Discussion:
Font/fount?
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Vicky Ayech
2020-05-14 07:01:18 UTC
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I'm re-reading DL Sayers Murder Must Advertise after many years and
just read fount being used for font. Did it change at some point or
was it used in old-fashioned printing but changed in IT?
Mike Ruddock
2020-05-14 07:55:39 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
I'm re-reading DL Sayers Murder Must Advertise after many years and
just read fount being used for font. Did it change at some point or
was it used in old-fashioned printing but changed in IT?
I think "fount" was the British term, "font" the US term. With the rise
of Microsoft "font" became the dominant spelling. According the Chambers
"fount" was pronounced as if spelled "font".

Mike Ruddock
Penny
2020-05-14 08:23:04 UTC
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On Thu, 14 May 2020 08:55:39 +0100, Mike Ruddock
Post by Mike Ruddock
Post by Vicky Ayech
I'm re-reading DL Sayers Murder Must Advertise after many years and
just read fount being used for font. Did it change at some point or
was it used in old-fashioned printing but changed in IT?
I think "fount" was the British term, "font" the US term. With the rise
of Microsoft "font" became the dominant spelling. According the Chambers
"fount" was pronounced as if spelled "font".
I heard both at college (graphics and typography). I may even have asked
that question - if so, I don't remember the answer. I think both spellings
and pronunciations are acceptable but font is more usual now.

These days font is generally used to mean 'typeface' but in (the
old-fashioned) proof-reading mark-up context WF stands for 'wrong font'
and can refer to a letter being of the correct typeface but wrong size or
weight (Roman, bold, italic) so 'font' seems to refer to the particular
type-drawer the letter came from. These can get muddled when breaking down
type and returning it to the drawers.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sid Nuncius
2020-05-14 08:07:12 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
I'm re-reading DL Sayers Murder Must Advertise after many years and
just read fount being used for font. Did it change at some point or
was it used in old-fashioned printing but changed in IT?
Meaning typeface, as in "They had set the headlines in the wrong fount"
(p.47)?

According to the Cambridge English Dictionary, this was/is the British
spelling:
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/fount
Presumably with the ubiquity of Windows and other US IT comanies, the US
spelling has become almost universally adopted.

While we're on the subject, may I just fulminate briefly about "fount of
all knowledge" now being almost universally misquoted as "font of all
knowledge"?

Thank you.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Vicky Ayech
2020-05-14 09:17:15 UTC
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On Thu, 14 May 2020 09:07:12 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
I'm re-reading DL Sayers Murder Must Advertise after many years and
just read fount being used for font. Did it change at some point or
was it used in old-fashioned printing but changed in IT?
Meaning typeface, as in "They had set the headlines in the wrong fount"
(p.47)?
That's the one :). I love so much the other stuff you learn about
reading her books. That one was the first Lord Peter I read. I found
it on my father's bookshelf. He died when I was seven and so it was
some years later I began to read his books. I got CS Lewis Out of the
Silent Planet from there too and went on to other CSL and a lifelong
love of DLS.

There were also Leslie Charteris Saint books. And nuggering Roger
Moore is NOTHING like the Saint. I joined the Saint club in my early
teens and had the rank and grade of angel :).
Post by Sid Nuncius
According to the Cambridge English Dictionary, this was/is the British
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/fount
Presumably with the ubiquity of Windows and other US IT comanies, the US
spelling has become almost universally adopted.
While we're on the subject, may I just fulminate briefly about "fount of
all knowledge" now being almost universally misquoted as "font of all
knowledge"?
Thank you.
Anne B
2020-05-15 14:04:08 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
There were also Leslie Charteris Saint books. And nuggering Roger
Moore is NOTHING like the Saint. I joined the Saint club in my early
teens and had the rank and grade of angel :).
I still have a complete set of Saint books in a box in the attic.

Anne B
Nick Odell
2020-05-15 19:12:58 UTC
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On Fri, 15 May 2020 15:04:08 +0100, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Vicky Ayech
There were also Leslie Charteris Saint books. And nuggering Roger
Moore is NOTHING like the Saint. I joined the Saint club in my early
teens and had the rank and grade of angel :).
I still have a complete set of Saint books in a box in the attic.
Roger Moore died three years ago so you probably do not have to keep
them there any longer if you do not want to.

Nick
Mike
2020-05-15 16:47:45 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 15 May 2020 15:04:08 +0100, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Vicky Ayech
There were also Leslie Charteris Saint books. And nuggering Roger
Moore is NOTHING like the Saint. I joined the Saint club in my early
teens and had the rank and grade of angel :).
I still have a complete set of Saint books in a box in the attic.
Roger Moore died three years ago so you probably do not have to keep
them there any longer if you do not want to.
Nick
But Shula hasn’t popped her clogs yet!
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2020-05-15 16:50:04 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 15 May 2020 15:04:08 +0100, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Vicky Ayech
There were also Leslie Charteris Saint books. And nuggering Roger
Moore is NOTHING like the Saint. I joined the Saint club in my early
teens and had the rank and grade of angel :).
I still have a complete set of Saint books in a box in the attic.
Roger Moore died three years ago so you probably do not have to keep
them there any longer if you do not want to.
As Vicky observed yesterday, Roger Moore was NOT the Saint and a Volvo
was not a Hirondelle !
Nick Odell
2020-05-15 23:27:00 UTC
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On Fri, 15 May 2020 17:50:04 +0100, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 15 May 2020 15:04:08 +0100, Anne B
Post by Anne B
Post by Vicky Ayech
There were also Leslie Charteris Saint books. And nuggering Roger
Moore is NOTHING like the Saint. I joined the Saint club in my early
teens and had the rank and grade of angel :).
I still have a complete set of Saint books in a box in the attic.
Roger Moore died three years ago so you probably do not have to keep
them there any longer if you do not want to.
As Vicky observed yesterday, Roger Moore was NOT the Saint and a Volvo
was not a Hirondelle !
Yebbut, The Saint in The Attic gambit does not really work otherwise.
Leslie Charteris himself was no oil painting after all.

And besides, I try not to let a day pass without broadcasting my Today
Programme for the benefit of of the nuclear submarine HMS UMRA and
sometimes a degree of unmitigated rubbish is all I have to offer at
the time.

Nick
Penny
2020-05-15 21:00:06 UTC
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On Fri, 15 May 2020 20:27:00 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
And besides, I try not to let a day pass without broadcasting my Today
Programme for the benefit of of the nuclear submarine HMS UMRA and
sometimes a degree of unmitigated rubbish is all I have to offer at
the time.
I for one am pleased you do. I'm not a great worrier but a number of people
in my life have gone rather quiet lately and niggles of concern seem to
rise to the surface more rapidly at the moment.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2020-05-15 21:30:38 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Fri, 15 May 2020 20:27:00 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
And besides, I try not to let a day pass without broadcasting my Today
Programme for the benefit of of the nuclear submarine HMS UMRA and
sometimes a degree of unmitigated rubbish is all I have to offer at
the time.
I for one am pleased you do. I'm not a great worrier but a number of people
in my life have gone rather quiet lately and niggles of concern seem to
rise to the surface more rapidly at the moment.
True. From time to time I wonder when I/we last heard from a regular
UMRA (other Usenet groups are available) correspondent, and worry about
if I should start to worry.
--
Sam Plusnet
John Ashby
2020-05-16 06:25:45 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Fri, 15 May 2020 20:27:00 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
And besides, I try not to let a day pass without broadcasting my Today
Programme for the benefit of of the nuclear submarine HMS UMRA and
sometimes a degree of unmitigated rubbish is all I have to offer at
the time.
I for one am pleased you do. I'm not a great worrier but a number of people
in my life have gone rather quiet lately and niggles of concern seem to
rise to the surface more rapidly at the moment.
Niggle did not so much rise as plummet.

john
Mike
2020-05-16 08:00:09 UTC
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Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
On Fri, 15 May 2020 20:27:00 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
And besides, I try not to let a day pass without broadcasting my Today
Programme for the benefit of of the nuclear submarine HMS UMRA and
sometimes a degree of unmitigated rubbish is all I have to offer at
the time.
I for one am pleased you do. I'm not a great worrier but a number of people
in my life have gone rather quiet lately and niggles of concern seem to
rise to the surface more rapidly at the moment.
Niggle did not so much rise as plummet.
john
Might have been plastered at the time.
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2020-05-16 20:51:16 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
On Fri, 15 May 2020 20:27:00 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
And besides, I try not to let a day pass without broadcasting my Today
Programme for the benefit of of the nuclear submarine HMS UMRA and
sometimes a degree of unmitigated rubbish is all I have to offer at
the time.
I for one am pleased you do. I'm not a great worrier but a number of people
in my life have gone rather quiet lately and niggles of concern seem to
rise to the surface more rapidly at the moment.
Niggle did not so much rise as plummet.
john
Might have been plastered at the time.
He had a roofless streak.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2020-05-17 07:39:00 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
On Fri, 15 May 2020 20:27:00 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
And besides, I try not to let a day pass without broadcasting my Today
Programme for the benefit of of the nuclear submarine HMS UMRA and
sometimes a degree of unmitigated rubbish is all I have to offer at
the time.
I for one am pleased you do. I'm not a great worrier but a number of people
in my life have gone rather quiet lately and niggles of concern seem to
rise to the surface more rapidly at the moment.
Niggle did not so much rise as plummet.
john
Might have been plastered at the time.
He had a roofless streak.
He hadn’t really reached the apex of his career either...
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2020-05-17 20:36:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
On Fri, 15 May 2020 20:27:00 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
And besides, I try not to let a day pass without broadcasting my Today
Programme for the benefit of of the nuclear submarine HMS UMRA and
sometimes a degree of unmitigated rubbish is all I have to offer at
the time.
I for one am pleased you do. I'm not a great worrier but a number of people
in my life have gone rather quiet lately and niggles of concern seem to
rise to the surface more rapidly at the moment.
Niggle did not so much rise as plummet.
john
Might have been plastered at the time.
He had a roofless streak.
He hadn’t really reached the apex of his career either...
Get your mind out of the gutter![1]

[1] Or, just possibly, his.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2020-05-18 07:33:23 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
On Fri, 15 May 2020 20:27:00 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
And besides, I try not to let a day pass without broadcasting my Today
Programme for the benefit of of the nuclear submarine HMS UMRA and
sometimes a degree of unmitigated rubbish is all I have to offer at
the time.
I for one am pleased you do. I'm not a great worrier but a number of people
in my life have gone rather quiet lately and niggles of concern seem to
rise to the surface more rapidly at the moment.
Niggle did not so much rise as plummet.
john
Might have been plastered at the time.
He had a roofless streak.
He hadn’t really reached the apex of his career either...
Get your mind out of the gutter![1]
[1] Or, just possibly, his.
He was totally drained...
--
Toodle Pip
Sid Nuncius
2020-05-18 07:50:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
On Fri, 15 May 2020 20:27:00 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
And besides, I try not to let a day pass without broadcasting my Today
Programme for the benefit of of the nuclear submarine HMS UMRA and
sometimes a degree of unmitigated rubbish is all I have to offer at
the time.
I for one am pleased you do. I'm not a great worrier but a number of people
in my life have gone rather quiet lately and niggles of concern seem to
rise to the surface more rapidly at the moment.
Niggle did not so much rise as plummet.
Might have been plastered at the time.
He had a roofless streak.
He hadn’t really reached the apex of his career either...
Get your mind out of the gutter![1]
[1] Or, just possibly, his.
He was totally drained...
Yes, he must have been shattered.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Mike
2020-05-18 08:18:20 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Mike
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
On Fri, 15 May 2020 20:27:00 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
And besides, I try not to let a day pass without broadcasting my Today
Programme for the benefit of of the nuclear submarine HMS UMRA and
sometimes a degree of unmitigated rubbish is all I have to offer at
the time.
I for one am pleased you do. I'm not a great worrier but a number of people
in my life have gone rather quiet lately and niggles of concern seem to
rise to the surface more rapidly at the moment.
Niggle did not so much rise as plummet.
Might have been plastered at the time.
He had a roofless streak.
He hadn’t really reached the apex of his career either...
Get your mind out of the gutter![1]
[1] Or, just possibly, his.
He was totally drained...
Yes, he must have been shattered.
His career went right down the tubes...
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Leverton
2020-05-17 23:38:59 UTC
Reply
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by John Ashby
Post by Penny
On Fri, 15 May 2020 20:27:00 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
And besides, I try not to let a day pass without broadcasting my Today
Programme for the benefit of of the nuclear submarine HMS UMRA and
sometimes a degree of unmitigated rubbish is all I have to offer at
the time.
I for one am pleased you do. I'm not a great worrier but a number of people
in my life have gone rather quiet lately and niggles of concern seem to
rise to the surface more rapidly at the moment.
Niggle did not so much rise as plummet.
john
Might have been plastered at the time.
He had a roofless streak.
He hadn’t really reached the apex of his career either...
The gravity of his situation had still to hit him.

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Joe Kerr
2020-05-16 12:55:59 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
a degree of unmitigated rubbish is all I have to offer
I think that makes you over qualified.
--
Ric
BrritSki
2020-05-14 11:02:36 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
I'm re-reading DL Sayers Murder Must Advertise after many years and
just read fount being used for font. Did it change at some point or
was it used in old-fashioned printing but changed in IT?
Meaning typeface, as in "They had set the headlines in the wrong fount"
(p.47)?
According to the Cambridge English Dictionary, this was/is the British
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/fount
Presumably with the ubiquity of Windows and other US IT comanies, the US
spelling has become almost universally adopted.
While we're on the subject, may I just fulminate briefly about "fount of
all knowledge" now being almost universally misquoted as "font of all
knowledge"?
Thank you.
Granted. None of them have a slither of sense and no idea how it
effects me.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-05-14 12:20:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 May 2020 at 09:07:12, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
I'm re-reading DL Sayers Murder Must Advertise after many years and
just read fount being used for font. Did it change at some point or
was it used in old-fashioned printing but changed in IT?
Meaning typeface, as in "They had set the headlines in the wrong fount"
(p.47)?
According to the Cambridge English Dictionary, this was/is the British
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/fount
Presumably with the ubiquity of Windows and other US IT comanies, the
US spelling has become almost universally adopted.
I agree - to the extent that fount actually now sounds wrong to me, even
though I know the old usage. (And that font is also the [usually] stone
vessel in which [usually] babies are launched.)
Post by Sid Nuncius
While we're on the subject, may I just fulminate briefly about "fount
of all knowledge" now being almost universally misquoted as "font of
all knowledge"?
Thank you.
I agree, I'd expect that expression to use fount. Though thinking about
it, what does it actually mean? It's pretty obvious from the context
it's usually used in, that it means source; so what is the word - a
poetic abbreviation of fountain? (I usually object to that sort of
poeticism [same as things like "crack'd"], as highly presumptuous for no
reason; however, not knowing the actual origin of the expression, I
don't know if it comes from a time when maybe the -ain part wasn't used,
so I withhold my disdain.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Veni, Vidi, VO5 (I came, I saw, I washed my hair) - Mik from S+AS Limited
(***@saslimited.demon.co.uk), 1998
Penny
2020-05-14 14:21:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 May 2020 13:20:33 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Thu, 14 May 2020 at 09:07:12, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
I'm re-reading DL Sayers Murder Must Advertise after many years and
just read fount being used for font. Did it change at some point or
was it used in old-fashioned printing but changed in IT?
Meaning typeface, as in "They had set the headlines in the wrong fount"
(p.47)?
According to the Cambridge English Dictionary, this was/is the British
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/fount
Presumably with the ubiquity of Windows and other US IT comanies, the
US spelling has become almost universally adopted.
I agree - to the extent that fount actually now sounds wrong to me, even
though I know the old usage. (And that font is also the [usually] stone
vessel in which [usually] babies are launched.)
Post by Sid Nuncius
While we're on the subject, may I just fulminate briefly about "fount
of all knowledge" now being almost universally misquoted as "font of
all knowledge"?
Thank you.
I agree, I'd expect that expression to use fount. Though thinking about
it, what does it actually mean? It's pretty obvious from the context
it's usually used in, that it means source; so what is the word - a
poetic abbreviation of fountain? (I usually object to that sort of
poeticism [same as things like "crack'd"], as highly presumptuous for no
reason; however, not knowing the actual origin of the expression, I
don't know if it comes from a time when maybe the -ain part wasn't used,
so I withhold my disdain.)
Chambers only defines 'font' in the baptismal sense and says it derives
from [L. fons - fontis, fountain]. It does then say: see fount.

Fount has two separate entries, the first being the printing term with the
origin given as [Fr. fonte - fondre - L. fundere, to cast] US font.
The second, a spring of water: a source. [L. fons, fontis]
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Kate B
2020-05-14 15:44:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Thu, 14 May 2020 13:20:33 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Thu, 14 May 2020 at 09:07:12, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Vicky Ayech
I'm re-reading DL Sayers Murder Must Advertise after many years and
just read fount being used for font. Did it change at some point or
was it used in old-fashioned printing but changed in IT?
Meaning typeface, as in "They had set the headlines in the wrong fount"
(p.47)?
According to the Cambridge English Dictionary, this was/is the British
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/fount
Presumably with the ubiquity of Windows and other US IT comanies, the
US spelling has become almost universally adopted.
I agree - to the extent that fount actually now sounds wrong to me, even
though I know the old usage. (And that font is also the [usually] stone
vessel in which [usually] babies are launched.)
Post by Sid Nuncius
While we're on the subject, may I just fulminate briefly about "fount
of all knowledge" now being almost universally misquoted as "font of
all knowledge"?
Thank you.
I agree, I'd expect that expression to use fount. Though thinking about
it, what does it actually mean? It's pretty obvious from the context
it's usually used in, that it means source; so what is the word - a
poetic abbreviation of fountain? (I usually object to that sort of
poeticism [same as things like "crack'd"], as highly presumptuous for no
reason; however, not knowing the actual origin of the expression, I
don't know if it comes from a time when maybe the -ain part wasn't used,
so I withhold my disdain.)
Chambers only defines 'font' in the baptismal sense and says it derives
from [L. fons - fontis, fountain]. It does then say: see fount.
Fount has two separate entries, the first being the printing term with the
origin given as [Fr. fonte - fondre - L. fundere, to cast] US font.
The second, a spring of water: a source. [L. fons, fontis]
I've always understood font/fount to mean 'hot metal' It's related to
French 'fondre' (as in fondant fancies), ie melting the metal to produce
the type for printing. Font/fountain has a different root, meaning
spring or pool. Even though they both have liquid origins, I believe the
etymologies are separate. Font/Fountain comes from Latin fons,
Font/Fount from Latin fundere.
--
Kate B
London
Penny
2020-05-14 19:18:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 14 May 2020 16:44:16 +0100, Kate B <***@nospam.demon.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
Chambers only defines 'font' in the baptismal sense and says it derives
from [L. fons - fontis, fountain]. It does then say: see fount.
Fount has two separate entries, the first being the printing term with the
origin given as [Fr. fonte - fondre - L. fundere, to cast] US font.
The second, a spring of water: a source. [L. fons, fontis]
I've always understood font/fount to mean 'hot metal' It's related to
French 'fondre' (as in fondant fancies), ie melting the metal to produce
the type for printing. Font/fountain has a different root, meaning
spring or pool. Even though they both have liquid origins, I believe the
etymologies are separate. Font/Fountain comes from Latin fons,
Font/Fount from Latin fundere.
I knew I should have snipped!
That's precisely what I said by quoting the dictionary, Kate.

As for 'hot metal', that's Linotype and you don't get 'wrong fonts'* in
that because it is cast into a slug from the molds selected by the machine.
The molds are sorted back into the right place automatically when finished
with.

We did a college field trip to the Daily Mail which I found fascinating,
the slugs are then set onto rollers and a papier mâché stereo is made to
actually print the newspaper. They don't do it like that anymore.

*see my earlier post
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2020-05-14 19:51:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
Chambers only defines 'font' in the baptismal sense and says it derives
from [L. fons - fontis, fountain]. It does then say: see fount.
Fount has two separate entries, the first being the printing term with the
origin given as [Fr. fonte - fondre - L. fundere, to cast] US font.
The second, a spring of water: a source. [L. fons, fontis]
I've always understood font/fount to mean 'hot metal' It's related to
French 'fondre' (as in fondant fancies), ie melting the metal to produce
the type for printing. Font/fountain has a different root, meaning
spring or pool. Even though they both have liquid origins, I believe the
etymologies are separate. Font/Fountain comes from Latin fons,
Font/Fount from Latin fundere.
I knew I should have snipped!
That's precisely what I said by quoting the dictionary, Kate.
As for 'hot metal', that's Linotype and you don't get 'wrong fonts'* in
that because it is cast into a slug from the molds selected by the machine.
The molds are sorted back into the right place automatically when finished
with.
We did a college field trip to the Daily Mail which I found fascinating,
the slugs are then set onto rollers and a papier mâché stereo is made to
actually print the newspaper. They don't do it like that anymore.
*see my earlier post
I witnessed that process many times when I worked for the Western Gazette
in Yeovil; my work took me into the Linotype operator’s area and the
‘stereo’ room many times. Happy days...
--
Toodle Pip
Anne B
2020-05-15 14:07:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
Chambers only defines 'font' in the baptismal sense and says it derives
from [L. fons - fontis, fountain]. It does then say: see fount.
Fount has two separate entries, the first being the printing term with the
origin given as [Fr. fonte - fondre - L. fundere, to cast] US font.
The second, a spring of water: a source. [L. fons, fontis]
I've always understood font/fount to mean 'hot metal' It's related to
French 'fondre' (as in fondant fancies), ie melting the metal to produce
the type for printing. Font/fountain has a different root, meaning
spring or pool. Even though they both have liquid origins, I believe the
etymologies are separate. Font/Fountain comes from Latin fons,
Font/Fount from Latin fundere.
I knew I should have snipped!
That's precisely what I said by quoting the dictionary, Kate.
As for 'hot metal', that's Linotype and you don't get 'wrong fonts'* in
that because it is cast into a slug from the molds selected by the machine.
The molds are sorted back into the right place automatically when finished
with.
We did a college field trip to the Daily Mail which I found fascinating,
the slugs are then set onto rollers and a papier mâché stereo is made to
actually print the newspaper. They don't do it like that anymore.
*see my earlier post
IIRC those were called flongs. I remember that from a 'field' trip to
'The Scotsman' when it was still printed in the building which is now
the Scotsman Hotel on North Bridge.

Anne B
Penny
2020-05-15 15:05:20 UTC
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Permalink
On Fri, 15 May 2020 15:07:24 +0100, Anne B <***@btinternet.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Anne B
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Kate B
Post by Penny
Chambers only defines 'font' in the baptismal sense and says it derives
from [L. fons - fontis, fountain]. It does then say: see fount.
Fount has two separate entries, the first being the printing term with the
origin given as [Fr. fonte - fondre - L. fundere, to cast] US font.
The second, a spring of water: a source. [L. fons, fontis]
I've always understood font/fount to mean 'hot metal' It's related to
French 'fondre' (as in fondant fancies), ie melting the metal to produce
the type for printing. Font/fountain has a different root, meaning
spring or pool. Even though they both have liquid origins, I believe the
etymologies are separate. Font/Fountain comes from Latin fons,
Font/Fount from Latin fundere.
I knew I should have snipped!
That's precisely what I said by quoting the dictionary, Kate.
As for 'hot metal', that's Linotype and you don't get 'wrong fonts'* in
that because it is cast into a slug from the molds selected by the machine.
The molds are sorted back into the right place automatically when finished
with.
We did a college field trip to the Daily Mail which I found fascinating,
the slugs are then set onto rollers and a papier mâché stereo is made to
actually print the newspaper. They don't do it like that anymore.
*see my earlier post
IIRC those were called flongs. I remember that from a 'field' trip to
'The Scotsman' when it was still printed in the building which is now
the Scotsman Hotel on North Bridge.
You're quite right.
It took me about an hour to recall the term 'stereo' and I knew there must
have been another part to the process. The flong was the egg-box-like mold
used to cast the cylindrical hot metal stereo which did the actual
printing.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Rosalind Mitchell
2020-05-14 17:36:49 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
I'm re-reading DL Sayers Murder Must Advertise after many years and
just read fount being used for font. Did it change at some point or
was it used in old-fashioned printing but changed in IT?
Let me quote from "Just My Type" by Simon Garfield, a book which
Post by Vicky Ayech
Fonts were once known as founts. Fonts and founts weren't the same as typefaces, and typefaces weren't the same as type. In Europe the transition from fount to font was essentially complete by the 1970s, a grudging acceptance of the Americanization [sic] of the word. The two were used interchangeably as early as the 1920s, although some whiskered English traditionalists will still insist on 'fount' in an elitist way, in the hope that it will stretch their authenticity all the way back to Caxton, the great British printer of Chaucer. But most people have stopped caring. There are more important things to worry about, such as what the word actually means.
Dorothy Sayers may well have been whiskered – she was no glamourpuss and
didn't care – but she wasn't much of a traditionalist. The typesetters
at Pym's Publicity Ltd in 1933, long before Letraset never mind word
processors, would be using letters cast in lead in a foundry.

R
Jenny M Benson
2020-05-15 09:35:04 UTC
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Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Let me quote from "Just My Type" by Simon Garfield, a book which
As did I, also. I don't recall whether it was an Umrat who recommended
it to me.
--
Jenny M Benson
Wrexham, UK
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