Discussion:
NOT Brexit, but Brexit inspired
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Joe Kerr
2019-10-03 21:02:30 UTC
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This is something I have been thinking about for ages. I've given up
hope of anybody explaining it so I'm relying on umra. It might also give
Britters something to contribute to and at least cheer him up.

Trade agreements: I think I know what they are and why they exist. It
seems fairly simple on the face of it. The question is why are they
/necessary/? Why is the WTO default position that there are tariffs to
penalise anybody without a trade agreement? I don't have to negotiate a
deal with Sainsbury's or Waitrose. I just buy what I want from wherever
is convenient or has the best offer.

(This could be the only time you see a sentence containing the words
Brexit* and inspired.)

Supplementary question: What will it be called if Spain decides to leave
the EU?

* Is Brexit actually a word?
--
Ric
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-03 22:43:43 UTC
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In message <qn5nl5$u1c$***@gioia.aioe.org>, Joe Kerr
<***@cheerful.com> writes:
[]
Post by Joe Kerr
Trade agreements: I think I know what they are and why they exist. It
seems fairly simple on the face of it. The question is why are they
/necessary/? Why is the WTO default position that there are tariffs to
penalise anybody without a trade agreement? I don't have to negotiate a
It's an excellent question. And I don't know the answer either! The only
thing I can think of is WTO may set _maximum_ tariff levels in the
absence of an agreement, but I have no idea of whether that's true or no
[]
Post by Joe Kerr
Supplementary question: What will it be called if Spain decides to
leave the EU?
The British press would start with Spexit, I suspect. I don't know in
Spain - possibly something starting with E for España; I don't know what
Spanish for exit is. (German for Spain is Spanien; French I think
l'Espagne; don't know others.)

Was it just the E- that triggered your question, or have you seen some
suggestion that Spain was considering it? The only other countries I
heard of were a few that had strong right-wing factions, and that only
just after our referendum - and those seem to have died down, and I
don't think that Spain was one of them anyway. There was the bit of
Spain - Catalonia - that wanted to break from _Spain_, and were
repressed, but that's different.
Post by Joe Kerr
* Is Brexit actually a word?
Depends on your definition. If you mean in the OED (and thus
subsequently in other dictionaries), I'd be _amazed_ if there isn't by
now a large entry for it (and probably citations from at least the
1970s, if not centuries earlier).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The early worm gets the bird.
Joe Kerr
2019-10-04 00:08:44 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Joe Kerr
Trade agreements: I think I know what they are and why they exist. It
seems fairly simple on the face of it. The question is why are they
/necessary/? Why is the WTO default position that there are tariffs to
penalise anybody without a trade agreement? I don't have to negotiate a
It's an excellent question. And I don't know the answer either! The only
thing I can think of is WTO may set _maximum_ tariff levels in the
absence of an agreement, but I have no idea of whether that's true or no
I'm glad I'm not alone. I thought it mas mandatory tariffs, but then
again ...
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Joe Kerr
Supplementary question: What will it be called if Spain decides to
leave the EU?
The British press would start with Spexit, I suspect. I don't know in
Spain - possibly something starting with E for España; I don't know what
Spanish for exit is. (German for Spain is Spanien; French I think
l'Espagne; don't know others.)
Was it just the E- that triggered your question, or have you seen some
suggestion that Spain was considering it? The only other countries I
heard of were a few that had strong right-wing factions, and that only
just after our referendum - and those seem to have died down, and I
don't think that Spain was one of them anyway. There was the bit of
Spain - Catalonia - that wanted to break from _Spain_, and were
repressed, but that's different.
You're taking that question way too seriously. We had the possibility of
Grexit a few years ago. Now we have Brexit (or not). I was just
wondering about the possibility of some other countries such as Italy,
Portugal, Austria that have less pronounceable equivalents. Then I
thought of what the taloids would do sticking S on the front of exit. I
don't actually have any inside information on any other countries
planning to leave.

Come to think of it, isn't it the UK rather than GB that is in the EU,
which would give us Unexit?
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Joe Kerr
* Is Brexit actually a word?
Depends on your definition. If you mean in the OED (and thus
subsequently in other dictionaries), I'd be _amazed_ if there isn't by
now a large entry for it (and probably citations from at least the
1970s, if not centuries earlier).
I thought you'd have the answer. I'm guessing it is by now but can't be
bothered to look. Again, it was more of an attempt at humour than a
serious question.
--
Ric
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-04 01:59:40 UTC
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In message <qn62ia$esm$***@gioia.aioe.org>, Joe Kerr
<***@cheerful.com> writes:
[]
Post by Joe Kerr
You're taking that question way too seriously. We had the possibility
of Grexit a few years ago. Now we have Brexit (or not). I was just
wondering about the possibility of some other countries such as Italy,
Portugal, Austria that have less pronounceable equivalents. Then I
thought of what the taloids would do sticking S on the front of exit. I
don't actually have any inside information on any other countries
planning to leave.
Gotcha.
Post by Joe Kerr
Come to think of it, isn't it the UK rather than GB that is in the EU,
which would give us Unexit?
Initially, yes; however, the current proposals are more like only the GB
part!
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Joe Kerr
* Is Brexit actually a word?
Depends on your definition. If you mean in the OED (and thus
subsequently in other dictionaries), I'd be _amazed_ if there isn't by
now a large entry for it (and probably citations from at least the
1970s, if not centuries earlier).
I thought you'd have the answer. I'm guessing it is by now but can't be
I don't; the above is just my understanding of how the OED works. I do
know that, once in, a word is never removed (unlike some of the smaller
dictionaries).
Post by Joe Kerr
bothered to look. Again, it was more of an attempt at humour than a
serious question.
I have always been prone to not realising when someone's kidding; I make
a good straight man.
2
--
(The "treat northern Ireland differently" option I've mentioned is back!)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The Daily Mail has led the campaign to limit pornography - "it demeans and
belittles women," they explain, "and that's our job." (Sandi Toksvig
[scripted], News Quiz 2013-7-26.)
Sid Nuncius
2019-10-04 06:29:28 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I have always been prone to not realising when someone's kidding; I make
a good straight man.
You are free to identify as whatever gender and sexuality you wish, John.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-04 08:12:46 UTC
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On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 07:29:28 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I have always been prone to not realising when someone's kidding; I make
a good straight man.
You are free to identify as whatever gender and sexuality you wish, John.
Ooooh you are awful! But I love you ;)!
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-04 09:11:05 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 07:29:28 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I have always been prone to not realising when someone's kidding; I make
a good straight man.
You are free to identify as whatever gender and sexuality you wish, John.
LOL! (Gender - as the name suggests [and I've had it from birth]; the
other matter - I've never had occasion to test, but I think inclined
towards "straight" [I find I absorb less of a weather forecast when the
in-vision forecaster is female*].)
Post by Vicky Ayech
Ooooh you are awful! But I love you ;)!
(-:
* I've actually found this more of a problem _recently_, when you'd
think it'd have been more the case when I was younger. I now find - I've
_always_ found it difficult to actually _absorb_ what's in a weather
forecast, but now - I have to _really_ make an effort to retain _any_
weather information from a TV forecast presented by a female forecaster.
I look at her figure and what she's wearing, and don't take in what
she's saying. I've recently been wondering - do female (or ...) viewers
have the same difficulty when the presenter is male?

(I've even wondered if there is a _need_ for the forecaster to be in
vision at all, but it is _nice_ to have a - sorry for non-PC terms -
pretty girl or handsome woman there, so I'm reluctant to suggest their
removal, in case my distraction is unusual.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If you can't construct a coherent argument for the other side, you probably
don't understand your own opinion. - Scott Adams, 2015
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-04 10:42:18 UTC
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On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 10:11:05 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 07:29:28 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I have always been prone to not realising when someone's kidding; I make
a good straight man.
You are free to identify as whatever gender and sexuality you wish, John.
LOL! (Gender - as the name suggests [and I've had it from birth]; the
other matter - I've never had occasion to test, but I think inclined
towards "straight" [I find I absorb less of a weather forecast when the
in-vision forecaster is female*].)
Post by Vicky Ayech
Ooooh you are awful! But I love you ;)!
* I've actually found this more of a problem _recently_, when you'd
think it'd have been more the case when I was younger. I now find - I've
_always_ found it difficult to actually _absorb_ what's in a weather
forecast, but now - I have to _really_ make an effort to retain _any_
weather information from a TV forecast presented by a female forecaster.
I look at her figure and what she's wearing, and don't take in what
she's saying. I've recently been wondering - do female (or ...) viewers
have the same difficulty when the presenter is male?
(I've even wondered if there is a _need_ for the forecaster to be in
vision at all, but it is _nice_ to have a - sorry for non-PC terms -
pretty girl or handsome woman there, so I'm reluctant to suggest their
removal, in case my distraction is unusual.)
If it is Carol, BBC and on breakfast tv and all over the shop I don't
get the forecast, I switch channels as can't stand her. I like London
Kate with the glasses. I don't think I absorb more from a female than
a male and I get most forecasts from Alexa or radio in the morning. If
the presenter has a voice I find irritating I change channels or if it
is hard to hear as first thing I don't put the hearing aids in,
because of going swimming.

I think I give a stupid or unfriendly impression in the pool but do
try and smile lots. I inceasingly miss what is said and tehre is a
limit to how often you can ask them to repeat it. I have told a couple
of people now that I haven't got the aids in. I do sometimes do the
just nod and smile thing :(
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-04 11:16:32 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 10:11:05 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
towards "straight" [I find I absorb less of a weather forecast when the
in-vision forecaster is female*].)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
* I've actually found this more of a problem _recently_, when you'd
think it'd have been more the case when I was younger. I now find - I've
_always_ found it difficult to actually _absorb_ what's in a weather
forecast, but now - I have to _really_ make an effort to retain _any_
weather information from a TV forecast presented by a female forecaster.
I look at her figure and what she's wearing, and don't take in what
she's saying. I've recently been wondering - do female (or ...) viewers
have the same difficulty when the presenter is male?
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
If it is Carol, BBC and on breakfast tv and all over the shop I don't
get the forecast, I switch channels as can't stand her. I like London
She certainly seems to be Marmite! I like her.
Post by Vicky Ayech
Kate with the glasses. I don't think I absorb more from a female than
I like all of them; I'm south-east; I particularly like the one I always
think of as Goth (I'm sure she isn't, just her shape - very thin waist
and long straight hair), and the one with only one hand (I've seen her
doing national forecasts too).
Post by Vicky Ayech
a male
Interesting. Do you find, when it is a male, you _do_ look at his
appearance and what he is wearing more than when it is a female? Maybe
our societal norms make the situation asymmetrical: there's almost a
uniform (jacket and tie) for male presenters. (I know there are
exceptions [where's Francis Wilson of the pullovers these days?], but on
the whole.) Whereas ladies have much more variety available to them.
Which maybe is of interest to other ladies too.
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
of people now that I haven't got the aids in. I do sometimes do the
just nod and smile thing :(
I have occasionally done that when I can't understand due to accent (-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

More people watch live theatre every year than Premier League football
matches. - Libby Purves, RT 2017/9/30-10/6
Jenny M Benson
2019-10-04 12:54:12 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Interesting. Do you find, when it is a male, you _do_ look at his
appearance and what he is wearing more than when it is a female? Maybe
our societal norms make the situation asymmetrical: there's almost a
uniform (jacket and tie) for male presenters. (I know there are
exceptions [where's Francis Wilson of the pullovers these days?], but on
the whole.) Whereas ladies have much more variety available to them.
Which maybe is of interest to other ladies too.
I commented on a recent Mastermind where one lady was wearing a very
simple but extremely becoming outfit and the men - one in particular
IIRC - looked downright scruffy. I expect people to dress up a little
bit to appear on tv (by appointment, rather than being stopped in the
street) but a great many don't.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Min
2019-10-04 22:29:09 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Interesting. Do you find, when it is a male, you _do_ look at his
appearance and what he is wearing more than when it is a female? Maybe
our societal norms make the situation asymmetrical: there's almost a
uniform (jacket and tie) for male presenters. (I know there are
exceptions [where's Francis Wilson of the pullovers these days?], but on
the whole.) Whereas ladies have much more variety available to them.
Which maybe is of interest to other ladies too.
I commented on a recent Mastermind where one lady was wearing a very
simple but extremely becoming outfit and the men - one in particular
IIRC - looked downright scruffy. I expect people to dress up a little
bit to appear on tv (by appointment, rather than being stopped in the
street) but a great many don't.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
My Mastermind semi-final <KF>, as soon as they started, it was reported that I was *strobing* - so I had to run (alone) back to the dressing room and change. My subsequent TV appearance and clothing was *very* adversely commented on by the Twitterati....little realising at that point I was a complete nervous wreck </KF>
--
Min
Min
2019-10-04 22:31:10 UTC
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Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Interesting. Do you find, when it is a male, you _do_ look at his
appearance and what he is wearing more than when it is a female? Maybe
our societal norms make the situation asymmetrical: there's almost a
uniform (jacket and tie) for male presenters. (I know there are
exceptions [where's Francis Wilson of the pullovers these days?], but on
the whole.) Whereas ladies have much more variety available to them.
Which maybe is of interest to other ladies too.
I commented on a recent Mastermind where one lady was wearing a very
simple but extremely becoming outfit and the men - one in particular
IIRC - looked downright scruffy. I expect people to dress up a little
bit to appear on tv (by appointment, rather than being stopped in the
street) but a great many don't.
My Mastermind semi-final <KF>, as soon as they started, it was reported
that I was *strobing* - so I had to run (alone) back to the dressing
room and change. My subsequent TV appearance and clothing was *very* adversely commented on by the Twitterati....little realising at that
point I was a complete nervous wreck </KF>
--
Min
BrritSki
2019-10-05 06:30:10 UTC
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Post by Min
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Interesting. Do you find, when it is a male, you _do_ look at his
appearance and what he is wearing more than when it is a female? Maybe
our societal norms make the situation asymmetrical: there's almost a
uniform (jacket and tie) for male presenters. (I know there are
exceptions [where's Francis Wilson of the pullovers these days?], but on
the whole.) Whereas ladies have much more variety available to them.
Which maybe is of interest to other ladies too.
I commented on a recent Mastermind where one lady was wearing a very
simple but extremely becoming outfit and the men - one in particular
IIRC - looked downright scruffy. I expect people to dress up a little
bit to appear on tv (by appointment, rather than being stopped in the
street) but a great many don't.
My Mastermind semi-final <KF>, as soon as they started, it was reported
that I was *strobing* - so I had to run (alone) back to the dressing
room and change. My subsequent TV appearance and clothing was *very* adversely commented on by the Twitterati....little realising at that
point I was a complete nervous wreck </KF>
You should have told them your shaking would cancel out the strobing...
BrritSki
2019-10-05 07:42:55 UTC
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Post by Min
My Mastermind semi-final <KF>, as soon as they started, it was reported
that I was *strobing*
Someone should tell Jonny Wilkinson that he is strobing on ITV as I type...
vk
2019-10-05 08:48:06 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Min
My Mastermind semi-final <KF>, as soon as they started, it was reported
that I was *strobing*
Someone should tell Jonny Wilkinson that he is strobing on ITV as I type...
Oooh Jonny Wilkinsom. Shallow, moi?
Nick Odell
2019-10-05 10:46:18 UTC
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On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 13:54:12 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Interesting. Do you find, when it is a male, you _do_ look at his
appearance and what he is wearing more than when it is a female? Maybe
our societal norms make the situation asymmetrical: there's almost a
uniform (jacket and tie) for male presenters. (I know there are
exceptions [where's Francis Wilson of the pullovers these days?], but on
the whole.) Whereas ladies have much more variety available to them.
Which maybe is of interest to other ladies too.
I commented on a recent Mastermind where one lady was wearing a very
simple but extremely becoming outfit and the men - one in particular
IIRC - looked downright scruffy. I expect people to dress up a little
bit to appear on tv (by appointment, rather than being stopped in the
street) but a great many don't.
I suspect a great many of them have smartened up in comparison with
their day-to-day appearance. Not that I'm one of those who wears
-erme- comfortable clothes around the house and any appearance of mine
in the outside world has got to be better than that.

Nick
Penny
2019-10-05 13:26:47 UTC
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On Sat, 05 Oct 2019 11:46:18 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 13:54:12 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
I commented on a recent Mastermind where one lady was wearing a very
simple but extremely becoming outfit and the men - one in particular
IIRC - looked downright scruffy. I expect people to dress up a little
bit to appear on tv (by appointment, rather than being stopped in the
street) but a great many don't.
I suspect a great many of them have smartened up in comparison with
their day-to-day appearance. Not that I'm one of those who wears
-erme- comfortable clothes around the house and any appearance of mine
in the outside world has got to be better than that.
I'm not one for dressing up on the rare occasions I go out these days. Most
of my smarter clothes don't fit any more and those that do are not warm
enough for most places go and they don't have pockets so I'd have to carry
a bag too.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-10-05 14:51:11 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Sat, 05 Oct 2019 11:46:18 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 13:54:12 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
I commented on a recent Mastermind where one lady was wearing a very
simple but extremely becoming outfit and the men - one in particular
IIRC - looked downright scruffy. I expect people to dress up a little
bit to appear on tv (by appointment, rather than being stopped in the
street) but a great many don't.
I suspect a great many of them have smartened up in comparison with
their day-to-day appearance. Not that I'm one of those who wears
-erme- comfortable clothes around the house and any appearance of mine
in the outside world has got to be better than that.
I'm not one for dressing up on the rare occasions I go out these days. Most
of my smarter clothes don't fit any more and those that do are not warm
enough for most places go and they don't have pockets so I'd have to carry
a bag too.
To me, clothes are for practicality; warmth, protection from the elements,
comfort and modesty - smart doesn’t come into consideration at all.
--
Toodle Pip
Jenny M Benson
2019-10-06 23:42:42 UTC
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But this does remind me of my father, going out on a Saturday to the
nearest market town (we lived in a village).
He would dress carefully in his best clothes, since it wouldn't do to go
shopping (mostly wandering around market stalls) in anything less.
With my father it was rather the other way round as he would wear a suit
to go to the office Monday to Friday, but on a Saturday he dressed down
and attended in a sports jacket and suitable trousers.

For many years he expressed a desire to grow a beard and when we went on
holiday to our country cottage he would not shave for a few days. Then
we'd be going out somewhere so he would feel he had to shave. He did
grow a beard eventually, after he'd retired, but I was long since left
home so I don't know how long he holed up out of public gaze before he
considered it sufficient to pass as a beard and not just as not having
shaved for a while.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
steveski
2019-10-06 23:59:30 UTC
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On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 00:42:42 +0100, Jenny M Benson wrote:

[]
Post by Jenny M Benson
He did
grow a beard eventually, after he'd retired, but I was long since left
home so I don't know how long he holed up out of public gaze before he
considered it sufficient to pass as a beard and not just as not having
shaved for a while.
When I 'slapped in to grow' (RN slang for 'Request to Discontinue
Shaving') I was given two weeks to show that I could. I was twenty and
quite dark-haired so it wasn't a problem.

I've had a (trimmed) beard ever since. I've shaved it off a couple of
times in the past, then looked in the mirror, gone Aaaarrgghh! and
immediately re-grown it :-)
--
Steveski
Chris J Dixon
2019-10-07 07:51:09 UTC
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Post by steveski
When I 'slapped in to grow' (RN slang for 'Request to Discontinue
Shaving') I was given two weeks to show that I could. I was twenty and
quite dark-haired so it wasn't a problem.
I've had a (trimmed) beard ever since. I've shaved it off a couple of
times in the past, then looked in the mirror, gone Aaaarrgghh! and
immediately re-grown it :-)
After leaving school I spent the summer working shifts. A week of
nights soon had me abandoning my shaver, and my then GF
encouraged me to see what appeared. Initially it was a chin
strap, but eventually the moustache was added.

There it has remained ever since, apart from one Christmas when
my then wife plied me with drink (back in the days when I still
partook) said she had never seen me without, and got me to shave
it off. Neither of us liked what we saw, and it was allowed to
re-grow immediately.

Dark originally, now gray.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Sid Nuncius
2019-10-07 08:21:04 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
After leaving school I spent the summer working shifts. A week of
nights soon had me abandoning my shaver, and my then GF
encouraged me to see what appeared. Initially it was a chin
strap, but eventually the moustache was added.
There it has remained ever since, apart from one Christmas when
my then wife plied me with drink (back in the days when I still
partook) said she had never seen me without, and got me to shave
it off. Neither of us liked what we saw, and it was allowed to
re-grow immediately.
I had had a beard for a year or so when wofe and I first met and I kept
it for 20-odd years thereafter. However, in the late 80s it was
seriously unfashionable and I shaved it off. I looked about 15 years
younger and wofe was so disconcerted by this new chap in the house that
I had to lie in bed with the covers up to my nose for a couple of
evenings so she knew who she was getting into bed with.

It's stayed off ever since, apart from the months after my ear failed
when moving my head made me incredibly sick and often involved falling
over, meaning shaving was...interesting. It didn't go well; it was
pretty grey by that time and made me look older than I wanted to, so it
came off as soon as I could physically manage it.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2019-10-07 08:26:17 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
I had had a beard for a year or so when wofe and I first met and I kept
it for 20-odd years thereafter.  However, in the late 80s it was
seriously unfashionable and I shaved it off.  I looked about 15 years
younger and wofe was so disconcerted by this new chap in the house that
I had to lie in bed with the covers up to my nose for a couple of
evenings so she knew who she was getting into bed with.
Of course if it was Matron you could have just covered your upper half...
Mike
2019-10-07 09:47:48 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
I had had a beard for a year or so when wofe and I first met and I kept
it for 20-odd years thereafter.  However, in the late 80s it was
seriously unfashionable and I shaved it off.  I looked about 15 years
younger and wofe was so disconcerted by this new chap in the house that
I had to lie in bed with the covers up to my nose for a couple of
evenings so she knew who she was getting into bed with.
Of course if it was Matron you could have just covered your upper half...
... for those of a genital disposition...
--
Toodle Pip
Chris J Dixon
2019-10-07 08:47:06 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
I had had a beard for a year or so when wofe and I first met and I kept
it for 20-odd years thereafter. However, in the late 80s it was
seriously unfashionable and I shaved it off. I looked about 15 years
younger and wofe was so disconcerted by this new chap in the house that
I had to lie in bed with the covers up to my nose for a couple of
evenings so she knew who she was getting into bed with.
LOL :-)

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Mike
2019-10-07 09:47:48 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris J Dixon
After leaving school I spent the summer working shifts. A week of
nights soon had me abandoning my shaver, and my then GF
encouraged me to see what appeared. Initially it was a chin
strap, but eventually the moustache was added.
There it has remained ever since, apart from one Christmas when
my then wife plied me with drink (back in the days when I still
partook) said she had never seen me without, and got me to shave
it off. Neither of us liked what we saw, and it was allowed to
re-grow immediately.
I had had a beard for a year or so when wofe and I first met and I kept
it for 20-odd years thereafter. However, in the late 80s it was
seriously unfashionable and I shaved it off. I looked about 15 years
younger and wofe was so disconcerted by this new chap in the house that
I had to lie in bed with the covers up to my nose for a couple of
evenings so she knew who she was getting into bed with.
It's stayed off ever since, apart from the months after my ear failed
when moving my head made me incredibly sick and often involved falling
over, meaning shaving was...interesting. It didn't go well; it was
pretty grey by that time and made me look older than I wanted to, so it
came off as soon as I could physically manage it.
I was rising at 04:15 to start work at 06:00 (3.5 mile walk to work was
involved) in the sixties and didn’t wish to wake the rest of the family -
so my beard was born; still there now, albeit grey/white these days!
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-07 11:14:38 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Chris J Dixon
After leaving school I spent the summer working shifts. A week of
nights soon had me abandoning my shaver, and my then GF
encouraged me to see what appeared. Initially it was a chin
strap, but eventually the moustache was added.
There it has remained ever since, apart from one Christmas when
my then wife plied me with drink (back in the days when I still
partook) said she had never seen me without, and got me to shave
it off. Neither of us liked what we saw, and it was allowed to
re-grow immediately.
I had had a beard for a year or so when wofe and I first met and I kept
it for 20-odd years thereafter. However, in the late 80s it was
seriously unfashionable and I shaved it off. I looked about 15 years
younger and wofe was so disconcerted by this new chap in the house that
I had to lie in bed with the covers up to my nose for a couple of
evenings so she knew who she was getting into bed with.
It's stayed off ever since, apart from the months after my ear failed
when moving my head made me incredibly sick and often involved falling
over, meaning shaving was...interesting. It didn't go well; it was
pretty grey by that time and made me look older than I wanted to, so it
came off as soon as I could physically manage it.
I was rising at 04:15 to start work at 06:00 (3.5 mile walk to work was
involved) in the sixties and didn’t wish to wake the rest of the family -
so my beard was born; still there now, albeit grey/white these days!
I make no bones about it: I started because I found shaving a chore. I
did remove it - to see what I could find - when I was 40 (ish - can't
remember exactly); family mostly found it an improvement apart from the
one person (brother's partner) who'd never known me without one, who
said no, no; regardless, I let it back.

I had desires of a nice long one, with a square end (King Edward is
it?); however, although I don't trim it, it seems to stay at the same
length. I think it must break off. Similarly, when I decided to let my
hair grow a few years ago to see what would happen, I'd had hopes of a
rope, but that seems to have a length beyond which it won't go either.

For _humorous_ effect (fluffed and with side lighting):
http://www.nationalbeardregistry.org/Beards/Beard-details.asp?ID=1458
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"The people here are more educated and intelligent. Even stupid people in
Britain are smarter than Americans." Madonna, in RT 30 June-6July 2001 (page
32)
steveski
2019-10-07 14:35:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 12:14:38 +0100, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:


[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
http://www.nationalbeardregistry.org/Beards/Beard-details.asp?ID=1458
Blimey! I thought the picture was of the bastard love child of Roy Wood
and Ian Anderson :-)
--
Steveski
Sid Nuncius
2019-10-07 18:46:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steveski
[]
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
http://www.nationalbeardregistry.org/Beards/Beard-details.asp?ID=1458
Blimey! I thought the picture was of the bastard love child of Roy Wood
and Ian Anderson :-)
:o)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Nick Odell
2019-10-07 12:36:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steveski
When I 'slapped in to grow' (RN slang for 'Request to Discontinue
Shaving') I was given two weeks to show that I could. I was twenty and
quite dark-haired so it wasn't a problem.
I've had a (trimmed) beard ever since. I've shaved it off a couple of
times in the past, then looked in the mirror, gone Aaaarrgghh! and
immediately re-grown it :-)
After leaving school I spent the summer working shifts. A week of
nights soon had me abandoning my shaver, and my then GF
encouraged me to see what appeared. Initially it was a chin
strap, but eventually the moustache was added.
There it has remained ever since, apart from one Christmas when
my then wife plied me with drink (back in the days when I still
partook) said she had never seen me without, and got me to shave
it off. Neither of us liked what we saw, and it was allowed to
re-grow immediately.
Dark originally, now gray.
On several occasions I've just grown a beard on a whim, kept it for a
few months or years then shaved it off again on a whim.

Unfortunately my toddler firstborn had never seen me without a beard
and one morning I came out of the bathroom - having just had a whim
(is that what you call it? - ed.) and the poor child screamed and
screamed at the stranger in the house.

Many, many years later I went to visit my very grown up firstborn and
some months before the journey I very deliberately grew a new beard
just so that I could make ammends for shocking him before and shave it
off again in front of him - which of course is what I should have done
in the first place.

Nick
Jenny M Benson
2019-10-07 13:13:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by steveski
When I 'slapped in to grow' (RN slang for 'Request to Discontinue
Shaving') I was given two weeks to show that I could. I was twenty and
quite dark-haired so it wasn't a problem.
I've had a (trimmed) beard ever since. I've shaved it off a couple of
times in the past, then looked in the mirror, gone Aaaarrgghh! and
immediately re-grown it :-)
After leaving school I spent the summer working shifts. A week of
nights soon had me abandoning my shaver, and my then GF
encouraged me to see what appeared. Initially it was a chin
strap, but eventually the moustache was added.
There it has remained ever since, apart from one Christmas when
my then wife plied me with drink (back in the days when I still
partook) said she had never seen me without, and got me to shave
it off. Neither of us liked what we saw, and it was allowed to
re-grow immediately.
Dark originally, now gray.
On several occasions I've just grown a beard on a whim, kept it for a
few months or years then shaved it off again on a whim.
Unfortunately my toddler firstborn had never seen me without a beard
and one morning I came out of the bathroom - having just had a whim
(is that what you call it? - ed.) and the poor child screamed and
screamed at the stranger in the house.
Many, many years later I went to visit my very grown up firstborn and
some months before the journey I very deliberately grew a new beard
just so that I could make ammends for shocking him before and shave it
off again in front of him - which of course is what I should have done
in the first place.
My first ex had a beard when I first met him. We were scheduled to work
together and I was worried that I wouldn't recognize him. Went into
work, stood chatting to new partner and someone else came in and
commented on his lack of beard. Only then did I realise ...

In due course beard was re-instated, partner and I had been married for
a while and I went into hospital for an op. He visited. A ward-mate
and I were moved to a convalescent home. Partner visited. Afterwards,
ward-mate commented "I see your husband has shaved his beard off." "I
KNEW there was something different!" I said.

On another, later, occasion I was again in hospital when a ward-mate was
visited by her husband and toddler daughter. Husband had leave from the
RN to care for the child during mother's illness and had returned home
beardless because of some skin problem. Toddler daughter refused to
look at him. She was quite happy to hold his hand and go with him but
could not even be tricked into facing him.
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Penny
2019-10-08 20:25:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 07 Oct 2019 13:36:14 +0100, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
On several occasions I've just grown a beard on a whim, kept it for a
few months or years then shaved it off again on a whim.
Unfortunately my toddler firstborn had never seen me without a beard
and one morning I came out of the bathroom - having just had a whim
(is that what you call it? - ed.) and the poor child screamed and
screamed at the stranger in the house.
My daughters, as toddlers, were both very wary of people with low voices
and no boobies who did *not* have beards. I think they thought there were
mummy people and daddy people and these strange people who sounded like
daddies but didn't look right.

My own beard is quite white now which makes it harder to see when plucking.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Steve Hague
2019-10-07 09:31:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steveski
I've had a (trimmed) beard ever since. I've shaved it off a couple of
times in the past, then looked in the mirror, gone Aaaarrgghh! and
immediately re-grown it :-)
I've had mine since I was 18. I only shaved it off once, and had the
same reaction as you. I was reminded why I'd grown it in the first place.
Steve
John Ashby
2019-10-07 10:40:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Post by steveski
I've had a (trimmed) beard ever since. I've shaved it off a couple of
times in the past, then looked in the mirror, gone Aaaarrgghh! and
immediately re-grown it :-)
I've had mine since I was 18. I only shaved it off once, and had the
same reaction as you. I was reminded why I'd grown it in the first place.
Steve
Almost likewise. The one time I shaved my beard off I discovered someone
who looked too much like John Major lurking behind it, so back it came.

john
Joe Kerr
2019-10-09 12:27:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
I've had mine since I was 18. I only shaved it off once, and had the
same reaction as you. I was reminded why I'd grown it in the first place.
Steve
All this talk of people growing beards! Mine grows quite happily on its
own with no input from me what so ever.
--
Ric
Penny
2019-10-07 22:28:25 UTC
Reply
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On Sun, 6 Oct 2019 20:40:24 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Penny
I'm not one for dressing up on the rare occasions I go out these days. Most
of my smarter clothes don't fit any more and those that do are not warm
enough for most places go and they don't have pockets so I'd have to carry
a bag too.
Me too also as well.
But this does remind me of my father, going out on a Saturday to the
nearest market town (we lived in a village).
He would dress carefully in his best clothes, since it wouldn't do to go
shopping (mostly wandering around market stalls) in anything less.
My bother had a theory back in the '70s - if you wear a suit to work, you
go out in jeans, if you wear jeans (or a uniform) to work, you dress up to
go out. Like all sweeping generalisations it is not entirely true and
probably less so nowadays but it was a fair guide at the time to the
'types' you were sharing a pub with.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2019-10-04 14:19:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 12:16:32 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I like all of them; I'm south-east; I particularly like the one I always
think of as Goth (I'm sure she isn't, just her shape - very thin waist
and long straight hair), and the one with only one hand (I've seen her
doing national forecasts too).
I have seen the one hand one recently but was surprised as not seen
her before. There is a quite slim one who has oong hair and waves her
hands in an affected and balletic way. I am not sure if she's your
Goth? Elizabeth Ritzini? Or similar name.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
a male
Interesting. Do you find, when it is a male, you _do_ look at his
appearance and what he is wearing more than when it is a female? Maybe
our societal norms make the situation asymmetrical: there's almost a
uniform (jacket and tie) for male presenters. (I know there are
exceptions [where's Francis Wilson of the pullovers these days?], but on
the whole.) Whereas ladies have much more variety available to them.
Which maybe is of interest to other ladies too.
I notice the female's clothes but not males'.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
of people now that I haven't got the aids in. I do sometimes do the
just nod and smile thing :(
Chris McMillan
2019-10-04 21:06:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 12:16:32 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I like all of them; I'm south-east; I particularly like the one I always
think of as Goth (I'm sure she isn't, just her shape - very thin waist
and long straight hair), and the one with only one hand (I've seen her
doing national forecasts too).
I have seen the one hand one recently but was surprised as not seen
her before. There is a quite slim one who has oong hair and waves her
hands in an affected and balletic way. I am not sure if she's your
Goth? Elizabeth Ritzini? Or similar name.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
a male
Interesting. Do you find, when it is a male, you _do_ look at his
appearance and what he is wearing more than when it is a female? Maybe
our societal norms make the situation asymmetrical: there's almost a
uniform (jacket and tie) for male presenters. (I know there are
exceptions [where's Francis Wilson of the pullovers these days?], but on
the whole.) Whereas ladies have much more variety available to them.
Which maybe is of interest to other ladies too.
I notice the female's clothes but not males'.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
of people now that I haven't got the aids in. I do sometimes do the
just nod and smile thing :(
Peter Sissons, it was noted on “Last Words” announced the death of Queen
mum not wearing a black tie. He wasn’t very popular with his audience.
Aunty had told everyone no black ties.

The chap relating the story, another newscaster, felt it was right to wear
a black tie and had enough time to find out. Someone, a lady, I forget her
title, found him one and never revealed who she was as she’d have lost her
job. Apparently the no black tie haunted him for a number of years through
no fault of his own

Sincerely Chris
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-05 00:35:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 12:16:32 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I like all of them; I'm south-east; I particularly like the one I always
think of as Goth (I'm sure she isn't, just her shape - very thin waist
and long straight hair), and the one with only one hand (I've seen her
doing national forecasts too).
I have seen the one hand one recently but was surprised as not seen
She's been on SE for a while. She seems to manage perfectly well. (I
always get cross when people say things like that - especially when they
describe "brave" children - as people with any sort of handicap have no
option _but_ to manage. But she does!)
Post by Vicky Ayech
her before. There is a quite slim one who has oong hair and waves her
hands in an affected and balletic way. I am not sure if she's your
Goth? Elizabeth Ritzini? Or similar name.
That's her. (They pronounce it Ret- rather than Rit- I think, but I
don't know how it's spelt. Lately, she wears lighter clothing - was in
white last time I saw her - but used to tend to the darker, hence
reinforcing my view of her as a Morticia-alike.
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
a male
Interesting. Do you find, when it is a male, you _do_ look at his
appearance and what he is wearing more than when it is a female? Maybe
our societal norms make the situation asymmetrical: there's almost a
uniform (jacket and tie) for male presenters. (I know there are
exceptions [where's Francis Wilson of the pullovers these days?], but on
the whole.) Whereas ladies have much more variety available to them.
Which maybe is of interest to other ladies too.
I notice the female's clothes but not males'.
Interesting. (I'm saying that word a lot. I know.)
[]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

War doesn't determine who's right. War determines who's left.
Kate B
2019-10-05 17:48:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 12:16:32 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I like all of them; I'm south-east; I particularly like the one I always
think of as Goth (I'm sure she isn't, just her shape - very thin waist
and long straight hair), and the one with only one hand (I've seen her
doing national forecasts too).
I have seen the one hand one recently but was surprised as not seen
She's been on SE for a while. She seems to manage perfectly well. (I
always get cross when people say things like that - especially when they
describe "brave" children - as people with any sort of handicap have no
option _but_ to manage. But she does!)
Post by Vicky Ayech
her before. There is a quite slim one who has oong hair and waves her
hands in an affected and balletic way. I am not sure if she's your
Goth? Elizabeth Ritzini? Or similar name.
That's her. (They pronounce it Ret- rather than Rit- I think, but I
don't know how it's spelt. Lately, she wears lighter clothing - was in
white last time I saw her - but used to tend to the darker, hence
reinforcing my view of her as a Morticia-alike.
Elizabeth Rizzini. Slim and dark-haired, wouldn't have connected
Morticia at all.
--
Kate B
London
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-05 22:34:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 12:16:32 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I like all of them; I'm south-east; I particularly like the one I always
think of as Goth (I'm sure she isn't, just her shape - very thin waist
and long straight hair), and the one with only one hand (I've seen her
doing national forecasts too).
I have seen the one hand one recently but was surprised as not seen
She's been on SE for a while. She seems to manage perfectly well. (I
always get cross when people say things like that - especially when
they describe "brave" children - as people with any sort of handicap
have no option _but_ to manage. But she does!)
Post by Vicky Ayech
her before. There is a quite slim one who has oong hair and waves her
hands in an affected and balletic way. I am not sure if she's your
Goth? Elizabeth Ritzini? Or similar name.
That's her. (They pronounce it Ret- rather than Rit- I think, but I
don't know how it's spelt. Lately, she wears lighter clothing - was in
white last time I saw her - but used to tend to the darker, hence
reinforcing my view of her as a Morticia-alike.
Elizabeth Rizzini. Slim and dark-haired, wouldn't have connected
Morticia at all.
But surely that describes Morticia? (I find ER attractive, FWIW, whether
dressed in dark or light. Is it un-PC to say so?)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Only dirty people need wash
krw
2019-10-04 15:58:52 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
If it is Carol,
Lucy Veeraswamy (sp?) is distracting.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Penny
2019-10-04 22:34:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 10:11:05 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I've
_always_ found it difficult to actually _absorb_ what's in a weather
forecast, but now - I have to _really_ make an effort to retain _any_
weather information from a TV forecast presented by a female forecaster.
I look at her figure and what she's wearing, and don't take in what
she's saying. I've recently been wondering - do female (or ...) viewers
have the same difficulty when the presenter is male?
I probably absorbed the forecast better when it was a graphic with a
voice-over and clear time-frames shown - these days there is too much to
see on the display to take it all in, I can watch the radar prediction or
the day/time but not both.

I find all the presenters distracting but the women are more distracting
than the men. Mostly because of the things they wear but there is one on
BBC Wales who distracts me more than the others because her shoulders are
always up round her ears. I just wish she'd take some Alexander Technique
lessons, then we could both relax.

I absorb the forecast best from Derek the weather. Mostly in Wales it is
true to say every valley has its own weather but when he does the forecast
I can tell if _my_ bit of the upper Severn will get rain or not.

Since I started following Schafernacker on Instagram (he paints) I find him
more distracting simply because he looks like a totally different person
when looking directly into the camera from the self portrait he has done in
profile.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-05 00:39:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Fri, 4 Oct 2019 10:11:05 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I've
_always_ found it difficult to actually _absorb_ what's in a weather
forecast, but now - I have to _really_ make an effort to retain _any_
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
I probably absorbed the forecast better when it was a graphic with a
voice-over and clear time-frames shown - these days there is too much to
see on the display to take it all in, I can watch the radar prediction or
the day/time but not both.
You may well have something there. One thing that came with the last
major set of changes (as well as the ditching of the foreshortened view
of Britain - good thing IMO), which more or less coincided with the
break with the Met. Office, was the increasing obscuring of the
coastline; now, if there is heavy cloud or rain over an area, I have
little idea where I am, as I can't see the shapes at all. And as you
say, there's a lot else there too now.
Post by Vicky Ayech
I find all the presenters distracting but the women are more distracting
than the men. Mostly because of the things they wear but there is one on
[]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

War doesn't determine who's right. War determines who's left.
Sam Plusnet
2019-10-06 19:48:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Mostly in Wales it is true to say every valley has its own weather
That's simply not true!

Here I can often look across to the other side of _this_ valley[1] where
it is raining hard whilst it's still dry here.

[1] It's somewhere between 1/3 and 1/2 mile wide at this point.
--
Sam Plusnet
Sid Nuncius
2019-10-07 06:27:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Mostly in Wales it is true to say every valley has its own weather
That's simply not true!
Here I can often look across to the other side of _this_ valley[1] where
it is raining hard whilst it's still dry here.
Thanks *so* much, you two. That's me with a Crowded House earworm for
the rest of the day.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Nick Odell
2019-10-07 12:41:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 7 Oct 2019 07:27:39 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
Mostly in Wales it is true to say every valley has its own weather
That's simply not true!
Here I can often look across to the other side of _this_ valley[1] where
it is raining hard whilst it's still dry here.
Thanks *so* much, you two. That's me with a Crowded House earworm for
the rest of the day.
Would that be Weather or Four Seasons? Never mind: whichever it was, I
expect you've now got the other one now.

I never complain about Crowded House earworms.

Nick
Penny
2019-10-08 20:19:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 6 Oct 2019 20:48:16 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Mostly in Wales it is true to say every valley has its own weather
That's simply not true!
Here I can often look across to the other side of _this_ valley[1] where
it is raining hard whilst it's still dry here.
[1] It's somewhere between 1/3 and 1/2 mile wide at this point.
Fairy nuf, you're right, the top of the ridge across the valley from my
place is about 2km away. Sometimes I can't see the ridge at all because of
the cloud sitting on it - so it's foggy up there (and on the new bypass).
Sometimes it's raining outside my back door but not out the front. Today it
was mostly sunny here _and_ across the valley but the dark sky seen above
the ridge suggested it was raining on the other side, which is often the
case.

All weather has edges, some better defined than others.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Joe Kerr
2019-10-09 12:47:30 UTC
Reply
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
* I've actually found this more of a problem _recently_, when you'd
think it'd have been more the case when I was younger. I now find - I've
_always_ found it difficult to actually _absorb_ what's in a weather
forecast, but now - I have to _really_ make an effort to retain _any_
weather information from a TV forecast presented by a female forecaster.
I look at her figure and what she's wearing, and don't take in what
she's saying.
Would it help if they dressed appropriately for the forecast? Overcoat
and umbrella for rain, thick sweater for cold, bikini for sunshine,
wetsuit for floods, etc? Rather like those old weather houses you could
get to forecast the weather.
--
Ric
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-09 12:58:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
* I've actually found this more of a problem _recently_, when you'd
think it'd have been more the case when I was younger. I now find -
I've _always_ found it difficult to actually _absorb_ what's in a
weather forecast, but now - I have to _really_ make an effort to
retain _any_ weather information from a TV forecast presented by a
female forecaster. I look at her figure and what she's wearing, and
don't take in what she's saying.
Would it help if they dressed appropriately for the forecast? Overcoat
and umbrella for rain, thick sweater for cold, bikini for sunshine,
wetsuit for floods, etc? Rather like those old weather houses you could
get to forecast the weather.
What a lovely idea! (The forecasters might not agree.)

The men, at least, already do _very slightly_: I remember in a prog.
about the subject, one of them saying they keep a lightweight suit in
the studio (or wherever) for when they're doing forecasts for BBC World,
as it'd look odd if he was giving the forecast for somewhere
experiencing tropical heat when dressed in heavy British winter tweeds.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Actors are fairly modest...A lot of us have quite a lot to be modest about. -
Simon Greenall (voice of Aleksandr the "Simples!" Meerkat), RT 11-17 Dec 2010
BrritSki
2019-10-04 07:28:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
This is something I have been thinking about for ages. I've given up
hope of anybody explaining it so I'm relying on umra. It might also give
Britters something to contribute to and at least cheer him up.
Trade agreements: I think I know what they are and why they exist. It
seems fairly simple on the face of it. The question is why are they
/necessary/? Why is the WTO default position that there are tariffs to
penalise anybody without a trade agreement?
I don't think that IS the WTO default position. After Brexit, the UK
could if it wants to decide that ALL imports would be tariff free and
there is nothing to stop that happening.

That won't happen of course, there will be some tariffs levied to
protect some sectors, e.g. agriculture as the EU does largely at the
behest of French farmers aiui.

What the WTO says is that if you levy a tariff then it has to be the
same for all countries, you can't discriminate against the ones that you
dislike for whatever reason.

If you want to favour some nations though, you can do that with a trade
deal, but they're not necessary.

According to this site: <https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-45112872>
"The government has set out its plans for tariffs in the case of a
no-deal Brexit.
Its temporary schedule would mean that 87% of imports by value will be
tariff-free, compared with 80% before Brexit."
but that was back in July so that number may change under the Johnson plans.
Joe Kerr
2019-10-09 13:04:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Joe Kerr
This is something I have been thinking about for ages. I've given up
hope of anybody explaining it so I'm relying on umra. It might also
give Britters something to contribute to and at least cheer him up.
Trade agreements: I think I know what they are and why they exist. It
seems fairly simple on the face of it. The question is why are they
/necessary/? Why is the WTO default position that there are tariffs to
penalise anybody without a trade agreement?
I don't think that IS the WTO default position. After Brexit, the UK
could if it wants to decide that ALL imports would be tariff free and
there is nothing to stop that happening.
That won't happen of course, there will be some tariffs levied to
protect some sectors, e.g. agriculture as the EU does largely at the
behest of French farmers aiui.
What the WTO says is that if you levy a tariff then it has to be the
same for all countries, you can't discriminate against the ones that you
dislike for whatever reason.
If you want to favour some nations though, you can do that with a trade
deal, but they're not necessary.
According to this site: <https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-45112872>
"The government has set out its plans for tariffs in the case of a
no-deal Brexit.
Its temporary schedule would mean that 87% of imports by value will be
tariff-free, compared with 80% before Brexit."
but that was back in July so that number may change under the Johnson plans.
That article seems to be just the information I was after. Thanks.
--
Ric
Mike
2019-10-04 07:40:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joe Kerr
Supplementary question: What will it be called if Spain decides to leave
the EU?
The Spanish Flew?
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-10-04 08:58:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Joe Kerr
Supplementary question: What will it be called if Spain decides to leave
the EU?
The Spanish Flew?
EXCELLENT!
3
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If you can't construct a coherent argument for the other side, you probably
don't understand your own opinion. - Scott Adams, 2015
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