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Judy Bennett
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krw
2018-10-05 08:59:41 UTC
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This appeared in the Daily Mail diary earlier this week:

Actress Judy Bennett, who has played Shula in the long-running radio
soap about farming folk, The Archers, for the past 47 years, will not be
joining the MeToo movement. ‘I’ve never had a man behave inappropriately
towards me,’ she tells me. ‘My daughter-in-law says it’s my eyes.
Apparently, I have a look that could kill at 30 paces.’

Or men would not want to cross Charles Collingwood.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
SODAM
2018-10-05 11:36:47 UTC
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Post by krw
Actress Judy Bennett, who has played Shula in the long-running radio
soap about farming folk, The Archers, for the past 47 years, will not be
joining the MeToo movement. ‘I’ve never had a man behave inappropriately
towards me,’ she tells me. ‘My daughter-in-law says it’s my eyes.
Apparently, I have a look that could kill at 30 paces.’
Or men would not want to cross Charles Collingwood.
It is up to everyone to join any movement they like. However, Ms. Bennett’s
reason for not joining MeToo seems too self-interested. Would one not
contribute to Shelter because one had never been homeless? Nor subscribe to
famine relief because one had a never starved? To say that something has
never happened to me so I don’t need to help or acknowledge others who
have, seems very isolationist. I can understand not contributing to
something because I don’t believe in it, can’t be bothered, or am not
interested. Find it harder to accept that I will only interest myself in
anything that affects me directly.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-10-05 12:07:32 UTC
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In message
Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Actress Judy Bennett, who has played Shula in the long-running radio
soap about farming folk, The Archers, for the past 47 years, will not be
joining the MeToo movement. ‘I’ve never had a man behave inappropriately
towards me,’ she tells me. ‘My daughter-in-law says it’s my eyes.
Apparently, I have a look that could kill at 30 paces.’
Or men would not want to cross Charles Collingwood.
It is up to everyone to join any movement they like. However, Ms. Bennett’s
reason for not joining MeToo seems too self-interested. Would one not
contribute to Shelter because one had never been homeless? Nor subscribe to
famine relief because one had a never starved? To say that something has
never happened to me so I don’t need to help or acknowledge others who
have, seems very isolationist. I can understand not contributing to
something because I don’t believe in it, can’t be bothered, or am not
interested. Find it harder to accept that I will only interest myself in
anything that affects me directly.
It _could_ be that JB does not "believe in" (that's oversimplifying, but
bear with me) the aims of this movement, but is hesitant about saying so
- with which I sympathise: anyone who so much as questions this does
seem to attract an awful lot of flak. So maybe JB has given a humorous
reason to avoid (or at least reduce) such.

Another - different, but related - issue was covered (in the usual
muddled manner) this morning: some women (and it was only women that
were discussed, though one did acknowledge it might happen to men too)
were complaining that they were getting inappropriate communications via
LinkedIn, which is a sort of social networking thing for business,
career, and so on. Now don't get me wrong: if they were getting
inappropriate communications, even mild ones such as asking for dates, I
disapprove - and that is also against LinkedIn's guidelines (someone
said - I haven't checked). But the waters were muddied by some of the
communications simply being "you look nice" or similar. It has come to a
pretty pass if such an innocent compliment cannot be made. It also makes
me wonder: why does LI _have_ photos (for women _or_ men), or at least
why does it pop them up on all posts? (On a wider theme, the same
question about lots of things - YouTube, probably Facebook and Twitter?)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I hate petitions, they're the modern-day equivalent of villagers with
pitchforks and flaming torches. - Alison Graham RT 2016/2/20-26
Penny
2018-10-05 13:29:08 UTC
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On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 13:07:32 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Another - different, but related - issue was covered (in the usual
muddled manner) this morning: some women (and it was only women that
were discussed, though one did acknowledge it might happen to men too)
were complaining that they were getting inappropriate communications via
LinkedIn, which is a sort of social networking thing for business,
career, and so on. Now don't get me wrong: if they were getting
inappropriate communications, even mild ones such as asking for dates, I
disapprove - and that is also against LinkedIn's guidelines (someone
said - I haven't checked). But the waters were muddied by some of the
communications simply being "you look nice" or similar. It has come to a
pretty pass if such an innocent compliment cannot be made. It also makes
me wonder: why does LI _have_ photos (for women _or_ men), or at least
why does it pop them up on all posts? (On a wider theme, the same
question about lots of things - YouTube, probably Facebook and Twitter?)
LinkedIn actually nags you for a photo, claiming it increases your chances
of getting a job (presumably only true if you are attractive and the
recruiter cares more about looks than ability).

I only joined so I could see the profiles of other people, not because I
was seeking a job. And yes, a picture can be helpful to confirm I have
found the person I was looking for and the ability to compare photos across
other platforms is useful too.
All of which makes me sound like a stalker...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Jenny M Benson
2018-10-05 14:19:05 UTC
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Post by Penny
All of which makes me sound like a stalker...
I notice you aren't denying it!
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Penny
2018-10-05 14:24:11 UTC
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On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 15:19:05 +0100, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by Penny
All of which makes me sound like a stalker...
I notice you aren't denying it!
Sometimes I'm just trying to figure out if reports of someone's death have
been exaggerated ;)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Kate B
2018-10-05 22:12:48 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 13:07:32 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Another - different, but related - issue was covered (in the usual
muddled manner) this morning: some women (and it was only women that
were discussed, though one did acknowledge it might happen to men too)
were complaining that they were getting inappropriate communications via
LinkedIn, which is a sort of social networking thing for business,
career, and so on. Now don't get me wrong: if they were getting
inappropriate communications, even mild ones such as asking for dates, I
disapprove - and that is also against LinkedIn's guidelines (someone
said - I haven't checked). But the waters were muddied by some of the
communications simply being "you look nice" or similar. It has come to a
pretty pass if such an innocent compliment cannot be made. It also makes
me wonder: why does LI _have_ photos (for women _or_ men), or at least
why does it pop them up on all posts? (On a wider theme, the same
question about lots of things - YouTube, probably Facebook and Twitter?)
LinkedIn actually nags you for a photo, claiming it increases your chances
of getting a job (presumably only true if you are attractive and the
recruiter cares more about looks than ability).
I only joined so I could see the profiles of other people, not because I
was seeking a job. And yes, a picture can be helpful to confirm I have
found the person I was looking for and the ability to compare photos across
other platforms is useful too.
All of which makes me sound like a stalker...
LinkedIn is supposed to be for business networking, so 'you look nice'
is not at all appropriate, particularly if you don't actually know the
person, but frankly in any case, it's not a beauty pageant.

'You look nice' is more appropriate on Facebook - but again, not from
complete strangers, where it's inevitably a lazy chat-up line.

'You look nice' as you greet your friend is perfectly appropriate in
most circumstances. Except possibly where they have clearly made such an
effort to look stunning that 'nice' just doesn't cut it.
--
Kate B
London
Serena Blanchflower
2018-10-05 12:19:25 UTC
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Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Actress Judy Bennett, who has played Shula in the long-running radio
soap about farming folk, The Archers, for the past 47 years, will not be
joining the MeToo movement. ‘I’ve never had a man behave inappropriately
towards me,’ she tells me. ‘My daughter-in-law says it’s my eyes.
Apparently, I have a look that could kill at 30 paces.’
Or men would not want to cross Charles Collingwood.
It is up to everyone to join any movement they like. However, Ms. Bennett’s
reason for not joining MeToo seems too self-interested. Would one not
contribute to Shelter because one had never been homeless? Nor subscribe to
famine relief because one had a never starved? To say that something has
never happened to me so I don’t need to help or acknowledge others who
have, seems very isolationist. I can understand not contributing to
something because I don’t believe in it, can’t be bothered, or am not
interested. Find it harder to accept that I will only interest myself in
anything that affects me directly.
I agree with you, to a large extent, but one of the important features
about MeToo is that it isn't just saying you support it's aims but is a
statement that "Me too, I've been affected by this". I think it's
quite possible that Judy Bennett would agree with the former, without
feeling she can claim the latter.
--
Best wishes, Serena
If you are going through hell, keep going. (Winston Churchill)
Penny
2018-10-05 13:22:58 UTC
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On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 13:19:25 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by krw
Actress Judy Bennett, who has played Shula in the long-running radio
soap about farming folk, The Archers, for the past 47 years, will not be
joining the MeToo movement. ‘I’ve never had a man behave inappropriately
towards me,’ she tells me. ‘My daughter-in-law says it’s my eyes.
Apparently, I have a look that could kill at 30 paces.’
Or men would not want to cross Charles Collingwood.
It is up to everyone to join any movement they like. However, Ms. Bennett’s
reason for not joining MeToo seems too self-interested. Would one not
contribute to Shelter because one had never been homeless? Nor subscribe to
famine relief because one had a never starved? To say that something has
never happened to me so I don’t need to help or acknowledge others who
have, seems very isolationist. I can understand not contributing to
something because I don’t believe in it, can’t be bothered, or am not
interested. Find it harder to accept that I will only interest myself in
anything that affects me directly.
I agree with you, to a large extent, but one of the important features
about MeToo is that it isn't just saying you support it's aims but is a
statement that "Me too, I've been affected by this". I think it's
quite possible that Judy Bennett would agree with the former, without
feeling she can claim the latter.
That was my assumption too. She just didn't feel she had ever experienced
the problem. I think this is very different from a number of (older) women
I have heard speaking against the movement saying "It's not a problem, it's
just the way things are and you get used to it."* . They seem to have
missed the point entirely :(

*Which is pretty much what I was brought up to believe - and never really
did.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2018-10-05 16:59:33 UTC
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On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 13:19:25 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by krw
Actress Judy Bennett, who has played Shula in the long-running radio
soap about farming folk, The Archers, for the past 47 years, will not be
joining the MeToo movement. ‘I’ve never had a man behave inappropriately
towards me,’ she tells me. ‘My daughter-in-law says it’s my eyes.
Apparently, I have a look that could kill at 30 paces.’
Or men would not want to cross Charles Collingwood.
It is up to everyone to join any movement they like. However, Ms. Bennett’s
reason for not joining MeToo seems too self-interested. Would one not
contribute to Shelter because one had never been homeless? Nor subscribe to
famine relief because one had a never starved? To say that something has
never happened to me so I don’t need to help or acknowledge others who
have, seems very isolationist. I can understand not contributing to
something because I don’t believe in it, can’t be bothered, or am not
interested. Find it harder to accept that I will only interest myself in
anything that affects me directly.
I agree with you, to a large extent, but one of the important features
about MeToo is that it isn't just saying you support it's aims but is a
statement that "Me too, I've been affected by this". I think it's
quite possible that Judy Bennett would agree with the former, without
feeling she can claim the latter.
I think that was why I didn't join in.
Btms
2018-10-11 07:25:25 UTC
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Post by SODAM
Post by krw
Actress Judy Bennett, who has played Shula in the long-running radio
soap about farming folk, The Archers, for the past 47 years, will not be
joining the MeToo movement. ‘I’ve never had a man behave inappropriately
towards me,’ she tells me. ‘My daughter-in-law says it’s my eyes.
Apparently, I have a look that could kill at 30 paces.’
Or men would not want to cross Charles Collingwood.
It is up to everyone to join any movement they like. However, Ms. Bennett’s
reason for not joining MeToo seems too self-interested. Would one not
contribute to Shelter because one had never been homeless? Nor subscribe to
famine relief because one had a never starved? To say that something has
never happened to me so I don’t need to help or acknowledge others who
have, seems very isolationist. I can understand not contributing to
something because I don’t believe in it, can’t be bothered, or am not
interested. Find it harder to accept that I will only interest myself in
anything that affects me directly.
Ok daily mail. I only see the mail on the bar in the pub. It’s that or
the racing post in this village
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
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