Discussion:
Visits from carers etc
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Sally Thompson
2020-03-22 08:37:15 UTC
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I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them. We have a weekly cleaner. She only does
downstairs and we need her but she also desperately needs the income.

I had planned to tell her to come in, wash her hands before she touches
anything such as a door handle (she brings her own vacuum etc), and that we
would both make ourselves scarce upstairs for the duration. Do you all
think this is okay, acceptable and safe?
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Serena Blanchflower
2020-03-22 09:19:36 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them. We have a weekly cleaner. She only does
downstairs and we need her but she also desperately needs the income.
I have a cleaner who comes in twice a week and, like you, I definitely
need her help. She's being scrupulously careful as all her clients are
vulnerable (she prefers to work for people who need her help, rather
than those for whom she would be a luxury). I've also told her that if
she has to stop working, because either one of us becomes too high risk,
I'll keep paying her.
Post by Sally Thompson
I had planned to tell her to come in, wash her hands before she touches
anything such as a door handle (she brings her own vacuum etc), and that we
would both make ourselves scarce upstairs for the duration. Do you all
think this is okay, acceptable and safe?
That seems entirely reasonable. It's very much what another friend is
planning with her cleaner as well. It's slightly more cautious than I'm
being; I'm just maintaining a reasonable distance from J while she's here.
--
Best wishes, Serena
If at first you don’t succeed try, try, Try a Gin
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-22 09:41:20 UTC
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On 22 Mar 2020 08:37:15 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them. We have a weekly cleaner. She only does
downstairs and we need her but she also desperately needs the income.
I had planned to tell her to come in, wash her hands before she touches
anything such as a door handle (she brings her own vacuum etc), and that we
would both make ourselves scarce upstairs for the duration. Do you all
think this is okay, acceptable and safe?
#1 daughter said the cleaner won't be coming. She has 2 children and
is now working from home and doesn't drive and Ocado closed the
website and opened and closed so she had to do shopping with children
and doesn't drive. And there were queues, so they were at risk. Plus
she can only carry so much.

I did point out it was how we had it before about the 1990s. Ok the
milkman delivered bread,eggs,potatoes,chicken,yoghurt,cheese, OJ. Not
cleaning stuff etc. And I was home with husband at sea. This would be
if a child was ill and I was stuck in with them. But my mum could
visit. It is the not seeing anyone..and I had a car, but if a child
was ill I was stuck indoors.
Jane Vernon
2020-03-22 17:47:28 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them. We have a weekly cleaner. She only does
downstairs and we need her but she also desperately needs the income.
I had planned to tell her to come in, wash her hands before she touches
anything such as a door handle (she brings her own vacuum etc), and that we
would both make ourselves scarce upstairs for the duration. Do you all
think this is okay, acceptable and safe?
I think you just decide if your cleaning is essential. My parents (91
and 92, with live-in carer) think it is for them. I think it isn't for me.

I emailed my cleaners and said I was aware they needed income and
suggested perhaps gloves and scarves over faces but still wasn't sure as
I shall be continuing to visit my parents once a month. They wrote a
lovely email back saying they'd been wondering if I would want them to
continue, that they would always be there to clean for me afterwards and
furthermore if I needed any shopping or anything dropping off to let
them know.

I suppose my visiting parents is controversial. I've read something
that says the elderly shouldn't think it doesn't matter if they catch
COVID-19 because they will still be taking up ventilators and ICU
spaces. OTOH, my parents say exactly this - that they aren't going to
live that much longer anyway but they would miss me hugely if I didn't
go. So I'm going.
--
Jane
The Potter in the Purple socks - to reply, please remove PURPLE
BTME

http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm - Umrats' recipes
John Ashby
2020-03-22 17:57:41 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them. We have a weekly cleaner. She only does
downstairs and we need her but she also desperately needs the income.
I had planned to tell her to come in, wash her hands before she touches
anything such as a door handle (she brings her own vacuum etc), and that we
would both make ourselves scarce upstairs for the duration. Do you all
think this is okay, acceptable and safe?
I think you just decide if your cleaning is essential.  My parents (91
and 92, with live-in carer) think it is for them.  I think it isn't for me.
I emailed my cleaners and said I was aware they needed income and
suggested perhaps gloves and scarves over faces but still wasn't sure as
I shall be continuing to visit my parents once a month.  They wrote a
lovely email back saying they'd been wondering if I would want them to
continue, that they would always be there to clean for me afterwards and
furthermore if I needed any shopping or anything dropping off to let
them know.
I suppose my visiting parents is controversial.  I've read something
that says the elderly shouldn't think it doesn't matter if they catch
COVID-19 because they will still be taking up ventilators and ICU
spaces.  OTOH, my parents say exactly this - that they aren't going to
live that much longer anyway but they would miss me hugely if I didn't
go.  So I'm going.
If you must go, then take as many precautions as you can.

john
Mike
2020-03-22 18:22:19 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them. We have a weekly cleaner. She only does
downstairs and we need her but she also desperately needs the income.
I had planned to tell her to come in, wash her hands before she touches
anything such as a door handle (she brings her own vacuum etc), and that we
would both make ourselves scarce upstairs for the duration. Do you all
think this is okay, acceptable and safe?
I think you just decide if your cleaning is essential.  My parents (91
and 92, with live-in carer) think it is for them.  I think it isn't for me.
I emailed my cleaners and said I was aware they needed income and
suggested perhaps gloves and scarves over faces but still wasn't sure as
I shall be continuing to visit my parents once a month.  They wrote a
lovely email back saying they'd been wondering if I would want them to
continue, that they would always be there to clean for me afterwards and
furthermore if I needed any shopping or anything dropping off to let
them know.
I suppose my visiting parents is controversial.  I've read something
that says the elderly shouldn't think it doesn't matter if they catch
COVID-19 because they will still be taking up ventilators and ICU
spaces.  OTOH, my parents say exactly this - that they aren't going to
live that much longer anyway but they would miss me hugely if I didn't
go.  So I'm going.
If you must go, then take as many precautions as you can.
john
How many precautions might one be able to carry?
--
Toodle Pip
Jane Vernon
2020-03-23 10:50:43 UTC
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Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm
wondering what
you're all doing about them. We have a weekly cleaner. She only does
downstairs and we need her but she also desperately needs the income.
I had planned to tell her to come in, wash her hands before she touches
anything such as a door handle (she brings her own vacuum etc), and that we
would both make ourselves scarce upstairs for the duration. Do you all
think this is okay, acceptable and safe?
I think you just decide if your cleaning is essential.  My parents (91
and 92, with live-in carer) think it is for them.  I think it isn't for me.
I emailed my cleaners and said I was aware they needed income and
suggested perhaps gloves and scarves over faces but still wasn't sure
a lovely email back saying they'd been wondering if I would want them
to continue, that they would always be there to clean for me
afterwards and furthermore if I needed any shopping or anything
dropping off to let them know.
I suppose my visiting parents is controversial.  I've read something
that says the elderly shouldn't think it doesn't matter if they catch
COVID-19 because they will still be taking up ventilators and ICU
spaces.  OTOH, my parents say exactly this - that they aren't going to
live that much longer anyway but they would miss me hugely if I didn't
go.  So I'm going.
If you must go, then take as many precautions as you can.
john
This morning have decided I'm not going and fortunately my mum was
coming to the same conclusion.
--
Jane
The Potter in the Purple socks - to reply, please remove PURPLE
BTME

http://www.clothandclay.co.uk/umra/cookbook.htm - Umrats' recipes
Serena Blanchflower
2020-03-23 12:16:15 UTC
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Post by Jane Vernon
This morning have decided I'm not going and fortunately my mum was
coming to the same conclusion.
I'm glad you both came to the same conclusion.
--
Best wishes, Serena
When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the
airplane takes off against the wind, not with it. (Henry Ford)
Kate B
2020-03-22 23:20:25 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them. We have a weekly cleaner. She only does
downstairs and we need her but she also desperately needs the income.
I had planned to tell her to come in, wash her hands before she touches
anything such as a door handle (she brings her own vacuum etc), and that we
would both make ourselves scarce upstairs for the duration. Do you all
think this is okay, acceptable and safe?
I think you just decide if your cleaning is essential.  My parents (91
and 92, with live-in carer) think it is for them.  I think it isn't for me.
My husband is 92 and asthmatic and feels that isolation should be
isolation. As it happens, the lovely girl who cleaned for us for years
has recently stopped to have a baby, and we had just engaged another
person, who is ok but not a patch as either a cleaner or as a
personality on our previous one. We have asked her not to come but feel
a bit ambivalent about continuing to pay her. Once the schools are
closed she wouldn't have been able to come anyway. We're still debating
amongst ourselves as to what to do next.

We have therefore now divided up the general cleaning between us. He
does the loos and I do the bath, the sinks, and the kitchen. He is quite
keen on hoovering, but thinks the little Miele is a bit flimsy, and has
resurrected the ancient pushalong Electrolux (state of the art in 1994)
that had been languishing in the attic for decades. It's beautifully
engineered and works a treat (he says) but you can't really use it for
stairs and it weighs a ton. So we have agreed he can do the rooms on the
bedroom floor and I will do everything else with the despised Miele.

Where is all this free time that everyone is moaning about?
--
Kate B
London
Mike
2020-03-23 08:49:16 UTC
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Post by Kate B
Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them. We have a weekly cleaner. She only does
downstairs and we need her but she also desperately needs the income.
I had planned to tell her to come in, wash her hands before she touches
anything such as a door handle (she brings her own vacuum etc), and that we
would both make ourselves scarce upstairs for the duration. Do you all
think this is okay, acceptable and safe?
I think you just decide if your cleaning is essential.  My parents (91
and 92, with live-in carer) think it is for them.  I think it isn't for me.
My husband is 92 and asthmatic and feels that isolation should be
isolation. As it happens, the lovely girl who cleaned for us for years
has recently stopped to have a baby, and we had just engaged another
person, who is ok but not a patch as either a cleaner or as a
personality on our previous one. We have asked her not to come but feel
a bit ambivalent about continuing to pay her. Once the schools are
closed she wouldn't have been able to come anyway. We're still debating
amongst ourselves as to what to do next.
We have therefore now divided up the general cleaning between us. He
does the loos and I do the bath, the sinks, and the kitchen. He is quite
keen on hoovering, but thinks the little Miele is a bit flimsy, and has
resurrected the ancient pushalong Electrolux (state of the art in 1994)
that had been languishing in the attic for decades. It's beautifully
engineered and works a treat (he says) but you can't really use it for
stairs and it weighs a ton. So we have agreed he can do the rooms on the
bedroom floor and I will do everything else with the despised Miele.
Where is all this free time that everyone is moaning about?
I’ll try to answer that question.... when I have the time...
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2020-03-23 09:30:13 UTC
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On Sun, 22 Mar 2020 23:20:25 +0000, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Where is all this free time that everyone is moaning about?
I don't know.
I generally self-isolate anyway and work from home. I've had more other
calls on my time (phone calls, messaging, umra, neighbours offering help)
in the last week than I usually get in a month or two.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Serena Blanchflower
2020-03-23 12:17:35 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Where is all this free time that everyone is moaning about?
I don't know.
I generally self-isolate anyway and work from home. I've had more other
calls on my time (phone calls, messaging, umra, neighbours offering help)
in the last week than I usually get in a month or two.
YANAOU. I found it rather surreal that last week was both the busiest
and the most social that I've had for a long time.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Hard work pays off in the future! Laziness pays off NOW!
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-23 18:12:32 UTC
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On Mon, 23 Mar 2020 12:17:35 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Where is all this free time that everyone is moaning about?
I don't know.
I generally self-isolate anyway and work from home. I've had more other
calls on my time (phone calls, messaging, umra, neighbours offering help)
in the last week than I usually get in a month or two.
YANAOU. I found it rather surreal that last week was both the busiest
and the most social that I've had for a long time.
MTAAW. I've spoken to smaller grandson twice in the last week and
today the older who I never get to speak to on the phone. B installed
what's ap and I tested it with grandson who chatted happily for ages.
His mum is making him do school hours of school work, but this was
the lunch break :). He seemed quite happy with it all as has no need
to do registration and travel now so feels he gained spare time.
Penny
2020-03-23 18:50:53 UTC
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On Mon, 23 Mar 2020 18:12:32 +0000, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
MTAAW. I've spoken to smaller grandson twice in the last week and
today the older who I never get to speak to on the phone. B installed
what's ap and I tested it with grandson who chatted happily for ages.
His mum is making him do school hours of school work, but this was
the lunch break :). He seemed quite happy with it all as has no need
to do registration and travel now so feels he gained spare time.
My Kent grandchildren had schoolwork delivered this morning and pounced
upon it. D#2 was concerned they'd get through it all too quickly so I
suggested she impose mornings only and get them working in the garden in
the afternoon while the weather holds.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-23 20:57:15 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
MTAAW. I've spoken to smaller grandson twice in the last week and
today the older who I never get to speak to on the phone. B installed
what's ap and I tested it with grandson who chatted happily for ages.
His mum is making him do school hours of school work, but this was
the lunch break :). He seemed quite happy with it all as has no need
to do registration and travel now so feels he gained spare time.
My Kent grandchildren had schoolwork delivered this morning and pounced
upon it. D#2 was concerned they'd get through it all too quickly so I
suggested she impose mornings only and get them working in the garden in
the afternoon while the weather holds.
Jackpot. Remaining grandchild, granddaughter, nearly 5, rang at
supper time :). I expect it is the novelty of being restricted to the
home and short walks made themlook for more people to talk to.
She did talk to her dad though, who is in Mexico. B said Trump will
turn out to have beenright and the Mexicans will pay for the wall
after all now to keep the Americans out.
Joe Kerr
2020-03-22 20:37:32 UTC
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Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them. We have a weekly cleaner. She only does
downstairs and we need her but she also desperately needs the income.
I had planned to tell her to come in, wash her hands before she touches
anything such as a door handle (she brings her own vacuum etc), and that we
would both make ourselves scarce upstairs for the duration. Do you all
think this is okay, acceptable and safe?
My mother was talking about suspending her cleaner (or perhaps just the
service). On the one hand it seems sensible. On the other hand, if she
can get by without a cleaner for 3 months or more why does she have one?
The cleaner is the only person my mother gets to talk to face to face on
a regular basis. The cleaner visiting lots of vulnerable old people is
probably not a problem if she takes precautions as they probably won't
catch anything to pass on to her to spread, but her family might. The
cleaner is very sensible and also does other things, like shopping. If
everybody cancels her services the cleaner will be without an income.

I don't know what the answer is. I think it is for my mother to work out
with her cleaner giving consideration to government advice. Life is too
complicated to be certain about anything in this context. You just need
to cross your fingers and toss a coin. What you are suggesting sounds
fairly reasonable to me.
--
Ric
198kHz
2020-03-23 12:57:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them.
Our cleaner phoned to say she's working from home and will email
instructions.
--
198kHz
Penny
2020-03-23 13:12:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 23 Mar 2020 12:57:39 +0000, 198kHz <***@anisp.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by 198kHz
Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them.
Our cleaner phoned to say she's working from home and will email
instructions.
:))
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-03-23 13:29:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by 198kHz
Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them.
Our cleaner phoned to say she's working from home and will email
instructions.
:))
+1
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Veni, Vidi, VO5 (I came, I saw, I washed my hair) - Mik from S+AS Limited
(***@saslimited.demon.co.uk), 1998
krw
2020-03-23 15:56:24 UTC
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Post by Penny
the dust...
Post by 198kHz
Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them.
Our cleaner phoned to say she's working from home and will email
instructions.
:))
+1
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Mike
2020-03-23 13:49:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by 198kHz
Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them.
Our cleaner phoned to say she's working from home and will email
instructions.
It sucks...
--
Toodle Pip
Serena Blanchflower
2020-03-24 12:49:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them. We have a weekly cleaner. She only does
downstairs and we need her but she also desperately needs the income.
I had planned to tell her to come in, wash her hands before she touches
anything such as a door handle (she brings her own vacuum etc), and that we
would both make ourselves scarce upstairs for the duration. Do you all
think this is okay, acceptable and safe?
I discussed this, and similar questions, with my cleaner, when she was
here yesterday. The one major addition to your list which came out of
that is that J is also abstaining from stroking cats (a great sadness,
both to her and to the cats). I'm assured her own cats are getting
plenty of extra cuddles to make up for this!

While she was here, most of the time we were in separate rooms (which is
as normal) but, when we did need to be in the same room, we were doing
the Covid Dance, where if one of us stepped forward to get something,
the other would step back, out of the way.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Christians shouldn't just be pulling people out of the river. We should
be going upstream to find out who's pushing them in. (Desmond Tutu)
Sally Thompson
2020-03-24 13:36:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them. We have a weekly cleaner. She only does
downstairs and we need her but she also desperately needs the income.
I had planned to tell her to come in, wash her hands before she touches
anything such as a door handle (she brings her own vacuum etc), and that we
would both make ourselves scarce upstairs for the duration. Do you all
think this is okay, acceptable and safe?
I discussed this, and similar questions, with my cleaner, when she was
here yesterday. The one major addition to your list which came out of
that is that J is also abstaining from stroking cats (a great sadness,
both to her and to the cats). I'm assured her own cats are getting
plenty of extra cuddles to make up for this!
While she was here, most of the time we were in separate rooms (which is
as normal) but, when we did need to be in the same room, we were doing
the Covid Dance, where if one of us stepped forward to get something,
the other would step back, out of the way.
After all my good intentions, I rang her yesterday (before the major Boris
announcement) and she said she'd been at her mother's all day. Sharp intake
of breath from me, and I said she really shouldn't be doing that, and she
said, well it was Mother's Day. I did say that people had been specifically
asked not to visit their mothers, and asked her what her other clients were
doing; she seemed puzzled that she should in any way change her behaviour.

After the announcement I rang her again and said that in light of that she
obviously couldn't come. She really doesn't seem to grasp what's going on
(she has no TV, no mobile phone, no internet) and said this morning that
her mum's paper had said that if you could work from home you should, but
otherwise you could go to work. I said well, not exactly, but she seems
determined to carry on as she is. She said, oh well, so and so needs me. I
said, I need you but I'm not allowed to have you. Sadly her behaviour makes
it less likely that she can come at the moment but I don't think she
realises that.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Serena Blanchflower
2020-03-24 14:03:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them. We have a weekly cleaner. She only does
downstairs and we need her but she also desperately needs the income.
I had planned to tell her to come in, wash her hands before she touches
anything such as a door handle (she brings her own vacuum etc), and that we
would both make ourselves scarce upstairs for the duration. Do you all
think this is okay, acceptable and safe?
I discussed this, and similar questions, with my cleaner, when she was
here yesterday. The one major addition to your list which came out of
that is that J is also abstaining from stroking cats (a great sadness,
both to her and to the cats). I'm assured her own cats are getting
plenty of extra cuddles to make up for this!
While she was here, most of the time we were in separate rooms (which is
as normal) but, when we did need to be in the same room, we were doing
the Covid Dance, where if one of us stepped forward to get something,
the other would step back, out of the way.
After all my good intentions, I rang her yesterday (before the major Boris
announcement) and she said she'd been at her mother's all day. Sharp intake
of breath from me, and I said she really shouldn't be doing that, and she
said, well it was Mother's Day. I did say that people had been specifically
asked not to visit their mothers, and asked her what her other clients were
doing; she seemed puzzled that she should in any way change her behaviour.
After the announcement I rang her again and said that in light of that she
obviously couldn't come. She really doesn't seem to grasp what's going on
(she has no TV, no mobile phone, no internet) and said this morning that
her mum's paper had said that if you could work from home you should, but
otherwise you could go to work. I said well, not exactly, but she seems
determined to carry on as she is. She said, oh well, so and so needs me. I
said, I need you but I'm not allowed to have you. Sadly her behaviour makes
it less likely that she can come at the moment but I don't think she
realises that.
It sounds as if you're likely to be better off not letting her come in
as she's unlikely to be careful, either when she's with you or between
visits. Very different from my cleaner, who I know is being extremely
careful, including not seeing her grandchildren :( I'm still thinking,
in the light of last night's announcement, about how essential her work is.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Be yourself, everyone else is taken (Oscar Wilde)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-03-24 16:16:36 UTC
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[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
the Covid Dance, where if one of us stepped forward to get something,
the other would step back, out of the way.
[]
Otherwise known as the ai corona?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The best way to achieve immortality is by not dying.
Paul Herber
2020-03-24 16:29:13 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
the Covid Dance, where if one of us stepped forward to get something,
the other would step back, out of the way.
[]
Otherwise known as the ai corona?
ai caramba!
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
Vicky Ayech
2020-03-24 18:27:54 UTC
Reply
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On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 12:49:56 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Sally Thompson
I know some of you have regular carers/cleaners etc, and I'm wondering what
you're all doing about them. We have a weekly cleaner. She only does
downstairs and we need her but she also desperately needs the income.
I had planned to tell her to come in, wash her hands before she touches
anything such as a door handle (she brings her own vacuum etc), and that we
would both make ourselves scarce upstairs for the duration. Do you all
think this is okay, acceptable and safe?
I discussed this, and similar questions, with my cleaner, when she was
here yesterday. The one major addition to your list which came out of
that is that J is also abstaining from stroking cats (a great sadness,
both to her and to the cats). I'm assured her own cats are getting
plenty of extra cuddles to make up for this!
While she was here, most of the time we were in separate rooms (which is
as normal) but, when we did need to be in the same room, we were doing
the Covid Dance, where if one of us stepped forward to get something,
the other would step back, out of the way.
What about takeaways? How dangerous are they? We get them very rarely
because of WW but I thought of cheering B up tomorrow after weigh in
as he had a chest infection for a couple of days and then a cold. No
fever so we think not Corona.
Penny
2020-03-25 15:08:43 UTC
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On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 12:49:56 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
doing
the Covid Dance
I saw a lovely little video this morning of a couple dancing together
holding the ends of two broom handles. Not quite 2 metres apart but it
worked well, including that twirling thing where each passes under the arm
of the other in quick succession.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-03-25 18:01:09 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Tue, 24 Mar 2020 12:49:56 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
doing
the Covid Dance
I saw a lovely little video this morning of a couple dancing together
holding the ends of two broom handles. Not quite 2 metres apart but it
worked well, including that twirling thing where each passes under the arm
of the other in quick succession.
You remind me of Morecambe and Wise dancing with Glenda Jackson (looking
very pretty) as Ginger Rogers, in their Christmas Special 1971. A broom
handle or something similar was used there! I'd give you a link, but the
only one I can find -

if I've got that right - comes up "This video contains content from BBC
Studios, who has blocked it in your country on copyright grounds."
Meanies. (They obviously weren't always, as I _do_ have a copy of it,
which I got 2010-8-8.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

You can't abdicate and eat it - attributed to Wallis Simpson, in Radio Times
14-20 January 2012.
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