Mum used to keep a "bottle" (it came in a bottle-shaped container) of
powdered milk in case she ran out. I keep one of UHT ("long life") [and
have to use it when it approaches its sell-by date - usually a year or
so].
I used to buy 1pt boxes of UHT skimmed milk they lasted me about a
fortnight once opened. My consumption of milk declined further and they
were going off before I finished them - the trouble with 'off' skimmed milk
is it tends to smell ok for too long and I had regular stomach upsets
before I figured it out and switched entirely to dried. It now takes me so
long to get through a pack of dried that it gets to that stage where it
separates so I guess it's time to give it up altogether.

*When family visit I buy wet milk, after asking what they need. In recent
years both daughters have switched to non-dairy milk and their menfolk
don't drink much tea and I ended up with an unopened litre of milk so I
froze it. Many months later I thought I might as well get it out and use it
in some planned baking rather than mix some up. It was entirely unlike milk
so I threw it away.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-06 13:29:17 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Wed, 5 Feb 2020 23:01:22 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Though I keep my cache in the freezer; semi-skimmed milk IME freezes
perfectly fine. (You've got to remember to get the next one out when the
current one is _approaching_ its end mind!) I believe full milk
_doesn't_ freeze well (tends to separate); I presume skimmed would, but
that's too watery for my taste.
Milk from the supermarket is all homogenised these days so will freeze (for
a while*) without separating. Milk in glass bottles from the milkman is not
- it separates in the bottle and you can skim off the top-of-the-milk
yourself if you so desire.
I don't think I've _seen_ milk in a glass bottle for a long time -
possibly years.

Was discussing last night's feature on plant "milks" with my blind
friend, and I happened to mention Channel Island milk; she replied
asking what was special about it. Can you still get it? I remembered the
name, but as I'm not fond of cream have never looked for it. According
to Wikipedia, it's so-called because it comes from Jersey or Guernsey
cows, not its origin, and is in fact made all over the place.
Post by Penny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
That's my logic too but it's many years since I regularly bought wet milk.
Mum used to keep a "bottle" (it came in a bottle-shaped container) of
powdered milk in case she ran out. I keep one of UHT ("long life") [and
have to use it when it approaches its sell-by date - usually a year or
so].
I used to buy 1pt boxes of UHT skimmed milk they lasted me about a
fortnight once opened. My consumption of milk declined further and they
I find I get through it (I think I get 1 litre ones) before it goes off,
but then I consume a fair amount of milk anyway (I have a bowl of cereal
as my dessert course most days).
Post by Penny
were going off before I finished them - the trouble with 'off' skimmed milk
is it tends to smell ok for too long and I had regular stomach upsets
Interesting. I think I've mentioned before that, at work, we had some
concern a 'fridge wasn't working properly, and I asked someone at the
food standards agency (?) what temperature was appropriate; he was
surprisingly reluctant to say, eventually coming back that milk was a
xxx food: I forget what the word was, but it meant that it
smells/tastes/whatever completely unpalatable well before it's actually
dangerous, so there isn't an actual guide temperature (or wasn't then).
(Given the existence of cheese, I could believe that. I'm usually pretty
sensitive to offness anyway.) If you're right, sounds like the UHT
process changes something.
Post by Penny
before I figured it out and switched entirely to dried. It now takes me so
long to get through a pack of dried that it gets to that stage where it
separates so I guess it's time to give it up altogether.
Dried milk separates?!?
Post by Penny
*When family visit I buy wet milk, after asking what they need. In recent
years both daughters have switched to non-dairy milk and their menfolk
(Anyone else see last night's look at non-dairy milks? I thought it
_somewhat_ superficial, though more scientific than most such looks.)
Post by Penny
don't drink much tea and I ended up with an unopened litre of milk so I
froze it. Many months later I thought I might as well get it out and use it
in some planned baking rather than mix some up. It was entirely unlike milk
so I threw it away.
Full milk certainly doesn't freeze well. (I don't think it becomes
dangerous, but separates.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

User Error: Replace user, hit any key to continue.
Mike
2020-02-06 14:10:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Interesting. I think I've mentioned before that, at work, we had some
concern a 'fridge wasn't working properly, and I asked someone at the
food standards agency (?) what temperature was appropriate; he was
surprisingly reluctant to say,
Recommended temperature range is from 3 to 8 degrees C.
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-06 14:26:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Interesting. I think I've mentioned before that, at work, we had some
concern a 'fridge wasn't working properly, and I asked someone at the
food standards agency (?) what temperature was appropriate; he was
surprisingly reluctant to say,
Recommended temperature range is from 3 to 8 degrees C.
Interesting. Recommended by whom? (8 seems quite high!)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Anybody who thinks there can be unlimited growth in a static, limited
environment, is either mad or an economist. - Sir David Attenborough, in
Radio Times 10-16 November 2012
Mike
2020-02-06 15:13:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Interesting. I think I've mentioned before that, at work, we had some
concern a 'fridge wasn't working properly, and I asked someone at the
food standards agency (?) what temperature was appropriate; he was
surprisingly reluctant to say,
Recommended temperature range is from 3 to 8 degrees C.
Interesting. Recommended by whom? (8 seems quite high!)
I have seen this quoted in a few places and heard it mentioned on the
goggle thingy in health / diet / science programmes. Don’t forget that 8
degrees is the highest recommended so as the temperature is not constant
but varies a few degrees even with doors shut, the lower part of the range
is the target. I also have a friend who kept insulin in their friend and
this was the range recommended by the horsepiddal. In the caee of insulin
storage, I believe the target was 5 but not below 3.
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2020-02-06 15:16:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Interesting. I think I've mentioned before that, at work, we had some
concern a 'fridge wasn't working properly, and I asked someone at the
food standards agency (?) what temperature was appropriate; he was
surprisingly reluctant to say,
Recommended temperature range is from 3 to 8 degrees C.
Interesting. Recommended by whom? (8 seems quite high!)
I have seen this quoted in a few places and heard it mentioned on the
goggle thingy in health / diet / science programmes. Don’t forget that 8
degrees is the highest recommended so as the temperature is not constant
but varies a few degrees even with doors shut, the lower part of the range
is the target. I also have a friend who kept insulin in their friend and
this was the range recommended by the horsepiddal. In the caee of insulin
storage, I believe the target was 5 but not below 3.
https://techtalk.currys.co.uk/kitchen-home/fridges-freezers/what-temperature-should-your-fridge-be/
Suggests 5 degrees tops.
--
Toodle Pip
Sally Thompson
2020-02-06 21:13:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
I have seen this quoted in a few places and heard it mentioned on the
goggle thingy in health / diet / science programmes. Don’t forget that 8
degrees is the highest recommended so as the temperature is not constant
but varies a few degrees even with doors shut, the lower part of the range
is the target. I also have a friend who kept insulin in their friend and
this was the range recommended by the horsepiddal. In the caee of insulin
storage, I believe the target was 5 but not below 3.
A friend indeed. My mind is boggling as to where exactly in their friend
the insulin was kept:-)
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-06 21:25:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Mike
I have seen this quoted in a few places and heard it mentioned on the
goggle thingy in health / diet / science programmes. Don’t forget that 8
degrees is the highest recommended so as the temperature is not constant
but varies a few degrees even with doors shut, the lower part of the range
is the target. I also have a friend who kept insulin in their friend and
this was the range recommended by the horsepiddal. In the caee of insulin
storage, I believe the target was 5 but not below 3.
A friend indeed. My mind is boggling as to where exactly in their friend
the insulin was kept:-)
LOL; I didn't even spot that on first reading Mike's post!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The desire to remain private and/or anonymous used to be a core British value,
but in recent times it has been treated with suspicion - an unfortunate by-
product of the widespread desire for fame. - Chris Middleton,
Computing 6 September 2011
Mike
2020-02-07 08:59:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Mike
I have seen this quoted in a few places and heard it mentioned on the
goggle thingy in health / diet / science programmes. Don’t forget that 8
degrees is the highest recommended so as the temperature is not constant
but varies a few degrees even with doors shut, the lower part of the range
is the target. I also have a friend who kept insulin in their friend and
this was the range recommended by the horsepiddal. In the caee of insulin
storage, I believe the target was 5 but not below 3.
A friend indeed. My mind is boggling as to where exactly in their friend
the insulin was kept:-)
Before it was injected into the friend, it was stored in the ‘fridge. ;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2020-02-07 10:31:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Mike
I have seen this quoted in a few places and heard it mentioned on the
goggle thingy in health / diet / science programmes. Don’t forget that 8
degrees is the highest recommended so as the temperature is not constant
but varies a few degrees even with doors shut, the lower part of the range
is the target. I also have a friend who kept insulin in their friend and
this was the range recommended by the horsepiddal. In the caee of insulin
storage, I believe the target was 5 but not below 3.
A friend indeed. My mind is boggling as to where exactly in their friend
the insulin was kept:-)
Before it was injected into the friend, it was stored in the ‘fridge. ;-)
Roger the non netted umrat was the fridge’s friend.

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2020-02-07 00:03:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 06 Feb 2020 15:13:04 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Interesting. I think I've mentioned before that, at work, we had some
concern a 'fridge wasn't working properly, and I asked someone at the
food standards agency (?) what temperature was appropriate; he was
surprisingly reluctant to say,
Recommended temperature range is from 3 to 8 degrees C.
Interesting. Recommended by whom? (8 seems quite high!)
I have seen this quoted in a few places and heard it mentioned on the
goggle thingy in health / diet / science programmes. Don’t forget that 8
degrees is the highest recommended so as the temperature is not constant
but varies a few degrees even with doors shut, the lower part of the range
is the target. I also have a friend who kept insulin in their friend and
this was the range recommended by the horsepiddal. In the caee of insulin
storage, I believe the target was 5 but not below 3.
I've always assumed the temperature in fridges is zoned like non-fan ovens.
Warmest at the top and coldest at the bottom. If your fridge door has a
place designed for the storage of butter (and eggs) this is usually on the
top shelf with its own flip door as the warmest part of the fridge.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris J Dixon
2020-02-07 09:08:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
I've always assumed the temperature in fridges is zoned like non-fan ovens.
Warmest at the top and coldest at the bottom. If your fridge door has a
place designed for the storage of butter (and eggs) this is usually on the
top shelf with its own flip door as the warmest part of the fridge.
With a conventional fridge I often found that lettuce stored in
the designated "salad drawer" would freeze. Basic physics
dictates that this will be the coldest spot, so why it is chosen
for stuff that really doesn't like to be frozen beats me. I ended
up using the drawer for less vulnerable items.

My present appliance has an optional circulating fan, which I
have turned on. It may use a tiny bit of extra energy, but
knowing that the entire fridge is, as near as is practicable, at
the designated (and indicated) temperature is well worth it.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Mike
2020-02-07 09:48:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
I've always assumed the temperature in fridges is zoned like non-fan ovens.
Warmest at the top and coldest at the bottom. If your fridge door has a
place designed for the storage of butter (and eggs) this is usually on the
top shelf with its own flip door as the warmest part of the fridge.
With a conventional fridge I often found that lettuce stored in
the designated "salad drawer" would freeze. Basic physics
dictates that this will be the coldest spot, so why it is chosen
for stuff that really doesn't like to be frozen beats me. I ended
up using the drawer for less vulnerable items.
My present appliance has an optional circulating fan, which I
have turned on. It may use a tiny bit of extra energy, but
knowing that the entire fridge is, as near as is practicable, at
the designated (and indicated) temperature is well worth it.
Chris
Ours is an ‘American Style’ fridge/freezer and the fridge part has three
drawers for salad, veg and meat and there are slider controls to adjust the
air flow to the drawers individually. The lowest drawer designated ‘meat’
can be adjusted to 1 degree C for meat storage. I have used various
thermometers to check the different zones for peace of mind. I rarely have
need to store meat, thus the lowest (meat) drawer is set at about 3 degrees
C. most of the time. Various fans are employed in the system and air
distribution is very good - fruit and vegetables keep for 1 - 2 weeks
generally so there is rarely any cosigning things to the the compost bin.
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2020-02-07 09:53:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
I've always assumed the temperature in fridges is zoned like non-fan ovens.
Warmest at the top and coldest at the bottom. If your fridge door has a
place designed for the storage of butter (and eggs) this is usually on the
top shelf with its own flip door as the warmest part of the fridge.
With a conventional fridge I often found that lettuce stored in
the designated "salad drawer" would freeze. Basic physics
dictates that this will be the coldest spot, so why it is chosen
for stuff that really doesn't like to be frozen beats me. I ended
up using the drawer for less vulnerable items.
My present appliance has an optional circulating fan, which I
have turned on. It may use a tiny bit of extra energy, but
knowing that the entire fridge is, as near as is practicable, at
the designated (and indicated) temperature is well worth it.
Chris
Our fridge-freezer has an adjustable salad drawer temperature. The
freezer is in 2 separate pull-out drawers, which is handy.
Serena Blanchflower
2020-02-06 16:14:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Was discussing last night's feature on plant "milks" with my blind
friend, and I happened to mention Channel Island milk; she replied
asking what was special about it. Can you still get it? I remembered the
name, but as I'm not fond of cream have never looked for it. According
to Wikipedia, it's so-called because it comes from Jersey or Guernsey
cows, not its origin, and is in fact made all over the place.
Yes, I think most of the supermarkets (regardless of chirality) stock
it. For example <https://www.tesco.com/groceries/en-GB/products/257750530>
--
Best wishes, Serena
My friend drowned in a bowl of muesli - he was pulled in by a strong
current.
Penny
2020-02-06 23:58:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 6 Feb 2020 13:29:17 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
before I figured it out and switched entirely to dried. It now takes me so
long to get through a pack of dried that it gets to that stage where it
separates so I guess it's time to give it up altogether.
Dried milk separates?!?
When it's been opened for a while about half of the powder you put in your
hot drink dissolves as it should, the rest falls to the bottom of the mug
as a sludge no matter how much you stir it. I've got around this to a
degree by taking a tablespoonful out of the main container and storing it
in a smaller one for daily use in the believe it is the frequent exposure
to slightly damp air - the kettle has recently boiled - which affects it.
Now I'm down to one cup of tea a day (a few years ago it was 10) I still
have to throw some powder away but only small amounts.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris J Dixon
2020-02-07 09:16:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Thu, 6 Feb 2020 13:29:17 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Dried milk separates?!?
When it's been opened for a while about half of the powder you put in your
hot drink dissolves as it should, the rest falls to the bottom of the mug
as a sludge no matter how much you stir it. I've got around this to a
degree by taking a tablespoonful out of the main container and storing it
in a smaller one for daily use in the believe it is the frequent exposure
to slightly damp air - the kettle has recently boiled - which affects it.
Now I'm down to one cup of tea a day (a few years ago it was 10) I still
have to throw some powder away but only small amounts.
There was a time whilst training, working on a power station
site, that I made a pre-mix of coffee, sugar and Marvel. The only
problem was differential settlement due to the particle sizes,
but regular agitation sorted that.

Eventually I realised that the way I decided on the right amount
of powdered milk in my coffee was just sufficient so that I
couldn't taste it. Realising the pointlessness, I took it black
from then on.

For about 30 years I have drunk no coffee, and only fruit, herb
and spice teas.

My current favourites are:
<https://www.pukkaherbs.com/shop/organic-teas/three-cinnamon/>
<https://www.pukkaherbs.com/shop/organic-teas/vanilla-chai/>

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Penny
2020-02-07 12:48:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 07 Feb 2020 09:16:23 +0000, Chris J Dixon <***@cdixon.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
There was a time whilst training, working on a power station
site, that I made a pre-mix of coffee, sugar and Marvel. The only
problem was differential settlement due to the particle sizes,
but regular agitation sorted that.
I used to do that at school but aggitation just agravates the problem - as
any pastry-maker noe. To mix in the small stuff you need to spoon it up
from the bottom and stir it through.

I've just about got to the point with tea when I don't really notice if
there is no milk in it so not sure why I still use it. I never liked
over-brewed tea and now I drink so little and no longer use a pot, one
teabag can last me three days.

Mostly I drink tap water but will have fruit tea if available when I go out
as it's preferable to over-brewed tea.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
BrritSki
2020-02-07 12:57:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
There was a time whilst training, working on a power station
site, that I made a pre-mix of coffee, sugar and Marvel. The only
problem was differential settlement due to the particle sizes,
but regular agitation sorted that.
I used to do that at school but aggitation just agravates the problem - as
any pastry-maker noe. To mix in the small stuff you need to spoon it up
from the bottom and stir it through.
Not if you invert the jar before agitation and stop before you are back
to where you started but the other way up (cont. Kama Sutra P94)
Post by Penny
I've just about got to the point with tea when I don't really notice if
there is no milk in it so not sure why I still use it. I never liked
over-brewed tea and now I drink so little and no longer use a pot, one
teabag can last me three days.
I stopped putting milk in tea some 25 years ago when I was spending 3
alternate days in a bedsit and CBA to buy milk just for 3 cups of tea
per week. I then stopped having at home too, but have my tea quite weak
now, but a teabag only last for 2 cups.
Post by Penny
Mostly I drink tap water
Fizzy water for me from Buxton.
steve hague
2020-02-07 13:00:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
On Thu, 6 Feb 2020 13:29:17 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Dried milk separates?!?
When it's been opened for a while about half of the powder you put in your
hot drink dissolves as it should, the rest falls to the bottom of the mug
as a sludge no matter how much you stir it. I've got around this to a
degree by taking a tablespoonful out of the main container and storing it
in a smaller one for daily use in the believe it is the frequent exposure
to slightly damp air - the kettle has recently boiled - which affects it.
Now I'm down to one cup of tea a day (a few years ago it was 10) I still
have to throw some powder away but only small amounts.
There was a time whilst training, working on a power station
site, that I made a pre-mix of coffee, sugar and Marvel. The only
problem was differential settlement due to the particle sizes,
but regular agitation sorted that.
Eventually I realised that the way I decided on the right amount
of powdered milk in my coffee was just sufficient so that I
couldn't taste it. Realising the pointlessness, I took it black
from then on.
For about 30 years I have drunk no coffee, and only fruit, herb
and spice teas.
Something similar for me. I gave up drinking tea and coffee about twenty
years ago and had no further need for milk except occasionally for
cooking. I recently started having the occasional cup of coffee, but it
needs to be good stuff with double cream. I wonder how much of tea/
coffee drinking custom is social convention rather than how much we
enjoy it.
Steve
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-07 14:38:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <***@4ax.com>, Chris J Dixon
<***@cdixon.me.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Chris J Dixon
Eventually I realised that the way I decided on the right amount
of powdered milk in my coffee was just sufficient so that I
couldn't taste it. Realising the pointlessness, I took it black
from then on.
[]
Conversely, I like a warm (_not_ that hot!), sweet, and milky drink;
I've often thought I should experiment with omitting the brown
ingredient (tea or coffee), but I think it does add a certain something
(and the caffeine _may_ help me not nod off, too).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I long for the commercialised Christmas of the 1970s. It's got so religious
now, it's lost its true meaning. - Mike [{at}ostic.demon.co.uk], 2003-12-24
Chris McMillan
2020-02-07 10:06:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
On Wed, 5 Feb 2020 23:01:22 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Though I keep my cache in the freezer; semi-skimmed milk IME freezes
perfectly fine. (You've got to remember to get the next one out when the
current one is _approaching_ its end mind!) I believe full milk
_doesn't_ freeze well (tends to separate); I presume skimmed would, but
that's too watery for my taste.
Milk from the supermarket is all homogenised these days so will freeze (for
a while*) without separating. Milk in glass bottles from the milkman is not
- it separates in the bottle and you can skim off the top-of-the-milk
yourself if you so desire.
I don't think I've _seen_ milk in a glass bottle for a long time -
possibly years.
Was discussing last night's feature on plant "milks" with my blind
friend, and I happened to mention Channel Island milk; she replied
asking what was special about it. Can you still get it? I remembered the
name, but as I'm not fond of cream have never looked for it. According
to Wikipedia, it's so-called because it comes from Jersey or Guernsey
cows, not its origin, and is in fact made all over the place.
Post by Penny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
That's my logic too but it's many years since I regularly bought wet milk.
Mum used to keep a "bottle" (it came in a bottle-shaped container) of
powdered milk in case she ran out. I keep one of UHT ("long life") [and
have to use it when it approaches its sell-by date - usually a year or
so].
I used to buy 1pt boxes of UHT skimmed milk they lasted me about a
fortnight once opened. My consumption of milk declined further and they
I find I get through it (I think I get 1 litre ones) before it goes off,
but then I consume a fair amount of milk anyway (I have a bowl of cereal
as my dessert course most days).
Post by Penny
were going off before I finished them - the trouble with 'off' skimmed milk
is it tends to smell ok for too long and I had regular stomach upsets
Interesting. I think I've mentioned before that, at work, we had some
concern a 'fridge wasn't working properly, and I asked someone at the
food standards agency (?) what temperature was appropriate; he was
surprisingly reluctant to say, eventually coming back that milk was a
xxx food: I forget what the word was, but it meant that it
smells/tastes/whatever completely unpalatable well before it's actually
dangerous, so there isn't an actual guide temperature (or wasn't then).
(Given the existence of cheese, I could believe that. I'm usually pretty
sensitive to offness anyway.) If you're right, sounds like the UHT
process changes something.
Post by Penny
before I figured it out and switched entirely to dried. It now takes me so
long to get through a pack of dried that it gets to that stage where it
separates so I guess it's time to give it up altogether.
Dried milk separates?!?
Post by Penny
*When family visit I buy wet milk, after asking what they need. In recent
years both daughters have switched to non-dairy milk and their menfolk
(Anyone else see last night's look at non-dairy milks? I thought it
_somewhat_ superficial, though more scientific than most such looks.)
Post by Penny
don't drink much tea and I ended up with an unopened litre of milk so I
froze it. Many months later I thought I might as well get it out and use it
in some planned baking rather than mix some up. It was entirely unlike milk
so I threw it away.
Full milk certainly doesn't freeze well. (I don't think it becomes
dangerous, but separates.)
Yes we did, John. Our Hazel is lactose intolerant.

Sincerely Chris
Rosemary Miskin
2020-02-07 10:31:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I don't think I've _seen_ milk in a glass bottle for a long time - 
possibly years. 
One of our neighbours still has milk delivered in glass bottles.

We gave up delivery when the price went up 5p a pint with no warning,
and, at about the same time, I went to put the empty bottles out and
found the next day's milk had already been delivered, and left in full sun.
Not a service I felt like paying quite a lot for!

Rosemary
Chris J Dixon
2020-02-07 10:37:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rosemary Miskin
We gave up delivery when the price went up 5p a pint with no warning,
and, at about the same time, I went to put the empty bottles out and
found the next day's milk had already been delivered, and left in full sun.
Not a service I felt like paying quite a lot for!
As I'm sure I have mused before, I bet that if doorstep delivery
was proposed as a new service, the Health & Safety folk would do
a Risk Assessment and declare the whole idea of milk left to stew
gently in the sun, to be manifestly unsound.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Chris McMillan
2020-02-05 19:04:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
I never know what day it is.
I don't know how I managed before I had a computer which would tell me.
I mean, calendars were no good unless you already knew. (Same with
dictionaries and spelling.) I do remember getting up and dashing off to
work one day, only to realise when I was on the bus that it was Saturday
and I only worked Mon-Fri. I also remember going to the hairdresser one
Friday for a Thursday appointment - I never did find out where the
missing day went that week. (I did get my hair cut, though.)
I recently turned up at my dentist an hour early. Very embarrassed but the
receptionist said lots of people turn up on time ...... but the wrong day.
She was very nice about it!

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2020-02-03 08:30:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
Fresh mint from the garden in January?!
Mine is producing new shoots I noticed a few days ago.
--
Toodle Pip
Vicky Ayech
2020-02-03 09:37:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Fresh mint from the garden in January?!
Mine is producing new shoots I noticed a few days ago.
Mine has vanished again. I can't seem to grow it and just exist on pot
plants from the supermarket for my fresh mint. I've tried seeds and
tried planting the used pot plants but then eventually no mint inthe
garden.
Sid Nuncius
2020-02-03 09:51:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Fresh mint from the garden in January?!
Mine is producing new shoots I noticed a few days ago.
Mine has vanished again. I can't seem to grow it and just exist on pot
plants from the supermarket for my fresh mint. I've tried seeds and
tried planting the used pot plants but then eventually no mint inthe
garden.
It's dead easy to propagate. You may need to buy a decent plant from a
garden centre to begin with, but once that's well established, take it
out of its pot and find some of the root runners in the soil. They may
even break the surface and go above ground like tentacles. Cut a few
short lengths of them and put them in new pots with fresh compost about
2cm deep. Er...that's it. Works for me.

I have no experience of this, but I'm told that if mint establishes
itself in a bed in a garden it will get *everywhere* and is completely
uncontrollable so it's best to grow it in pots.

No mint here yet, but hyacinths and early narcissi are flowering on our
little terrace. <beam>
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Vicky Ayech
2020-02-03 09:59:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 3 Feb 2020 09:51:08 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Fresh mint from the garden in January?!
Mine is producing new shoots I noticed a few days ago.
Mine has vanished again. I can't seem to grow it and just exist on pot
plants from the supermarket for my fresh mint. I've tried seeds and
tried planting the used pot plants but then eventually no mint inthe
garden.
It's dead easy to propagate. You may need to buy a decent plant from a
garden centre to begin with, but once that's well established, take it
out of its pot and find some of the root runners in the soil. They may
even break the surface and go above ground like tentacles. Cut a few
short lengths of them and put them in new pots with fresh compost about
2cm deep. Er...that's it. Works for me.
I have no experience of this, but I'm told that if mint establishes
itself in a bed in a garden it will get *everywhere* and is completely
uncontrollable so it's best to grow it in pots.
No mint here yet, but hyacinths and early narcissi are flowering on our
little terrace. <beam>
I think we tried that too. B says it is because I pick it to use in my
tea.
Rosemary Miskin
2020-02-03 10:17:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I have no experience of this, but I'm told that if mint establishes 
itself in a bed in a garden it will get *everywhere* and is completely 
uncontrollable so it's best to grow it in pots. 
This is very true! The (large) pot can be buried in the ground to keep
the lookof a herb bed, and stops the mint swamping everything else.

Rosemary
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-03 10:51:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rosemary Miskin
I have no experience of this, but I'm told that if mint establishes 
itself in a bed in a garden it will get *everywhere* and is completely 
uncontrollable so it's best to grow it in pots. 
This is very true! The (large) pot can be buried in the ground to keep
the lookof a herb bed, and stops the mint swamping everything else.
Rosemary
Somehow seems appropriate that Rosemary grows mint. (-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Society has the right to punish wrongdoing; it doesn't have the right to make
punishment a form of entertainment. This is where things have gone wrong:
humiliating other people has become both a blood sport and a narcotic.
- Joe Queenan, RT 2015/6/27-7/3
Jim Easterbrook
2020-02-03 10:55:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Post by Sid Nuncius
I have no experience of this, but I'm told that if mint establishes
itself in a bed in a garden it will get *everywhere* and is completely
uncontrollable so it's best to grow it in pots.
This is very true! The (large) pot can be buried in the ground to keep
the lookof a herb bed, and stops the mint swamping everything else.
I'm glad she found the thyme to offer us her sage advice.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Chris McMillan
2020-02-05 19:04:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Post by Sid Nuncius
I have no experience of this, but I'm told that if mint establishes
itself in a bed in a garden it will get *everywhere* and is completely
uncontrollable so it's best to grow it in pots.
This is very true! The (large) pot can be buried in the ground to keep
the lookof a herb bed, and stops the mint swamping everything else.
I'm glad she found the thyme to offer us her sage advice.
What you like with Rosemary, Rosemary?

Sincerely Chris
BrritSki
2020-02-05 20:23:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Post by Sid Nuncius
I have no experience of this, but I'm told that if mint establishes
itself in a bed in a garden it will get *everywhere* and is completely
uncontrollable so it's best to grow it in pots.
This is very true! The (large) pot can be buried in the ground to keep
the lookof a herb bed, and stops the mint swamping everything else.
I'm glad she found the thyme to offer us her sage advice.
What you like with Rosemary...
I like lamb shanks, cooked low for 3 hours with red wine, stock,
carrots, onions, garlic and a tin of chopped tomatoes. Yum...
That's what we had for dinner...
Sam Plusnet
2020-02-05 21:36:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
I have no experience of this, but I'm told that if mint establishes
itself in a bed in a garden it will get *everywhere* and is completely
uncontrollable so it's best to grow it in pots.
This is very true!  The (large) pot can be buried in the ground to
keep
the lookof a herb bed, and stops the mint swamping everything else.
I'm glad she found the thyme to offer us her sage advice.
What you like with Rosemary...
I like lamb shanks, cooked low for 3 hours with red wine, stock,
carrots, onions, garlic and a tin of chopped tomatoes.  Yum...
That's what we had for dinner...
I hope you decanted those tomatoes before serving.
--
Sam Plusnet
BrritSki
2020-02-06 09:37:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by BrritSki
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Sid Nuncius
I have no experience of this, but I'm told that if mint establishes
itself in a bed in a garden it will get *everywhere* and is completely
uncontrollable so it's best to grow it in pots.
This is very true!  The (large) pot can be buried in the ground to
keep
the lookof a herb bed, and stops the mint swamping everything else.
I'm glad she found the thyme to offer us her sage advice.
What you like with Rosemary...
I like lamb shanks, cooked low for 3 hours with red wine, stock,
carrots, onions, garlic and a tin of chopped tomatoes.  Yum...
That's what we had for dinner...
I hope you decanted those tomatoes before serving.
:)
Rosemary Miskin
2020-02-06 11:02:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Chris asked
What you like with Rosemary, Rosemary? 
Braised lamb shanks, please! Must do those again soon,
while the cold weather lasts.

To be serious for a moment, I believe I was named in memory of
an elder brother who died a cot death aged five months.

Rosemary
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-06 13:14:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Chris asked
What you like with Rosemary, Rosemary? 
Braised lamb shanks, please! Must do those again soon,
while the cold weather lasts.
Yum. I think I first had that some decades ago, in a Greek restaurant in
Notting Hill, under the name Kleftico - it was some lamb joint, anyway.
Post by Rosemary Miskin
To be serious for a moment, I believe I was named in memory of
an elder brother who died a cot death aged five months.
Rosemary
I'm puzzled: I can't think of a male version of Rosemary.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

User Error: Replace user, hit any key to continue.
Serena Blanchflower
2020-02-06 16:15:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Chris asked
Post by Chris McMillan
What you like with Rosemary, Rosemary?
Braised lamb shanks, please! Must do those again soon,
while the cold weather lasts.
Yum. I think I first had that some decades ago, in a Greek restaurant in
Notting Hill, under the name Kleftico - it was some lamb joint, anyway.
Post by Rosemary Miskin
To be serious for a moment, I believe I was named in memory of
an elder brother who died a cot death aged five months.
Rosemary
I'm puzzled: I can't think of a male version of Rosemary.
Rosemary for rememberance.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I used to be a banker, but then I lost interest.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-06 16:27:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Rosemary Miskin
To be serious for a moment, I believe I was named in memory of
an elder brother who died a cot death aged five months.
Rosemary
I'm puzzled: I can't think of a male version of Rosemary.
Rosemary for rememberance.
Ah, I didn't know that, though now you say it it does sound vaguely
familiar.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Apologies to [those] who may have been harmed by the scientific inaccuracies
in this post. - Roger Tilbury in UMRA, 2018-3-14
John Ashby
2020-02-06 16:53:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Rosemary Miskin
To be serious for a moment, I believe I was named in memory of
an elder brother who died a cot death aged five months.
Rosemary
I'm puzzled: I can't think of a male version of Rosemary.
Rosemary for rememberance.
Ah, I didn't know that, though now you say it it does sound vaguely
familiar.
Ophelia's mad scene in Hamlet.

john
Vicky Ayech
2020-02-06 18:02:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 6 Feb 2020 13:14:30 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Chris asked
What you like with Rosemary, Rosemary? 
Braised lamb shanks, please! Must do those again soon,
while the cold weather lasts.
Yum. I think I first had that some decades ago, in a Greek restaurant in
Notting Hill, under the name Kleftico - it was some lamb joint, anyway.
Post by Rosemary Miskin
To be serious for a moment, I believe I was named in memory of
an elder brother who died a cot death aged five months.
Rosemary
I'm puzzled: I can't think of a male version of Rosemary.
Rosemary for remembrance?
Mike
2020-02-06 18:21:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 6 Feb 2020 13:14:30 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Chris asked
What you like with Rosemary, Rosemary? 
Braised lamb shanks, please! Must do those again soon,
while the cold weather lasts.
Yum. I think I first had that some decades ago, in a Greek restaurant in
Notting Hill, under the name Kleftico - it was some lamb joint, anyway.
Post by Rosemary Miskin
To be serious for a moment, I believe I was named in memory of
an elder brother who died a cot death aged five months.
Rosemary
I'm puzzled: I can't think of a male version of Rosemary.
Rosemary for remembrance?
... and to go with roast potatoes;-)
--
Toodle Pip
John Ashby
2020-02-06 20:36:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 6 Feb 2020 13:14:30 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Chris asked
Post by Chris McMillan
What you like with Rosemary, Rosemary?
Braised lamb shanks, please! Must do those again soon,
while the cold weather lasts.
Yum. I think I first had that some decades ago, in a Greek restaurant in
Notting Hill, under the name Kleftico - it was some lamb joint, anyway.
Post by Rosemary Miskin
To be serious for a moment, I believe I was named in memory of
an elder brother who died a cot death aged five months.
Rosemary
I'm puzzled: I can't think of a male version of Rosemary.
Rosemary for remembrance?
... and to go with roast potatoes;-)
I'm surprised nobody makes garlic and rosemary flavoured crisps.

john
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-06 20:57:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <r1htcp$nbq$***@dont-email.me>, John Ashby
<***@yahoo.com> writes:
[]
Post by John Ashby
I'm surprised nobody makes garlic and rosemary flavoured crisps.
john
Or garlic any anything (or even just garlic); surely the xenophobia that
used to work against it must have evaporated, so I guess there must be
another reason.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The desire to remain private and/or anonymous used to be a core British value,
but in recent times it has been treated with suspicion - an unfortunate by-
product of the widespread desire for fame. - Chris Middleton,
Computing 6 September 2011
Penny
2020-02-07 00:06:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 6 Feb 2020 20:36:41 +0000, John Ashby <***@yahoo.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
I'm surprised nobody makes garlic and rosemary flavoured crisps.
I expect somebody does and uses actual rosemary not some vile artificial
flavouring.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2020-02-07 08:57:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Thu, 6 Feb 2020 13:14:30 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Chris asked
Post by Chris McMillan
What you like with Rosemary, Rosemary?
Braised lamb shanks, please! Must do those again soon,
while the cold weather lasts.
Yum. I think I first had that some decades ago, in a Greek restaurant in
Notting Hill, under the name Kleftico - it was some lamb joint, anyway.
Post by Rosemary Miskin
To be serious for a moment, I believe I was named in memory of
an elder brother who died a cot death aged five months.
Rosemary
I'm puzzled: I can't think of a male version of Rosemary.
Rosemary for remembrance?
... and to go with roast potatoes;-)
I'm surprised nobody makes garlic and rosemary flavoured crisps.
john
https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=garlic+and+rosemary+flavoured+crisps.&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en-gb&client=safari
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2020-02-07 10:05:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rosemary Miskin
Chris asked
What you like with Rosemary, Rosemary? 
Braised lamb shanks, please! Must do those again soon,
while the cold weather lasts.
To be serious for a moment, I believe I was named in memory of
an elder brother who died a cot death aged five months.
Rosemary
Hmm. Think you got the better name.

Yes, lamb shanks here too. Slow cooked.

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2020-02-03 19:39:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 3 Feb 2020 02:17:04 -0800 (PST), Rosemary Miskin
Post by Rosemary Miskin
I have no experience of this, but I'm told that if mint establishes 
itself in a bed in a garden it will get *everywhere* and is completely 
uncontrollable so it's best to grow it in pots. 
This is very true! The (large) pot can be buried in the ground to keep
the lookof a herb bed, and stops the mint swamping everything else.
I had the idea of growing something* similarly invasive in a washing
machine drum. I acquired the drum but not the energy or enthusiasm to dig
the big hole necessary to contain it.

*I can't recall what - brain like a sieve just now - but knowing how small
the holes are which I drilled in the cow-lick buckets which allowed the
mint roots through, it would have to be something with hefty roots.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
BrritSki
2020-02-03 10:30:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Fresh mint from the garden in January?!
Mine is producing new shoots I noticed a few days ago.
Mine has vanished again. I can't seem to grow it and just exist on pot
plants from the supermarket for my fresh mint. I've tried seeds and
tried planting the used pot plants but then eventually no mint inthe
garden.
It's dead easy to propagate.  You may need to buy a decent plant from a
garden centre to begin with, but once that's well established, take it
out of its pot and find some of the root runners in the soil.  They may
even break the surface and go above ground like tentacles.  Cut a few
short lengths of them and put them in new pots with fresh compost about
2cm deep.  Er...that's it.  Works for me.
Yes, the pots you buy from supermarkets have been force fed fertilisers
and errm, forced, so don't do well longer term.
I have no experience of this, but I'm told that if mint establishes
itself in a bed in a garden it will get *everywhere* and is completely
uncontrollable so it's best to grow it in pots.
That brings back memories of Grandad's garden that was COVERED in it :)
Knowing that when I planted some in the herb bed outside our kitchen
door in Italy it was contained in a bucket with the bottom cut off. Even
with the lip of the bucket above ground it would still attempt to break
free.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-03 10:50:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <***@mid.individual.net>, Sid Nuncius
<***@hotmail.co.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
No mint here yet, but hyacinths and early narcissi are flowering on our
little terrace. <beam>
My hippeastrum (amaryllis) has many healthy-looking leaves (I _don't_
remove them, except when they die off anyway); I expect it to pop up its
ridiculous red flowers in a month or so (which I always think look like
the Tannoy stacks you used to see at village fetes and the like).

(It must be about four or five years I've had it now - received as big
bulb in cardboard box; as per the instructions, I put it in a big pot of
compost, and added more after the first year - but since then virtually
nothing; I give it the dregs from my coffee or other drink, that's all.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Society has the right to punish wrongdoing; it doesn't have the right to make
punishment a form of entertainment. This is where things have gone wrong:
humiliating other people has become both a blood sport and a narcotic.
- Joe Queenan, RT 2015/6/27-7/3
Jenny M Benson
2020-02-03 11:10:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
My hippeastrum (amaryllis) has many healthy-looking leaves (I _don't_
remove them, except when they die off anyway); I expect it to pop up its
ridiculous red flowers in a month or so (which I always think look like
the Tannoy stacks you used to see at village fetes and the like).
My first introduction to a hippeastrum was when an older spinster lady
in our village had one on her windowsill and my daughter and I were
surprised at her displaying such a phallic symbol.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(It must be about four or five years I've had it now - received as big
bulb in cardboard box; as per the instructions, I put it in a big pot of
compost, and added more after the first year - but since then virtually
nothing; I give it the dregs from my coffee or other drink, that's all.)
Mine started off the same way. Several years old now and has produced
many offspring, most of which I have given away.

Is yours kept indoors? Mine have been outside (on my sheltered,
south-facing patio) for at least a couple of years now. One has the
remains of a last year's leaf still green but I am not expecting this
year's activity quite yet.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-03 14:08:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <***@mid.individual.net>, Jenny M Benson
<***@hotmail.co.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Jenny M Benson
My first introduction to a hippeastrum was when an older spinster lady
in our village had one on her windowsill and my daughter and I were
surprised at her displaying such a phallic symbol.
Yes, when the flower bud appears, it does seem to grow with indecent
haste, doesn't it!
[]
Post by Jenny M Benson
Mine started off the same way. Several years old now and has produced
many offspring, most of which I have given away.
Offspring? Mine doesn't (well, I don't try to cross-pollinate the
flowers to make seeds, but I presume you mean side bulbs like crocuses
do).
Post by Jenny M Benson
Is yours kept indoors? Mine have been outside (on my sheltered,
south-facing patio) for at least a couple of years now. One has the
remains of a last year's leaf still green but I am not expecting this
year's activity quite yet.
Indoors - on my draining board by the south-facing kitchen window.
(That's why it gets dregs.) Except for the brief time from when the
spike appears until the flowers have finished, when I put it on one of
my east-facing windowsills so my neighbours can enjoy it. It normally
(all year round) has several extremely healthy green leaves
(occasionally the outer one or two wither and die, and I pull them off
once all the green has disappeared); at present it has 8 (which I think
is the most it's ever had).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The trouble with the death penalty has always been that nobody wanted it for
everybody, but everybody differed about who should get off. - Albert
Pierrepoint, in his 1974 autobiography.
SODAM
2020-02-03 11:37:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
No mint here yet, but hyacinths and early narcissi are flowering on our
little terrace. <beam>
My hippeastrum (amaryllis) has many healthy-looking leaves (I _don't_
remove them, except when they die off anyway); I expect it to pop up its
ridiculous red flowers in a month or so (which I always think look like
the Tannoy stacks you used to see at village fetes and the like).
(It must be about four or five years I've had it now - received as big
bulb in cardboard box; as per the instructions, I put it in a big pot of
compost, and added more after the first year - but since then virtually
nothing; I give it the dregs from my coffee or other drink, that's all.)
Stop watering it. When you see the flower buds appear, you can water it
again.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-03 14:15:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message
[]
Post by SODAM
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
My hippeastrum (amaryllis) has many healthy-looking leaves (I _don't_
[]
Post by SODAM
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
nothing; I give it the dregs from my coffee or other drink, that's all.)
Stop watering it. When you see the flower buds appear, you can water it
again.
It's been happy for years as it is, generally producing the ridiculous
flowers (normally one pair on a shared stalk, though one year - the
first or second - it produced two such stalks, i. e. four flowers)
around February or March. Apart from mug dregs, I don't really water it,
except perhaps a bit in high summer when the house gets very hot (as
homes of this type do) and I feel its soil is bone dry.

I couldn't put it outside - I'd forget about it, and besides it's the
only living thing I _intentionally_ share with, and I like its company!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The trouble with the death penalty has always been that nobody wanted it for
everybody, but everybody differed about who should get off. - Albert
Pierrepoint, in his 1974 autobiography.
Mike
2020-02-03 17:39:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In message
[]
Post by SODAM
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
My hippeastrum (amaryllis) has many healthy-looking leaves (I _don't_
[]
Post by SODAM
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
nothing; I give it the dregs from my coffee or other drink, that's all.)
Stop watering it. When you see the flower buds appear, you can water it
again.
It's been happy for years as it is, generally producing the ridiculous
flowers (normally one pair on a shared stalk, though one year - the
first or second - it produced two such stalks, i. e. four flowers)
around February or March. Apart from mug dregs, I don't really water it,
except perhaps a bit in high summer when the house gets very hot (as
homes of this type do) and I feel its soil is bone dry.
I couldn't put it outside - I'd forget about it, and besides it's the
only living thing I _intentionally_ share with, and I like its company!
‘Is this the thread to Amarylii?’
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-03 19:42:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[woffle snipped]
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I couldn't put it outside - I'd forget about it, and besides it's the
only living thing I _intentionally_ share with, and I like its company!
‘Is this the thread to Amarylii?’
LOL! VG.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The average age at which a woman has her first child has passed 30.
Jason Cowley, RT 2016/6/11-17
Chris McMillan
2020-02-05 19:04:30 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
No mint here yet, but hyacinths and early narcissi are flowering on our
little terrace. <beam>
My hippeastrum (amaryllis) has many healthy-looking leaves (I _don't_
remove them, except when they die off anyway); I expect it to pop up its
ridiculous red flowers in a month or so (which I always think look like
the Tannoy stacks you used to see at village fetes and the like).
(It must be about four or five years I've had it now - received as big
bulb in cardboard box; as per the instructions, I put it in a big pot of
compost, and added more after the first year - but since then virtually
nothing; I give it the dregs from my coffee or other drink, that's all.)
Stick it outside, minus its pot after it’s died down, in a shady spot for
the summer and start it again in the autumn. Works for some people. Mine,
stupid thing, never died last year and has had healthy leaves only all the
year.

Sincerely Chris
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-05 23:05:23 UTC
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Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
No mint here yet, but hyacinths and early narcissi are flowering on our
little terrace. <beam>
My hippeastrum (amaryllis) has many healthy-looking leaves (I _don't_
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Stick it outside, minus its pot after it’s died down, in a shady spot for
the summer and start it again in the autumn. Works for some people. Mine,
I'd forget it - besides, I like its company.
Post by Chris McMillan
stupid thing, never died last year and has had healthy leaves only all the
year.
Mine's always flowered, despite having healthy leaves - though there's
no sign of the flower spike until there suddenly is (at which point it's
one of the fastest-growing parts of any plant I have known: it shoots up
about a couple of feet in a few days, and it's not just a shoot, but
quite a substantial stalk).
Post by Chris McMillan
Sincerely Chris
John
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If you want to make people angry, lie to them. If you want to make them
absolutely livid, then tell 'em the truth.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-02-03 19:43:19 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
No mint here yet, but hyacinths and early narcissi are flowering on
our little terrace.  <beam>
I'm wrong. There are some small shoots already. Not enough to eat
yet, though.
Mmm. Hyacinths ad narcissi - yum?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Santa's elves are just a bunch of subordinate Clauses.
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-02-05 18:57:42 UTC
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On Monday, 3 February 2020 09:51:11 UTC, Sid Nuncius wrote:

snipped>
Post by Sid Nuncius
I have no experience of this, but I'm told that if mint establishes
itself in a bed in a garden it will get *everywhere* and is completely
uncontrollable so it's best to grow it in pots.
A few years ago our mint was taking over and I was assured that I would never manage to dig it all out. In fact I got rid of it all and we had to repalnt.
Mike
2020-02-03 10:13:28 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Fresh mint from the garden in January?!
Mine is producing new shoots I noticed a few days ago.
Mine has vanished again. I can't seem to grow it and just exist on pot
plants from the supermarket for my fresh mint. I've tried seeds and
tried planting the used pot plants but then eventually no mint inthe
garden.
I tried repeatedly for years, in pots and in the garden - failed repeatedly
then - wow! it grew, and grew; this was about three years back and is now
doing very well next to the greenhouse. The only direction in which it
could spread is down the side of the greenhouse which is stony and weedy as
well as difficult to access.
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2020-02-03 19:31:07 UTC
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On Mon, 03 Feb 2020 09:37:55 +0000, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Fresh mint from the garden in January?!
Mine is producing new shoots I noticed a few days ago.
Mine has vanished again. I can't seem to grow it and just exist on pot
plants from the supermarket for my fresh mint. I've tried seeds and
tried planting the used pot plants but then eventually no mint inthe
garden.
I can't get rid of mine. I dumped some cow-lick buckets on top of it to
grow potatoes and Jerusalem artichokes in but the mint has crept in through
the drainage holes. Fortunately the artichokes have not escaped by the same
route.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
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