Discussion:
Forms (this might run and run!)
(too old to reply)
Mike McMillan
2021-08-04 11:22:40 UTC
Permalink
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???

Just curious really.
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
krw
2021-08-04 11:42:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
I think in this country we fill them in but our American cousins fill
them out.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Vicky Ayech
2021-08-04 12:41:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
I think in this country we fill them in but our American cousins fill
them out.
Yes.
Sam Plusnet
2021-08-04 21:07:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
I think in this country we fill them in but our American cousins fill
them out.
They run for office whilst we stand for parliament.
--
Sam Plusnet
Sid Nuncius
2021-08-05 06:54:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
I think in this country we fill them in but our American cousins fill
them out.
But, as with so many other idioms, US usage is leaking into the language
here. I have always said that one fills forms in but I think both are
accepted here now and I don't think it matters that much.

You say "fill out", I say "fill in"
Let's call the whole thing off...
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Jenny M Benson
2021-08-05 09:29:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
But, as with so many other idioms, US usage is leaking into the language
here.
I don't object to IS (or other) usage leaking into our language - it is,
after all, how English came to be the extensive language it is to-day.

What I do object to, strongly, is the weakening of the language by so
many words losing their precise meaning. For
goodness-knows-how-many-years we have all known what a butcher is. But
"The Vegetarian Butcher" for heaven's sake? (Absolutely no objection to
vegetarianism, as long as it's not forced on me.) Husband no longer
necessarily means "Married man", nor wife "married woman". Of course
the REAL meanings of disinterested, decimated and many others are long gone.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Clive Arthur
2021-08-05 10:16:30 UTC
Permalink
On 05/08/2021 10:29, Jenny M Benson wrote:

<snip>
Post by Jenny M Benson
What I do object to, strongly, is the weakening of the language by so
many words losing their precise meaning.  For
goodness-knows-how-many-years we have all known what a butcher is.  But
"The Vegetarian Butcher" for heaven's sake?  (Absolutely no objection to
vegetarianism, as long as it's not forced on me.)
I'm a vegetarian, and I've absolutely no objection to being butchered as
long as it's not forced on me.

That's probably what most farm animals think too.
--
Cheers
Clive
Peter
2021-08-05 13:36:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
<snip>
Post by Jenny M Benson
What I do object to, strongly, is the weakening of the language by so
many words losing their precise meaning.  For
goodness-knows-how-many-years we have all known what a butcher is.
But "The Vegetarian Butcher" for heaven's sake?  (Absolutely no
objection to vegetarianism, as long as it's not forced on me.)
I'm a vegetarian
I know it's none of my business, but may I ask why? Health reasons,
moral reasons,...?
Post by Clive Arthur
, and I've absolutely no objection to being butchered as
long as it's not forced on me.
That's probably what most farm animals think too.
--
The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here
Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg
Clive Arthur
2021-08-05 14:13:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
<snip>
Post by Jenny M Benson
What I do object to, strongly, is the weakening of the language by so
many words losing their precise meaning.  For
goodness-knows-how-many-years we have all known what a butcher is.
But "The Vegetarian Butcher" for heaven's sake?  (Absolutely no
objection to vegetarianism, as long as it's not forced on me.)
I'm a vegetarian
I know it's none of my business, but may I ask why?  Health reasons,
moral reasons,...?
Post by Clive Arthur
, and I've absolutely no objection to being butchered as long as it's
not forced on me.
That's probably what most farm animals think too.
At first it was just convenience, because I lived with a vegetarian and
wasn't really too fussed about meat. I've never really liked the crap
stuff like cheap burgers and kebabs except after a few pints, and after
working in the far east and eating proper chicken, never again ate the
warm soggy cardboard we have here. I did eat steak a couple of years
ago in Texas and it was very nice, but at £50 for an 8oz steak it should
have been (I wasn't buying), and I've eaten reindeer (well, part of one)
in Norway in similar circumstances.

But, it's better for one, better for us, and let's face it, modern meat
production is industrialised animal cruelty. So I can revel in post hoc
justification.

Of course, there are people who 'only eat free range organic meat', just
like the 90% of drivers who think they're above average. "But I like
it!" seems to be the best reason most people can give, as if they've
never changed the things they like before.
--
Cheers
Clive
Mike McMillan
2021-08-05 14:27:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Clive Arthur
<snip>
Post by Jenny M Benson
What I do object to, strongly, is the weakening of the language by so
many words losing their precise meaning.  For
goodness-knows-how-many-years we have all known what a butcher is.
But "The Vegetarian Butcher" for heaven's sake?  (Absolutely no
objection to vegetarianism, as long as it's not forced on me.)
I'm a vegetarian
I know it's none of my business, but may I ask why?  Health reasons,
moral reasons,...?
Post by Clive Arthur
, and I've absolutely no objection to being butchered as long as it's
not forced on me.
That's probably what most farm animals think too.
At first it was just convenience, because I lived with a vegetarian and
wasn't really too fussed about meat. I've never really liked the crap
stuff like cheap burgers and kebabs except after a few pints, and after
working in the far east and eating proper chicken, never again ate the
warm soggy cardboard we have here. I did eat steak a couple of years
ago in Texas and it was very nice, but at £50 for an 8oz steak it should
have been (I wasn't buying), and I've eaten reindeer (well, part of one)
in Norway in similar circumstances.
But, it's better for one, better for us, and let's face it, modern meat
production is industrialised animal cruelty. So I can revel in post hoc
justification.
Of course, there are people who 'only eat free range organic meat', just
like the 90% of drivers who think they're above average. "But I like
it!" seems to be the best reason most people can give, as if they've
never changed the things they like before.
I would not profess to be vegetarian - I like meat, I don’t like all meat
and can’t tolerate any offal at all but, when we do have meat (mainly
chicken with occasional cuts of beef) we tend to restrict ourselves to
relatively small portion sizes and find that what suppliers regard as a
single portion is usually enough for the two of us and sometimes it is
enough for two meals each. We have a problem with the ‘five a day’ regime
as our normal diet means we have 10 - 12 veg / fruit a day most days. The
reason for this being not only that we enjoy the veg and fruit but that as
we are both diet controlled type 2 diabetics, it helps us avoid having to
take medication.

A few years back, I was taking pills daily for diabetes, blood pressure,
cancer of the prostate and also ‘statins for cholesterol control. I am
still on statins as the doctors seem to regard them as an insurance policy
but the rest are just distant memories thank goodness!
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Jenny M Benson
2021-08-05 15:43:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
we tend to restrict ourselves to
relatively small portion sizes and find that what suppliers regard as a
single portion is usually enough for the two of us and sometimes it is
enough for two meals each.
May I swerve this thread a little again, please? If you said yes, thank
you! If you said no, please move on to the next thread.

The other day I was actually in a real live supermarket (clockwise)
buying ingredients for salad. I bought 2 Little Gem lettuces. I bought
a bunch of spring onions, a bag of radishes and a pack of haslet.

Since then, I've eaten salad 3 times and also had a couple of lettuce &
Marmite sandwiches. The haslet has all gone, the onions have all gone.
I still have nearly a whole lettuce. I still have 4 enormous radishes.

Why on earth can't I buy just ONE Little Gem lettuce at a time? Why on
earth aren't radishes packed to match the the number of spring onions in
a bunch? (Or vice versa, IYSWIM.)

I wonder how radishes "fit" as an accompaniment to lettuce & Marmite
sandwiches.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
Peter
2021-08-05 16:09:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
we tend to restrict ourselves to
relatively small portion sizes and find that what suppliers regard as a
single portion is usually enough for the two of us and sometimes it is
enough for two meals each.
May I swerve this thread a little again, please?  If you said yes, thank
you!  If you said no, please move on to the next thread.
The other day I was actually in a real live supermarket  (clockwise)
buying ingredients for salad.  I bought 2 Little Gem lettuces.  I bought
a bunch of spring onions, a bag of radishes and a pack of haslet.
Since then, I've eaten salad 3 times and also had a couple of lettuce &
Marmite sandwiches.  The haslet has all gone, the onions have all gone.
 I still have nearly a whole lettuce.  I still have 4 enormous radishes.
Why on earth can't I buy just ONE Little Gem lettuce at a time?  Why on
earth aren't radishes packed to match the the number of spring onions in
a bunch?  (Or vice versa, IYSWIM.)
I wonder how radishes "fit" as an accompaniment to lettuce & Marmite
sandwiches.
My local Sainsbury's (anticlockwise) sells its little gem two to the
packet. I eat one per salad (and one salad = one lunch). Am I being
greedy?

When my wife was alive we used to buy iceberg lettuce: one salad each
and a week of lettuce+ham sandwiches for my supper.
--
The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here
Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg
Nick Odell
2021-08-05 16:42:05 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 5 Aug 2021 16:43:59 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Mike McMillan
we tend to restrict ourselves to
relatively small portion sizes and find that what suppliers regard as a
single portion is usually enough for the two of us and sometimes it is
enough for two meals each.
May I swerve this thread a little again, please? If you said yes, thank
you! If you said no, please move on to the next thread.
The other day I was actually in a real live supermarket (clockwise)
buying ingredients for salad. I bought 2 Little Gem lettuces. I bought
a bunch of spring onions, a bag of radishes and a pack of haslet.
Since then, I've eaten salad 3 times and also had a couple of lettuce &
Marmite sandwiches. The haslet has all gone, the onions have all gone.
I still have nearly a whole lettuce. I still have 4 enormous radishes.
Why on earth can't I buy just ONE Little Gem lettuce at a time? Why on
earth aren't radishes packed to match the the number of spring onions in
a bunch? (Or vice versa, IYSWIM.)
I wonder how radishes "fit" as an accompaniment to lettuce & Marmite
sandwiches.
I think the key word in that rant might be "supermarket." If you still
have a greengrocer nearby they might be more helpful since I'm sure
you won't be the only local customer with similar needs.

If you are stuck with only a supermarket to shop from, do they offer
"living salads"? Yes, I know all salads are alive, apart from the ones
that end up in the compost but they mean salad sown in a tray which
keeps growing provided you water it and until you use it all up.

Tonight I am having lettuce omlette. If you've not tried it, give it a
go. Not only does it help to use up the abundance of lettuce before it
goes brown but it tastes delicious and provided the omlette isn't
overcooked, still remains crunchy.


Nick
Penny
2021-08-06 17:44:06 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 05 Aug 2021 17:42:05 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Tonight I am having lettuce omlette. If you've not tried it, give it a
go. Not only does it help to use up the abundance of lettuce before it
goes brown but it tastes delicious and provided the omlette isn't
overcooked, still remains crunchy.
I don't like lettuce much at all and don't buy it these days. I have, in
the past, found myself with a surfeit of lettuce and added it all to a
clear-out-the-fridge soup, very tasty :)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2021-08-09 18:13:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
I think the key word in that rant might be "supermarket." If you still
have a greengrocer nearby they might be more helpful since I'm sure
you won't be the only local customer with similar needs.
Sadly, our local greengrocer has been no more for some years now.
Post by Nick Odell
If you are stuck with only a supermarket to shop from, do they offer
"living salads"? Yes, I know all salads are alive, apart from the ones
that end up in the compost but they mean salad sown in a tray which
keeps growing provided you water it and until you use it all up.
I usually rely on my own living salad, but for various reasons it has
not been a good year for my veg growing this year. Chief culprit(s) as
far as lettuce is concerned is/are the wood pigeons who polished off a
promising crop.
Post by Nick Odell
Tonight I am having lettuce omlette. If you've not tried it, give it a
go. Not only does it help to use up the abundance of lettuce before it
goes brown but it tastes delicious and provided the omlette isn't
overcooked, still remains crunchy.
Two snags there. The principal one is that I have never got the hang of
omelettes. Just can't seem to cook a decent one. Secondary to that is
that although I have a 2-ring hotplate, it is such a fag to find
somewhere to put it and connect it and wait for ages for it to heat up
that I can hardly ever be bothered to use it. As a general rule, if it
can't be microwaved or miniature-ovened it don't get cooked here. (With
the exception of jacket potatoes for which I do use the designated combi
setting on "the other microwave."
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
John Ashby
2021-08-05 17:27:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
we tend to restrict ourselves to
relatively small portion sizes and find that what suppliers regard as a
single portion is usually enough for the two of us and sometimes it is
enough for two meals each.
May I swerve this thread a little again, please?  If you said yes, thank
you!  If you said no, please move on to the next thread.
The other day I was actually in a real live supermarket  (clockwise)
buying ingredients for salad.  I bought 2 Little Gem lettuces.  I bought
a bunch of spring onions, a bag of radishes and a pack of haslet.
Since then, I've eaten salad 3 times and also had a couple of lettuce &
Marmite sandwiches.  The haslet has all gone, the onions have all gone.
 I still have nearly a whole lettuce.  I still have 4 enormous radishes.
Why on earth can't I buy just ONE Little Gem lettuce at a time?  Why on
earth aren't radishes packed to match the the number of spring onions in
a bunch?  (Or vice versa, IYSWIM.)
I wonder how radishes "fit" as an accompaniment to lettuce & Marmite
sandwiches.
In my youth, Father Will^W^W I used to snack on what might be called
breadless lettuce and marmite sandwiches - dollops of yeasty saltness
folded within a lettuce leaf.

Another way to use up lettuce is with peas - saute onion till
translucent, then add shredded lettuce, frozen peas, cook in stock
(chicken or veg) and finish with cream.

john
Sam Plusnet
2021-08-06 17:55:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
we tend to restrict ourselves to
relatively small portion sizes and find that what suppliers regard as a
single portion is usually enough for the two of us and sometimes it is
enough for two meals each.
May I swerve this thread a little again, please?  If you said yes, thank
you!  If you said no, please move on to the next thread.
The other day I was actually in a real live supermarket  (clockwise)
buying ingredients for salad.  I bought 2 Little Gem lettuces.  I bought
a bunch of spring onions, a bag of radishes and a pack of haslet.
Since then, I've eaten salad 3 times and also had a couple of lettuce &
Marmite sandwiches.  The haslet has all gone, the onions have all gone.
 I still have nearly a whole lettuce.  I still have 4 enormous radishes.
Why on earth can't I buy just ONE Little Gem lettuce at a time?  Why on
earth aren't radishes packed to match the the number of spring onions in
a bunch?  (Or vice versa, IYSWIM.)
I wonder how radishes "fit" as an accompaniment to lettuce & Marmite
sandwiches.
When reading the nutrition information on various packets (you have to
make your own entertainment these days) I have seen a recommended
"serving"[1] on many a strange item.
Perhaps their ideas of suitable "servings" of radish, lettuce & onions
are random enough to justify those quantities?

[1] Apparently the amount they imagine one individual will/should eat at
a single sitting[2].

[2] Stand up when you eat - it doesn't count against your diet.
--
Sam Plusnet
Chris
2021-08-06 09:16:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Clive Arthur
<snip>
Post by Jenny M Benson
What I do object to, strongly, is the weakening of the language by so
many words losing their precise meaning.  For
goodness-knows-how-many-years we have all known what a butcher is.
But "The Vegetarian Butcher" for heaven's sake?  (Absolutely no
objection to vegetarianism, as long as it's not forced on me.)
I'm a vegetarian
I know it's none of my business, but may I ask why?  Health reasons,
moral reasons,...?
Post by Clive Arthur
, and I've absolutely no objection to being butchered as long as it's
not forced on me.
That's probably what most farm animals think too.
At first it was just convenience, because I lived with a vegetarian and
wasn't really too fussed about meat. I've never really liked the crap
stuff like cheap burgers and kebabs except after a few pints, and after
working in the far east and eating proper chicken, never again ate the
warm soggy cardboard we have here. I did eat steak a couple of years
ago in Texas and it was very nice, but at £50 for an 8oz steak it should
have been (I wasn't buying), and I've eaten reindeer (well, part of one)
in Norway in similar circumstances.
But, it's better for one, better for us, and let's face it, modern meat
production is industrialised animal cruelty. So I can revel in post hoc
justification.
Of course, there are people who 'only eat free range organic meat', just
like the 90% of drivers who think they're above average. "But I like
it!" seems to be the best reason most people can give, as if they've
never changed the things they like before.
I would not profess to be vegetarian - I like meat, I don’t like all meat
and can’t tolerate any offal at all but, when we do have meat (mainly
chicken with occasional cuts of beef) we tend to restrict ourselves to
relatively small portion sizes and find that what suppliers regard as a
single portion is usually enough for the two of us and sometimes it is
enough for two meals each. We have a problem with the ‘five a day’ regime
as our normal diet means we have 10 - 12 veg / fruit a day most days. The
reason for this being not only that we enjoy the veg and fruit but that as
we are both diet controlled type 2 diabetics, it helps us avoid having to
take medication.
A few years back, I was taking pills daily for diabetes, blood pressure,
cancer of the prostate and also ‘statins for cholesterol control. I am
still on statins as the doctors seem to regard them as an insurance policy
but the rest are just distant memories thank goodness!
As a rule once you’re diagnosed diabetic type 2, it’s expected you’ll go
from diet controlled fairly soon to a medication, that’s if you’re unlucky
enough to need medication on first testing but if the symptoms I had were
diabetes I’ve had them for so long it’s unlikely they were so naturally I’m
going to be super strict with myself. I have been aware of the severe
diabetes sll my life as a cousin had a friend who was a diabetic type 1 in
the 1950s, and that was *grim*. I was reminded of her when I met another
schoolgirl just as I left school. Her dietary life was as lousy as
everyone else being treated for childhood obesity plus the injections.

Now I’ve been feeling more than off colour for a few years I’ve followed
the sensible Wunderkind and removed all gluten and dairy from the diet and
having got used to little sugar it’s been an easy change over. The worst
thing is that soya has also become an allergy so tofu is out. One can buy
a non wheat soy sauce I can tolerate being well diluted in marinades.

Unlike Himself I’m stuck on my blood pressure meds for life.

Sincerely Chris
Mike McMillan
2021-08-05 12:14:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sid Nuncius
But, as with so many other idioms, US usage is leaking into the language
here.
I don't object to IS (or other) usage leaking into our language - it is,
after all, how English came to be the extensive language it is to-day.
What I do object to, strongly, is the weakening of the language by so
many words losing their precise meaning. For
goodness-knows-how-many-years we have all known what a butcher is. But
"The Vegetarian Butcher" for heaven's sake? (Absolutely no objection to
vegetarianism, as long as it's not forced on me.) Husband no longer
necessarily means "Married man", nor wife "married woman". Of course
the REAL meanings of disinterested, decimated and many others are long gone.
Decimated has been devalued by far more than 10%:-(((
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Peter
2021-08-05 13:34:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sid Nuncius
But, as with so many other idioms, US usage is leaking into the
language here.
I don't object to IS
If that's "Islamic State" you are obliged by law to insert a "so-called".
Post by Jenny M Benson
(or other) usage leaking into our language - it is,
after all, how English came to be the extensive language it is to-day.
What I do object to, strongly, is the weakening of the language by so
many words losing their precise meaning.
Yes, I agree. One that annoys me is "dilemma" being used to mean
"problem (or maybe just annoyance) of any kind"; rather than a problem
of a particular kind. Also, in just a couple of years we've lost
"exponential". And the BBC, single handedly so to speak, has deprived
us of "curate".
Post by Jenny M Benson
  For
goodness-knows-how-many-years we have all known what a butcher is.  But
"The Vegetarian Butcher" for heaven's sake?  (Absolutely no objection to
vegetarianism, as long as it's not forced on me.)  Husband no longer
necessarily means "Married man", nor wife "married woman".  Of course
the REAL meanings of disinterested, decimated and many others are long gone.
--
The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here
Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg
John Ashby
2021-08-05 13:56:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sid Nuncius
But, as with so many other idioms, US usage is leaking into the
language here.
I don't object to IS
If that's "Islamic State" you are obliged by law to insert a "so-called".
If, as seems likely, it was a typo for US, the same might very well apply.

john
Mike McMillan
2021-08-05 14:13:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Peter
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sid Nuncius
But, as with so many other idioms, US usage is leaking into the
language here.
I don't object to IS
If that's "Islamic State" you are obliged by law to insert a "so-called".
If, as seems likely, it was a typo for US, the same might very well apply.
john
And what a ‘state’ the united is in!;-)))
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Peter
2021-08-05 14:53:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Peter
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Sid Nuncius
But, as with so many other idioms, US usage is leaking into the
language here.
I don't object to IS
If that's "Islamic State" you are obliged by law to insert a "so-called".
If, as seems likely, it was a typo for US, the same might very well apply.
Tee hee hee.
Post by John Ashby
john
--
The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here
Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg
Nick Leverton
2021-08-04 11:44:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
Given the choice, I would bury them in soft peat for three months then
recycle them as firelighters.

Nick
--
We will be restoring normality as soon as we are sure what is normal anyway.
- Douglas Adams
Penny
2021-08-04 11:45:44 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 4 Aug 2021 11:22:40 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Yes
HTH
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
John Finlay
2021-08-04 12:13:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Wed, 4 Aug 2021 11:22:40 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Yes
HTH
You fill them up!
Mike McMillan
2021-08-04 12:26:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Finlay
Post by Penny
On Wed, 4 Aug 2021 11:22:40 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Yes
HTH
You fill them up!
My late father-in-law was vociferously adamant that one *always* filled
forms in and not out! Furthermore, he would defend his view to the death I
suspect (he was not known for his affability, pragmatism or ability to
‘suffer fools’ amiably!
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Chris
2021-08-04 14:44:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by John Finlay
Post by Penny
On Wed, 4 Aug 2021 11:22:40 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Yes
HTH
You fill them up!
My late father-in-law was vociferously adamant that one *always* filled
forms in and not out! Furthermore, he would defend his view to the death I
suspect (he was not known for his affability, pragmatism or ability to
‘suffer fools’ amiably!
There was a *lot* of form filling in the land of the planner - in his case
lease and sale of railway land.

Sincerely Chris
Sam Plusnet
2021-08-04 21:09:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by John Finlay
Post by Penny
On Wed, 4 Aug 2021 11:22:40 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Yes
HTH
You fill them up!
My late father-in-law was vociferously adamant that one *always* filled
forms in and not out! Furthermore, he would defend his view to the death I
suspect (he was not known for his affability, pragmatism or ability to
‘suffer fools’ amiably!
Well, once you've filled in all the letter "O"s on the form, you may as
well fill in the boxes.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2021-08-04 22:39:21 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 4 Aug 2021 13:13:46 +0100, John Finlay <***@hotmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Finlay
Post by Penny
On Wed, 4 Aug 2021 11:22:40 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Yes
HTH
You fill them up!
Fill them in, fill them out, in, out, in, out, shake them all about.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Clive Arthur
2021-08-04 12:23:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
One has people to do that.
--
Cheers
Clive
Mike McMillan
2021-08-04 12:26:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
One has people to do that.
That one reason cats keep staff then!
--
Toodle Pip, Mike McMillan
Peter
2021-08-04 13:41:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
One has people to do that.
That one reason cats keep staff then!
You must be right, for I have never seen a cat filling a form in or out.
--
The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here
Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg
Nick Leverton
2021-08-04 13:47:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
One has people to do that.
That one reason cats keep staff then!
Cats sit *on* forms, as all cat staff know!

Nick
--
We will be restoring normality as soon as we are sure what is normal anyway.
- Douglas Adams
Nick Odell
2021-08-04 13:54:58 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 4 Aug 2021 12:26:52 -0000 (UTC), Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
One has people to do that.
That one reason cats keep staff then!
On-line forms shouldn't present any problems for cats: their keyboard
skills are the stuff of legend.

Nick
Peter
2021-08-04 13:38:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
In. Americans fill them out.
--
The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here
Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2021-08-04 14:11:56 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 4 Aug 2021 at 11:22:40, Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
I think UK usage leans more towards in, though out perhaps more when
you're doing it to achieve something - say, obtain something - than just
as a chore.

I'd normally say these are spurious auxiliaries, and one could indeed
say just fill them - but that does sound odd. Complete them doesn't,
though.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Veni Vidi Visa [I came, I saw, I did a little shopping] - Mik from S+AS Limited
(***@saslimited.demon.co.uk), 1998
Sam Plusnet
2021-08-04 21:12:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Wed, 4 Aug 2021 at 11:22:40, Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
I think UK usage leans more towards in, though out perhaps more when
you're doing it to achieve something - say, obtain something - than just
as a chore.
I'd normally say these are spurious auxiliaries, and one could indeed
say just fill them - but that does sound odd. Complete them doesn't,
though.
Spurious Auxiliary?
Name of the last Roman soldier left on duty at Hadrian's Wall when it
was abandoned?
--
Sam Plusnet
Sid Nuncius
2021-08-05 06:46:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Wed, 4 Aug 2021 at 11:22:40, Mike McMillan
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
I think UK usage leans more towards in, though out perhaps more when
you're doing it to achieve something - say, obtain something - than
just as a chore.
I'd normally say these are spurious auxiliaries, and one could indeed
say just fill them - but that does sound odd. Complete them doesn't,
though.
Spurious Auxiliary?
Name of the last Roman soldier left on duty at Hadrian's Wall when it
was abandoned?
Whoever they were named after, their second album was rubbish.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Clive Arthur
2021-08-04 15:55:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laws_of_Form
--
Cheers
Clive
Joe Kerr
2021-08-04 22:14:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
I've always been under the impression that when confronted with a form
most people grumble vociferously and do their best to ignore it.
--
Ric
Penny
2021-08-04 22:37:52 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 4 Aug 2021 23:14:05 +0100, Joe Kerr <***@cheerful.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
I've always been under the impression that when confronted with a form
most people grumble vociferously and do their best to ignore it.
They certainly don't read the instructions provided.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
198kHz
2021-08-05 09:05:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Does one fill them in - or fill them out???
Just curious really.
I complete them - dilemma avoided. :)
--
198kHz
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