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OT: Technical issues
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Penny
2020-10-22 09:31:09 UTC
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Am I alone in being thoroughly fed up with 'live' interviews, not just on
the news but on other programmes such as Woman's hour where the 'phone
call' or whatever from the interviewee is constantly dropping out or being
obscured by odd noises?

Why on earth can't they record these interviews before the programme and
clean them up before broadcast? I don't believe the immediacy of
broadcasting it 'live' is worth the often very poor and frustrating result.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
krw
2020-10-22 10:00:00 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Penny
Am I alone in being thoroughly fed up with 'live' interviews, not just on
the news but on other programmes such as Woman's hour where the 'phone
call' or whatever from the interviewee is constantly dropping out or being
obscured by odd noises?
Why on earth can't they record these interviews before the programme and
clean them up before broadcast? I don't believe the immediacy of
broadcasting it 'live' is worth the often very poor and frustrating result.
Feels just like the Teams call on which I am participating!
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-22 21:14:41 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by Penny
Am I alone in being thoroughly fed up with 'live' interviews, not just on
the news but on other programmes such as Woman's hour where the 'phone
call' or whatever from the interviewee is constantly dropping out or being
obscured by odd noises?
I now listen to radio little, outside 7:0x four days a week.

But I'm equally irritated when they're talking to someone over some sort
of link, and abandon him/her when it fails - rather than switching to
the telephone. Near enough anyone who has home internet - which they're
being interviewed over - therefore has a landline, even if they rarely
use it: finding their number before they get put on air, then calling
them if the video link fails (or even setting both going, then falling
back) surely isn't beyond the wit ... well, it obviously is, because
they don't.
Post by krw
Post by Penny
Why on earth can't they record these interviews before the programme and
clean them up before broadcast? I don't believe the immediacy of
broadcasting it 'live' is worth the often very poor and frustrating result.
Unnecessary anyway, as what they're going to say has been officially
leaked well in advance too.
Post by krw
Feels just like the Teams call on which I am participating!
While posting?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Abandon hope, all ye who <ENTER> here.
Mike
2020-10-22 21:27:58 UTC
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Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
Post by Penny
Am I alone in being thoroughly fed up with 'live' interviews, not just on
the news but on other programmes such as Woman's hour where the 'phone
call' or whatever from the interviewee is constantly dropping out or being
obscured by odd noises?
I now listen to radio little, outside 7:0x four days a week.
But I'm equally irritated when they're talking to someone over some sort
of link, and abandon him/her when it fails - rather than switching to
the telephone. Near enough anyone who has home internet - which they're
being interviewed over - therefore has a landline, even if they rarely
use it: finding their number before they get put on air, then calling
them if the video link fails (or even setting both going, then falling
back) surely isn't beyond the wit ... well, it obviously is, because
they don't.
Post by krw
Post by Penny
Why on earth can't they record these interviews before the programme and
clean them up before broadcast? I don't believe the immediacy of
broadcasting it 'live' is worth the often very poor and frustrating result.
Unnecessary anyway, as what they're going to say has been officially
leaked well in advance too.
Post by krw
Feels just like the Teams call on which I am participating!
While posting?
The last time the Toodleses were being interviewed for radio 4, it was down
a landline and with my phobile recording all our responses which I then
emailed to the producer - it was overtaken by other events as it turned out
and ended up byteing the madnetic dust. Ho hum.
--
Toodle Pip
DavidK
2020-10-23 07:48:23 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
Post by Penny
Am I alone in being thoroughly fed up with 'live' interviews, not just on
the news but on other programmes such as Woman's hour where the 'phone
call' or whatever from the interviewee is constantly dropping out or being
obscured by odd noises?
I now listen to radio little, outside 7:0x four days a week.
But I'm equally irritated when they're talking to someone over some sort
of link, and abandon him/her when it fails - rather than switching to
the telephone. Near enough anyone who has home internet - which they're
being interviewed over - therefore has a landline, even if they rarely
use it: finding their number before they get put on air, then calling
them if the video link fails (or even setting both going, then falling
back) surely isn't beyond the wit ... well, it obviously is, because
they don't.
Post by krw
Post by Penny
Why on earth can't they record these interviews before the programme and
clean them up before broadcast? I don't believe the immediacy of
broadcasting it 'live' is worth the often very poor and frustrating result.
Unnecessary anyway, as what they're going to say has been officially
leaked well in advance too.
Post by krw
Feels just like the Teams call on which I am participating!
While posting?
The last time the Toodleses were being interviewed for radio 4, it was down
a landline and with my phobile recording all our responses which I then
emailed to the producer - it was overtaken by other events as it turned out
and ended up byteing the madnetic dust. Ho hum.
That's interesting, what application on the phobile was used?
Mike
2020-10-23 21:24:45 UTC
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Post by DavidK
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
Post by Penny
Am I alone in being thoroughly fed up with 'live' interviews, not just on
the news but on other programmes such as Woman's hour where the 'phone
call' or whatever from the interviewee is constantly dropping out or being
obscured by odd noises?
I now listen to radio little, outside 7:0x four days a week.
But I'm equally irritated when they're talking to someone over some sort
of link, and abandon him/her when it fails - rather than switching to
the telephone. Near enough anyone who has home internet - which they're
being interviewed over - therefore has a landline, even if they rarely
use it: finding their number before they get put on air, then calling
them if the video link fails (or even setting both going, then falling
back) surely isn't beyond the wit ... well, it obviously is, because
they don't.
Post by krw
Post by Penny
Why on earth can't they record these interviews before the programme and
clean them up before broadcast? I don't believe the immediacy of
broadcasting it 'live' is worth the often very poor and frustrating result.
Unnecessary anyway, as what they're going to say has been officially
leaked well in advance too.
Post by krw
Feels just like the Teams call on which I am participating!
While posting?
The last time the Toodleses were being interviewed for radio 4, it was down
a landline and with my phobile recording all our responses which I then
emailed to the producer - it was overtaken by other events as it turned out
and ended up byteing the madnetic dust. Ho hum.
That's interesting, what application on the phobile was used?
It is called ‘Audio Memo’. [
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.imesart.android.audiomemosfree&hl=en_GB&gl=US
]
--
Toodle Pip
DavidK
2020-10-24 10:08:00 UTC
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Post by Mike
It is called ‘Audio Memo’. [
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.imesart.android.audiomemosfree&hl=en_GB&gl=US
]
Ta.
Serena Blanchflower
2020-10-23 09:38:45 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
But I'm equally irritated when they're talking to someone over some sort
of link, and abandon him/her when it fails - rather than switching to
the telephone. Near enough anyone who has home internet - which they're
being interviewed over - therefore has a landline, even if they rarely
use it: finding their number before they get put on air, then calling
them if the video link fails (or even setting both going, then falling
back) surely isn't beyond the wit ... well, it obviously is, because
they don't.
You will be glad to hear that Women's Hour has done just that. They
were talking to someone online this morning and were having problems
with the link and said they would phone her back to get a decent line.
While I was typing this though, the phone line failed as well...
--
Best wishes, Serena
Christians shouldn't just be pulling people out of the river. We should
be going upstream to find out who's pushing them in. (Desmond Tutu)
BrritSki
2020-10-23 10:16:43 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
But I'm equally irritated when they're talking to someone over some
sort of link, and abandon him/her when it fails - rather than
switching to the telephone. Near enough anyone who has home internet -
which they're being interviewed over - therefore has a landline, even
if they rarely use it: finding their number before they get put on
air, then calling them if the video link fails (or even setting both
going, then falling back) surely isn't beyond the wit ... well, it
obviously is, because they don't.
You will be glad to hear that Women's Hour has done just that.  They
were talking to someone online this morning and were having problems
with the link and said they would phone her back to get a decent line.
While I was typing this though, the phone line failed as well...
They'd have trouble doing that with us. We have a landline and number,
but there's nothing connected to it and never will be.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-23 14:16:06 UTC
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Permalink
[]
Post by BrritSki
You will be glad to hear that Women's Hour has done just that.  They
were talking to someone online this morning and were having problems
with the link and said they would phone her back to get a decent line.
While I was typing this though, the phone line failed as well...
They'd have trouble doing that with us. We have a landline and number,
but there's nothing connected to it and never will be.
Why not? Surely useful in emergency? (Such as when your phobile has run
down during a long power cut?) If you don't want to _receive_ calls, you
can always disconnect the bell, or leave it unplugged (but accessible).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Abandon hope, all ye who <ENTER> here.
BrritSki
2020-10-23 16:10:35 UTC
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Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by BrritSki
 You will be glad to hear that Women's Hour has done just that.  They
were talking to someone online this morning and were having problems
with the link and said they would phone her back to get a decent
line. While I was typing this though, the phone line failed as well...
They'd have trouble doing that with us. We have a landline and number,
but there's nothing connected to it and never will be.
Why not? Surely useful in emergency? (Such as when your phobile has run
down during a long power cut?)
We haven't had a landline phone for getting on for 10 years and somehow
we have managed. We both charge our phones every night and I have a
powerbank if there's a longer term problem. We coped with a 12 hour
power cut in Greece recently without any problems (actually closer to 20
hours when you take into account the airport/flight/train home)...
DavidK
2020-10-23 18:08:54 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
We haven't had a landline phone for getting on for 10 years and somehow
we have managed. We both charge our phones every night and I have a
powerbank if there's a longer term problem. We coped with a 12 hour
power cut in Greece recently without any problems (actually closer to 20
hours when you take into account the airport/flight/train home)...
Um, why didn't the power cut affect the mobile phone mast? I had always
assumed that this was the main argument for keeping landline, it still
worked during a power cut.
BrritSki
2020-10-23 19:18:13 UTC
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Post by DavidK
Post by BrritSki
We haven't had a landline phone for getting on for 10 years and
somehow we have managed. We both charge our phones every night and I
have a powerbank if there's a longer term problem. We coped with a 12
hour power cut in Greece recently without any problems (actually
closer to 20 hours when you take into account the airport/flight/train
home)...
Um, why didn't the power cut affect the mobile phone mast? I had always
assumed that this was the main argument for keeping landline, it still
worked during a power cut.
No idea. Maybe they had a backup generator that automatically kicked in.
At least one of the restaurants did and another one sourced one very
quickly. I guess blackout is a regular occurrence.

The time at the airport there was power, but we didn't need it so I
counted that as effective blackout as of course the flight and train was
(no sockets on that service).

Do people really suffer long blackouts in the UK? We've had 2 or 3
while we've been back, longest was a couple of hours iirc.
Serena Blanchflower
2020-10-23 19:26:46 UTC
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Do people really suffer long blackouts in the UK?  We've had 2 or 3
while we've been back, longest was a couple of hours iirc.
It's generally in rural areas but it isn't unusual to hear of one area
or another being without power for a day or three after storms each winter.
--
Best wishes, Serena
It's not what happens to you; it's what you do about it that makes the
difference. (W. Mitchell)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-23 20:50:48 UTC
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On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 20:26:46, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Do people really suffer long blackouts in the UK?  We've had 2 or 3
while we've been back, longest was a couple of hours iirc.
It's generally in rural areas but it isn't unusual to hear of one area
or another being without power for a day or three after storms each winter.
Yes, I'm moderately rural, though here haven't had more than a few
hours. Usually, they're precautionary deliberate cuts - there's a report
of a fault (line down or similar) that they consider credible (e. g.
their monitoring confirms it), and they isolate the section until they
can investigate it; usually, once they do so, they can supply the power
to adjacent sections by a different route. (That's why they call it the
Grid - most parts are supplied from more than one point, so once the
fault has been isolated, they can turn the power back on to the rest.)
Where I used to live, I think I did experience the odd one of a day or
two - I think after the Big Storm, there might have been most of a week.
Of course, if a storm (or drunk driver) does demolish something, the
parts right next to it have to remain off until the downed bit can be
separated from ground.

Some rural areas supplied by overhead lines have "pole-mounted
reclosers" - these have a spring-driven mechanism that trips then
attempts to restore power, up to about three times on one charge of the
spring: they're mainly intended for when a fallen branch briefly falls
across the lines, but bounces off (or is thrown off by the brief power
pulse of the reclose): if the fault remains after the spring energy is
used up, they stay off until someone goes to remove the branch and
manually (e. g. by pulling on a lug with a long pole) reset the
recloser. (When power is restored, the recloser recharges its spring,
using a giant version of an electric bell mechanism.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Linux is a car kit and Mac is a car with the hood welded shut - Mayayana in
alt.windows7.general, 2015-12-4
Serena Blanchflower
2020-10-23 19:20:29 UTC
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Post by DavidK
Post by BrritSki
We haven't had a landline phone for getting on for 10 years and
somehow we have managed. We both charge our phones every night and I
have a powerbank if there's a longer term problem. We coped with a 12
hour power cut in Greece recently without any problems (actually
closer to 20 hours when you take into account the airport/flight/train
home)...
Um, why didn't the power cut affect the mobile phone mast? I had always
assumed that this was the main argument for keeping landline, it still
worked during a power cut.
That's certainly the reason I keep a basic phone next to the phone
socket, for emergency use if there's a sufficiently widespread (or long
lasting) powercut that the mobile network is down (or my phone has run
out of power). A basic, wired phone is pretty cheap so seemed well
worth while.
--
Best wishes, Serena
She generally gave herself very good advice, (though she very seldom
followed it). (Lewis Carroll)
Nick Odell
2020-10-24 00:09:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DavidK
Post by BrritSki
We haven't had a landline phone for getting on for 10 years and somehow
we have managed. We both charge our phones every night and I have a
powerbank if there's a longer term problem. We coped with a 12 hour
power cut in Greece recently without any problems (actually closer to 20
hours when you take into account the airport/flight/train home)...
Um, why didn't the power cut affect the mobile phone mast? I had always
assumed that this was the main argument for keeping landline, it still
worked during a power cut.
I was under the impresssion that they were equipped with something
akin to a UPS - not the delivery company - and they could stay on line
many hours/several days.

Things have been much better during the past few years over here
vis-a-vis power cuts because of more investment in the electricity
industry - something not being followed through right now because of
the state of the economy. Having said that, we had two power cuts of
several hours each last week and feared we might be going back to the
bad old days. It turns out that a water main burst and knocked out an
underground cable (first cut) and the second cut was when the crew
came back a few days later to make a proper repair and they turned off
the electricity, just in case.

Nick
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-23 21:34:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 21:09:11, Nick Odell
[]
Post by Nick Odell
Post by DavidK
Um, why didn't the power cut affect the mobile phone mast? I had always
assumed that this was the main argument for keeping landline, it still
worked during a power cut.
I was under the impresssion that they were equipped with something
akin to a UPS - not the delivery company - and they could stay on line
many hours/several days.
They do have battery backup, or at least some of them do - but nothing
like the batteries in telephone exchanges.

There was some concern, some years ago, about various users (e. g.
utility companies, other backup and emergency provision - even parts of
the police) giving up their own independent radio networks, and instead
switching to the mobile network, because the latter's durability under
_prolonged_ loss of power wasn't reliable. Whether things have changed,
I don't know.
Post by Nick Odell
Things have been much better during the past few years over here
vis-a-vis power cuts because of more investment in the electricity
industry - something not being followed through right now because of
the state of the economy. Having said that, we had two power cuts of
several hours each last week and feared we might be going back to the
bad old days. It turns out that a water main burst and knocked out an
underground cable (first cut) and the second cut was when the crew
came back a few days later to make a proper repair and they turned off
the electricity, just in case.
(They mostly need it off to work on it, with rare exceptions.)
Post by Nick Odell
Nick
John
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Just grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked,the good fortune
to remember the ones I do, and the eyesight to tell the difference.
Mike
2020-10-23 21:41:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 21:09:11, Nick Odell
[]
Post by Nick Odell
Post by DavidK
Um, why didn't the power cut affect the mobile phone mast? I had always
assumed that this was the main argument for keeping landline, it still
worked during a power cut.
I was under the impresssion that they were equipped with something
akin to a UPS - not the delivery company - and they could stay on line
many hours/several days.
They do have battery backup, or at least some of them do - but nothing
like the batteries in telephone exchanges.
There was some concern, some years ago, about various users (e. g.
utility companies, other backup and emergency provision - even parts of
the police) giving up their own independent radio networks, and instead
switching to the mobile network, because the latter's durability under
_prolonged_ loss of power wasn't reliable. Whether things have changed,
I don't know.
Post by Nick Odell
Things have been much better during the past few years over here
vis-a-vis power cuts because of more investment in the electricity
industry - something not being followed through right now because of
the state of the economy. Having said that, we had two power cuts of
several hours each last week and feared we might be going back to the
bad old days. It turns out that a water main burst and knocked out an
underground cable (first cut) and the second cut was when the crew
came back a few days later to make a proper repair and they turned off
the electricity, just in case.
(They mostly need it off to work on it, with rare exceptions.)
Post by Nick Odell
Nick
John
I believe that is current practice.
--
Toodle Pip
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-24 00:05:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 21:09:11, Nick Odell
[]
Post by Nick Odell
Post by DavidK
Um, why didn't the power cut affect the mobile phone mast? I had always
assumed that this was the main argument for keeping landline, it still
worked during a power cut.
I was under the impresssion that they were equipped with something
akin to a UPS - not the delivery company - and they could stay on line
many hours/several days.
They do have battery backup, or at least some of them do - but nothing
like the batteries in telephone exchanges.
There was some concern, some years ago, about various users (e. g.
utility companies, other backup and emergency provision - even parts of
the police) giving up their own independent radio networks, and instead
switching to the mobile network, because the latter's durability under
_prolonged_ loss of power wasn't reliable. Whether things have changed,
I don't know.
Post by Nick Odell
Things have been much better during the past few years over here
vis-a-vis power cuts because of more investment in the electricity
industry - something not being followed through right now because of
the state of the economy. Having said that, we had two power cuts of
several hours each last week and feared we might be going back to the
bad old days. It turns out that a water main burst and knocked out an
underground cable (first cut) and the second cut was when the crew
came back a few days later to make a proper repair and they turned off
the electricity, just in case.
(They mostly need it off to work on it, with rare exceptions.)
Post by Nick Odell
Nick
John
I believe that is current practice.
If not, they have to charge extra. (Luv)
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike McMillan
2020-10-24 06:58:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 21:09:11, Nick Odell
[]
Post by Nick Odell
Post by DavidK
Um, why didn't the power cut affect the mobile phone mast? I had always
assumed that this was the main argument for keeping landline, it still
worked during a power cut.
I was under the impresssion that they were equipped with something
akin to a UPS - not the delivery company - and they could stay on line
many hours/several days.
They do have battery backup, or at least some of them do - but nothing
like the batteries in telephone exchanges.
There was some concern, some years ago, about various users (e. g.
utility companies, other backup and emergency provision - even parts of
the police) giving up their own independent radio networks, and instead
switching to the mobile network, because the latter's durability under
_prolonged_ loss of power wasn't reliable. Whether things have changed,
I don't know.
Post by Nick Odell
Things have been much better during the past few years over here
vis-a-vis power cuts because of more investment in the electricity
industry - something not being followed through right now because of
the state of the economy. Having said that, we had two power cuts of
several hours each last week and feared we might be going back to the
bad old days. It turns out that a water main burst and knocked out an
underground cable (first cut) and the second cut was when the crew
came back a few days later to make a proper repair and they turned off
the electricity, just in case.
(They mostly need it off to work on it, with rare exceptions.)
Post by Nick Odell
Nick
John
I believe that is current practice.
If not, they have to charge extra. (Luv)
Should we expect a battery of these now?
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-24 19:05:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 21:09:11, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by DavidK
Um, why didn't the power cut affect the mobile phone mast? I had always
assumed that this was the main argument for keeping landline, it still
worked during a power cut.
I was under the impresssion that they were equipped with something
akin to a UPS - not the delivery company - and they could stay on line
many hours/several days.
They do have battery backup, or at least some of them do - but nothing
like the batteries in telephone exchanges.
There was some concern, some years ago, about various users (e. g.
utility companies, other backup and emergency provision - even parts of
the police) giving up their own independent radio networks, and instead
switching to the mobile network, because the latter's durability under
_prolonged_ loss of power wasn't reliable. Whether things have changed,
I don't know.
Post by Nick Odell
Things have been much better during the past few years over here
vis-a-vis power cuts because of more investment in the electricity
industry - something not being followed through right now because of
the state of the economy. Having said that, we had two power cuts of
several hours each last week and feared we might be going back to the
bad old days. It turns out that a water main burst and knocked out an
underground cable (first cut) and the second cut was when the crew
came back a few days later to make a proper repair and they turned off
the electricity, just in case.
(They mostly need it off to work on it, with rare exceptions.)
Post by Nick Odell
Nick
John
I believe that is current practice.
If not, they have to charge extra. (Luv)
Should we expect a battery of these now?
I assume you're trying to spark a punthread?
--
Sam Plusnet
BrritSki
2020-10-24 19:39:03 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 21:09:11, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by DavidK
Um, why didn't the power cut affect the mobile phone mast? I had always
assumed that this was the main argument for keeping landline, it still
worked during a power cut.
I was under the impresssion that they were equipped with something
akin to a UPS - not the delivery company - and they could stay on line
many hours/several days.
They do have battery backup, or at least some of them do - but nothing
like the batteries in telephone exchanges.
There was some concern, some years ago, about various users (e. g.
utility companies, other backup and emergency provision - even parts of
the police) giving up their own independent radio networks, and instead
switching to the mobile network, because the latter's durability under
_prolonged_ loss of power wasn't reliable. Whether things have changed,
I don't know.
Post by Nick Odell
Things have been much better during the past few years over here
vis-a-vis power cuts because of more investment in the electricity
industry - something not being followed through right now because of
the state of the economy. Having said that, we had two power cuts of
several hours each last week and feared we might be going back to the
bad old days. It turns out that a water main burst and knocked out an
underground cable (first cut) and the second cut was when the crew
came back a few days later to make a proper repair and they turned off
the electricity, just in case.
(They mostly need it off to work on it, with rare exceptions.)
I believe that is current practice.
If not, they have to charge extra. (Luv)
Should we expect a battery of these now?
I assume you're trying to spark a punthread?
That would be terminal.
Sid Nuncius
2020-10-25 07:52:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 21:09:11, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by DavidK
Um, why didn't the power cut affect the mobile phone mast? I had always
assumed that this was the main argument for keeping landline, it still
worked during a power cut.
I was under the impresssion that they were equipped with something
akin to a UPS - not the delivery company - and they could stay on line
many hours/several days.
They do have battery backup, or at least some of them do - but nothing
like the batteries in telephone exchanges.
There was some concern, some years ago, about various users (e. g.
utility companies, other backup and emergency provision - even parts of
the police) giving up their own independent radio networks, and instead
switching to the mobile network, because the latter's durability under
_prolonged_ loss of power wasn't reliable. Whether things have changed,
I don't know.
Post by Nick Odell
Things have been much better during the past few years over here
vis-a-vis power cuts because of more investment in the electricity
industry - something not being followed through right now because of
the state of the economy. Having said that, we had two power cuts of
several hours each last week and feared we might be going back to the
bad old days. It turns out that a water main burst and knocked out an
underground cable (first cut) and the second cut was when the crew
came back a few days later to make a proper repair and they turned off
the electricity, just in case.
(They mostly need it off to work on it, with rare exceptions.)
I believe that is current practice.
If not, they have to charge extra. (Luv)
Should we expect a battery of these now?
I assume you're trying to spark a punthread?
That would be terminal.
It's all very anode-yne.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2020-10-25 09:15:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 21:09:11, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by DavidK
Um, why didn't the power cut affect the mobile phone mast? I had always
assumed that this was the main argument for keeping landline, it still
worked during a power cut.
I was under the impresssion that they were equipped with something
akin to a UPS - not the delivery company - and they could stay on line
many hours/several days.
They do have battery backup, or at least some of them do - but nothing
like the batteries in telephone exchanges.
There was some concern, some years ago, about various users (e. g.
utility companies, other backup and emergency provision - even parts of
the police) giving up their own independent radio networks, and instead
switching to the mobile network, because the latter's durability under
_prolonged_ loss of power wasn't reliable. Whether things have changed,
I don't know.
Post by Nick Odell
Things have been much better during the past few years over here
vis-a-vis power cuts because of more investment in the electricity
industry - something not being followed through right now because of
the state of the economy. Having said that, we had two power cuts of
several hours each last week and feared we might be going back to the
bad old days. It turns out that a water main burst and knocked out an
underground cable (first cut) and the second cut was when the crew
came back a few days later to make a proper repair and they turned off
the electricity, just in case.
(They mostly need it off to work on it, with rare exceptions.)
I believe that is current practice.
If not, they have to charge extra. (Luv)
Should we expect a battery of these now?
I assume you're trying to spark a punthread?
That would be terminal.
It's all very anode-yne.
No need to get short with us.
Chris J Dixon
2020-10-25 16:05:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
No need to get short with us.
I was amused to see news reports that there was a suggestion of
taking action against Covid by using a short circuit-breaker.

That might result in a big bang.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-25 16:39:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by BrritSki
No need to get short with us.
I was amused to see news reports that there was a suggestion of
taking action against Covid by using a short circuit-breaker.
That might result in a big bang.
Chris
(-:

I'm sure IANAOU in being irritated when "they" use an only
vaguely-appropriate term for something, and the media let them, because
(a) it sounds [superficially] "hip", (b) it stops them [the media]
actually having to think about it. (That may be why they like sounding
"hip", of course.)

It's _usually_ (at least it is when I notice it) a somewhat technical
term, such as circuit breaker, firebreak, and so on. But not always
(oven ready, for example).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Easy reading is damned hard writing. -Nathaniel Hawthorne, writer (1804-1864)
Sid Nuncius
2020-10-25 19:19:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I'm sure IANAOU in being irritated when "they" use an only
vaguely-appropriate term for something, and the media let them, because
(a) it sounds [superficially] "hip", (b) it stops them [the media]
actually having to think about it. (That may be why they like sounding
"hip", of course.)
It's _usually_ (at least it is when I notice it) a somewhat technical
term, such as circuit breaker, firebreak, and so on. But not always
(oven ready, for example).
Do not get me started on financial "black holes". It's a boodly
monetary shortfall, or "hole" if you absolutely must; it's *not* a
gravitational phenomenon which...

I told you not to get me started.
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2020-10-25 19:47:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I'm sure IANAOU in being irritated when "they" use an only
vaguely-appropriate term for something, and the media let them,
because (a) it sounds [superficially] "hip", (b) it stops them [the
media] actually having to think about it. (That may be why they like
sounding "hip", of course.)
It's _usually_ (at least it is when I notice it) a somewhat technical
term, such as circuit breaker, firebreak, and so on. But not always
(oven ready, for example).
Do not get me started on financial "black holes".  It's a boodly
monetary shortfall, or "hole" if you absolutely must; it's *not* a
gravitational phenomenon which...
I told you not to get me started.
Is this the epicentre for linguistic inaccuracy rants ?
Mike
2020-10-25 22:45:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I'm sure IANAOU in being irritated when "they" use an only
vaguely-appropriate term for something, and the media let them,
because (a) it sounds [superficially] "hip", (b) it stops them [the
media] actually having to think about it. (That may be why they like
sounding "hip", of course.)
It's _usually_ (at least it is when I notice it) a somewhat technical
term, such as circuit breaker, firebreak, and so on. But not always
(oven ready, for example).
Do not get me started on financial "black holes".  It's a boodly
monetary shortfall, or "hole" if you absolutely must; it's *not* a
gravitational phenomenon which...
I told you not to get me started.
Is this the epicentre for linguistic inaccuracy rants ?
It was, but it has been decimated and very little remains.
--
Toodle Pip
Steve Hague
2020-10-26 08:30:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I'm sure IANAOU in being irritated when "they" use an only
vaguely-appropriate term for something, and the media let them,
because (a) it sounds [superficially] "hip", (b) it stops them [the
media] actually having to think about it. (That may be why they like
sounding "hip", of course.)
It's _usually_ (at least it is when I notice it) a somewhat technical
term, such as circuit breaker, firebreak, and so on. But not always
(oven ready, for example).
Do not get me started on financial "black holes".  It's a boodly
monetary shortfall, or "hole" if you absolutely must; it's *not* a
gravitational phenomenon which...
I told you not to get me started.
Is this the epicentre for linguistic inaccuracy rants ?
Literally, yes.
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-25 18:55:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by BrritSki
No need to get short with us.
I was amused to see news reports that there was a suggestion of
taking action against Covid by using a short circuit-breaker.
That might result in a big bang.
Your 'suggestion' has been in force here since Friday.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike McMillan
2020-10-25 10:07:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 21:09:11, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by DavidK
Um, why didn't the power cut affect the mobile phone mast? I had always
assumed that this was the main argument for keeping landline, it still
worked during a power cut.
I was under the impresssion that they were equipped with something
akin to a UPS - not the delivery company - and they could stay on line
many hours/several days.
They do have battery backup, or at least some of them do - but nothing
like the batteries in telephone exchanges.
There was some concern, some years ago, about various users (e. g.
utility companies, other backup and emergency provision - even parts of
the police) giving up their own independent radio networks, and instead
switching to the mobile network, because the latter's durability under
_prolonged_ loss of power wasn't reliable. Whether things have changed,
I don't know.
Post by Nick Odell
Things have been much better during the past few years over here
vis-a-vis power cuts because of more investment in the electricity
industry - something not being followed through right now because of
the state of the economy. Having said that, we had two power cuts of
several hours each last week and feared we might be going back to the
bad old days. It turns out that a water main burst and knocked out an
underground cable (first cut) and the second cut was when the crew
came back a few days later to make a proper repair and they turned off
the electricity, just in case.
(They mostly need it off to work on it, with rare exceptions.)
I believe that is current practice.
If not, they have to charge extra. (Luv)
Should we expect a battery of these now?
I assume you're trying to spark a punthread?
That would be terminal.
Yes, I’m quite positive about that.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Mike
2020-10-25 22:36:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 21:09:11, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by DavidK
Um, why didn't the power cut affect the mobile phone mast? I had always
assumed that this was the main argument for keeping landline, it still
worked during a power cut.
I was under the impresssion that they were equipped with something
akin to a UPS - not the delivery company - and they could stay on line
many hours/several days.
They do have battery backup, or at least some of them do - but nothing
like the batteries in telephone exchanges.
There was some concern, some years ago, about various users (e. g.
utility companies, other backup and emergency provision - even parts of
the police) giving up their own independent radio networks, and instead
switching to the mobile network, because the latter's durability under
_prolonged_ loss of power wasn't reliable. Whether things have changed,
I don't know.
Post by Nick Odell
Things have been much better during the past few years over here
vis-a-vis power cuts because of more investment in the electricity
industry - something not being followed through right now because of
the state of the economy. Having said that, we had two power cuts of
several hours each last week and feared we might be going back to the
bad old days. It turns out that a water main burst and knocked out an
underground cable (first cut) and the second cut was when the crew
came back a few days later to make a proper repair and they turned off
the electricity, just in case.
(They mostly need it off to work on it, with rare exceptions.)
I believe that is current practice.
If not, they have to charge extra. (Luv)
Should we expect a battery of these now?
I assume you're trying to spark a punthread?
That would be terminal.
Don’t be so negative.
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2020-10-23 15:05:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by krw
Post by Penny
Am I alone in being thoroughly fed up with 'live' interviews, not just on
the news but on other programmes such as Woman's hour where the 'phone
call' or whatever from the interviewee is constantly dropping out or being
obscured by odd noises?
I now listen to radio little, outside 7:0x four days a week.
But I'm equally irritated when they're talking to someone over some sort
of link, and abandon him/her when it fails - rather than switching to
the telephone. Near enough anyone who has home internet - which they're
being interviewed over - therefore has a landline, even if they rarely
use it: finding their number before they get put on air, then calling
them if the video link fails (or even setting both going, then falling
back) surely isn't beyond the wit ... well, it obviously is, because
they don't.
Post by krw
Post by Penny
Why on earth can't they record these interviews before the programme and
clean them up before broadcast? I don't believe the immediacy of
broadcasting it 'live' is worth the often very poor and frustrating result.
Unnecessary anyway, as what they're going to say has been officially
leaked well in advance too.
Post by krw
Feels just like the Teams call on which I am participating!
While posting?
Lots of people, allegedly, no longer have a landline. Anyway, they’d
rather stand in some totally inappropriate spot to be interviewed ‘at the
time’, than admit to a landline. It’s demeaning to those being
interviewed, and for many people with hearing g loss, even a mild one, they
can’t hear a word of what might be lifeline important information. I’ve
seen on one dead/hard of hearing forum a comment from someone who prefers
radio to tv that on asking if there are transcripts of programmes, gets a
more or less ‘no’. They were told “In Touch”, which doesn’t do very much
on dual sensory loss and has nothing to do with any hearing loss alone.
Maybe the twerp replying thought it was a dual sensory prog.

Sincerely Chris
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-23 15:30:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 15:05:41, Chris McMillan
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
But I'm equally irritated when they're talking to someone over some sort
of link, and abandon him/her when it fails - rather than switching to
the telephone. Near enough anyone who has home internet - which they're
being interviewed over - therefore has a landline, even if they rarely
use it: finding their number before they get put on air, then calling
them if the video link fails (or even setting both going, then falling
back) surely isn't beyond the wit ... well, it obviously is, because
they don't.
[]
Post by Chris McMillan
Lots of people, allegedly, no longer have a landline. Anyway, they’d
So I've heard claimed. But (almost) anyone who has home internet - i. e.
uses it from a home computer, rather than just a 'phone or tablet - has
a landline, as that's what their internet comes over. (You _can_ get
internet-only contracts, but only from a few providers, and according to
moneysavingexpert they're actually slightly more expensive than the
ordinary internet-plus-home-'phone contracts from many of the main
providers.)
Post by Chris McMillan
rather stand in some totally inappropriate spot to be interviewed ‘at the
time’, than admit to a landline. It’s demeaning to those being
Ah, you're talking about outdoor interviews. Yes, it's a common question
on feedback-type programs "why does the reporter need to physically be
there - what does that add?", but they still send them.
Post by Chris McMillan
interviewed, and for many people with hearing g loss, even a mild one, they
can’t hear a word of what might be lifeline important information. I’ve
seen on one dead/hard of hearing forum a comment from someone who prefers
radio to tv that on asking if there are transcripts of programmes, gets a
more or less ‘no’. They were told “In Touch”, which doesn’t do very much
on dual sensory loss and has nothing to do with any hearing loss alone.
Indeed not. (_Is_ there a prog. for hearing-loss folk? I guess it would
have to be a TV one! I have vague memories of one from my childhood -
wasn't "Vision On" of that sort? - but I can't think of one now.)
Post by Chris McMillan
Maybe the twerp replying thought it was a dual sensory prog.
My completely-blind friends aren't _that_ keen on In Touch.
Post by Chris McMillan
Sincerely Chris
John (sometimes insincere?)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Apologies to [those] who may have been harmed by the scientific inaccuracies
in this post. - Roger Tilbury in UMRA, 2018-3-14
Serena Blanchflower
2020-10-23 19:22:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
So I've heard claimed. But (almost) anyone who has home internet - i. e.
uses it from a home computer, rather than just a 'phone or tablet - has
a landline, as that's what their internet comes over. (You _can_ get
internet-only contracts, but only from a few providers, and according to
moneysavingexpert they're actually slightly more expensive than the
ordinary internet-plus-home-'phone contracts from many of the main
providers.)
Yes, most people who have broadband will, also, have a landline. That
doesn't mean that they all have a handset which can be connected to it
and, if they never use it, they may well have lost track of what its
number would be, if they connected a phone to it.
--
Best wishes, Serena
Enjoy life, you will never get out alive.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-23 20:56:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 20:22:43, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
So I've heard claimed. But (almost) anyone who has home internet - i.
e. uses it from a home computer, rather than just a 'phone or tablet
- has a landline, as that's what their internet comes over. (You
_can_ get internet-only contracts, but only from a few providers, and
according to moneysavingexpert they're actually slightly more
expensive than the ordinary internet-plus-home-'phone contracts from
many of the main providers.)
Yes, most people who have broadband will, also, have a landline. That
doesn't mean that they all have a handset which can be connected to it
and, if they never use it, they may well have lost track of what its
number would be, if they connected a phone to it.
Ah, I hadn't thought of that last point! (Would never occur to me _not_
to have such a handset - and connected; but then I _do_ use my landline.
In fact I've just renegotiated with PlusNet for [a slightly lower
broadband speed which I won't notice and] free anytime calls, rather
than just evenings and weekends as I had previously.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Just grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked,the good fortune
to remember the ones I do, and the eyesight to tell the difference.
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-23 19:34:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 15:05:41, Chris McMillan
[]
Lots of people, allegedly, no longer have a landline.  Anyway, they’d
So I've heard claimed. But (almost) anyone who has home internet - i. e.
uses it from a home computer, rather than just a 'phone or tablet - has
a landline, as that's what their internet comes over. (You _can_ get
internet-only contracts, but only from a few providers, and according to
moneysavingexpert they're actually slightly more expensive than the
ordinary internet-plus-home-'phone contracts from many of the main
providers.)
There are now lots of people who use a MiFi router at home with no
landline connection.
It might be more expensive per Gb used (I haven't checked recently), but
you're not paying any line rental.
--
Sam Plusnet
DavidK
2020-10-23 21:12:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 15:05:41, Chris McMillan
[]
Lots of people, allegedly, no longer have a landline.  Anyway, they’d
So I've heard claimed. But (almost) anyone who has home internet - i.
e. uses it from a home computer, rather than just a 'phone or tablet -
has a landline, as that's what their internet comes over. (You _can_
get internet-only contracts, but only from a few providers, and
according to moneysavingexpert they're actually slightly more
expensive than the ordinary internet-plus-home-'phone contracts from
many of the main providers.)
There are now lots of people who use a MiFi router at home with no
landline connection.
It might be more expensive per Gb used (I haven't checked recently), but
you're not paying any line rental.
I use mobile broadband and tether my phone. £18 per month for all i can eat.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-23 21:40:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 22:12:19, DavidK <***@invalid.invalid> wrote:
[]
Post by DavidK
I use mobile broadband and tether my phone. £18 per month for all i can eat.
Is that truly unlimited data, texts, and minutes? If so, sounds good -
who's it with? And what sort of speed do you get?

(One snag [assuming the speed is OK]: presumably the number you give to
others starts 07. That means _some_ of those calling you, depending on
_their_ tariff plans, will find calling you is expensive.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Just grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked,the good fortune
to remember the ones I do, and the eyesight to tell the difference.
DavidK
2020-10-24 10:01:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by DavidK
I use mobile broadband and tether my phone. £18 per month for all i can eat.
Is that truly unlimited data, texts, and minutes? If so, sounds good -
who's it with? And what sort of speed do you get?
That's with Three. Several years ago I signed a 2-year contract of
unlimited everything for £20 a month and when it ended we continued
until last month they said that that scheme was being discontinued and
offered payg for £23. I rang them and said I wanted to leave and, lo and
behold, they offered a 1 year contract for unlimited everything for £18.
I expect they would offer the same if you asked. I rarely make calls and
send only a few texts and never go above 100GB; I haven't encountered a
limit.

Giffgaff offer 80GB for £20 and I could live within that; I was
intending to move to it.

Mobile broadband suits me because I am away from home more than half the
time. I just checked and the speed test says 13 Mb/s, it's bound to
differ from place to place. I just watched Des on catchup but for some
reason I don't understand I can watch The Simpsons on my phone but it
quickly fails if I try on my laptop using my tethered phone.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-24 15:44:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DavidK
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by DavidK
I use mobile broadband and tether my phone. £18 per month for all i can eat.
Is that truly unlimited data, texts, and minutes? If so, sounds good
- who's it with? And what sort of speed do you get?
That's with Three. Several years ago I signed a 2-year contract of
unlimited everything for £20 a month and when it ended we continued
until last month they said that that scheme was being discontinued and
offered payg for £23. I rang them and said I wanted to leave and, lo
and behold, they offered a 1 year contract for unlimited everything for
£18. I expect they would offer the same if you asked. I rarely make
Yes, it's got to be the same as car (and other I believe) insurance,
utilities, and so on - you have to haggle as each contract comes to an
end, or they put the price up (sometimes by a cheeky amount). There are
moves, I gather, from "Rip-off Britain" (an occasional TV prog.), to
make it so that retained customers are offered the same as new customers
would be offered, but (a) it hasn't happened yet, (b) I think it'll only
apply to insurance, and (c) we all know they'll get round it somehow
anyway. Now where was I ...
Post by DavidK
calls and send only a few texts and never go above 100GB; I haven't
encountered a limit.
Hmm. According to PlusNet, I'd used 125G by sometime in September since
the start of my contract (which I think was the previous November).

I've just agreed to 25 a month for a while; I think I'll stay, as they
seem to work well most of the time, though their customer service are
often clueless (and sometimes disingenuous). But the basic provision
works well.
Post by DavidK
Giffgaff offer 80GB for £20 and I could live within that; I was
intending to move to it.
My main objection to GiffGaff (though as a fobile provider, I hadn't
thought of them for data) is presentational rather than financial - I
could save by moving to the above. My objection to them is that they
present their "goodie bags" (do they still use that term? I haven't
looked at them for a while) as you buying a certain number of
minutes/text/data for a certain amount of money, same as a PAYG 'phone;
trouble is, when you read the small print, it has to be used within a
month of when you start using it, or it all expires. All - it's not just
that you have to make the odd call to keep the number active. I can't
see why they don't sell a _true_ PAYG offer (OK, with the requirement to
make the odd call to keep the number active): the tenner I put on the
SIM I bought on 3's 3-2-1 tariff many years ago still had over 7 left
last time I checked.
Post by DavidK
Mobile broadband suits me because I am away from home more than half
the time. I just checked and the speed test says 13 Mb/s, it's bound to
Hmm. I used to get around 29-30; after my renegotiation (which I knew
was in theory going to drop my speed from 66 to 33), I seem to be on
about 18-20. I suspect before I was mainly limited by wifi speed.
Post by DavidK
differ from place to place. I just watched Des on catchup but for some
reason I don't understand I can watch The Simpsons on my phone but it
quickly fails if I try on my laptop using my tethered phone.
At a guess, the 'phone uses a lower-resolution stream?
I'm a bit rural - on my dual-SIM 'phone, I can usually see a moderate
connection to whatever network Virgin uses, but whatever 3 uses is often
minimal or non-functional.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I'm the oldest woman on primetime not baking cakes.
- Anne Robinson, RT 2015/8/15-21
Serena Blanchflower
2020-10-24 16:16:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Hmm. According to PlusNet, I'd used 125G by sometime in September since
the start of my contract (which I think was the previous November).
I've just agreed to 25 a month for a while; I think I'll stay, as they
seem to work well most of the time, though their customer service are
often clueless (and sometimes disingenuous). But the basic provision
works well.
I've had a wonderfully farcical time with PlusNet this year. I realised
I was paying them too much, as I'd gone onto their default rate and
phoned to renegotiate. I was immediately offered a large discount, if I
signed up for a new 18 month contract; I pointed out however that this
was still significantly more than they were advertising Broadband for on
that package.

When I was told that this was only for new customers, I immediately
suggested that this meant it was time to leave them, so that i could be
a new customer elsewhere. I was then offered a much cheaper deal, so
long as I upgraded from a stupidly fast package to a really ridiculously
fast one!

Over the next few months though, they couldn't get the billing right and
nor could they get the speed they'd promised (I was still getting
stupidly fast broadband, more than good enough for what I do with it
though). After much tweaking and discussion, they got the speed up to
almost the minimum, guaranteed amount. Neither an engineer's visit nor
a new router fixed it and they offered me a £2pm discount which should,
once they've also applied the referral discounts I get, mean I'm paying
a negative amount each month (which will go towards my next line rental
bill)!

They've just been in touch again, saying they think I should be getting
more than the promised speed and cancelling the credit. As I've made it
clear that I'm still "only" getting about 55mbps, I've got another
engineer coming out to look at my line this week. Who knows what will
happen after that!
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by DavidK
Giffgaff offer 80GB for £20 and I could live within that; I was
intending to move to it.
My main objection to GiffGaff (though as a fobile provider, I hadn't
thought of them for data) is presentational rather than financial - I
could save by moving to the above. My objection to them is that they
present their "goodie bags" (do they still use that term? I haven't
looked at them for a while) as you buying a certain number of
minutes/text/data for a certain amount of money, same as a PAYG 'phone;
trouble is, when you read the small print, it has to be used within a
month of when you start using it, or it all expires. All - it's not just
that you have to make the odd call to keep the number active. I can't
see why they don't sell a _true_ PAYG offer (OK, with the requirement to
make the odd call to keep the number active): the tenner I put on the
SIM I bought on 3's 3-2-1 tariff many years ago still had over 7 left
last time I checked.
I find the GiffGaff goody bags work well for me. For £6pm, I get as
many calls[1] and text messages[1] as I want, plus a small amount of
data (500MB). This means I only use my landline for outgoing calls
extremely rarely and that's normally all I need to pay for phone usage.
Because my phone rarely leaves the area covered by my internet router, I
need very little data usage on it and generally use far less than 50MB,
let alone the 500MB allowed.

It's perfectly possible to use GiffGaff without having a goody bag
though, and just to work on PAYG credit. Your credits aren't time
limited, although I think you do need to use the phone at least once in
a while to keep the SIM active.

You can see their rates at <Loading Image...fgaff.com/pricing>




[1] Apart from premium rate numbers
--
Best wishes, Serena
It actually doesn't take much to be considered a difficult woman. That's
why there are so many of us. (Jane Goodall)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-24 17:11:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 24 Oct 2020 at 17:16:50, Serena Blanchflower
<***@blanchflower.me.uk> wrote:
[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
I've had a wonderfully farcical time with PlusNet this year. I
realised I was paying them too much, as I'd gone onto their default
rate and phoned to renegotiate. I was immediately offered a large
discount, if I signed up for a new 18 month contract; I pointed out
however that this was still significantly more than they were
advertising Broadband for on that package.
When I was told that this was only for new customers, I immediately
suggested that this meant it was time to leave them, so that i could be
a new customer elsewhere. I was then offered a much cheaper deal, so
Sounds normal for all these haggles.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
long as I upgraded from a stupidly fast package to a really
ridiculously fast one!
Yes, last time (or the time before) I got a slight saving (few tens of
pence a month IIRR) by accepting an _increase_ in nominal speed.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Over the next few months though, they couldn't get the billing right
Oh, tell me about it! I don't think I've had a year in which they
haven't made _some_ mistake with the billing for some time, if ever. So
far, they've always fixed it when I've pointed it out to them (though
infuriatingly usually not the _first_ month after the error comes to
light).
Post by Serena Blanchflower
and nor could they get the speed they'd promised (I was still getting
stupidly fast broadband, more than good enough for what I do with it
though). After much tweaking and discussion, they got the speed up to
almost the minimum, guaranteed amount. Neither an engineer's visit nor
a new router fixed it and they offered me a £2pm discount which should,
once they've also applied the referral discounts I get, mean I'm paying
a negative amount each month (which will go towards my next line rental >bill)!
Aargh, I thought you meant you had a _lot_ of referral discounts - but
you're still considering broadband and line rental separately. They do
for me to, but when I speak to them, I make clear that I'm totally
disregarding any such artificial split, and want to talk total amount
per month. They're not the only ones to preserve this deception: nearly
all the providers do it. To me, it's purely so they can LIE by
presenting only one of the charges (usually broadband) in their adverts
on TV and in print.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
They've just been in touch again, saying they think I should be getting
more than the promised speed and cancelling the credit. As I've made
it clear that I'm still "only" getting about 55mbps, I've got another
engineer coming out to look at my line this week. Who knows what will
happen after that!
Indeed!
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by DavidK
Giffgaff offer 80GB for £20 and I could live within that; I was
intending to move to it.
My main objection to GiffGaff (though as a fobile provider, I hadn't
thought of them for data) is presentational rather than financial - I
could save by moving to the above. My objection to them is that they
present their "goodie bags" (do they still use that term? I haven't
looked at them for a while) as you buying a certain number of
minutes/text/data for a certain amount of money, same as a PAYG
'phone; trouble is, when you read the small print, it has to be used
within a month of when you start using it, or it all expires. All -
it's not just that you have to make the odd call to keep the number
active. I can't see why they don't sell a _true_ PAYG offer (OK, with
the requirement to make the odd call to keep the number active): the
tenner I put on the SIM I bought on 3's 3-2-1 tariff many years ago
still had over 7 left last time I checked.
I find the GiffGaff goody bags work well for me. For £6pm, I get as
many calls[1] and text messages[1] as I want, plus a small amount of
I just object to the name/marketing: to me, "goody bag" implies I am
buying something that I can use as fast or slowly as I wish. "pm"
implies a contract.
Post by Serena Blanchflower
data (500MB). This means I only use my landline for outgoing calls
extremely rarely and that's normally all I need to pay for phone usage.
Because my phone rarely leaves the area covered by my internet router,
I need very little data usage on it and generally use far less than
50MB, let alone the 500MB allowed.
(If I ever anticipated using my mobile more than the tiny amount I do,
I'd probably look at PlusNet's offerings - they offer what they claim
are good prices to existing BB/LL customers. But they're all so much
[more than 0] a month [they don't offer a PAYG].)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
It's perfectly possible to use GiffGaff without having a goody bag
though, and just to work on PAYG credit. Your credits aren't time
limited, although I think you do need to use the phone at least once in
a while to keep the SIM active.
You can see their rates at <https://www.giffgaff.com/pricing>
25p a minute, 5p a megabyte. I'll stick with 3-2-1!
Post by Serena Blanchflower
[1] Apart from premium rate numbers
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Religion often uses faith as a blindfold, saying anyone who doesn't believe
the same as us must be wiped out. It's not God saying that. It's people, which
is so dangerous. - Jenny Agutter, RT 2015/1/17-23
John Ashby
2020-10-24 18:22:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Sat, 24 Oct 2020 at 17:16:50, Serena Blanchflower
[]
I've had a wonderfully farcical time with PlusNet this year.  I
realised I was paying them too much, as I'd gone onto their default
rate and phoned to renegotiate.  I was immediately offered a large
discount, if I signed up for a new 18 month contract; I pointed out
however that this was still significantly more than they were
advertising Broadband for on that package.
When I was told that this was only for new customers, I immediately
suggested that this meant it was time to leave them, so that i could
be a new customer elsewhere.  I was then offered a much cheaper deal, so
Sounds normal for all these haggles.
long as I upgraded from a stupidly fast package to a really
ridiculously fast one!
Yes, last time (or the time before) I got a slight saving (few tens of
pence a month IIRR) by accepting an _increase_ in nominal speed.
Over the next few months though, they couldn't get the billing right
Oh, tell me about it! I don't think I've had a year in which they
haven't made _some_ mistake with the billing for some time, if ever. So
far, they've always fixed it when I've pointed it out to them (though
infuriatingly usually not the _first_ month after the error comes to
light).
and nor could they get the speed they'd promised (I was still getting
stupidly fast broadband, more than good enough for what I do with it
though).  After much tweaking and discussion, they got the speed up to
almost the minimum, guaranteed amount.  Neither an engineer's visit
nor a new router fixed it and they offered me a £2pm discount which
should, once they've also applied the referral discounts I get, mean
I'm paying a negative amount each month (which will go towards my next
line rental >bill)!
Aargh, I thought you meant you had a _lot_ of referral discounts - but
you're still considering broadband and line rental separately. They do
for me to, but when I speak to them, I make clear that I'm totally
disregarding any such artificial split, and want to talk total amount
per month. They're not the only ones to preserve this deception: nearly
all the providers do it. To me, it's purely so they can LIE by
presenting only one of the charges (usually broadband) in their adverts
on TV and in print.
The other trick the sometimes pull is to do a deal for 18 months for
broadband and only 12 months for line rental which can seriously screw
up getting out at the end of a deal.

john
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-24 19:15:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
The other trick the sometimes pull is to do a deal for 18 months for
broadband and only 12 months for line rental which can seriously screw
up getting out at the end of a deal.
ITYM
"Retain a loyal customer who is very happy with the service."
Or some such.
--
Sam Plusnet
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-24 21:17:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
Post by John Ashby
but you're still considering broadband and line rental separately.
They do for me to, but when I speak to them, I make clear that I'm
totally disregarding any such artificial split, and want to talk
total amount per month. They're not the only ones to preserve this
deception: nearly all the providers do it. To me, it's purely so they
can LIE by presenting only one of the charges (usually broadband) in
their adverts on TV and in print.
The other trick the sometimes pull is to do a deal for 18 months for
broadband and only 12 months for line rental which can seriously screw
up getting out at the end of a deal.
Oh, I'm wise to that one. I don't know if they still do it, but it was a
despicable way to get round the "you can leave with no penalty if
there's a change to your disadvantage" legislation. That's probably why
(or partly why) they couch their terms with the silly "discount": they
charge you a huge amount for BB or LL, then give you back a discount as
long as you buy both from them. Then, when the shorter one ends, and
they put the price up for that part, you either have to pay the
early-termination fee to end the other one, or accept the rise for the
new one: they can claim there's no change to your disadvantage in the
longer one, as the "discount only while you take both from us" was there
from the start and they haven't changed it.

(I don't know if PlusNet - or, indeed, any of the others - actually ever
invoke this weaseliness; I could see it coming, so never accepted
non-coterminous contracts.)
Post by John Ashby
john
John
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If something works, thank an engineer. (Reported seen on a bumper sticker.)
Serena Blanchflower
2020-10-24 18:56:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
On Sat, 24 Oct 2020 at 17:16:50, Serena Blanchflower
I find the GiffGaff goody bags work well for me.  For £6pm, I get as
many calls[1] and text messages[1] as I want, plus a small amount of
I just object to the name/marketing: to me, "goody bag" implies I am
buying something that I can use as fast or slowly as I wish. "pm"
implies a contract.
The main difference between a goody bag and a monthly contract is what
happens if you do anything (such as call a premium number) which isn't
included in your monthly payment. If you're on a contract, it will be
billed in arrears, with your next bill. If you are on PAYG with a goody
bag, you have to have some credit on your account so that you can pay
for it up front.



<snip>
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
(If I ever anticipated using my mobile more than the tiny amount I do,
I'd probably look at PlusNet's offerings - they offer what they claim
are good prices to existing BB/LL customers. But they're all so much
[more than 0] a month [they don't offer a PAYG].)
I used to be with PN for my mobile but left because they don't allow you
to send texts to short 5 digit numbers. This had been a theoretical
concern but became a more active one when I got a text from Barclaycard,
asking whether some transactions were legitimate[1]. If they were, all
I had to do was reply Y to the text, which was from a 5 digit code.

As Plusnet wouldn't allow me to do that, I had to waste a significant
amount of time phoning Barclaycard's fraud department to confirm that
the transactions were fine.

When I phoned Plusnet to cancel my contract and request my PAC, to allow
me to leave, I got the impression I was far from the first person to
leave because of this.

[1] The transaction they were primarily concerned about was something
which was out of the ordinary for me, so I have absolutely no problem
with them wanting to check it out.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I have never heard anything about the resolutions of the apostles, but a
good deal about their acts. (Horace Mann)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-24 21:21:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 24 Oct 2020 at 19:56:40, Serena Blanchflower
<***@blanchflower.me.uk> wrote:
[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
When I phoned Plusnet to cancel my contract and request my PAC, to
allow me to leave, I got the impression I was far from the first person
to leave because of this.
From what I've read in the internal newsgroups, it was a bone of
contention with many. (I wonder what the _technical_ reason was they
wouldn't let you text to a five-digit number. What happened when you
tried?)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
[1] The transaction they were primarily concerned about was something
which was out of the ordinary for me, so I have absolutely no problem
with them wanting to check it out.
I could wish the co-op were better at that; the odd time I _have_ had
fraudulent transactions, they've been fairly obviously _not_ my normal
pattern. (So far I've always got it back eventually, mind.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If something works, thank an engineer. (Reported seen on a bumper sticker.)
Serena Blanchflower
2020-10-25 11:39:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
When I phoned Plusnet to cancel my contract and request my PAC, to
allow me to leave, I got the impression I was far from the first
person to leave because of this.
From what I've read in the internal newsgroups, it was a bone of
contention with many. (I wonder what the _technical_ reason was they
wouldn't let you text to a five-digit number. What happened when you
tried?)
Yes, I had been aware of it from discussions, and complaints, on the PN
newsgroups. When I tried to reply to the text, I was just told it was
an invalid number, or words to that effect (I forget the exact
terminology they used).
--
Best wishes, Serena
In filling in an application, where it says, 'In case of emergency,
notify:' I put 'DOCTOR.'
Penny
2020-10-25 17:58:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 25 Oct 2020 11:39:26 +0000, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Serena Blanchflower
When I phoned Plusnet to cancel my contract and request my PAC, to
allow me to leave, I got the impression I was far from the first
person to leave because of this.
From what I've read in the internal newsgroups, it was a bone of
contention with many. (I wonder what the _technical_ reason was they
wouldn't let you text to a five-digit number. What happened when you
tried?)
Yes, I had been aware of it from discussions, and complaints, on the PN
newsgroups. When I tried to reply to the text, I was just told it was
an invalid number, or words to that effect (I forget the exact
terminology they used).
Oh, I've had that problem with 3. I just assumed they were correct and it
was the equivalent of a 'noreply' address in email.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2020-10-25 01:34:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 24 Oct 2020 17:16:50 +0100, Serena Blanchflower
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Hmm. According to PlusNet, I'd used 125G by sometime in September since
the start of my contract (which I think was the previous November).
I've just agreed to 25 a month for a while; I think I'll stay, as they
seem to work well most of the time, though their customer service are
often clueless (and sometimes disingenuous). But the basic provision
works well.
I've had a wonderfully farcical time with PlusNet this year. I realised
I was paying them too much, as I'd gone onto their default rate and
phoned to renegotiate. I was immediately offered a large discount, if I
signed up for a new 18 month contract; I pointed out however that this
was still significantly more than they were advertising Broadband for on
that package.
When I was told that this was only for new customers, I immediately
suggested that this meant it was time to leave them, so that i could be
a new customer elsewhere. I was then offered a much cheaper deal, so
long as I upgraded from a stupidly fast package to a really ridiculously
fast one!
Over the next few months though, they couldn't get the billing right and
nor could they get the speed they'd promised (I was still getting
stupidly fast broadband, more than good enough for what I do with it
though). After much tweaking and discussion, they got the speed up to
almost the minimum, guaranteed amount. Neither an engineer's visit nor
a new router fixed it and they offered me a £2pm discount which should,
once they've also applied the referral discounts I get, mean I'm paying
a negative amount each month (which will go towards my next line rental
bill)!
They've just been in touch again, saying they think I should be getting
more than the promised speed and cancelling the credit. As I've made it
clear that I'm still "only" getting about 55mbps, I've got another
engineer coming out to look at my line this week. Who knows what will
happen after that!
<snip>
I have a legacy account with Plusnet which is now costing me just over
thirty quid per month. For something I haven't used at all since March
that's boodily extortionate! But then my water bill is higher and I
haven't used any water since March either. On the other hand, even
though thirty quid is more than I would have to pay elsewhere and more
than I would have to pay if I took out an 18 month contract with
Plusnet, I don't think in itself it's a bad price.

Maybe umra can answer this: one of my main reasons for not changing
anything is because I have got time and energy tied up in my Plusnet
email addresses and money - in the form of printed goods - tied up in
my free Plusnet webspace and I wouldn't want to save a few quid per
month off my internet costs and then have to take the time to untangle
my email addresses and reprint stuff. Does anybody know? Do the new
FTTC and FTTP 18 month contracts carry across pre-existing email and
webspace? It is not obvious from where I am that they do.

I presume if I go down the route to change my service on their website
that I will be offered the full T&Cs beforehand but I am reluctant to
try that in case I find I am unexpectedly signed up for something
before I want to be. Does anybody have a direct link to the T&Cs
because I am nuggered if I can find one from their site? Not that I
plan to change anything before I get home...

Thanks,

Nick
Penny
2020-10-25 11:41:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 24 Oct 2020 22:34:54 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
But then my water bill is higher and I
haven't used any water since March either.
I really must get around to switching to a water meter - maybe you should
too...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-25 19:05:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Sat, 24 Oct 2020 22:34:54 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
But then my water bill is higher and I
haven't used any water since March either.
I really must get around to switching to a water meter - maybe you should
too...
Our water charges are _still_ based on the house's (very low) rateable
value, despite rates having been abolished 30 years ago.
Consequently our water charges are low, and Dwr Cymru don't seem all
that eager to force meters on everyone.
--
Sam Plusnet
Penny
2020-10-25 19:56:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 25 Oct 2020 19:05:58 +0000, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> scrawled in
the dust...
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
On Sat, 24 Oct 2020 22:34:54 -0300, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
But then my water bill is higher and I
haven't used any water since March either.
I really must get around to switching to a water meter - maybe you should
too...
Our water charges are _still_ based on the house's (very low) rateable
value, despite rates having been abolished 30 years ago.
Consequently our water charges are low, and Dwr Cymru don't seem all
that eager to force meters on everyone.
My little Tudor 'cottage' down in Kent had a ridiculously low rateable
value (and ended up with a ridiculously high council tax band - but that's
a different rant altogether) so I was somewhat surprised by the cost of
water hereabouts, in a house built in 1950 with a moderate C-tax band. I
hadn't really considered a meter as it was something I had always avoided
but think it could really save me £s even in very dry summers when I tend
to (over)water the fruit and veg.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-25 23:49:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 25 Oct 2020 at 19:56:45, Penny <***@labyrinth.freeuk.com>
wrote:
[]
Post by Penny
water hereabouts, in a house built in 1950 with a moderate C-tax band. I
hadn't really considered a meter as it was something I had always avoided
but think it could really save me £s even in very dry summers when I tend
to (over)water the fruit and veg.
There's some rule of thumb - it's something like if you have fewer
people than bedrooms, a meter is likely to be worth it. (There may be a
"plus one" or "minus one", or I might have remembered the wrong
parameter, but it's something like that.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

But remember, in a permissive society, it is also permissible to stay at home
and have a nice cup of tea instead. Andrew Collins, RT 2015/2/14-20
Mike McMillan
2020-10-26 12:00:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Penny
water hereabouts, in a house built in 1950 with a moderate C-tax band. I
hadn't really considered a meter as it was something I had always avoided
but think it could really save me £s even in very dry summers when I tend
to (over)water the fruit and veg.
There's some rule of thumb - it's something like if you have fewer
people than bedrooms, a meter is likely to be worth it. (There may be a
"plus one" or "minus one", or I might have remembered the wrong
parameter, but it's something like that.)
We have had a water meter for some years now and consistently find that
even with some watering of the garden in dry spells, (water butts most of
the time) we are approx. 10% below the average consumption for 2 persons.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Serena Blanchflower
2020-10-25 11:46:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Maybe umra can answer this: one of my main reasons for not changing
anything is because I have got time and energy tied up in my Plusnet
email addresses and money - in the form of printed goods - tied up in
my free Plusnet webspace and I wouldn't want to save a few quid per
month off my internet costs and then have to take the time to untangle
my email addresses and reprint stuff. Does anybody know? Do the new
FTTC and FTTP 18 month contracts carry across pre-existing email and
webspace? It is not obvious from where I am that they do.
If you change package it certainly doesn't affect your email address[1]
and I'd be staggered if it affected your webspace either but, as I don't
have any, that isn't something I have first hand experience of.

For me though, that's linked to one of the main benefits of having my
own domain. It means that my email address isn't dependent either on my
ISP or my email provider and I can change either of those without having
to change my email address.

[1] In my years with PlusNet, I've been on ADSL, standard FTTC and high
speed FTTC - I think I'd migrated to broadband before switching to
PlusNet, so I don't think I had dial-up with them. My PlusNet email
inbox has remained the same throughout.
--
Best wishes, Serena
If you smile at life, life will smile back at you...
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-25 16:44:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 25 Oct 2020 at 11:46:03, Serena Blanchflower
<***@blanchflower.me.uk> wrote:
[]
Post by Serena Blanchflower
For me though, that's linked to one of the main benefits of having my
own domain. It means that my email address isn't dependent either on
my ISP or my email provider and I can change either of those without
having to change my email address.
[]
Agreed. I kept my old Demon "subdomain" and attached emails, from well
before 1995, through all the variations in who owned Demon, even for a
year or two after they brought in Namesco to run the legacy ones - but
then when Namesco started playing silly buggers, I bit the bullet and
haven't looked back - I pay twentysomething a _year_ to TSOhost,
including registration (and I made sure the registration is in _my_
name, so I can switch from _them_ if I want to).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Easy reading is damned hard writing. -Nathaniel Hawthorne, writer (1804-1864)
krw
2020-10-25 23:23:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
As I've made it clear that I'm still "only" getting about 55mbps,
Some of us dream of 55mbps. In theory 19.97 (which is such an odd
number I can only believe that there is a "must not exceed" setting on
my line. As previously mentioned I am a good distance from the cabinet
so 12 - 13 is good and when it drops lower the router gets rebooted.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Mike McMillan
2020-10-26 11:56:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
As I've made it clear that I'm still "only" getting about 55mbps,
Some of us dream of 55mbps. In theory 19.97 (which is such an odd
number I can only believe that there is a "must not exceed" setting on
my line. As previously mentioned I am a good distance from the cabinet
so 12 - 13 is good and when it drops lower the router gets rebooted.
We are with Virginontheridiculous and they provide us with 112 Mbps down
and 10 Mbps up; time this has left the modem and been processed by our Mesh
router nodes, we actually get ~108 Mbps near the parent node and this drops
to about 98 Mbps further ‘down the line’ so to speak; however, these are
‘up to’ figures and sometimes we are averaging ~75 Mbps.
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-26 14:41:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 26 Oct 2020 at 11:56:54, Mike McMillan
<***@ntlworld.com> wrote:
[]
Post by Mike McMillan
We are with Virginontheridiculous and they provide us with 112 Mbps down
and 10 Mbps up; time this has left the modem and been processed by our Mesh
router nodes, we actually get ~108 Mbps near the parent node and this drops
to about 98 Mbps further ‘down the line’ so to speak; however, these are
‘up to’ figures and sometimes we are averaging ~75 Mbps.
I know in a few years' time people will look at my question and laugh,
but I'll ask for the moment: what are you _doing_ with all those
megabytes? Even with both of you watching streaming HD TV at once, you'd
be pushed to use that much!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Veni, Vidi, VO5 (I came, I saw, I washed my hair) - Mik from S+AS Limited
(***@saslimited.demon.co.uk), 1998
Penny
2020-10-24 09:02:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 22:12:19 +0100, DavidK <***@invalid.invalid>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
I use mobile broadband and tether my phone. £18 per month for all i can eat.
I think that's about what I pay for my landline line rent, which may be
more reliable than mobile signals hereabouts. There are still valleys in
Wales unreachable by some mobile networks.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
BrritSki
2020-10-24 09:28:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
I use mobile broadband and tether my phone. £18 per month for all i can eat.
I think that's about what I pay for my landline line rent, which may be
more reliable than mobile signals hereabouts. There are still valleys in
Wales unreachable by some mobile networks.
Hope you don't get a power cut for the next few days - apparently
candles are non-essential items <boggle>
John Ashby
2020-10-24 11:20:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
I use mobile broadband and tether my phone. £18 per month for all i can eat.
I think that's about what I pay for my landline line rent, which may be
more reliable than mobile signals hereabouts. There are still valleys in
Wales unreachable by some mobile networks.
Hope you don't get a power cut for the next few days - apparently
candles are non-essential items <boggle>
What, even for nuns?

(oops, sorry Sid).

john
Sid Nuncius
2020-10-24 17:46:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by BrritSki
Hope you don't get a power cut for the next few days - apparently
candles are non-essential items <boggle>
What, even for nuns?
(oops, sorry Sid).
:o)) Haven't heard that one for a very long time.

(Apropos not much, I listened to Jake Thackray's Sister Josephine a few
days ago, for the first time in decades. Still makes me smile.)
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Steve Hague
2020-10-25 08:48:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by BrritSki
Hope you don't get a power cut for the next few days - apparently
candles are non-essential items <boggle>
What, even for nuns?
(oops, sorry Sid).
:o))  Haven't heard that one for a very long time.
(Apropos not much, I listened to Jake Thackray's Sister Josephine a few
days ago, for the first time in decades.  Still makes me smile.)
Many of his songs still give me a good grin.
Steve
Mike McMillan
2020-10-24 13:15:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
I use mobile broadband and tether my phone. £18 per month for all i can eat.
I think that's about what I pay for my landline line rent, which may be
more reliable than mobile signals hereabouts. There are still valleys in
Wales unreachable by some mobile networks.
Hope you don't get a power cut for the next few days - apparently
candles are non-essential items <boggle>
Buy them wholesale at Wicks;-)
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Steve Hague
2020-10-24 13:32:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
I use mobile broadband and tether my phone. £18 per month for all i can eat.
I think that's about what I pay for my landline line rent, which may be
more reliable than mobile signals hereabouts. There are still valleys in
Wales unreachable by some mobile networks.
Hope you don't get a power cut for the next few days - apparently
candles are non-essential items <boggle>
Buy them wholesale at Wicks;-)
I could wax lyrical about that.
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-24 19:19:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by DavidK
I use mobile broadband and tether my phone. £18 per month for all i can eat.
I think that's about what I pay for my landline line rent, which may be
more reliable than mobile signals hereabouts. There are still valleys in
Wales unreachable by some mobile networks.
Speak up Penny, I can hardly hear you.

AOL. Where there is serious geography around, one house might get a
reasonable signal whilst next door is bar-less.
--
Sam Plusnet
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-24 21:22:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
more reliable than mobile signals hereabouts. There are still valleys in
Wales unreachable by some mobile networks.
Speak up Penny, I can hardly hear you.
AOL. Where there is serious geography around, one house might get a
reasonable signal whilst next door is bar-less.
One understands that, where the chapel is strong, there are indeed such
parts of Wales ...
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If something works, thank an engineer. (Reported seen on a bumper sticker.)
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-25 19:07:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
more reliable than mobile signals hereabouts. There are still valleys in
Wales unreachable by some mobile networks.
Speak up Penny, I can hardly hear you.
AOL.  Where there is serious geography around, one house might get a
reasonable signal whilst next door is bar-less.
One understands that, where the chapel is strong, there are indeed such
parts of Wales ...
Bar-less, but not Baa Baa less.
--
Sam Plusnet
Sid Nuncius
2020-10-25 19:21:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
more reliable than mobile signals hereabouts. There are still valleys in
Wales unreachable by some mobile networks.
Speak up Penny, I can hardly hear you.
AOL.  Where there is serious geography around, one house might get a
reasonable signal whilst next door is bar-less.
One understands that, where the chapel is strong, there are indeed
such parts of Wales ...
Bar-less, but not Baa Baa less.
Barless and Bible-black?
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-25 19:30:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
more reliable than mobile signals hereabouts. There are still valleys in
Wales unreachable by some mobile networks.
Speak up Penny, I can hardly hear you.
AOL.  Where there is serious geography around, one house might get
a reasonable signal whilst next door is bar-less.
One understands that, where the chapel is strong, there are indeed
such parts of Wales ...
Bar-less, but not Baa Baa less.
Barless and Bible-black?
I reJoyce in your literary erudition ...


[Sudden afterthought: I think I'm getting my literary greats mixed up. I
think that might have been Thomas.

Turnpike's delay-before-posting does come in handy sometimes!]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

All change is not growth, as all movement is not forward. -Ellen Glasgow,
novelist (1874-1945)
Penny
2020-10-25 19:59:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 25 Oct 2020 19:30:20 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
more reliable than mobile signals hereabouts. There are still valleys in
Wales unreachable by some mobile networks.
Speak up Penny, I can hardly hear you.
AOL.  Where there is serious geography around, one house might get
a reasonable signal whilst next door is bar-less.
One understands that, where the chapel is strong, there are indeed
such parts of Wales ...
Bar-less, but not Baa Baa less.
Barless and Bible-black?
:))
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I reJoyce in your literary erudition ...
[Sudden afterthought: I think I'm getting my literary greats mixed up. I
think that might have been Thomas.
Muddled countries too.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2020-10-25 22:43:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
more reliable than mobile signals hereabouts. There are still valleys in
Wales unreachable by some mobile networks.
Speak up Penny, I can hardly hear you.
AOL.  Where there is serious geography around, one house might get a
reasonable signal whilst next door is bar-less.
One understands that, where the chapel is strong, there are indeed
such parts of Wales ...
Bar-less, but not Baa Baa less.
Barless and Bible-black?
I suppose milk would.
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-25 23:41:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
more reliable than mobile signals hereabouts. There are still valleys in
Wales unreachable by some mobile networks.
Speak up Penny, I can hardly hear you.
AOL.  Where there is serious geography around, one house might get a
reasonable signal whilst next door is bar-less.
One understands that, where the chapel is strong, there are indeed
such parts of Wales ...
Bar-less, but not Baa Baa less.
Barless and Bible-black?
I suppose milk would.
Excellent!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The losses on both sides at Borodino [1812], 70 miles from Moscow, are the
equivalent of a jumbo jet crashing into an area of six square miles every five
minutes for the whole ten hours of the battle, killing or wounding everyone on
board. - Andrew Roberts on Napoleon, RT 2015/6/13-19
Chris J Dixon
2020-10-24 09:58:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
I’ve
seen on one dead/hard of hearing forum a comment from someone who prefers
radio to tv
Communicating through a medium?

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-23 19:24:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I now listen to radio little, outside 7:0x four days a week.
What is this Radio Little of which you speak?

I haven't heard of that one.
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Odell
2020-10-24 00:12:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I now listen to radio little, outside 7:0x four days a week.
What is this Radio Little of which you speak?
I haven't heard of that one.
Is that not what blares out at you from ceiling speakers as you steer
your shopping cart up and down the ailes of your local German-owned
discount supermarket?

Nick
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-23 21:27:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 23 Oct 2020 at 21:12:50, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I now listen to radio little, outside 7:0x four days a week.
What is this Radio Little of which you speak?
I haven't heard of that one.
Is that not what blares out at you from ceiling speakers as you steer
your shopping cart up and down the ailes of your local German-owned
discount supermarket?
Nick
I'd have to pronounce "Little" with an American accent (-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Just grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked,the good fortune
to remember the ones I do, and the eyesight to tell the difference.
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-24 00:08:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I now listen to radio little, outside 7:0x four days a week.
What is this Radio Little of which you speak?
I haven't heard of that one.
Is that not what blares out at you from ceiling speakers as you steer
your shopping cart up and down the ailes of your local German-owned
discount supermarket?
That happens Aldi time.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike McMillan
2020-10-24 07:00:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I now listen to radio little, outside 7:0x four days a week.
What is this Radio Little of which you speak?
I haven't heard of that one.
Is that not what blares out at you from ceiling speakers as you steer
your shopping cart up and down the ailes of your local German-owned
discount supermarket?
That happens Aldi time.
Very Lidl in our local branch (which I prefer, they use the PA to announce
offers and remind shoppers about Lidl Plus)
--
Toodle Pip (My other iPad is an old Pro)
Penny
2020-10-24 09:06:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 24 Oct 2020 07:00:33 GMT, Mike McMillan <***@ntlworld.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I now listen to radio little, outside 7:0x four days a week.
What is this Radio Little of which you speak?
I haven't heard of that one.
Is that not what blares out at you from ceiling speakers as you steer
your shopping cart up and down the ailes of your local German-owned
discount supermarket?
That happens Aldi time.
Very Lidl in our local branch (which I prefer, they use the PA to announce
offers and remind shoppers about Lidl Plus)
No music in ours and the bilingual announcements are all about social
distancing, respect for staff and other customers and which till is about
to open.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Steve Hague
2020-10-24 13:27:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Mike McMillan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I now listen to radio little, outside 7:0x four days a week.
What is this Radio Little of which you speak?
I haven't heard of that one.
Is that not what blares out at you from ceiling speakers as you steer
your shopping cart up and down the ailes of your local German-owned
discount supermarket?
That happens Aldi time.
Very Lidl in our local branch (which I prefer, they use the PA to announce
offers and remind shoppers about Lidl Plus)
No music in ours and the bilingual announcements are all about social
distancing, respect for staff and other customers and which till is about
to open.
Same here. Our Aldi is a very civilised place to shop, convivial staff
and no muzak. I do get a sinking feeling though when I hear "Manager
required at till three" when there are a couple of people in front of me
at till three.
Steve
Jim Easterbrook
2020-10-24 13:47:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Same here. Our Aldi is a very civilised place to shop, convivial staff
and no muzak. I do get a sinking feeling though when I hear "Manager
required at till three" when there are a couple of people in front of me
at till three.
Steve
Try again - reinstalling my software seems to have messed up my settings.

One of the distancing measures at my local Waitrose is that there is one
queue from which people are called forward to tills as they become free.
Hence I no longer pick the wrong queue to join.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-24 15:54:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 24 Oct 2020 at 13:47:22, Jim Easterbrook
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Steve Hague
Same here. Our Aldi is a very civilised place to shop, convivial staff
and no muzak. I do get a sinking feeling though when I hear "Manager
required at till three" when there are a couple of people in front of me
at till three.
Steve
Try again - reinstalling my software seems to have messed up my settings.
(The first try did come through, though with a lot of garbage at the
beginning.)
Post by Jim Easterbrook
One of the distancing measures at my local Waitrose is that there is one
queue from which people are called forward to tills as they become free.
Hence I no longer pick the wrong queue to join.
What an excellent idea; more should do it. It'd obviously need some
rearrangement.

It's what many already have in place for the self-scan tills - at least,
in groups of about 6 such. On the whole, seems to work well.

(I use a collapsible crate for my shopping - much easier to put in the
car, carry to the kitchen, and so on. Trouble is, can't use self-scan
tills - partly its weight confuses them, though the member of staff can
usually override that, but mainly the space-to-put-your-bag isn't
usually big enough. [If in a hurry, main tills are busy, and I only have
a few items, I just self-scan onto the weighing area, and then move to
my crate afterwards, but that does defeat some of the intention of
self-scan.] Scan-as-you-go works, but I find the handheld scanners work
less well, plus I'm slightly afraid I'll - unintentionally! - trolley
something without scanning it.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Tact is the ability to describe others as they see themselves. -Abraham
Lincoln, 16th president of the U.S (1809-1865)
Penny
2020-10-24 17:51:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 24 Oct 2020 16:54:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I use a collapsible crate for my shopping - much easier to put in the
car, carry to the kitchen, and so on. Trouble is, can't use self-scan
tills - partly its weight confuses them, though the member of staff can
usually override that, but mainly the space-to-put-your-bag isn't
usually big enough.
I use a crate too and Morrisons has had two self-scan points with big
'weighing platforms' next to them for some years now which makes life
easier in that respect - they don't bleep for a bag check..

When Lidl introduced small trolleys (still a bit too deep to my mind) I was
disappointed to find the folding crate (probably bought from Lidl) didn't
fit at the back of the new trolleys.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-24 21:31:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Sat, 24 Oct 2020 16:54:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
[]
Post by Penny
I use a crate too and Morrisons has had two self-scan points with big
'weighing platforms' next to them for some years now which makes life
easier in that respect - they don't bleep for a bag check..
I'll have to look next time I go. (Unfortunately, there isn't a
Morrisons in Ashford, so I have to go a bit further - Canterbury for
example. I still do, sometimes - I like Morrisons, and the trip's a nice
drive out if the weather's reasonable.)
Post by Penny
When Lidl introduced small trolleys (still a bit too deep to my mind) I was
disappointed to find the folding crate (probably bought from Lidl) didn't
fit at the back of the new trolleys.
My crates (actually bought from a market trader - he wasn't selling them
as such, just using them to display his wares! But I asked him if he
knew where I could get some, and he sold me a couple. They're wider,
shallower, and in particular stronger than the normal collapsible ones
sold by various places) won't fit in Lidl's smaller trolleys either.
They will fit in the Sainsbury's smaller ones - which are also high, so
I need less bending. I think ditto Tesco.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If something works, thank an engineer. (Reported seen on a bumper sticker.)
Steve Hague
2020-10-25 09:01:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Sat, 24 Oct 2020 16:54:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I use a collapsible crate for my shopping - much easier to put in the
car, carry to the kitchen, and so on. Trouble is, can't use self-scan
tills - partly its weight confuses them, though the member of staff can
usually override that, but mainly the space-to-put-your-bag isn't
usually big enough.
I use a crate too and Morrisons has had two self-scan points with big
'weighing platforms' next to them for some years now which makes life
easier in that respect - they don't bleep for a bag check..
When Lidl introduced small trolleys (still a bit too deep to my mind) I was
disappointed to find the folding crate (probably bought from Lidl) didn't
fit at the back of the new trolleys.
I stopped using Lidl except very occasionally (they do our cats
favourite kibble type food, and their Magnum type ice creams are
excellent) because of those trolley/basket abominations. We have Aldi,
Tesco and Morrisons all within a five minute drive, not to mention
Iceland and Farm Foods both easily to reach, so it's not like we don't
have plenty of choice.
Steve
Penny
2020-10-25 18:03:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 25 Oct 2020 09:01:36 +0000, Steve Hague <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
I stopped using Lidl except very occasionally (they do our cats
favourite kibble type food, and their Magnum type ice creams are
excellent) because of those trolley/basket abominations. We have Aldi,
Tesco and Morrisons all within a five minute drive, not to mention
Iceland and Farm Foods both easily to reach, so it's not like we don't
have plenty of choice.
Oh I don't use the back-breaking trolley baskets, I'm talking about the
small trolleys which came in a couple of years ago. Lidl is the only
supermarket in town who still want a deposit £1 (or a token - fortunately
my old one fits) - I've never seen a shopping trolley in the river here but
maybe the nearby high school kids are not to be trusted with trolleys.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Penny
2020-10-24 17:44:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 24 Oct 2020 13:47:22 GMT, Jim Easterbrook <***@jim-easterbrook.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
One of the distancing measures at my local Waitrose is that there is one
queue from which people are called forward to tills as they become free.
Hence I no longer pick the wrong queue to join.
They did that for a while at our Morrisons but on my last visit it had gone
away. Mined ewe, I've never seen a queue as long as three people in there -
they call folk back early from their break* if it looks like happening.

* which seems very unfair
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2020-10-24 19:23:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Steve Hague
Same here. Our Aldi is a very civilised place to shop, convivial staff
and no muzak. I do get a sinking feeling though when I hear "Manager
at till three.
Steve
Try again - reinstalling my software seems to have messed up my settings.
One of the distancing measures at my local Waitrose is that there is one
queue from which people are called forward to tills as they become free.
Hence I no longer pick the wrong queue to join.
Mention of "Waitrose" and "social distancing" reminded me of Alan
Coren's comment about Sainsbury.

"I like Sainsburys. It keeps the riff-raff out of Waitrose."
--
Sam Plusnet
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-24 21:36:47 UTC
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On Sat, 24 Oct 2020 at 20:23:30, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> wrote:
[]
Post by Sam Plusnet
Mention of "Waitrose" and "social distancing" reminded me of Alan
Coren's comment about Sainsbury.
"I like Sainsburys. It keeps the riff-raff out of Waitrose."
And reminds me (sorry if it was in UMRA that I saw it!) of the limits
when they brought in rationing in the early days of lock-down:

Tesco/Sainsburys/ASDA: one pack of loo roll, two loaves.

Waitrose: one pack of Cushelle, two baguettes, one pot foie gras.

Lidl/Aldi: pack of loo roll, two loaves, one cordless drill, one wetsuit
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If something works, thank an engineer. (Reported seen on a bumper sticker.)
Sid Nuncius
2020-10-25 07:53:46 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Tesco/Sainsburys/ASDA: one pack of loo roll, two loaves.
The lockdown version of "Shave and a haircut - two bits"?
--
Sid
(Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2020-10-25 16:46:06 UTC
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Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Tesco/Sainsburys/ASDA: one pack of loo roll, two loaves.
The lockdown version of "Shave and a haircut - two bits"?
(-:! Didn't realise it fitted that rhythm. (Or "fit", but that makes the
sentence "feel" wrong.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

But this can only happen if we replace the urge to blame with the urge to
learn so that it is safe for staff to admit errors and raise concerns without
the fear of being punished.
- Former MI5 boss Eliza Manningham-Buller, RT 2016/5/7-13
Steve Hague
2020-10-25 08:54:05 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Steve Hague
Same here. Our Aldi is a very civilised place to shop, convivial staff
and no muzak. I do get a sinking feeling though when I hear "Manager
required at till three" when there are a couple of people in front of me
at till three.
Steve
Try again - reinstalling my software seems to have messed up my settings.
One of the distancing measures at my local Waitrose is that there is one
queue from which people are called forward to tills as they become free.
Hence I no longer pick the wrong queue to join.
That's the same method as was used in our local Morrison's, although
they seem to have discontinued it now, at least when I go there, which
is just after they open in the morning.
Steve
Mike
2020-10-22 21:21:19 UTC
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Post by Penny
Am I alone in being thoroughly fed up with 'live' interviews, not just on
the news but on other programmes such as Woman's hour where the 'phone
call' or whatever from the interviewee is constantly dropping out or being
obscured by odd noises?
Why on earth can't they record these interviews before the programme and
clean them up before broadcast? I don't believe the immediacy of
broadcasting it 'live' is worth the often very poor and frustrating result.
LW x 1000000!
--
Toodle Pip
Jim Easterbrook
2020-10-24 13:37:55 UTC
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Post by Steve Hague
Same here. Our Aldi is a very civilised place to shop, convivial staff
and no muzak. I do get a sinking feeling though when I hear "Manager
required at till three" when there are a couple of people in front of me
at till three.
One of the distancing measures at my local Waitrose is that there is one
queue from which people are called forward to tills as they become free.
Hence I no longer pick the wrong queue to join.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
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