Discussion:
OT customer service fail from Morrisons delivery
(too old to reply)
Vicky Ayech
2018-07-22 17:17:30 UTC
Permalink
I emailed Morrisons yesterday because we found a bug in our spinach.
I said
Extra protein was found today in the baby spinach.
1 Morrisons Baby Spinach 1.00 GBP
We had already microwaved the pack and put it on plates. Luckily my
companion spotted it. I might not have as was notwearing my glasses. I
am rather upset to think I might have eaten it. Your supplier should
wash the bugs out of the veg. I enclose a picture of bug and packet.
They responded with 2 emails. One said £1 refund and the other
said:

Good afternoon Mrs Ayech,

Thank you for attachments and I apologise for spoiling your meal.

I am sorry to see that you have found an insect in the baby spinch. I
can understand your disappointment because you must have put so much
effort in cooking this dish which had to be thrown away due to our
actions. As you are aware that issues like these are quite rare and
your assistance with this matter will help us in preventing them in
the future.

Could I ask you to give us a call on the 0345 322 0000 so that I could
transfer your call to our Head Office team who will deal with your
complaint? Alternatively, Head Office Team can be contacted directly
on 0345 611 6111 and they are open from 8am-8pm Monday-Friday,
Saturday 9am-5pm and Sunday 10am-4pm.

Again, please accept my apologies for any inconvenience this may have
caused and do not hesitate to contact me, should you require any
further assistance.

Kind regards,

Noreen Ahmed
Morrisons Online Customer Service Team
I emailed again

Well, that is a silly reply as I said in my email I microwaved the
spinach, so no effort in cooking it! I don't want to call head office.
You have a photo of the bug and the pictures of the wrapping, showing
the name and bar code. I certainly hope that issues like this are
rare!

We found a sink plug in bagged veg a few months ago but Tesco refunded
and also send a £5 voucher to say sorry.
Btms
2018-07-22 17:33:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
I emailed Morrisons yesterday because we found a bug in our spinach.
I said
Extra protein was found today in the baby spinach.
1 Morrisons Baby Spinach 1.00 GBP
We had already microwaved the pack and put it on plates. Luckily my
companion spotted it. I might not have as was notwearing my glasses. I
am rather upset to think I might have eaten it. Your supplier should
wash the bugs out of the veg. I enclose a picture of bug and packet.
They responded with 2 emails. One said £1 refund and the other
Good afternoon Mrs Ayech,
Thank you for attachments and I apologise for spoiling your meal.
I am sorry to see that you have found an insect in the baby spinch. I
can understand your disappointment because you must have put so much
effort in cooking this dish which had to be thrown away due to our
actions. As you are aware that issues like these are quite rare and
your assistance with this matter will help us in preventing them in
the future.
Could I ask you to give us a call on the 0345 322 0000 so that I could
transfer your call to our Head Office team who will deal with your
complaint? Alternatively, Head Office Team can be contacted directly
on 0345 611 6111 and they are open from 8am-8pm Monday-Friday,
Saturday 9am-5pm and Sunday 10am-4pm.
Again, please accept my apologies for any inconvenience this may have
caused and do not hesitate to contact me, should you require any
further assistance.
Kind regards,
Noreen Ahmed
Morrisons Online Customer Service Team
I emailed again
Well, that is a silly reply as I said in my email I microwaved the
spinach, so no effort in cooking it! I don't want to call head office.
You have a photo of the bug and the pictures of the wrapping, showing
the name and bar code. I certainly hope that issues like this are
rare!
We found a sink plug in bagged veg a few months ago but Tesco refunded
and also send a £5 voucher to say sorry.
What an interesting life you lead. I have never anything so interesting.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Mike
2018-07-22 17:38:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Btms
Post by Vicky Ayech
I emailed Morrisons yesterday because we found a bug in our spinach.
I said
Extra protein was found today in the baby spinach.
1 Morrisons Baby Spinach 1.00 GBP
We had already microwaved the pack and put it on plates. Luckily my
companion spotted it. I might not have as was notwearing my glasses. I
am rather upset to think I might have eaten it. Your supplier should
wash the bugs out of the veg. I enclose a picture of bug and packet.
They responded with 2 emails. One said £1 refund and the other
Good afternoon Mrs Ayech,
Thank you for attachments and I apologise for spoiling your meal.
I am sorry to see that you have found an insect in the baby spinch. I
can understand your disappointment because you must have put so much
effort in cooking this dish which had to be thrown away due to our
actions. As you are aware that issues like these are quite rare and
your assistance with this matter will help us in preventing them in
the future.
Could I ask you to give us a call on the 0345 322 0000 so that I could
transfer your call to our Head Office team who will deal with your
complaint? Alternatively, Head Office Team can be contacted directly
on 0345 611 6111 and they are open from 8am-8pm Monday-Friday,
Saturday 9am-5pm and Sunday 10am-4pm.
Again, please accept my apologies for any inconvenience this may have
caused and do not hesitate to contact me, should you require any
further assistance.
Kind regards,
Noreen Ahmed
Morrisons Online Customer Service Team
I emailed again
Well, that is a silly reply as I said in my email I microwaved the
spinach, so no effort in cooking it! I don't want to call head office.
You have a photo of the bug and the pictures of the wrapping, showing
the name and bar code. I certainly hope that issues like this are
rare!
We found a sink plug in bagged veg a few months ago but Tesco refunded
and also send a £5 voucher to say sorry.
What an interesting life you lead. I have never anything so interesting.
I found a colourful used twist tie in a packet of Lidl salad leaf a few
months ago....
--
Toodle Pip
Btms
2018-07-22 18:10:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Btms
Post by Vicky Ayech
I emailed Morrisons yesterday because we found a bug in our spinach.
I said
Extra protein was found today in the baby spinach.
1 Morrisons Baby Spinach 1.00 GBP
We had already microwaved the pack and put it on plates. Luckily my
companion spotted it. I might not have as was notwearing my glasses. I
am rather upset to think I might have eaten it. Your supplier should
wash the bugs out of the veg. I enclose a picture of bug and packet.
They responded with 2 emails. One said £1 refund and the other
Good afternoon Mrs Ayech,
Thank you for attachments and I apologise for spoiling your meal.
I am sorry to see that you have found an insect in the baby spinch. I
can understand your disappointment because you must have put so much
effort in cooking this dish which had to be thrown away due to our
actions. As you are aware that issues like these are quite rare and
your assistance with this matter will help us in preventing them in
the future.
Could I ask you to give us a call on the 0345 322 0000 so that I could
transfer your call to our Head Office team who will deal with your
complaint? Alternatively, Head Office Team can be contacted directly
on 0345 611 6111 and they are open from 8am-8pm Monday-Friday,
Saturday 9am-5pm and Sunday 10am-4pm.
Again, please accept my apologies for any inconvenience this may have
caused and do not hesitate to contact me, should you require any
further assistance.
Kind regards,
Noreen Ahmed
Morrisons Online Customer Service Team
I emailed again
Well, that is a silly reply as I said in my email I microwaved the
spinach, so no effort in cooking it! I don't want to call head office.
You have a photo of the bug and the pictures of the wrapping, showing
the name and bar code. I certainly hope that issues like this are
rare!
We found a sink plug in bagged veg a few months ago but Tesco refunded
and also send a £5 voucher to say sorry.
What an interesting life you lead. I have never anything so interesting.
I found a colourful used twist tie in a packet of Lidl salad leaf a few
months ago....
Well that’s done it: I am into envy now 🤥
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Jenny M Benson
2018-07-22 19:05:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Thank you for attachments and I apologise for spoiling your meal.
I am sorry to see that you have found an insect in the baby spinch. I
can understand your disappointment because you must have put so much
effort in cooking this dish which had to be thrown away due to our
actions. As you are aware that issues like these are quite rare and
your assistance with this matter will help us in preventing them in
the future.
A girl at my school once found a caterpillar on her lettuce. She asked
the Deputy Head what she should do about it. The DH said "Eat it,
child! It's been eating the same thing you have."
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Sally Thompson
2018-07-22 19:28:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Vicky Ayech
Thank you for attachments and I apologise for spoiling your meal.
I am sorry to see that you have found an insect in the baby spinch. I
can understand your disappointment because you must have put so much
effort in cooking this dish which had to be thrown away due to our
actions. As you are aware that issues like these are quite rare and
your assistance with this matter will help us in preventing them in
the future.
A girl at my school once found a caterpillar on her lettuce. She asked
the Deputy Head what she should do about it. The DH said "Eat it,
child! It's been eating the same thing you have."
It's when you find half a caterpillar you need to worry!
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Btms
2018-07-22 21:11:54 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Jenny M Benson
A girl at my school once found a caterpillar on her lettuce. She asked
the Deputy Head what she should do about it. The DH said "Eat it,
child! It's been eating the same thing you have."
It's when you find half a caterpillar you need to worry!
🤭
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
steveski
2018-07-23 00:56:33 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 20:05:49 +0100, Jenny M Benson wrote:

[spinach]
Post by Jenny M Benson
A girl at my school once found a caterpillar on her lettuce. She asked
the Deputy Head what she should do about it. The DH said "Eat it,
child! It's been eating the same thing you have."
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
--
Steveski
Sally Thompson
2018-07-23 07:09:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
[spinach]
Post by Jenny M Benson
A girl at my school once found a caterpillar on her lettuce. She asked
the Deputy Head what she should do about it. The DH said "Eat it,
child! It's been eating the same thing you have."
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
:-)
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Btms
2018-07-23 08:10:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
[spinach]
Post by Jenny M Benson
A girl at my school once found a caterpillar on her lettuce. She asked
the Deputy Head what she should do about it. The DH said "Eat it,
child! It's been eating the same thing you have."
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
:-)
Rather bad taste but I guess you didn’t eat it.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
steveski
2018-07-23 18:50:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Btms
Post by steveski
[spinach]
Post by Jenny M Benson
A girl at my school once found a caterpillar on her lettuce. She
asked the Deputy Head what she should do about it. The DH said "Eat
it, child! It's been eating the same thing you have."
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told
the D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
:-)
Rather bad taste but I guess you didn’t eat it.
Of course I did! We needed all the extra protein we could get.
--
Steveski
Btms
2018-07-23 08:10:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
[spinach]
Post by Jenny M Benson
A girl at my school once found a caterpillar on her lettuce. She asked
the Deputy Head what she should do about it. The DH said "Eat it,
child! It's been eating the same thing you have."
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
🤪 brilliant.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Fenny
2018-07-23 18:31:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
[spinach]
Post by Jenny M Benson
A girl at my school once found a caterpillar on her lettuce. She asked
the Deputy Head what she should do about it. The DH said "Eat it,
child! It's been eating the same thing you have."
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
That was Pa's standard reply to the report of finding any small
creature (not just in food).

At lunchtime today, a large bee flew in through the open window and
the boss called to me "Look out for that bee!", to which I replied,
"It won't eat my dinner"
--
Fenny
Chris J Dixon
2018-08-13 14:05:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
I believe I have mentioned before that, in the early days of
frozen food (late 50s), my dad found a small slug in a packet of
frozen peas. He wrote a polite letter to Birds Eye, and they
replied with a compensation cheque sufficient to pay for his new
greenhouse. They were clearly keen to avoid bad publicity.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Mike
2018-08-13 14:18:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steveski
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
I believe I have mentioned before that, in the early days of
frozen food (late 50s), my dad found a small slug in a packet of
frozen peas. He wrote a polite letter to Birds Eye, and they
replied with a compensation cheque sufficient to pay for his new
greenhouse. They were clearly keen to avoid bad publicity.
Chris
In the mid to late sixties, I was one of the team of engineers who machined
parts and assembled them to build ‘Tenderometers’ which were used to test
the tenderness of a crop of peas prior to picking for freezing; the TV
adverts were of course ‘so accurate’ that the scale we fitted to the
machines which indicated shear force measured by degree of angular
deflexion of a weight at the base, was replaced with a scale with the
wording in the middle of the scale that read “Perfect”.;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Clive Arthur
2018-08-13 15:47:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steveski
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
I believe I have mentioned before that, in the early days of
frozen food (late 50s), my dad found a small slug in a packet of
frozen peas. He wrote a polite letter to Birds Eye, and they
replied with a compensation cheque sufficient to pay for his new
greenhouse. They were clearly keen to avoid bad publicity.
Chris
In the mid to late sixties, I was one of the team of engineers who machined
parts and assembled them to build ‘Tenderometers’ which were used to test
the tenderness of a crop of peas prior to picking for freezing; the TV
adverts were of course ‘so accurate’ that the scale we fitted to the
machines which indicated shear force measured by degree of angular
deflexion of a weight at the base, was replaced with a scale with the
wording in the middle of the scale that read “Perfect”.;-)
Lettuce spray for whirled peas.

Cheers
--
Clive
Jenny M Benson
2018-08-13 16:41:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steveski
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
I believe I have mentioned before that, in the early days of
frozen food (late 50s), my dad found a small slug in a packet of
frozen peas. He wrote a polite letter to Birds Eye, and they
replied with a compensation cheque sufficient to pay for his new
greenhouse. They were clearly keen to avoid bad publicity.
Chris
In the mid to late sixties, I was one of the team of engineers who machined
parts and assembled them to build ‘Tenderometers’ which were used to test
the tenderness of a crop of peas prior to picking for freezing; the TV
adverts were of course ‘so accurate’ that the scale we fitted to the
machines which indicated shear force measured by degree of angular
deflexion of a weight at the base, was replaced with a scale with the
wording in the middle of the scale that read “Perfect”.;-)
# Sweet as the moment when the pod went pop! #
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-13 20:34:34 UTC
Permalink
In message <pks97m$4ob$***@dont-email.me>, Clive Arthur
<***@nowaytoday.co.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Clive Arthur
Lettuce spray for whirled peas.
Cheers
I got the lettuce spray, but it took me ages to work out the whirled
peas - which made it all the better (or worse)!

On the subject of peas, we're into the season for them: one of the few
things which still have a limited season, peas in pods, which I buy and
eat raw from the pods. (Even strawberries - even English-or-Scottish
ones, which IMO have far more taste than Spanish ones which used to fill
in the gaps - seem to have been available throughout this last year. But
peas-in-pods - which they seem to want to call "garden" peas - are still
only available for a limited few weeks.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Knowledge isnt elitist - that's rubbish! Why are we embarrassed by the idea
that people know things? It's not a conspiracy against the ignorant. Knowing
things is good!" - Jeremy Paxman, RT 14-20 August 2010
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2018-08-14 11:09:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Clive Arthur
Lettuce spray for whirled peas.
Cheers
I got the lettuce spray, but it took me ages to work out the whirled
peas - which made it all the better (or worse)!
Well, I had to think about it and then regarded it as a dialect joke, as I distinguish "wh" from "w" as sounds.
Sam Plusnet
2018-08-13 21:31:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steveski
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
I believe I have mentioned before that, in the early days of
frozen food (late 50s), my dad found a small slug in a packet of
frozen peas. He wrote a polite letter to Birds Eye, and they
replied with a compensation cheque sufficient to pay for his new
greenhouse. They were clearly keen to avoid bad publicity.
Chris
In the mid to late sixties, I was one of the team of engineers who machined
parts and assembled them to build ‘Tenderometers’ which were used to test
the tenderness of a crop of peas prior to picking for freezing; the TV
adverts were of course ‘so accurate’ that the scale we fitted to the
machines which indicated shear force measured by degree of angular
deflexion of a weight at the base, was replaced with a scale with the
wording in the middle of the scale that read “Perfect”.;-)
After my time then.
All the Tenderometers I operated had some sort of numeric scale.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2018-08-14 08:12:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steveski
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
I believe I have mentioned before that, in the early days of
frozen food (late 50s), my dad found a small slug in a packet of
frozen peas. He wrote a polite letter to Birds Eye, and they
replied with a compensation cheque sufficient to pay for his new
greenhouse. They were clearly keen to avoid bad publicity.
Chris
In the mid to late sixties, I was one of the team of engineers who machined
parts and assembled them to build ‘Tenderometers’ which were used to test
the tenderness of a crop of peas prior to picking for freezing; the TV
adverts were of course ‘so accurate’ that the scale we fitted to the
machines which indicated shear force measured by degree of angular
deflexion of a weight at the base, was replaced with a scale with the
wording in the middle of the scale that read “Perfect”.;-)
After my time then.
All the Tenderometers I operated had some sort of numeric scale.
As I recall, ours were some five feet or so to the top of the scale, we
sprayed the bodywork green, the mechanism was housed in a body about a foot
in diameter with a weight system underneath. The shearing action was
motorized and the moving parts were stainless steel or bronze. The scale
was calibrated for three different ranges depending on the softness of
product being tested and the correct weight of the three was fitted to
suit. Can’t now recall what details were on the scale but I do recall that
a crop that had been tenderometer tested commanded a premium price for the
grower.
--
Toodle Pip
Btms
2018-08-14 09:35:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steveski
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
I believe I have mentioned before that, in the early days of
frozen food (late 50s), my dad found a small slug in a packet of
frozen peas. He wrote a polite letter to Birds Eye, and they
replied with a compensation cheque sufficient to pay for his new
greenhouse. They were clearly keen to avoid bad publicity.
Chris
In the mid to late sixties, I was one of the team of engineers who machined
parts and assembled them to build ‘Tenderometers’ which were used to test
the tenderness of a crop of peas prior to picking for freezing; the TV
adverts were of course ‘so accurate’ that the scale we fitted to the
machines which indicated shear force measured by degree of angular
deflexion of a weight at the base, was replaced with a scale with the
wording in the middle of the scale that read “Perfect”.;-)
After my time then.
All the Tenderometers I operated had some sort of numeric scale.
As I recall, ours were some five feet or so to the top of the scale, we
sprayed the bodywork green, the mechanism was housed in a body about a foot
in diameter with a weight system underneath. The shearing action was
motorized and the moving parts were stainless steel or bronze. The scale
was calibrated for three different ranges depending on the softness of
product being tested and the correct weight of the three was fitted to
suit. Can’t now recall what details were on the scale but I do recall that
a crop that had been tenderometer tested commanded a premium price for the
grower.
Is it 1st April?
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Mike
2018-08-14 09:45:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Btms
Post by Mike
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steveski
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
I believe I have mentioned before that, in the early days of
frozen food (late 50s), my dad found a small slug in a packet of
frozen peas. He wrote a polite letter to Birds Eye, and they
replied with a compensation cheque sufficient to pay for his new
greenhouse. They were clearly keen to avoid bad publicity.
Chris
In the mid to late sixties, I was one of the team of engineers who machined
parts and assembled them to build ‘Tenderometers’ which were used to test
the tenderness of a crop of peas prior to picking for freezing; the TV
adverts were of course ‘so accurate’ that the scale we fitted to the
machines which indicated shear force measured by degree of angular
deflexion of a weight at the base, was replaced with a scale with the
wording in the middle of the scale that read “Perfect”.;-)
After my time then.
All the Tenderometers I operated had some sort of numeric scale.
As I recall, ours were some five feet or so to the top of the scale, we
sprayed the bodywork green, the mechanism was housed in a body about a foot
in diameter with a weight system underneath. The shearing action was
motorized and the moving parts were stainless steel or bronze. The scale
was calibrated for three different ranges depending on the softness of
product being tested and the correct weight of the three was fitted to
suit. Can’t now recall what details were on the scale but I do recall that
a crop that had been tenderometer tested commanded a premium price for the
grower.
Is it 1st April?
No Bottoms, this is absolutely genuine. The Tenderometers were used ‘in the
field’ so to speak to ensure that peas (and also soft fruits) were at their
peak state for harvesting; if tested and having passed the test, they would
be picked and then frozen within about two hours.
--
Toodle Pip
Btms
2018-08-14 10:22:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Btms
Post by Mike
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steveski
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
I believe I have mentioned before that, in the early days of
frozen food (late 50s), my dad found a small slug in a packet of
frozen peas. He wrote a polite letter to Birds Eye, and they
replied with a compensation cheque sufficient to pay for his new
greenhouse. They were clearly keen to avoid bad publicity.
Chris
In the mid to late sixties, I was one of the team of engineers who machined
parts and assembled them to build ‘Tenderometers’ which were used to test
the tenderness of a crop of peas prior to picking for freezing; the TV
adverts were of course ‘so accurate’ that the scale we fitted to the
machines which indicated shear force measured by degree of angular
deflexion of a weight at the base, was replaced with a scale with the
wording in the middle of the scale that read “Perfect”.;-)
After my time then.
All the Tenderometers I operated had some sort of numeric scale.
As I recall, ours were some five feet or so to the top of the scale, we
sprayed the bodywork green, the mechanism was housed in a body about a foot
in diameter with a weight system underneath. The shearing action was
motorized and the moving parts were stainless steel or bronze. The scale
was calibrated for three different ranges depending on the softness of
product being tested and the correct weight of the three was fitted to
suit. Can’t now recall what details were on the scale but I do recall that
a crop that had been tenderometer tested commanded a premium price for the
grower.
Is it 1st April?
No Bottoms, this is absolutely genuine. The Tenderometers were used ‘in the
field’ so to speak to ensure that peas (and also soft fruits) were at their
peak state for harvesting; if tested and having passed the test, they would
be picked and then frozen within about two hours.
Excellent. Suggest some strawberry producers might invest.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-14 18:59:22 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by Mike
Post by Btms
Is it 1st April?
No Bottoms, this is absolutely genuine. The Tenderometers were used ‘in the
field’ so to speak to ensure that peas (and also soft fruits) were at their
peak state for harvesting; if tested and having passed the test, they would
be picked and then frozen within about two hours.
"Sweet* as the moment when the pod - went - pop!"
(*May have been another word.)

No, I'm not _quite_ old enough to remember that from first time round,
but I _do_ remember for the Huddersfield Choral Society's 150th (which
was televised), one of the pieces they did was a medley of various
musical slogans from commercials. I said I thought that was high art,
and my brother gave me a withering look. But I did (and do).

Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Her [Valerie Singleton's] main job on /Blue Peter/ was to stop unpredictable
creatres running amok. And that was just John Noakes.
- Alison Pearson, RT 2014/9/6-12
steveski
2018-08-15 00:32:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
Post by Btms
Is it 1st April?
No Bottoms, this is absolutely genuine. The Tenderometers were used ‘in
the field’ so to speak to ensure that peas (and also soft fruits) were
at their peak state for harvesting; if tested and having passed the
test, they would be picked and then frozen within about two hours.
"Sweet* as the moment when the pod - went - pop!"
(*May have been another word.)
No, I'm not _quite_ old enough to remember that from first time round,
but I _do_ remember for the Huddersfield Choral Society's 150th (which
was televised), one of the pieces they did was a medley of various
musical slogans from commercials. I said I thought that was high art,
and my brother gave me a withering look. But I did (and do).
Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
Cool as a mountain stream . . . You'll wonder where the yellow went . . .
(cont. p 94)

Hah! Just thought of one that foxes (so cool) my peers: "Mighty meaty
matey" NO Googling :-)
--
Steveski
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-15 04:51:22 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"Sweet* as the moment when the pod - went - pop!"
(*May have been another word.)
No, I'm not _quite_ old enough to remember that from first time round,
but I _do_ remember for the Huddersfield Choral Society's 150th (which
was televised), one of the pieces they did was a medley of various
musical slogans from commercials. I said I thought that was high art,
[]
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
Cool as a mountain stream . . . You'll wonder where the yellow went . . .
(cont. p 94)
I don't think the mountain stream was in the medley (was that Gibbs SR?
I don't think that had a jingle), but Pepsodent was definitely in it!
Post by steveski
Hah! Just thought of one that foxes (so cool) my peers: "Mighty meaty
matey" NO Googling :-)
No, can't get it; some sort of sausage?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I'm the oldest woman on primetime not baking cakes.
- Anne Robinson, RT 2015/8/15-21
Vicky Ayech
2018-08-15 06:12:16 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 15 Aug 2018 05:51:22 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"Sweet* as the moment when the pod - went - pop!"
(*May have been another word.)
No, I'm not _quite_ old enough to remember that from first time round,
but I _do_ remember for the Huddersfield Choral Society's 150th (which
was televised), one of the pieces they did was a medley of various
musical slogans from commercials. I said I thought that was high art,
[]
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
Cool as a mountain stream . . . You'll wonder where the yellow went . . .
(cont. p 94)
I don't think the mountain stream was in the medley (was that Gibbs SR?
I don't think that had a jingle), but Pepsodent was definitely in it!
Post by steveski
Hah! Just thought of one that foxes (so cool) my peers: "Mighty meaty
matey" NO Googling :-)
No, can't get it; some sort of sausage?
Would Foxes be glacier mints?
Mike
2018-08-15 07:35:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Wed, 15 Aug 2018 05:51:22 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"Sweet* as the moment when the pod - went - pop!"
(*May have been another word.)
No, I'm not _quite_ old enough to remember that from first time round,
but I _do_ remember for the Huddersfield Choral Society's 150th (which
was televised), one of the pieces they did was a medley of various
musical slogans from commercials. I said I thought that was high art,
[]
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
Cool as a mountain stream . . . You'll wonder where the yellow went . . .
(cont. p 94)
I don't think the mountain stream was in the medley (was that Gibbs SR?
I don't think that had a jingle), but Pepsodent was definitely in it!
Post by steveski
Hah! Just thought of one that foxes (so cool) my peers: "Mighty meaty
matey" NO Googling :-)
No, can't get it; some sort of sausage?
Would Foxes be glacier mints?
But it was a polar bear on the glacier mints - not a fox?!
--
Toodle Pip
agsmith578688@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
2018-08-15 11:24:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
But it was a polar bear on the glacier mints - not a fox?!
Oh yes, I remember the polar bear.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-15 11:58:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
Post by Mike
But it was a polar bear on the glacier mints - not a fox?!
Oh yes, I remember the polar bear.
So do I - I think they may even still use him. But I don't remember any
musical jingle for him, so it wouldn't have appeared in the HCS medley.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"I'm a paranoid agnostic. I doubt the existence of God, but I'm sure there is
some force, somewhere, working against me." - Marc Maron
steveski
2018-08-15 12:57:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by ***@gmail.com Tony Smith Prestbury Glos.
Post by Mike
But it was a polar bear on the glacier mints - not a fox?!
Oh yes, I remember the polar bear.
So do I - I think they may even still use him. But I don't remember any
musical jingle for him, so it wouldn't have appeared in the HCS medley.
I only chucked in the 'so cool' remark when I realised that I had written
'foxes'.
--
Steveski
John Ashby
2018-08-15 09:09:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"Sweet* as the moment when the pod - went - pop!"
(*May have been another word.)
No, I'm not _quite_ old enough to remember that from first time round,
but I _do_ remember for the Huddersfield Choral Society's 150th (which
was televised), one of the pieces they did was a medley of various
musical slogans from commercials. I said I thought that was high art,
[]
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
Cool as a mountain stream . . . You'll wonder where the yellow went . . .
(cont. p 94)
I don't think the mountain stream was in the medley (was that Gibbs SR?
I don't think that had a jingle), but Pepsodent was definitely in it!
Consulate menthol tipped cigarettes

john
steveski
2018-08-15 10:52:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"Sweet* as the moment when the pod - went - pop!"
(*May have been another word.)
No, I'm not _quite_ old enough to remember that from first time round,
but I _do_ remember for the Huddersfield Choral Society's 150th
(which was televised), one of the pieces they did was a medley of
various musical slogans from commercials. I said I thought that was
high art,
[]
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
Cool as a mountain stream . . . You'll wonder where the yellow went . . .
(cont. p 94)
I don't think the mountain stream was in the medley (was that Gibbs SR?
I don't think that had a jingle), but Pepsodent was definitely in it!
Consulate menthol tipped cigarettes
Indeed, John.

The 'Mighty meaty matey ad *was* for sausages (and pies) but can anyone
remember whose they were? A clue; they stopped making them for retail but
carried on for wholesale. They're prob. defunct now.
--
Steveski
krw
2018-08-15 14:58:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"Sweet* as the moment when the pod - went - pop!"
(*May have been another word.)
No, I'm not _quite_ old enough to remember that from first time round,
but I _do_ remember for the Huddersfield Choral Society's 150th
(which was televised), one of the pieces they did was a medley of
various musical slogans from commercials. I said I thought that was
high art,
[]
Post by steveski
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
Cool as a mountain stream . . . You'll wonder where the yellow went . . .
(cont. p 94)
I don't think the mountain stream was in the medley (was that Gibbs SR?
I don't think that had a jingle), but Pepsodent was definitely in it!
Consulate menthol tipped cigarettes
Indeed, John.
The 'Mighty meaty matey ad *was* for sausages (and pies) but can anyone
remember whose they were? A clue; they stopped making them for retail but
carried on for wholesale. They're prob. defunct now.
Was that Mattesons?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
steveski
2018-08-15 15:10:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by steveski
The 'Mighty meaty matey ad *was* for sausages (and pies) but can anyone
remember whose they were? A clue; they stopped making them for retail
but carried on for wholesale. They're prob. defunct now.
Was that Mattesons?
A frayed knot, jpeg.
--
Steveski
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-15 11:59:34 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
Cool as a mountain stream . . . You'll wonder where the yellow went . . .
(cont. p 94)
I don't think the mountain stream was in the medley (was that Gibbs
SR? I don't think that had a jingle), but Pepsodent was definitely in
Consulate menthol tipped cigarettes
john
Ah, I vaguely remember that phrase now. Don't remember any jingle with
it, though.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"I'm a paranoid agnostic. I doubt the existence of God, but I'm sure there is
some force, somewhere, working against me." - Marc Maron
Rosalainn nic Thearach
2018-08-19 17:06:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
Cool as a mountain stream . . . You'll wonder where the yellow went . . .
(cont. p 94)
I don't think the mountain stream was in the medley (was that Gibbs
SR? I don't think that had a jingle), but Pepsodent was definitely in
Consulate menthol tipped cigarettes
john
Ah, I vaguely remember that phrase now. Don't remember any jingle with
it, though.
One Thousand and One cleans a big big carpet
For less than half-a-crown

<sigh>

I remember when you could get 10 Players No 6 for less than
half-a-crown.

RnT
Sid Nuncius
2018-08-19 17:16:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rosalainn nic Thearach
I remember when you could get 10 Players No 6 for less than
half-a-crown.
Half a crown? I remember when they employed pretty young women to hand
them out free to spectators at Trent Bridge during John Player League
matches. Shame I didn't smoke, really.

I can't remember how much they cost when I worked at the factory which
made 'em in 1974, but everyone got two packs of 20 with their wages each
week. I gave mine to a mate at the folk club every Friday and he bought
me a couple of pints in exchange.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Penny
2018-08-19 18:18:58 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 19 Aug 2018 17:06:05 -0000 (UTC), Rosalainn nic Thearach
Post by Rosalainn nic Thearach
I remember when you could get 10 Players No 6 for less than
half-a-crown.
I think they were about 2/- for 20 when I were at school, Embassy were 2/3.
Mined ewe, a pint of bitter was 2/1 at around the same time.

Which reminds me, I bought 5 rolls of Refreshers for £1* in eTsco earlier.
When I was little I bought a roll of Refreshers every week from my sweetie
money. You could get 120 rolls for £1 then.

* a bargain - they are 35p (7/-) each!
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Clive Arthur
2018-08-19 18:48:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rosalainn nic Thearach
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
Cool as a mountain stream . . . You'll wonder where the yellow went . . .
(cont. p 94)
I don't think the mountain stream was in the medley (was that Gibbs
SR? I don't think that had a jingle), but Pepsodent was definitely in
Consulate menthol tipped cigarettes
john
Ah, I vaguely remember that phrase now. Don't remember any jingle with
it, though.
One Thousand and One cleans a big big carpet
For less than half-a-crown
<sigh>
I remember when you could get 10 Players No 6 for less than
half-a-crown.
RnT
Number 6? Luxury. Ten No. 10 for a shilling.

And later, Watney's Starlight for 11p a pint. Red barrel was only for
the wealthy at 12p.

Cheers
--
Clive
SODAM
2018-08-19 20:48:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Rosalainn nic Thearach
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
Cool as a mountain stream . . . You'll wonder where the yellow went . . .
(cont. p 94)
I don't think the mountain stream was in the medley (was that Gibbs
SR? I don't think that had a jingle), but Pepsodent was definitely in
Consulate menthol tipped cigarettes
john
Ah, I vaguely remember that phrase now. Don't remember any jingle with
it, though.
One Thousand and One cleans a big big carpet
For less than half-a-crown
<sigh>
I remember when you could get 10 Players No 6 for less than
half-a-crown.
RnT
Number 6? Luxury. Ten No. 10 for a shilling.
And later, Watney's Starlight for 11p a pint. Red barrel was only for
the wealthy at 12p.
Cheers
Did you mean 12p or 12d - a shilling.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Clive Arthur
2018-08-19 21:55:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by Rosalainn nic Thearach
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by steveski
Cool as a mountain stream . . . You'll wonder where the yellow went . . .
(cont. p 94)
I don't think the mountain stream was in the medley (was that Gibbs
SR? I don't think that had a jingle), but Pepsodent was definitely in
Consulate menthol tipped cigarettes
john
Ah, I vaguely remember that phrase now. Don't remember any jingle with
it, though.
One Thousand and One cleans a big big carpet
For less than half-a-crown
<sigh>
I remember when you could get 10 Players No 6 for less than
half-a-crown.
RnT
Number 6? Luxury. Ten No. 10 for a shilling.
And later, Watney's Starlight for 11p a pint. Red barrel was only for
the wealthy at 12p.
Cheers
Did you mean 12p or 12d - a shilling.
12p. Decimalisation happened between the No. 10 and the Starlight.

Eight pints and still change from a pound in Reading University Students
Union bar - they didn't care about ID then, I was sixteen.

Cheers
--
Clive
steveski
2018-08-20 00:00:59 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 19 Aug 2018 19:48:35 +0100, Clive Arthur wrote:

[]
Red barrel was only for the wealthy at 12p.
Cormoranting in a punt . . .
--
Steveski
BrritSki
2018-08-20 08:27:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
[]
Red barrel was only for the wealthy at 12p.
Cormoranting in a punt . . .
My FiL told me that one. F***ing near water :)
krw
2018-08-20 10:35:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by steveski
[]
Red barrel was only for the wealthy at 12p.
Cormoranting in a punt . . .
My FiL told me that one. F***ing near water :)
No that was Watneys' Red - when they dropped the barrel.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Sid Nuncius
2018-08-20 10:44:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by BrritSki
Post by steveski
Red barrel was only for the wealthy at 12p.
Cormoranting in a punt . . .
My FiL told me that one. F***ing near water :)
No that was Watneys' Red - when they dropped the barrel.
Whereas we all know what a Double Diamond could do - but you can't drink
one today.[1]

[1]Just in case some youngerrats may not be aware:

--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
John Ashby
2018-08-20 12:18:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by krw
Post by BrritSki
Post by steveski
Red barrel was only for the wealthy at 12p.
Cormoranting in a punt . . .
My FiL told me that one. F***ing near water :)
No that was Watneys' Red - when they dropped the barrel.
Tolly Cobbold in Cambridge.
Post by Sid Nuncius
Whereas we all know what a Double Diamond could do
And what your right arm's for.

john

Jenny M Benson
2018-08-19 17:14:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by John Ashby
Consulate menthol tipped cigarettes
john
Ah, I vaguely remember that phrase now. Don't remember any jingle with
it, though.
Cool as a mountain stream.
--
Jenny M Benson
Jenny M Benson
2018-08-15 09:42:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"Sweet* as the moment when the pod - went - pop!"
(*May have been another word.)
You're not kill-filing me, are you, Jpeg?!
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-15 12:09:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
"Sweet* as the moment when the pod - went - pop!"
(*May have been another word.)
You're not kill-filing me, are you, Jpeg?!
Most definitely not; killfile a fellow genealogist? No, I have very few
killfile rules for UMRA! Mainly ones set up some years ago so that I
don't see posts from, or followups to, one particularrat - not that I
disliked thatrat, just that I thought I was disagreeing with them so
often (and tending to get non-UMRAtic - both of us) that I thought it
was for the benefit of UMRA if I just didn't see those threads. I've
only added one rule to UMRA in, I think, the past year.

Why do you ask? I've just expanded this thread, and the above is the
only post from you that I can see in the past day. (Remember I have an
expiry time of one day for UMRA to avoid gillivery.) But, obviously, I
am seeing it.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"I'm a paranoid agnostic. I doubt the existence of God, but I'm sure there is
some force, somewhere, working against me." - Marc Maron
LFS
2018-08-15 13:42:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
Post by Btms
Is it 1st April?
No Bottoms, this is absolutely genuine. The Tenderometers were used ‘in the
field’ so to speak to ensure that peas (and also soft fruits) were at their
peak state for harvesting; if tested and having passed the test, they would
be picked and then frozen within about two hours.
"Sweet* as the moment when the pod - went - pop!"
(*May have been another word.)
No, I'm not _quite_ old enough to remember that from first time round,
but I _do_ remember for the Huddersfield Choral Society's 150th (which
was televised), one of the pieces they did was a medley of various
musical slogans from commercials. I said I thought that was high art,
and my brother gave me a withering look. But I did (and do).
Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
Coincidentally I have just eaten a Murraymint while humming the jingle.
I wonder if 1001 still cleans a big big carpet for less than half a
crown. I'm fairly sure that Cyril Lord no longer offers luxury you can
afford, though.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
steveski
2018-08-15 14:33:10 UTC
Permalink
[]
Post by LFS
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
Coincidentally I have just eaten a Murraymint while humming the jingle.
Was it too good to hurry?
Post by LFS
I wonder if 1001 still cleans a big big carpet for less than half a
crown. I'm fairly sure that Cyril Lord no longer offers luxury you can
afford, though.
Weren't they 'carpets' you can afford? (Or 'boredom' in the case of the
Bonzo Dog Band).

And that reminded me of "John Collier, John Collier, the window to
watch" :-)
--
Steveski
Clive Arthur
2018-08-15 15:24:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
[]
Post by LFS
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
Coincidentally I have just eaten a Murraymint while humming the jingle.
Was it too good to hurry?
Post by LFS
I wonder if 1001 still cleans a big big carpet for less than half a
crown. I'm fairly sure that Cyril Lord no longer offers luxury you can
afford, though.
Weren't they 'carpets' you can afford? (Or 'boredom' in the case of the
Bonzo Dog Band).
Give it the treatment, the family treatment
Enkalon is made to last for
Years and years and
This is luxury you can afford from Cyril Lord.
Post by steveski
And that reminded me of "John Collier, John Collier, the window to
watch" :-)
Cheers
--
Clive
SODAM
2018-08-16 00:34:51 UTC
Permalink
Clive Arthur <***@nowaytoday.co.uk> wrote:

<snip jingles>
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by steveski
And that reminded me of "John Collier, John Collier, the window to
watch" :-)
Cheers
What about the Mad Hatter’s tea party, accompanied by:
“I love those tiny little tea leaves in Tetley,
Tiny little tea leaves in Tetley tea,
Specially made for tea bags. “
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Mike
2018-08-16 07:27:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
<snip jingles>
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by steveski
And that reminded me of "John Collier, John Collier, the window to
watch" :-)
Cheers
“I love those tiny little tea leaves in Tetley,
Tiny little tea leaves in Tetley tea,
Specially made for tea bags. “
That’s that one bagged then.
--
Toodle Pip
Btms
2018-08-16 17:57:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by SODAM
<snip jingles>
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by steveski
And that reminded me of "John Collier, John Collier, the window to
watch" :-)
Cheers
“I love those tiny little tea leaves in Tetley,
Tiny little tea leaves in Tetley tea,
Specially made for tea bags. “
Tea dust which guarantees a disgusting brew.
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
SODAM
2018-08-16 20:30:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Btms
Post by SODAM
<snip jingles>
Post by Clive Arthur
Post by steveski
And that reminded me of "John Collier, John Collier, the window to
watch" :-)
Cheers
“I love those tiny little tea leaves in Tetley,
Tiny little tea leaves in Tetley tea,
Specially made for tea bags. “
Tea dust which guarantees a disgusting brew.
I don’t remember that line. Of course, my memory isn’t what it was. Mustn’t
grumble. <dribbles down cardie>.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
Rosalainn nic Thearach
2018-08-19 17:09:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clive Arthur
This is luxury you can afford from Cyril Lord.
But not since the man was busted for fraud.

RnT
Mike
2018-08-15 14:39:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
Post by Btms
Is it 1st April?
No Bottoms, this is absolutely genuine. The Tenderometers were used ‘in the
field’ so to speak to ensure that peas (and also soft fruits) were at their
peak state for harvesting; if tested and having passed the test, they would
be picked and then frozen within about two hours.
"Sweet* as the moment when the pod - went - pop!"
(*May have been another word.)
No, I'm not _quite_ old enough to remember that from first time round,
but I _do_ remember for the Huddersfield Choral Society's 150th (which
was televised), one of the pieces they did was a medley of various
musical slogans from commercials. I said I thought that was high art,
and my brother gave me a withering look. But I did (and do).
Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
Coincidentally I have just eaten a Murraymint while humming the jingle.
I wonder if 1001 still cleans a big big carpet for less than half a
crown. I'm fairly sure that Cyril Lord no longer offers luxury you can
afford, though.
‘Don’t forget the fruit gums, Mum.
--
Toodle Pip
Chris J Dixon
2018-08-15 16:10:50 UTC
Permalink
‘Don’t forget the fruit gums, Mum.
I forget what the product was, but I can picture a tin can and
"...down in the garden where the praties grow."

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-15 21:46:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by LFS
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
Post by Btms
Is it 1st April?
No Bottoms, this is absolutely genuine. The Tenderometers were used ‘in the
field’ so to speak to ensure that peas (and also soft fruits) were at their
peak state for harvesting; if tested and having passed the test, they would
be picked and then frozen within about two hours.
"Sweet* as the moment when the pod - went - pop!"
(*May have been another word.)
No, I'm not _quite_ old enough to remember that from first time round,
but I _do_ remember for the Huddersfield Choral Society's 150th (which
was televised), one of the pieces they did was a medley of various
musical slogans from commercials. I said I thought that was high art,
and my brother gave me a withering look. But I did (and do).
Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
Coincidentally I have just eaten a Murraymint while humming the jingle.
I wonder if 1001 still cleans a big big carpet for less than half a
crown. I'm fairly sure that Cyril Lord no longer offers luxury you can
afford, though.
‘Don’t forget the fruit gums, Mum.
Clearly, for the HCS's 200th, another medley should be welcome! (I
should see it; the 150th was in the VHS period, since after searching
without success for that piece on YouTube, I wrote to their archivist
asking if it _was_ available anywhere, and was very kindly sent a DVD,
which obviously has been made from a VHS or similar tape.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

<This space unintentionally left blank>.
Sam Plusnet
2018-08-15 19:29:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
Post by Btms
Is it 1st April?
No Bottoms, this is absolutely genuine. The Tenderometers were used ‘in the
field’ so to speak to ensure that peas (and also soft fruits) were at their
peak state for harvesting; if tested and having passed the test, they would
be picked and then frozen within about two hours.
"Sweet* as the moment when the pod - went - pop!"
(*May have been another word.)
No, I'm not _quite_ old enough to remember that from first time round,
but I _do_ remember for the Huddersfield Choral Society's 150th (which
was televised), one of the pieces they did was a medley of various
musical slogans from commercials. I said I thought that was high art,
and my brother gave me a withering look. But I did (and do).
Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
Coincidentally I have just eaten a Murraymint while humming the jingle.
I wonder if 1001 still cleans a big big carpet for less than half a
crown. I'm fairly sure that Cyril Lord no longer offers luxury you can
afford, though.
But are Whitworth's a girl's best friend? ITWSBT.
--
Sam Plusnet
steveski
2018-08-15 21:10:59 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 15 Aug 2018 20:29:29 +0100, Sam Plusnet wrote:

[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
But are Whitworth's a girl's best friend? ITWSBT.
Deep - didn't remember that one until you mentioned it. Were there stars
(or sultanas etc.) flashing in a circle?
--
Steveski <--- impressed
Sam Plusnet
2018-08-16 00:37:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by steveski
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
But are Whitworth's a girl's best friend? ITWSBT.
Deep - didn't remember that one until you mentioned it. Were there stars
(or sultanas etc.) flashing in a circle?
I have no visual memory of it, just that occasional STS.

"In days of old
when fruits were sold
they had to be washed at home
now you can buy then
spin washed by Whitworth's..."

(To the tune of Diamonds are a girls best friend)

More boringly, I found

"Whitworths is a British baking institution, their products having lined
the pantries of many a baker or home cook since the company’s creation
in 1886. The name belongs to the three Whitworth brothers, who were
flour millers. In 1953, some decades after founding their mill and
starting to supply flour to local bakeries, the company moved with the
times and started to use the milling equipment to spin, wash and dry
dried fruit – literally a revolutionary concept for the time. Think
about how popular fruit cake was back then and how many dried fruit
ingredients used to go into each."
--
Sam Plusnet
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-16 08:35:56 UTC
Permalink
In message <***@brightview.co.uk>, Sam
Plusnet <***@home.com> writes:
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
spin washed by Whitworth's..."
(To the tune of Diamonds are a girls best friend)
More boringly, I found
"Whitworths is a British baking institution, their products having
lined the pantries of many a baker or home cook since the company’s
creation in 1886. The name belongs to the three Whitworth brothers, who
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
dried fruit – literally a revolutionary concept for the time. Think
about how popular fruit cake was back then and how many dried fruit
ingredients used to go into each."
I don't remember ever registering the name in the context of food
products; to me "Whitworth" always makes me think of screws, nuts, and
bolts, as it's (or was) one of the standard thread sizes for such
things. "British Standard Whitworth".
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Look out for #1. Don't step in #2 either.
Fenny
2018-08-15 16:36:15 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 14 Aug 2018 19:59:22 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
Don't be mean with the beans, Mum!
--
Fenny
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-08-15 21:49:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fenny
On Tue, 14 Aug 2018 19:59:22 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Hands that do dishes ... cook: cook: cookability ...
Don't be mean with the beans, Mum!
I don't think that line was in it, but certainly the "a million
housewives every day" one was.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Radio 4 is one of the reasons being British is good. It's not a subset of
Britain - it's almost as if Britain is a subset of Radio 4. - Stephen Fry, in
Radio Times, 7-13 June, 2003.
Sam Plusnet
2018-08-14 22:30:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steveski
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
I believe I have mentioned before that, in the early days of
frozen food (late 50s), my dad found a small slug in a packet of
frozen peas. He wrote a polite letter to Birds Eye, and they
replied with a compensation cheque sufficient to pay for his new
greenhouse. They were clearly keen to avoid bad publicity.
Chris
In the mid to late sixties, I was one of the team of engineers who machined
parts and assembled them to build ‘Tenderometers’ which were used to test
the tenderness of a crop of peas prior to picking for freezing; the TV
adverts were of course ‘so accurate’ that the scale we fitted to the
machines which indicated shear force measured by degree of angular
deflexion of a weight at the base, was replaced with a scale with the
wording in the middle of the scale that read “Perfect”.;-)
After my time then.
All the Tenderometers I operated had some sort of numeric scale.
As I recall, ours were some five feet or so to the top of the scale, we
sprayed the bodywork green, the mechanism was housed in a body about a foot
in diameter with a weight system underneath. The shearing action was
motorized and the moving parts were stainless steel or bronze. The scale
was calibrated for three different ranges depending on the softness of
product being tested and the correct weight of the three was fitted to
suit. Can’t now recall what details were on the scale but I do recall that
a crop that had been tenderometer tested commanded a premium price for the
grower.
The description agrees with my memory - but (AFAICR) the scale was just
numeric from 0 to (maybe) 100-ish.

We took several samples from each lorry load, & the farmer did indeed
get paid more for more tender peas (or less for the rough stuff).
I don't really know _why_ that should be so, because Batchelors supplied
the seed, chose when to sow the fields, when to spray (and with what) &
when to harvest.
All the farmer did was to provide the field, and some labour.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2018-08-13 15:26:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steveski
I found a caterpillar on my lunch salad in the galley (RN) and told the
D.O. (duty officer. He said "Don't worry, it won't eat much" :-)
I believe I have mentioned before that, in the early days of
frozen food (late 50s), my dad found a small slug in a packet of
frozen peas. He wrote a polite letter to Birds Eye, and they
replied with a compensation cheque sufficient to pay for his new
greenhouse. They were clearly keen to avoid bad publicity.
Chris
I am told that in those early days of frozen foods sold to the general
public, Bird’s Eye wanted to market cod - the marketing department
suggested calling them ‘Frozen Cod Pieces’ err.... well let’s just say,
that idea was ‘frozen’ before being marketed.

Did you know that his name was Birdseye, even if he wasn’t a captain; I
believe that was added to add to the nautical freshness element for
marketing purposes?
--
Toodle Pip
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