Discussion:
Cricket
(too old to reply)
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-01-27 16:06:08 UTC
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<beam>
Sid Nuncius
2020-01-27 19:40:37 UTC
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Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
<beam>
<exceedingly large beam>
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-01-27 19:50:49 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
<beam>
Tubaifor?
Post by Sid Nuncius
<exceedingly large beam>
Railway sleeper?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

By the very definition of "news," we hear very little about the dominant
threats to our lives, and the most about the rarest, including terror.
"LibertyMcG" alias Brian P. McGlinchey, 2013-7-23
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-01-27 21:07:21 UTC
Permalink
On Monday, 27 January 2020 19:53:30 UTC, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:

<snipped>
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Tubaifor?
?
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-01-27 21:29:08 UTC
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Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
<snipped>
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Tubaifor?
?
Ask any builder or DIY enthusiast what one is ... (-:
(Or an Irish Jay.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The desire to remain private and/or anonymous used to be a core British value,
but in recent times it has been treated with suspicion - an unfortunate by-
product of the widespread desire for fame. - Chris Middleton,
Computing 6 September 2011
John Ashby
2020-01-27 21:50:03 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
<snipped>
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Tubaifor?
?
(Or an Irish Jay.)
The Irish builder's exam: What's the difference between a joist and a
girder?
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Joist wrote Ulysses while Girder wrote Faust.

john
Penny
2020-01-28 16:25:44 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 27 Jan 2020 21:29:08 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
<snipped>
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Tubaifor?
?
I don't think a tubaifor (which I initially read with Welsh pronunciation
and was further confused) is much of a beam at all. Glad you're not
building houses...
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Or an Irish Jay.)
That's definitely a beam.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-01-28 22:59:13 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Mon, 27 Jan 2020 21:29:08 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
<snipped>
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Tubaifor?
?
I don't think a tubaifor (which I initially read with Welsh pronunciation
and was further confused) is much of a beam at all. Glad you're not
building houses...
Oh, I know; first time I came across the word was in Fawlty Towers,
where the cowboy builder Basil had found had blocked off a door in a
retaining wall just using one, to the anguish of the proper builder
Sybil had brought in ...
Post by Penny
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(Or an Irish Jay.)
That's definitely a beam.
(-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

He [Alfred Kinsey] wouldn't ask 'Have you ever slept with a horse?' He would
say, 'When did you first sleep with a horse?' [RT 2018/5/5-11]
John Ashby
2020-01-27 21:44:13 UTC
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Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
<snipped>
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Tubaifor?
?
2"x4"

john
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-01-27 23:16:11 UTC
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Ah, 2×4. Of course.
Tony Smith Gloucestershire
2020-01-27 23:23:23 UTC
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Ah! 2×4 of course. Thanks.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-01-28 02:01:19 UTC
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Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
<snipped>
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Tubaifor?
?
2"x4"
john
And the other one's an RSJ (reinforced steel joist, i. e. a girder).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

offensive speech is something to be protected, not celebrated.
- "yoni", 2015-8-5
Jim Easterbrook
2020-01-28 08:45:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Tony Smith Gloucestershire
<snipped>
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Tubaifor?
?
2"x4"
john
And the other one's an RSJ (reinforced steel joist, i. e. a girder).
Rolled Steel Joist.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Chris J Dixon
2020-01-28 08:45:56 UTC
Permalink
2"x4"
And, as all carpenters know, if you expect the timber thus
designated actually to have those dimensions, you will be
woefully disappointed.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Mike
2020-01-28 10:12:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
2"x4"
And, as all carpenters know, if you expect the timber thus
designated actually to have those dimensions, you will be
woefully disappointed.
Chris
I was employed in the DIY trade in the early to late 60’s and dealt with
softwood and hardwood sections and mouldings. I was told that (frinstance)
2” x 4” was the that of the sawn state of the timber and that approximately
1/16” would be planed off each face to produce ‘PAR’ (planed all round)
section. In practice,
I found that rather than 1/8” being lost on either dimension, it was
invariably 1/4”, thus, 2X4 was actually
1 3/4 “ x 3 3/4” and no more! My theory was (and still is) that the sawn
section was undersize to start with which no doubt gave the timber merchant
a slight gain! And of course, converting to metric measurements gave the
devil chance to exploit this matter further!!!
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2020-01-28 11:14:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
2"x4"
And, as all carpenters know, if you expect the timber thus
designated actually to have those dimensions, you will be
woefully disappointed.
Chris
I was employed in the DIY trade in the early to late 60’s and dealt with
softwood and hardwood sections and mouldings. I was told that (frinstance)
2” x 4” was the that of the sawn state of the timber and that approximately
1/16” would be planed off each face to produce ‘PAR’ (planed all round)
section. In practice,
I found that rather than 1/8” being lost on either dimension, it was
invariably 1/4”, thus, 2X4 was actually
1 3/4 “ x 3 3/4” and no more! My theory was (and still is) that the sawn
section was undersize to start with which no doubt gave the timber merchant
a slight gain! And of course, converting to metric measurements gave the
devil chance to exploit this matter further!!!
I think you'll find the (for instance) 2" measurement is to the
pencil-mark or equivalent. You are going to pay for the sawdust and
the planed shavings so first you have the 1/8"+ table saw blade and
then you have the planer blade all whittling away your initial width.

Nick
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