Discussion:
OT: Something for the weekend.
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Nick Odell
2019-11-02 18:05:58 UTC
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Has this ever happened to you? The cap for your tube of Pringles got
stuck inside another cap. If this has happened to you and it won't
cause a return of the PTSD from the original event, could you please
tell me what the product was?

Well, yes, of course I have a reason for the question. I own some
quite expensive film cameras which I only own because they stopped
being expensive because they were film cameras. Unfortunately nobody
told the accessory manufacturers and useful bits and bobs are still
priced sky high.

Quite by chance I discovered that the lid from a Nutella jar is a
perfect fit replacement for the cap that fits on the back of the lens:
so perfect that even the screw threads work. If you eat Nutella the
lens cap is effectively free: even if you are going to chuck the
chocolate hazelnut spread in the bin it's only going to cost £2.39.

I don't need a front lens cap - you can get them two-a-penny from
China (and sometimes they really are two a penny - have you seen eBay
recently?) but what I'm looking for is something to use as a body cap
to cover up the hole where the lens goes.

The lid from Birds Custard almost works. The ring around the top where
you put your fingers to prise it off the drum would be a perfect fit
if it were not for the extra bulk around the outside that gets in the
way of the controls on the front. The plastic caps from some varieties
of yogurt and cream will fit but they are so flimsy they offer no
protection at all.

What I'm looking for is an ordinary domestic product which has a
plastic cap like a Pringles or a Bisto gravy granules tub. The
external diameter of a Pringles top is exactly the internal diameter I
am looking for so anything that a Pringles top would get stuck in
would work - and yes, I do go around supermarkets with a Pringles top
in my pocket.

I know, I know, I should just bite the bullet and pay the asking price
but having struck lucky once....



All suggestions gratefully received.

Thanks,

Nick
Penny
2019-11-02 19:30:32 UTC
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On Sat, 02 Nov 2019 18:05:58 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
What I'm looking for is an ordinary domestic product which has a
plastic cap like a Pringles or a Bisto gravy granules tub. The
external diameter of a Pringles top is exactly the internal diameter I
am looking for so anything that a Pringles top would get stuck in
would work - and yes, I do go around supermarkets with a Pringles top
in my pocket.
I possess a lid stash (although it's shrunk a bit since I used some of the
metal ones as giant 'washers' when fixing some foam insulation board in the
eaves cupboards). However, I am not now, nor have I ever been, a consumer
of Pringles. Please supply the actual measurement of the diameter you
require and I'll take a look.

If you don't own suitable calipers you could try drawing around the
Pringles lid, cutting out the circle within the line, folding it in half
and measuring the straight edge.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Nick Odell
2019-11-07 12:05:05 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Sat, 02 Nov 2019 18:05:58 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
What I'm looking for is an ordinary domestic product which has a
plastic cap like a Pringles or a Bisto gravy granules tub. The
external diameter of a Pringles top is exactly the internal diameter I
am looking for so anything that a Pringles top would get stuck in
would work - and yes, I do go around supermarkets with a Pringles top
in my pocket.
(Sorry: I'm late back to the proceedings. Blame it on the event that
nearly had me named Guy seventy years ago, if you like.)
Post by Penny
I possess a lid stash (although it's shrunk a bit since I used some of the
metal ones as giant 'washers' when fixing some foam insulation board in the
eaves cupboards). However, I am not now, nor have I ever been, a consumer
of Pringles. Please supply the actual measurement of the diameter you
require and I'll take a look.
The external diameter of the Pringles lid and hence the internal
diameter of the lid I am looking for is 80.0mm. Thanks for looking!

I'm not a Pringles consumer either but I "acquire" lids from time to
time. They are a convenient substitute for covering "Bonne Maman" jars
when the original lids have gone astray.
Post by Penny
If you don't own suitable calipers you could try drawing around the
Pringles lid, cutting out the circle within the line, folding it in half
and measuring the straight edge.
<splutter> If I don't own suitable calipers </splutter>
I think you might be mistaking me for someone who hasn't been a
musical instrument maker all their life and who doesn't as a
consequence have a shed-load of measuring equipment.

Nick
Penny
2019-11-07 13:11:55 UTC
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On Thu, 07 Nov 2019 12:05:05 +0000, Nick Odell
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
On Sat, 02 Nov 2019 18:05:58 +0000, Nick Odell
The external diameter of the Pringles lid and hence the internal
diameter of the lid I am looking for is 80.0mm. Thanks for looking!
Actually looking will have to wait until tomorrow - I'll try not to forget
<writes note on back of envelope>.
Post by Nick Odell
Post by Penny
If you don't own suitable calipers you could try drawing around the
Pringles lid, cutting out the circle within the line, folding it in half
and measuring the straight edge.
<splutter> If I don't own suitable calipers </splutter>
I think you might be mistaking me for someone who hasn't been a
musical instrument maker all their life and who doesn't as a
consequence have a shed-load of measuring equipment.
Apologies - yes I know what you do. In my defence, I did say "If you
don't..."; in my own case it would have been "If you can't find..." (many
different calipers exist somewhere on my premises) but I can always lay my
hands on a piece of paper, often the back of a used envelope (to fit in
with the recycling theme).

With my 'customer service' hat on, it is always tricky to figure out what
sort of idiot^W^W^W^W how much the customer knows or understands when
responding to a query.
I won't go into my thoughts upon the male customer who won't believe what I
say because I am not male...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Penny
2019-11-08 09:01:18 UTC
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On Thu, 7 Nov 2019 19:17:35 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
I won't go into my thoughts upon the male customer who won't believe what I
say because I am not male...
Well, don't worry your pretty little head about it, my dear.[1]
[1]Footnote in case the irony smiley doesn't show in some newsreaders.
:)
I have considered changing my name to Sam or Chris. I could just stop
signing my emails but I once had a complaint about that.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-11-08 09:10:26 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Thu, 7 Nov 2019 19:17:35 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
I won't go into my thoughts upon the male customer who won't believe what I
say because I am not male...
Well, don't worry your pretty little head about it, my dear.[1]
[1]Footnote in case the irony smiley doesn't show in some newsreaders.
:)
I have considered changing my name to Sam or Chris. I could just stop
signing my emails but I once had a complaint about that.
Saving Pennys were you?
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Leverton
2019-11-08 09:37:08 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by Penny
On Thu, 7 Nov 2019 19:17:35 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
I won't go into my thoughts upon the male customer who won't believe what I
say because I am not male...
Well, don't worry your pretty little head about it, my dear.[1]
[1]Footnote in case the irony smiley doesn't show in some newsreaders.
:)
I have considered changing my name to Sam or Chris. I could just stop
signing my emails but I once had a complaint about that.
Saving Pennys were you?
Penny saved, tuppence gained ;)

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
krw
2019-11-08 13:05:53 UTC
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Post by Penny
I could just stop
signing my emails but I once had a complaint about that.
My last employer sent out about 150 letters a day to acknowledge receipt
of a watch (or similar) which had been sent for repair.

I always knew that I was dealing with a loony complainant when they
raised the subject of the letter being unsigned.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Sam Plusnet
2019-11-09 00:21:03 UTC
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Post by Penny
On Thu, 7 Nov 2019 19:17:35 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
I won't go into my thoughts upon the male customer who won't believe what I
say because I am not male...
Well, don't worry your pretty little head about it, my dear.[1]
[1]Footnote in case the irony smiley doesn't show in some newsreaders.
:)
I have considered changing my name to Sam or Chris. I could just stop
signing my emails but I once had a complaint about that.
Just sign as

"The Management"
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2019-11-09 07:39:53 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Penny
On Thu, 7 Nov 2019 19:17:35 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Penny
I won't go into my thoughts upon the male customer who won't believe what I
say because I am not male...
Well, don't worry your pretty little head about it, my dear.[1]
[1]Footnote in case the irony smiley doesn't show in some newsreaders.
:)
I have considered changing my name to Sam or Chris. I could just stop
signing my emails but I once had a complaint about that.
Just sign as
"The Management"
Or ‘The Big Cheese’.
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2019-11-08 09:05:40 UTC
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On 7 Nov 2019 14:43:28 GMT, Jim Easterbrook <***@jim-easterbrook.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
With my 'customer service' hat on, it is always tricky to figure out
what sort of idiot^W^W^W^W how much the customer knows or understands
when responding to a query.
I'm struggling with one of those at the moment. Someone who says one of
my bits of open source software is just what he needs, but he can't find
out how to install it. I emailed him a link to the installation
instructions. He replied that he can't find the installer. I replied that
the instructions link to the page you download it from, and include a
link to that page in my email. He replied with a screen grab of the right
page, but says he still can't find the installer. I replied that he needs
to scroll down a bit. Next instalment will be tomorrow as he's obviously
in a different time zone. This has taken four days so far.
Sympathy.
I once had a similar conversation on a public forum, it took about 6
exchanges before he finally said "Thank you, I've found it now."
Nobody else said a word.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-08 10:46:02 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
[]
Post by Penny
page, but says he still can't find the installer. I replied that he needs
to scroll down a bit. Next instalment will be tomorrow as he's obviously
in a different time zone. This has taken four days so far.
Sympathy.
I once had a similar conversation on a public forum, it took about 6
exchanges before he finally said "Thank you, I've found it now."
It's under these circumstances that I find TeamViewer invaluable. I use
the general form, and I get the remote person to run the QS version (I
tell them to get it direct:
https://download.teamviewer.com/download/TeamViewerQS.exe - since
navigating to it on the TeamViewer website isn't easy). Great for
(giving) support over the 'phone, not really practical via a
forum/newsgroup, though.

Skype also has a screen sharing function - you can see their screen, but
not actually manipulate their cursor. But that might be enough to tell
them "scroll down a bit [Pertwee]".

TeamViewer's very useful when I'm helping my blind friends, to whom
software, and especially web pages, "look" very different to how they
look to us (next time you're on a web page, try moving around it just by
pressing the tab key - you'll see it presents in a very odd order).
Post by Penny
Nobody else said a word.
No, I'm sure they didn't. Just enjoyed watching you suffer.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you to recognize a mistake when
you make it again. -Franklin P. Jones
Chris J Dixon
2019-11-08 09:58:59 UTC
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Post by Penny
I won't go into my thoughts upon the male customer who won't believe what I
say because I am not male...
Quite. About 30 years ago a female friend of mine was CFO for a
large brick firm, and found that the most frequent response was
along the lines of "Where is he?", assuming that she was simply
the PA to the CFO.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Kate B
2019-11-08 10:27:58 UTC
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Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by Penny
I won't go into my thoughts upon the male customer who won't believe what I
say because I am not male...
Quite. About 30 years ago a female friend of mine was CFO for a
large brick firm, and found that the most frequent response was
along the lines of "Where is he?", assuming that she was simply
the PA to the CFO.
Chris
Ooh don't get me started. In my directing career I often had male
assistants who without fail were always assumed to be the director. The
one time I had a female assistant, in Germany, the rest of the (male)
management did their best to rubbish the whole production, with the
honourable exception of the Intendant who had engaged me. The fact we
got the best reviews by far that season for our production did not go
down well with the dinosaurs.
--
Kate B
London
Jim Easterbrook
2019-11-15 08:27:49 UTC
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Post by Penny
With my 'customer service' hat on, it is always tricky to figure out
what sort of idiot^W^W^W^W how much the customer knows or understands
when responding to a query.
I'm struggling with one of those at the moment. Someone who says one of
my bits of open source software is just what he needs, but he can't find
out how to install it. I emailed him a link to the installation
instructions. He replied that he can't find the installer. I replied
that the instructions link to the page you download it from, and include
a link to that page in my email. He replied with a screen grab of the
right page, but says he still can't find the installer. I replied that
he needs to scroll down a bit. Next instalment will be tomorrow as he's
obviously in a different time zone. This has taken four days so far.
I was wrong. One week later and I've heard nothing from him. Obviously
he's given up, because if he'd succeeded I'd have had a "thank you for
all your help" message.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
John Ashby
2019-11-15 11:26:28 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Penny
With my 'customer service' hat on, it is always tricky to figure out
what sort of idiot^W^W^W^W how much the customer knows or understands
when responding to a query.
I'm struggling with one of those at the moment. Someone who says one of
my bits of open source software is just what he needs, but he can't find
out how to install it. I emailed him a link to the installation
instructions. He replied that he can't find the installer. I replied
that the instructions link to the page you download it from, and include
a link to that page in my email. He replied with a screen grab of the
right page, but says he still can't find the installer. I replied that
he needs to scroll down a bit. Next instalment will be tomorrow as he's
obviously in a different time zone. This has taken four days so far.
I was wrong. One week later and I've heard nothing from him. Obviously
he's given up, because if he'd succeeded I'd have had a "thank you for
all your help" message.
<snort>

john
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-15 18:44:34 UTC
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Post by Jim Easterbrook
I'm struggling with one of those at the moment. Someone who says one of
my bits of open source software is just what he needs, but he can't find
out how to install it. I emailed him a link to the installation
instructions. He replied that he can't find the installer. I replied
that the instructions link to the page you download it from, and include
a link to that page in my email. He replied with a screen grab of the
right page, but says he still can't find the installer. I replied that
he needs to scroll down a bit. Next instalment will be tomorrow as he's
obviously in a different time zone. This has taken four days so far.
I was wrong. One week later and I've heard nothing from him. Obviously
he's given up, because if he'd succeeded I'd have had a "thank you for
all your help" message.
I always try to ring back or email to thank people who have helped me to
sort out a problem - generally admin/delivery etc for online orders,
sorting out medical admin, difficulties with utilities and that kind of
thing. They almost often express both pleasure and surprise that I
should have done so. I'm sad that it should be so rare that anyone
thinks to do this; to me it's just decent behaviour. We'd all thank
someone for their help if we were conversing face to face, wouldn't we?
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-16 03:22:56 UTC
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In message <***@mid.individual.net>, Sid Nuncius
<***@hotmail.co.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
I always try to ring back or email to thank people who have helped me
to sort out a problem - generally admin/delivery etc for online orders,
sorting out medical admin, difficulties with utilities and that kind of
thing. They almost often express both pleasure and surprise that I
should have done so. I'm sad that it should be so rare that anyone
thinks to do this; to me it's just decent behaviour. We'd all thank
someone for their help if we were conversing face to face, wouldn't we?
Agreed. I usually say thank you when getting off a bus, too.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

What's really worth knowing is for the most part unlearnable until you have
enough experience to even recognise it as knowledge, let alone as useful
knowledge. - Wolf K <***@sympatico.ca>, in alt.windows7.general, 2017-4-30
Mike
2019-11-16 08:00:49 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
I always try to ring back or email to thank people who have helped me
to sort out a problem - generally admin/delivery etc for online orders,
sorting out medical admin, difficulties with utilities and that kind of
thing. They almost often express both pleasure and surprise that I
should have done so. I'm sad that it should be so rare that anyone
thinks to do this; to me it's just decent behaviour. We'd all thank
someone for their help if we were conversing face to face, wouldn't we?
Agreed. I usually say thank you when getting off a bus, too.
We know many of our local bus drivers and always have a greeting with them
and a ‘bye for now’ as we get off; many of them know where we would like
them to stop for us as our road is ‘hail & ride’.:-)))
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2019-11-16 17:16:15 UTC
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Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
I always try to ring back or email to thank people who have helped me
to sort out a problem - generally admin/delivery etc for online orders,
sorting out medical admin, difficulties with utilities and that kind of
thing. They almost often express both pleasure and surprise that I
should have done so. I'm sad that it should be so rare that anyone
thinks to do this; to me it's just decent behaviour. We'd all thank
someone for their help if we were conversing face to face, wouldn't we?
Agreed. I usually say thank you when getting off a bus, too.
We know many of our local bus drivers and always have a greeting with them
and a ‘bye for now’ as we get off; many of them know where we would like
them to stop for us as our road is ‘hail & ride’.:-)))
And when we catch the single decker (should be a pink bus, rather than our
orange, and very different stops), its not unknown for them to check we’re
on the right one!

Simcerely Chris
krw
2019-11-26 14:37:39 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I usually say thank you when getting off a bus, too.
I don't remember that happening but over the last year I have spent time
travelling on buses in Guildford and notice that it is now common (and I
join in as well). When did it start? Does it apply in that there London?
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
BrritSki
2019-11-26 14:44:02 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I usually say thank you when getting off a bus, too.
I don't remember that happening but over the last year I have spent time
travelling on buses in Guildford and notice that it is now common (and I
join in as well).  When did it start?  Does it apply in that there London?
It does if it's me or waife travelling.

Of course in the old days when you jumped off the open platform whenever
you felt like it, there was not much opportunity to say anything to the
driver, or probably to the conductor either :)
krw
2019-11-26 15:00:08 UTC
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Post by BrritSki
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I usually say thank you when getting off a bus, too.
I don't remember that happening but over the last year I have spent
time travelling on buses in Guildford and notice that it is now common
(and I join in as well).  When did it start?  Does it apply in that
there London?
It does if it's me or waife travelling.
Of course in the old days when you jumped off the open platform whenever
you felt like it, there was not much opportunity to say anything to the
driver, or probably to the conductor either  :)
The driver was in a separate box up front.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Nick Odell
2019-11-26 18:48:04 UTC
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On Tue, 26 Nov 2019 14:44:02 +0000, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I usually say thank you when getting off a bus, too.
I don't remember that happening but over the last year I have spent time
travelling on buses in Guildford and notice that it is now common (and I
join in as well).  When did it start?  Does it apply in that there London?
It does if it's me or waife travelling.
It's more tricky in that London because the exits in the bendy-bus or
Boris bus (Am I allowed to call it a Boris bus in the run-up to an
election?) are away from the front but I usually call out a general
"Thank you" on the way out. And always find a few wordsto say to the
driver up here in t'north where all the buses I use have exits at the
front.
Post by BrritSki
Of course in the old days when you jumped off the open platform whenever
you felt like it, there was not much opportunity to say anything to the
driver, or probably to the conductor either :)
I try to do the same overseas, getting on and getting off. I usually
preface my request to the driver for a destination with a "Buen Dia"
(Argentines are the fabled Scotsmen(apols Anne) or Yorkshiremen(apols
Fenny) of South America and only give out Buenos Dias one at a time)
and holler out a "Gracias!" when I get off.

Nick
John Finlay
2019-11-26 15:09:14 UTC
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Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I usually say thank you when getting off a bus, too.
I don't remember that happening but over the last year I have spent time
travelling on buses in Guildford and notice that it is now common (and I
join in as well).  When did it start?  Does it apply in that there London?
Been doing it in Leicester as long as I can remember but this assumes
you pass the driver on the way out. Lunnon buses have multiple doors.
Anne B
2019-11-26 19:16:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I usually say thank you when getting off a bus, too.
I don't remember that happening but over the last year I have spent time
travelling on buses in Guildford and notice that it is now common (and I
join in as well).  When did it start?  Does it apply in that there London?
Dunno, but I've been doing it for years.

Anne B
Penny
2019-11-26 22:16:08 UTC
Reply
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On Tue, 26 Nov 2019 19:16:35 +0000, Anne B <***@btinternet.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Anne B
Post by krw
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I usually say thank you when getting off a bus, too.
I don't remember that happening but over the last year I have spent time
travelling on buses in Guildford and notice that it is now common (and I
join in as well).  When did it start?  Does it apply in that there London?
Dunno, but I've been doing it for years.
What baffles me a bit is shop staff apparently expecting me to greet them
when I enter and say thank you when I leave a shop without buying anything.
I'm not sure what I'm thanking them for.

But I'm probably just a grumpy old woman who can't be bothered with small
talk much of the time.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sam Plusnet
2019-11-07 22:31:55 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
<splutter> If I don't own suitable calipers </splutter>
I think you might be mistaking me for someone who hasn't been a
musical instrument maker all their life and who doesn't as a
consequence have a shed-load of measuring equipment.
Bang goes my romantic image of it all being done by eye and decades of
experience.
I bet none of those Stradivari lads had a micrometer.
--
Sam Plusnet
Nick Leverton
2019-11-08 09:38:46 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
<splutter> If I don't own suitable calipers </splutter>
I think you might be mistaking me for someone who hasn't been a
musical instrument maker all their life and who doesn't as a
consequence have a shed-load of measuring equipment.
Bang goes my romantic image of it all being done by eye and decades of
experience.
I bet none of those Stradivari lads had a micrometer.
I'd be surprised too if they knew how to tune a 3/8" Gripley ...

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-08 09:55:45 UTC
Reply
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Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
<splutter> If I don't own suitable calipers </splutter>
I think you might be mistaking me for someone who hasn't been a
musical instrument maker all their life and who doesn't as a
consequence have a shed-load of measuring equipment.
Bang goes my romantic image of it all being done by eye and decades of
experience.
I bet none of those Stradivari lads had a micrometer.
I'd be surprised too if they knew how to tune a 3/8" Gripley ...
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate. Good job, really, because getting a
properly bevelled Gripley in 17th-Century Cremona can't have been easy.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Nick Leverton
2019-11-08 10:20:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
<splutter> If I don't own suitable calipers </splutter>
I think you might be mistaking me for someone who hasn't been a
musical instrument maker all their life and who doesn't as a
consequence have a shed-load of measuring equipment.
Bang goes my romantic image of it all being done by eye and decades of
experience.
I bet none of those Stradivari lads had a micrometer.
I'd be surprised too if they knew how to tune a 3/8" Gripley ...
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate. Good job, really, because getting a
properly bevelled Gripley in 17th-Century Cremona can't have been easy.
I suppose so, now you mention it. Just as Leonardo's intriguing sketches
of the Antagonistic Undecagonstring wouldn't become reality for another
few millenia, until bio-engineering caught up ...

Nick
--
"The Internet, a sort of ersatz counterfeit of real life"
-- Janet Street-Porter, BBC2, 19th March 1996
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-08 10:38:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <***@mid.individual.net>, Sid Nuncius
<***@hotmail.co.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate. Good job, really, because getting a
properly bevelled Gripley in 17th-Century Cremona can't have been easy.
Whenever I hear mention of Cremona, certainly in the musical-instrument
context, I am reminded of what Richard Stilgoe gave as the explanation
of what CELLO stands for.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you to recognize a mistake when
you make it again. -Franklin P. Jones
Penny
2019-11-08 11:38:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 10:38:31 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate. Good job, really, because getting a
properly bevelled Gripley in 17th-Century Cremona can't have been easy.
Whenever I hear mention of Cremona, certainly in the musical-instrument
context, I am reminded of what Richard Stilgoe gave as the explanation
of what CELLO stands for.
For the benefit of otherrats who wondered...
<http://www.richardstilgoe.com/poems/Birth%20of%20the%20Cello,%20The.pdf>
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sally Thompson
2019-11-08 14:41:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 10:38:31 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate. Good job, really, because getting a
properly bevelled Gripley in 17th-Century Cremona can't have been easy.
Whenever I hear mention of Cremona, certainly in the musical-instrument
context, I am reminded of what Richard Stilgoe gave as the explanation
of what CELLO stands for.
For the benefit of otherrats who wondered...
<http://www.richardstilgoe.com/poems/Birth%20of%20the%20Cello,%20The.pdf>
I didn't know that one. Brilliant!
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-08 15:05:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 10:38:31 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate. Good job, really, because getting a
properly bevelled Gripley in 17th-Century Cremona can't have been easy.
Whenever I hear mention of Cremona, certainly in the musical-instrument
context, I am reminded of what Richard Stilgoe gave as the explanation
of what CELLO stands for.
For the benefit of otherrats who wondered...
<http://www.richardstilgoe.com/poems/Birth%20of%20the%20Cello,%20The.pdf>
I have it as part of an episode of "Stilgoe's Around", presented in
Christie's auction rooms; I'd put it in temp, or say email me, but I'm
wary of the copyright situation (-:.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

At the end of the day, I wasn't asking to kill the pandas, I was simply asking
for an audit in terms of conservation resources, and I stand by every word.
-Chris Packham, quoted in Radio Times, 29 May - 4 June 2010
Penny
2019-11-08 16:55:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 15:05:43 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 10:38:31 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate. Good job, really, because getting a
properly bevelled Gripley in 17th-Century Cremona can't have been easy.
Whenever I hear mention of Cremona, certainly in the musical-instrument
context, I am reminded of what Richard Stilgoe gave as the explanation
of what CELLO stands for.
For the benefit of otherrats who wondered...
<http://www.richardstilgoe.com/poems/Birth%20of%20the%20Cello,%20The.pdf>
I have it as part of an episode of "Stilgoe's Around", presented in
Christie's auction rooms; I'd put it in temp, or say email me, but I'm
wary of the copyright situation (-:.
It's freely available from that website, I didn't check the details which
may exist on <http://www.richardstilgoe.com/poems/>
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-08 17:51:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 15:05:43 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 10:38:31 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate. Good job, really, because getting a
properly bevelled Gripley in 17th-Century Cremona can't have been easy.
Whenever I hear mention of Cremona, certainly in the musical-instrument
context, I am reminded of what Richard Stilgoe gave as the explanation
of what CELLO stands for.
For the benefit of otherrats who wondered...
<http://www.richardstilgoe.com/poems/Birth%20of%20the%20Cello,%20The.pdf>
I have it as part of an episode of "Stilgoe's Around", presented in
Christie's auction rooms; I'd put it in temp, or say email me, but I'm
wary of the copyright situation (-:.
It's freely available from that website, I didn't check the details which
may exist on <http://www.richardstilgoe.com/poems/>
I meant I have him delivering it, as audio. IIRR, recorded from the
radio.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I used to dream of the day when linux was as stable as windows. Never did I
imagine that parity would be achieved by windows declining into the chaos that
engulfs and stifles linux.
- mike <***@netzero.net> in alt.windows7.general, 2018-4-1
BrritSki
2019-11-08 11:41:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate.  Good job, really, because getting a
properly bevelled Gripley in 17th-Century Cremona can't have been easy.
Whenever I hear mention of Cremona, certainly in the musical-instrument
context, I am reminded of what Richard Stilgoe gave as the explanation
of what CELLO stands for.
Mmmm, limoncello, cherrycello, lamponecello, limecello, aranciello...
Jim Easterbrook
2019-11-09 08:31:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate. Good job, really, because getting a
properly bevelled Gripley in 17th-Century Cremona can't have been easy.
Whenever I hear mention of Cremona, certainly in the musical-instrument
context, I am reminded of what Richard Stilgoe gave as the explanation
of what CELLO stands for.
I was amused by this portrait of Richard Stilgoe on the wall of a hotel
in France I stayed in last year.
https://flic.kr/p/26mhkGQ
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
BrritSki
2019-11-08 11:39:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
<splutter> If I don't own suitable calipers </splutter>
I think you might be mistaking me for someone who hasn't been a
musical instrument maker all their life and who doesn't as a
consequence have a shed-load of measuring equipment.
Bang goes my romantic image of it all being done by eye and decades of
experience.
I bet none of those Stradivari lads had a micrometer.
I'd be surprised too if they knew how to tune a 3/8" Gripley ...
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate.  Good job, really, because getting a
properly bevelled Gripley in 17th-Century Cremona can't have been easy.
Mmmm, Cremona Rice Pudding :)
Nick Odell
2019-11-08 13:09:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 11:39:22 +0000, BrritSki
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Nick Leverton
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Nick Odell
<splutter> If I don't own suitable calipers </splutter>
I think you might be mistaking me for someone who hasn't been a
musical instrument maker all their life and who doesn't as a
consequence have a shed-load of measuring equipment.
Bang goes my romantic image of it all being done by eye and decades of
experience.
I bet none of those Stradivari lads had a micrometer.
I'd be surprised too if they knew how to tune a 3/8" Gripley ...
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate.  Good job, really, because getting a
properly bevelled Gripley in 17th-Century Cremona can't have been easy.
Mmmm, Cremona Rice Pudding :)
I think it was called Cremola. It was delicious and I could never
understand how it could taste so delicious if, as it claimed on the
packet it was only rice.

I haven't seen it for years but I make a very acceptable substitute
by using ground corn meal (polenta) instead.

Nick
krw
2019-11-08 14:25:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
I think it was called Cremola. It was delicious and I could never
understand how it could taste so delicious if, as it claimed on the
packet it was only rice.
Loved the stuff. Suspect it had high sugar content and would not be
allowed these days.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Jenny M Benson
2019-11-08 14:11:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Mmmm, Cremona Rice Pudding :)
Does anyrat remember Creamola Foam?
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Penny
2019-11-08 16:54:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 14:11:41 +0000, Jenny M Benson <***@hotmail.co.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jenny M Benson
Mmmm, Cremona Rice Pudding :)
Does anyrat remember Creamola Foam?
I was about to mention that. I loved it!
To the extent that my mother ordered several packets to be collected from
the little grocery store in Salen, Argyle, on the way to our regular island
holiday in Loch Sunart. I was extremely disappointed when what we got was
Cremola Rice Pudding instead :(
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-08 19:15:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 14:11:41 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Mmmm, Cremona Rice Pudding :)
Does anyrat remember Creamola Foam?
Lemonade?
Penny
2019-11-09 00:00:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 08 Nov 2019 19:15:11 +0000, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 14:11:41 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Mmmm, Cremona Rice Pudding :)
Does anyrat remember Creamola Foam?
Lemonade?
It was a powdered fizzy drink - just add to water. My favourite flavour was
red ;)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2019-11-09 07:39:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 14:11:41 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Mmmm, Cremona Rice Pudding :)
Does anyrat remember Creamola Foam?
Lemonade?
It was a powdered fizzy drink - just add to water. My favourite flavour was
red ;)
Eiffel for that too.
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2019-11-09 12:54:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Penny
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 14:11:41 +0000, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Mmmm, Cremona Rice Pudding :)
Does anyrat remember Creamola Foam?
Lemonade?
It was a powdered fizzy drink - just add to water. My favourite flavour was
red ;)
Even I was allowed that in a summer holiday! Granny didn’t generally buy
me things so I assume my cousins were having it when they visited.

Another sumner it was drinking cold milk through a straw through which a
cardboard strip ran infused with strawberry or chocolate. One was
*allowed* to blow Bubbles as that was how to flavour the milk thoroughly!

Sincerely Chris

Sincerely Chris
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-08 19:19:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Mmmm, Cremona Rice Pudding :)
Does anyrat remember Creamola Foam?
Yep. Their second album was rubbish.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Sam Plusnet
2019-11-09 00:26:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Mmmm, Cremona Rice Pudding :)
Does anyrat remember Creamola Foam?
Yep.  Their second album was rubbish.
Trust you to burst Jenny's bubble(s).
--
Sam Plusnet
Mike
2019-11-09 07:37:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Jenny M Benson
Mmmm, Cremona Rice Pudding :)
Does anyrat remember Creamola Foam?
Yep. Their second album was rubbish.
Ah but, their third was real Ambrosia!
--
Toodle Pip
Anne B
2019-11-23 23:05:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Mmmm, Cremona Rice Pudding :)
Does anyrat remember Creamola Foam >
But of course.

Anne B
steveski
2019-11-09 01:45:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Nick Leverton
I'd be surprised too if they knew how to tune a 3/8" Gripley ...
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate.
With, obviously, disastrous results . . .
--
Steveski
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-09 06:47:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steveski
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Nick Leverton
I'd be surprised too if they knew how to tune a 3/8" Gripley ...
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate.
With, obviously, disastrous results . . .
All this apparently lighthearted badinage does have consequences, you
know. I'm now compelled to read Reaper Man for (I think) the fourth
time. And I can see Soul Music following that, too.[1] See what you've
done?

[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has been
setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time. The man was a genius. A
slightly variable genius, but a genius nonetheless - and I owe my
discovery of him to umra. Thanks chums. (And for Patrick O'Brian, now
I come to think of it.)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-09 07:50:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message <***@mid.individual.net>, Sid Nuncius
<***@hotmail.co.uk> writes:
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
All this apparently lighthearted badinage does have consequences, you
know. I'm now compelled to read Reaper Man for (I think) the fourth
time. And I can see Soul Music following that, too.[1] See what
you've done?
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has been
setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time. The man was a genius. A
slightly variable genius, but a genius nonetheless - and I owe my
discovery of him to umra. Thanks chums. (And for Patrick O'Brian, now
I come to think of it.)
I do love a well-set-up line - the more tortuous and implausible, the
better; it has the same feel as a good (i. e. really awful) pun. There
was an episode of "Brass" (now, _there's_ a TV series that could bear
repeating!), which managed to contrive the line "Sergeant Pepper's
Lonely Hearts Club Band" into the dialogue perfectly plausibly. I think
it was the same episode which used (ITIW) Noel Coward's line "it's
amazing how effective cheap music is" in a way different to the master.
(Actually, I think "Brass" used a lot of clever stuff like that, rather
than just that one episode.)

And it had Red Agnes ... (-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Can you open your mind without it falling out?
Mike
2019-11-09 08:08:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
All this apparently lighthearted badinage does have consequences, you
know. I'm now compelled to read Reaper Man for (I think) the fourth
time. And I can see Soul Music following that, too.[1] See what
you've done?
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has been
setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time. The man was a genius. A
slightly variable genius, but a genius nonetheless - and I owe my
discovery of him to umra. Thanks chums. (And for Patrick O'Brian, now
I come to think of it.)
I do love a well-set-up line - the more tortuous and implausible, the
better; it has the same feel as a good (i. e. really awful) pun. There
was an episode of "Brass" (now, _there's_ a TV series that could bear
repeating!), which managed to contrive the line "Sergeant Pepper's
Lonely Hearts Club Band" into the dialogue perfectly plausibly. I think
it was the same episode which used (ITIW) Noel Coward's line "it's
amazing how effective cheap music is" in a way different to the master.
(Actually, I think "Brass" used a lot of clever stuff like that, rather
than just that one episode.)
In ISIRTA (I think it was) they contrived to come out with ‘The mills are
alive with the hounds of Munich’ in one programme.
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-09 08:28:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has been
setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time. The man was a genius. A
[]
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I do love a well-set-up line - the more tortuous and implausible, the
better; it has the same feel as a good (i. e. really awful) pun. There
was an episode of "Brass" (now, _there's_ a TV series that could bear
[]
(I've just been YouTube diving; sadly, there are only six short clips.
Though convey the flavour - oh, those double-entendres!)
Post by Mike
In ISIRTA (I think it was) they contrived to come out with ‘The mills are
alive with the hounds of Munich’ in one programme.
I think it might have been "My Word". I have a little book of them - the
ones I remember are a sailor's anguish that his beloved married someone
else: "Carmen! Toothy Gordon - moored!", and the following shopping
list: "Soup, a cauli, 'fridge, elastic, eggs, pea, halitosis".
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Can you open your mind without it falling out?
Serena Blanchflower
2019-11-09 08:42:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has been
setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time.  The man was a genius.  A
[]
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I do love a well-set-up line - the more tortuous and implausible, the
better; it has the same feel as a good (i. e. really awful) pun. There
was an episode of "Brass" (now, _there's_ a TV series that could bear
[]
(I've just been YouTube diving; sadly, there are only six short clips.
Though convey the flavour - oh, those double-entendres!)
Post by Mike
In ISIRTA (I think it was) they contrived to come out with ‘The mills are
alive with the hounds of Munich’ in one programme.
I think it might have been "My Word". I have a little book of them - the
ones I remember are a sailor's anguish that his beloved married someone
else: "Carmen! Toothy Gordon - moored!", and the following shopping
list: "Soup, a cauli, 'fridge, elastic, eggs, pea, halitosis".
Yes, Frank Muir and Dennis Norden always ended "My Word" with a tale
which ended with something along those lines. Like you, I've got (or at
least, I used to have - I can't see it in my small collection of such
books) the book of them.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I must say I find television very educational. The minute somebody turns
it on, I go to the library and read a good book (Groucho Marx)
Mike
2019-11-09 11:04:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has been
setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time.  The man was a genius.  A
[]
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I do love a well-set-up line - the more tortuous and implausible, the
better; it has the same feel as a good (i. e. really awful) pun. There
was an episode of "Brass" (now, _there's_ a TV series that could bear
[]
(I've just been YouTube diving; sadly, there are only six short clips.
Though convey the flavour - oh, those double-entendres!)
Post by Mike
In ISIRTA (I think it was) they contrived to come out with ‘The mills are
alive with the hounds of Munich’ in one programme.
I think it might have been "My Word". I have a little book of them - the
ones I remember are a sailor's anguish that his beloved married someone
else: "Carmen! Toothy Gordon - moored!", and the following shopping
list: "Soup, a cauli, 'fridge, elastic, eggs, pea, halitosis".
Yes, Frank Muir and Dennis Norden always ended "My Word" with a tale
which ended with something along those lines. Like you, I've got (or at
least, I used to have - I can't see it in my small collection of such
books) the book of them.
One of them was challenged to include the words ‘Mrs. B White’ in a
song.....
‘May all your chris. ..Mrs. B White’ was the outcome.
--
Toodle Pip
Chris J Dixon
2019-11-10 08:44:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Yes, Frank Muir and Dennis Norden always ended "My Word" with a tale
which ended with something along those lines. Like you, I've got (or at
least, I used to have - I can't see it in my small collection of such
books) the book of them.
Amongst my favourites (crudely summarised):

1. His pet bee was wasting away until he bought a garden plot.

2. The polar dweller whose fishing craft caught fire when he
tried to keep warm with a paraffin stove.

3. The eastern potentate who wanted to ski. No water, so he
gathered his minions who undulated as he travelled along their
greased torsos on a large tray.

4. An aristo was being tortured for information. No joy, so they
decided to guillotine him. As the blade fell he cried OK, OK
I'll tell...THUNK
1. My bee eats because I'm a landowner.

2. You can't have your kayak and heat it.

3. Sliding a gong on the chest of a slave.

4. Don't hatchet your counts before they chicken.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk @ChrisJDixon1
Plant amazing Acers.
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-09 09:34:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
In ISIRTA (I think it was) they contrived to come out with ‘The mills are
alive with the hounds of Munich’ in one programme.
I think it might have been "My Word".
No - that one was definitely ISIRTA. As was, from the same musical, the
cry of the mouse-tusk sellers in the market: "Prime iv'ry mouse-tusks."
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Jenny M Benson
2019-11-09 10:00:51 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I think it might have been "My Word". I have a little book of them - the
ones I remember are a sailor's anguish that his beloved married someone
else: "Carmen! Toothy Gordon - moored!", and the following shopping
list: "Soup, a cauli, 'fridge, elastic, eggs, pea, halitosis".
My favourite was "Now is the time for Lord Goodman to come to the aid of
the potty."
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Mike
2019-11-09 11:00:58 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has been
setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time. The man was a genius. A
[]
Post by Mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I do love a well-set-up line - the more tortuous and implausible, the
better; it has the same feel as a good (i. e. really awful) pun. There
was an episode of "Brass" (now, _there's_ a TV series that could bear
[]
(I've just been YouTube diving; sadly, there are only six short clips.
Though convey the flavour - oh, those double-entendres!)
Post by Mike
In ISIRTA (I think it was) they contrived to come out with ‘The mills are
alive with the hounds of Munich’ in one programme.
I think it might have been "My Word". I have a little book of them - the
ones I remember are a sailor's anguish that his beloved married someone
else: "Carmen! Toothy Gordon - moored!", and the following shopping
list: "Soup, a cauli, 'fridge, elastic, eggs, pea, halitosis".
If you meant that the mills bit was from My Word, sorry but no, the words
were spoken by Bill Oddy.
--
Toodle Pip
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-09 09:38:05 UTC
Reply
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has been
setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time.
I do love a well-set-up line - the more tortuous and implausible, the
better;
This was neither. It was an oblique song reference (there are many in
Soul Music, all very good), the seeds of which had been planted and
gently nurtured throughout the book. I didn't see it coming at all, so
when it did, I was floored.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
steveski
2019-11-09 10:59:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has been
setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time.
I do love a well-set-up line - the more tortuous and implausible, the
better;
This was neither. It was an oblique song reference (there are many in
Soul Music, all very good), the seeds of which had been planted and
gently nurtured throughout the book. I didn't see it coming at all, so
when it did, I was floored.
I wrote to Alistair Reynolds about the most incredibly contrived Yes
lyric he managed to get into one of his 'Revelation Space' novels - he
appreciated that I laughed out loud when I got to it.
--
Steveski
Min
2019-11-09 21:54:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has been
setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time.
I do love a well-set-up line - the more tortuous and implausible, the
better;
This was neither. It was an oblique song reference (there are many in
Soul Music, all very good), the seeds of which had been planted and
gently nurtured throughout the book. I didn't see it coming at all, so
when it did, I was floored.
I only got it on the second reading...and while we're mentioning it,
RIP Kirsty...
--
Min (Who also missed the Deaf Leopard first time around...)
Min
2019-11-09 22:06:37 UTC
Reply
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Post by Min
Post by Sid Nuncius
This was neither. It was an oblique song reference (there are many in
Soul Music, all very good), the seeds of which had been planted and
gently nurtured throughout the book. I didn't see it coming at all, so
when it did, I was floored.
I only got it on the second reading...and while we're mentioning it,
RIP Kirsty...
--
Min (Who also missed the Deaf Leopard first time around...)
I met Gid (late of this parish) at the DW Convention in 2002 (IIRC - 2000
if I'm not) and I also remember sharing a taxi from the station with Doug
Faunt to the McTs and he had the first e-book reader I'd ever seen and we
were Deeply Impressed that it was packed with Pratchett, so one of us might
be responsible, Sid....I must admit that I am Very Jealous now if^^ when I
meet someone who is just starting their Pratchett journey...
--
Min (who absolutely adores the Johnny Maxwell trilogy...)
carolet
2019-11-10 18:42:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Min
Post by Min
Post by Sid Nuncius
This was neither. It was an oblique song reference (there are many in
Soul Music, all very good), the seeds of which had been planted and
gently nurtured throughout the book. I didn't see it coming at all, so
when it did, I was floored.
I only got it on the second reading...and while we're mentioning it,
RIP Kirsty...
--
Min (Who also missed the Deaf Leopard first time around...)
I met Gid (late of this parish) at the DW Convention in 2002 (IIRC - 2000
if I'm not) and I also remember sharing a taxi from the station with Doug
Faunt to the McTs and he had the first e-book reader I'd ever seen and we
were Deeply Impressed that it was packed with Pratchett, so one of us might
be responsible, Sid....I must admit that I am Very Jealous now if^^ when I
meet someone who is just starting their Pratchett journey...
I have just started reading them. They have long been sat on my book
shelf, my late husband having bought them all as they came out. My son
found them, when quite young, and read them too, but I didn't feel any
inclination to do so. Since I retired I have been reading more, and
started thinking that maybe I should give them a go. A few weeks ago I
took the plunge. Following one suggested reading order, I started with
the witches books. I am reading each one in just a few days, and am
already onto the sixth one. I'm wondering why I left it so long.
--
CaroleT
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-10 06:47:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Min
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has been
setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time.
I do love a well-set-up line - the more tortuous and implausible, the
better;
This was neither. It was an oblique song reference (there are many in
Soul Music, all very good), the seeds of which had been planted and
gently nurtured throughout the book. I didn't see it coming at all, so
when it did, I was floored.
I only got it on the second reading...and while we're mentioning it,
RIP Kirsty...
What - in those shoes? :o)

RIP, indeed. A true great, IMO. (And Electric Landlady is one of the
all-time great album titles, too. <chortle> )
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2019-11-09 09:44:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has been
setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time.  The man was a genius.
I am one of those few people who don;t get on with him at all.
A
Post by Sid Nuncius
slightly variable genius, but a genius nonetheless - and I owe my
discovery of him to umra.  Thanks chums.  (And for Patrick O'Brian, now
I come to think of it.)
Coo, the earliest mention of him I can find on umra was me in 2004, so
am I responsible ? Or did we both pick up on an earlier mention that
Google Gropes doesn't grok ?
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-09 09:52:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has
been setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time.  The man was a genius.
I am one of those few people who don;t get on with him at all.
 A
slightly variable genius, but a genius nonetheless - and I owe my
discovery of him to umra.  Thanks chums.  (And for Patrick O'Brian,
now I come to think of it.)
Coo, the earliest mention of him I can find on umra was me in 2004, so
am I responsible ?  Or did we both pick up on an earlier mention that
Google Gropes doesn't grok ?
Not sure. I just remember somerat or rats being enthusiastic about him,
so I got The Thirteen Gun Salute from the library because that's the one
they had handy. I then read to the end of the series (as it stood
then), went back to Master and Commander and read to the end of the
series again. Brilliant.

And fair enough about Pratchett. Nunciette couldn't get on with him,
either and I know quite a few others who don't. I can't be doing with
Rincewind at all, but the Watch, Death and Lu-Tze books especially I
think are wonderful, as are some of the stand-alone ones like Small
Gods. Chacun a son gout, eh?
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2019-11-09 10:27:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has
been setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time.  The man was a genius.
I am one of those few people who don;t get on with him at all.
  A
slightly variable genius, but a genius nonetheless - and I owe my
discovery of him to umra.  Thanks chums.  (And for Patrick O'Brian,
now I come to think of it.)
Coo, the earliest mention of him I can find on umra was me in 2004, so
am I responsible ?  Or did we both pick up on an earlier mention that
Google Gropes doesn't grok ?
Not sure.  I just remember somerat or rats being enthusiastic about him,
so I got The Thirteen Gun Salute from the library because that's the one
they had handy.  I then read to the end of the series (as it stood
then), went back to Master and Commander and read to the end of the
series again.  Brilliant.
It might have been a friend of mine from Frod. I started with book 1,
but it was only about 3 books in that I realised that Jack and Stephen
were winding each other up most of the time. I've now read them all 3
times and waife once. About time I started again.

The other author I owe to an umrat (although possibly not umra) is Robin
Hobb. I've read all the Fitz and associated books twice and will go back
to them again sometime.
And fair enough about Pratchett.  Nunciette couldn't get on with him,
either and I know quite a few others who don't.  I can't be doing with
Rincewind at all,
I think that was my mistake. Rincewind and the boodly luggage which I
found deepy unfunny and immensely irritating.
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-09 18:06:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
The other author I owe to an umrat (although possibly not umra) is Robin
Hobb. I've read all the Fitz and associated books twice and will go back
to them again sometime.
Thanks, MOPMB. Not a genre I normally go for, but I'll look into her
work. Are the ones you mention a good place to start?
Post by BrritSki
And fair enough about Pratchett.  Nunciette couldn't get on with him,
either and I know quite a few others who don't.  I can't be doing with
Rincewind at all,
I think that was my mistake. Rincewind and the boodly luggage which I
found deepy unfunny and immensely irritating.
<languid wave>

He may just not be your thing, but if you fancy giving Pratchett
another go you could try, say, Carpe Jugulum or Soul Music or Feet Of
Clay or Going Postal, all of which I think are v.good.

(His masterpiece, IMO, is Night Watch, but you do need to have read the
other Watch books first.)
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-09 21:41:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 9 Nov 2019 18:06:27 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by BrritSki
The other author I owe to an umrat (although possibly not umra) is Robin
Hobb. I've read all the Fitz and associated books twice and will go back
to them again sometime.
Thanks, MOPMB. Not a genre I normally go for, but I'll look into her
work. Are the ones you mention a good place to start?
Post by BrritSki
And fair enough about Pratchett.  Nunciette couldn't get on with him,
either and I know quite a few others who don't.  I can't be doing with
Rincewind at all,
I think that was my mistake. Rincewind and the boodly luggage which I
found deepy unfunny and immensely irritating.
<languid wave>
He may just not be your thing, but if you fancy giving Pratchett
another go you could try, say, Carpe Jugulum or Soul Music or Feet Of
Clay or Going Postal, all of which I think are v.good.
(His masterpiece, IMO, is Night Watch, but you do need to have read the
other Watch books first.)
To read the witches you should read Wee Free Men first and thenread in
order. Or you could begin with which is the first Witches? Not a
TIffany one.
Steve Hague
2019-11-09 17:59:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Sid Nuncius
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has
been setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time.  The man was a genius.
I am one of those few people who don;t get on with him at all.
  A
slightly variable genius, but a genius nonetheless - and I owe my
discovery of him to umra.  Thanks chums.  (And for Patrick O'Brian,
now I come to think of it.)
Coo, the earliest mention of him I can find on umra was me in 2004, so
am I responsible ?  Or did we both pick up on an earlier mention that
Google Gropes doesn't grok ?
Not sure.  I just remember somerat or rats being enthusiastic about him,
so I got The Thirteen Gun Salute from the library because that's the one
they had handy.  I then read to the end of the series (as it stood
then), went back to Master and Commander and read to the end of the
series again.  Brilliant.
And fair enough about Pratchett.  Nunciette couldn't get on with him,
either and I know quite a few others who don't.  I can't be doing with
Rincewind at all, but the Watch, Death and Lu-Tze books especially I
think are wonderful, as are some of the stand-alone ones like Small
Gods.  Chacun a son gout, eh?
Small Gods was possibly my favourite of his books, perhaps because it
worked on so many levels, not that others of his books didn't. I lent it
to someone and never got it back. My favourite character? Granny
Weatherwax I think.
Sid Nuncius
2019-11-09 18:23:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 09/11/2019 17:59, Steve Hague wrote:

<Pratchett>
Post by Steve Hague
Small Gods was possibly my favourite of his books, perhaps because it
worked on so many levels, not that others of his books didn't. I lent it
to someone and never got it back. My favourite character? Granny
Weatherwax I think.
I have been irredeemably in love with Sergeant Angua for years. Mind
you, I agree that Granny Weatherwax is a gem, as are Sam Vimes, The
Patrician and Death. Detritus is a contender for my favourite character,
for, among much else, his wonderful turn as Cultural Attaché and his
translation of "You may have a Field Marshall's baton in the bottom of
your knapsack" to telling new recruits that "One of you may have a Field
Marshall's knapsack in his bottom."
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-09 21:43:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 9 Nov 2019 18:23:59 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
<Pratchett>
Post by Steve Hague
Small Gods was possibly my favourite of his books, perhaps because it
worked on so many levels, not that others of his books didn't. I lent it
to someone and never got it back. My favourite character? Granny
Weatherwax I think.
I love them too. But probably Tiffany best.
Post by Sid Nuncius
I have been irredeemably in love with Sergeant Angua for years. Mind
you, I agree that Granny Weatherwax is a gem,
as are Sam Vimes, The
Patrician and Death. Detritus is a contender for my favourite character,
for, among much else, his wonderful turn as Cultural Attaché and his
translation of "You may have a Field Marshall's baton in the bottom of
your knapsack" to telling new recruits that "One of you may have a Field
Marshall's knapsack in his bottom."
Serena Blanchflower
2019-11-09 18:53:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Steve Hague
Small Gods was possibly my favourite of his books, perhaps because it
worked on so many levels, not that others of his books didn't. I lent it
to someone and never got it back. My favourite character? Granny
Weatherwax I think.
Yes, I enjoyed that hugely and I was lucky in that it was the first one
that I read, and so very quickly got me hooked on Pterry. I'd gone
looking for his books in the library, after so many umrats (including a
number who appeared to have similar tastes in both literature and humour
to me) had recommended him and Small Gods came to hand. That said, the
one which I seem to turn to most often, is Monstrous Regiment but I
think you probably have to be familiar with his world and some of his
characters to get the most out of it.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I hope to God the doctor finds something wrong with me because I'd hate
to feel like this if I was well! (Anon)
Fenny
2019-11-09 23:19:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 9 Nov 2019 09:52:43 +0000, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
And fair enough about Pratchett. Nunciette couldn't get on with him,
either and I know quite a few others who don't. I can't be doing with
Rincewind at all, but the Watch, Death and Lu-Tze books especially I
think are wonderful, as are some of the stand-alone ones like Small
Gods. Chacun a son gout, eh?
I find him patchy, so have read some, but not all of his books. The
ones I enjoyed I thought were hilarious. The others, tedious.
--
Fenny
Steve Hague
2019-11-09 17:48:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Nick Leverton
I'd be surprised too if they knew how to tune a 3/8" Gripley ...
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate.
With, obviously, disastrous results . . .
All this apparently lighthearted badinage does have consequences, you
know.  I'm now compelled to read Reaper Man for (I think) the fourth
time.  And I can see Soul Music following that, too.[1]  See what you've
done?
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has been
setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time.  The man was a genius.  A
slightly variable genius, but a genius nonetheless - and I owe my
discovery of him to umra.  Thanks chums.  (And for Patrick O'Brian, now
I come to think of it.)
The man made me laugh more than any other writer. I first read The Light
Fantastic when we were staying at Centre Parcs, in Sherwood Forest in
the late '80s. Wofe wondered why I kept laughing out loud, then she read
it and had the same reaction. We had quite an argument about who would
read The Colour of Magic first, when we found it in the same on- site
shop a couple of days later.
Steve
Penny
2019-11-09 20:59:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 9 Nov 2019 17:48:33 +0000, Steve Hague <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
The man made me laugh more than any other writer. I first read The Light
Fantastic when we were staying at Centre Parcs, in Sherwood Forest in
the late '80s. Wofe wondered why I kept laughing out loud, then she read
it and had the same reaction. We had quite an argument about who would
read The Colour of Magic first, when we found it in the same on- site
shop a couple of days later.
Pleased to find I am NAOU in actually liking Rincewind and the Luggage and
associated books. I think it was the Time Being who got me hooked, along
with the little demon who painted the pictures in Two Flower's camera.

There were one or two along the way which felt too much like pot-boilers -
I suspected the publishers were to blame - but mostly they went from
strength to strength and Making Money was prophetic.

I really should read them again but my darling daughters bought me hard
backs as they were published and I've sort of got used to reading ebooks
now.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-09 21:47:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
The man made me laugh more than any other writer. I first read The Light
Fantastic when we were staying at Centre Parcs, in Sherwood Forest in
the late '80s. Wofe wondered why I kept laughing out loud, then she read
it and had the same reaction. We had quite an argument about who would
read The Colour of Magic first, when we found it in the same on- site
shop a couple of days later.
Pleased to find I am NAOU in actually liking Rincewind and the Luggage and
associated books. I think it was the Time Being who got me hooked, along
with the little demon who painted the pictures in Two Flower's camera.
There were one or two along the way which felt too much like pot-boilers -
I suspected the publishers were to blame - but mostly they went from
strength to strength and Making Money was prophetic.
I really should read them again but my darling daughters bought me hard
backs as they were published and I've sort of got used to reading ebooks
now.
I like Susan too and the tv version of her was very good. I hated
David Jazon in the one he was in.But I don't like him in anything
except Open All Hours. The original version.
Steve Hague
2019-11-10 08:36:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
The man made me laugh more than any other writer. I first read The Light
Fantastic when we were staying at Centre Parcs, in Sherwood Forest in
the late '80s. Wofe wondered why I kept laughing out loud, then she read
it and had the same reaction. We had quite an argument about who would
read The Colour of Magic first, when we found it in the same on- site
shop a couple of days later.
Pleased to find I am NAOU in actually liking Rincewind and the Luggage and
associated books. I think it was the Time Being who got me hooked, along
with the little demon who painted the pictures in Two Flower's camera.
There were one or two along the way which felt too much like pot-boilers -
I suspected the publishers were to blame - but mostly they went from
strength to strength and Making Money was prophetic.
I really should read them again but my darling daughters bought me hard
backs as they were published and I've sort of got used to reading ebooks
now.
I like Susan too and the tv version of her was very good. I hated
David Jazon in the one he was in.But I don't like him in anything
except Open All Hours. The original version.
I thought the choice of David Jason to play Rincewind very odd. He comes
across as a much younger man in the books.
Steve
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-10 09:31:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 10 Nov 2019 08:36:14 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
The man made me laugh more than any other writer. I first read The Light
Fantastic when we were staying at Centre Parcs, in Sherwood Forest in
the late '80s. Wofe wondered why I kept laughing out loud, then she read
it and had the same reaction. We had quite an argument about who would
read The Colour of Magic first, when we found it in the same on- site
shop a couple of days later.
Pleased to find I am NAOU in actually liking Rincewind and the Luggage and
associated books. I think it was the Time Being who got me hooked, along
with the little demon who painted the pictures in Two Flower's camera.
There were one or two along the way which felt too much like pot-boilers -
I suspected the publishers were to blame - but mostly they went from
strength to strength and Making Money was prophetic.
I really should read them again but my darling daughters bought me hard
backs as they were published and I've sort of got used to reading ebooks
now.
I like Susan too and the tv version of her was very good. I hated
David Jazon in the one he was in.But I don't like him in anything
except Open All Hours. The original version.
I thought the choice of David Jason to play Rincewind very odd. He comes
across as a much younger man in the books.
Steve
What did he play Rincewind in? I think I saw him as Albert was it? In
..Godfather? I think I have that title wrong but something about
Christmas? He drove a horse and cart?
BrritSki
2019-11-10 10:36:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sun, 10 Nov 2019 08:36:14 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Steve Hague
The man made me laugh more than any other writer. I first read The Light
Fantastic when we were staying at Centre Parcs, in Sherwood Forest in
the late '80s. Wofe wondered why I kept laughing out loud, then she read
it and had the same reaction. We had quite an argument about who would
read The Colour of Magic first, when we found it in the same on- site
shop a couple of days later.
Pleased to find I am NAOU in actually liking Rincewind and the Luggage and
associated books. I think it was the Time Being who got me hooked, along
with the little demon who painted the pictures in Two Flower's camera.
There were one or two along the way which felt too much like pot-boilers -
I suspected the publishers were to blame - but mostly they went from
strength to strength and Making Money was prophetic.
I really should read them again but my darling daughters bought me hard
backs as they were published and I've sort of got used to reading ebooks
now.
I like Susan too and the tv version of her was very good. I hated
David Jazon in the one he was in.But I don't like him in anything
except Open All Hours. The original version.
I thought the choice of David Jason to play Rincewind very odd. He comes
across as a much younger man in the books.
Steve
What did he play Rincewind in? I think I saw him as Albert was it? In
..Godfather? I think I have that title wrong but something about
Christmas? He drove a horse and cart?
That was Steptoe and Son ;)
Penny
2019-11-10 16:32:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 10 Nov 2019 09:31:40 +0000, Vicky Ayech <***@gmail.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sun, 10 Nov 2019 08:36:14 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I thought the choice of David Jason to play Rincewind very odd. He comes
across as a much younger man in the books.
Steve
Agreed, he wasn't a good choice IMO.
Post by Vicky Ayech
What did he play Rincewind in?
The Colour of Magic and the Light Fantastic
Post by Vicky Ayech
I think I saw him as Albert was it? In
..Godfather? I think I have that title wrong but something about
Christmas? He drove a horse and cart?
He was also in the Hogfather and did, indeed play Albert.

I see there are two filmed versions of the Wyrd Sisters, one of which is a
Czech production. The other has June Whitfield, Jane Horrocks and Annette
Crosbie - I think that might end up on my Christmas list...

TA connection - Tamsin Greig is in Going Postal.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-10 17:39:42 UTC
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Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sun, 10 Nov 2019 08:36:14 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I thought the choice of David Jason to play Rincewind very odd. He comes
across as a much younger man in the books.
Steve
Agreed, he wasn't a good choice IMO.
Post by Vicky Ayech
What did he play Rincewind in?
The Colour of Magic and the Light Fantastic
Post by Vicky Ayech
I think I saw him as Albert was it? In
..Godfather? I think I have that title wrong but something about
Christmas? He drove a horse and cart?
He was also in the Hogfather and did, indeed play Albert.
I see there are two filmed versions of the Wyrd Sisters, one of which is a
Czech production. The other has June Whitfield, Jane Horrocks and Annette
Crosbie - I think that might end up on my Christmas list...
Not on my list with those actors. :(
Post by Penny
TA connection - Tamsin Greig is in Going Postal.
Oh I did see that and she was brilliant.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-10 19:01:32 UTC
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[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
Czech production. The other has June Whitfield, Jane Horrocks and Annette
Crosbie - I think that might end up on my Christmas list...
Not on my list with those actors. :(
[]
Interesting how tastes vary. Personally, I'd probably watch something
with those three in it, without knowing what it was, just on that basis!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

resentment is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die -
attributed to Carrie Fisher by Gareth McLean, in Radio Times 28 January-3
February 2012
Steve Hague
2019-11-11 09:05:20 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Penny
Czech production. The other has June Whitfield, Jane Horrocks and Annette
Crosbie - I think that might end up on my Christmas list...
Not on my list with those actors. :(
[]
Interesting how tastes vary. Personally, I'd probably watch something
with those three in it, without knowing what it was, just on that basis!
Me too. I'd love to see that.
Steve
Min
2019-11-11 01:16:42 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sun, 10 Nov 2019 08:36:14 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
I thought the choice of David Jason to play Rincewind very odd. He comes
across as a much younger man in the books.
Steve
Agreed, he wasn't a good choice IMO.
Post by Vicky Ayech
What did he play Rincewind in?
The Colour of Magic and the Light Fantastic
Post by Vicky Ayech
I think I saw him as Albert was it? In
..Godfather? I think I have that title wrong but something about
Christmas? He drove a horse and cart?
He was also in the Hogfather and did, indeed play Albert.
I see there are two filmed versions of the Wyrd Sisters, one of which is a
Czech production. The other has June Whitfield, Jane Horrocks and Annette
Crosbie - I think that might end up on my Christmas list...
Poisonally, I don't think the TADS 'Wyrd Sisters' casting this year could be beaten....
--
Min
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-09 21:39:30 UTC
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On Sat, 9 Nov 2019 17:48:33 +0000, Steve Hague
Post by Steve Hague
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
[]
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by Nick Leverton
I'd be surprised too if they knew how to tune a 3/8" Gripley ...
No - but to be fair, wooden stringed instruments don't often have a
problem with an elliptical cam gradually sliding up the beam shaft and
catching on the flange rebate.
With, obviously, disastrous results . . .
All this apparently lighthearted badinage does have consequences, you
know.  I'm now compelled to read Reaper Man for (I think) the fourth
time.  And I can see Soul Music following that, too.[1]  See what you've
done?
[1] There's a joke near the end of Soul Music which Pratchett has been
setting up over about 250 pages and which rendered me absolutely
helpless with laughter for quite some time.  The man was a genius.  A
slightly variable genius, but a genius nonetheless - and I owe my
discovery of him to umra.  Thanks chums.  (And for Patrick O'Brian, now
I come to think of it.)
The man made me laugh more than any other writer. I first read The Light
Fantastic when we were staying at Centre Parcs, in Sherwood Forest in
the late '80s. Wofe wondered why I kept laughing out loud, then she read
it and had the same reaction. We had quite an argument about who would
read The Colour of Magic first, when we found it in the same on- site
shop a couple of days later.
Steve
I only really like the guards and the witches books, not so much the
rest, and I didn't manage to finish Colour of Magic. I love the
witches.
Paul Herber
2019-11-02 21:00:43 UTC
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Post by Nick Odell
What I'm looking for is an ordinary domestic product which has a
plastic cap like a Pringles or a Bisto gravy granules tub. The
external diameter of a Pringles top is exactly the internal diameter I
am looking for so anything that a Pringles top would get stuck in
would work - and yes, I do go around supermarkets with a Pringles top
in my pocket.
I know, I know, I should just bite the bullet and pay the asking price
but having struck lucky once....
Sounds like a job for 3D printer.
--
Regards, Paul Herber
https://www.paulherber.co.uk/
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2019-11-02 21:12:31 UTC
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In message
<***@news.eternal-september.org>, Paul
Herber <***@pherber.com> writes:
[]
Post by Paul Herber
Sounds like a job for 3D printer.
Is that the latest superhero?
3
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

The death of democracy is not likely to be an assassination from ambush.
It will be a slow extinction from apathy, indifference, and undernourishment.
-Robert Maynard Hutchins, educator (1899-1977)
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-02 22:27:29 UTC
Reply
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Post by Paul Herber
Post by Nick Odell
What I'm looking for is an ordinary domestic product which has a
plastic cap like a Pringles or a Bisto gravy granules tub. The
external diameter of a Pringles top is exactly the internal diameter I
am looking for so anything that a Pringles top would get stuck in
would work - and yes, I do go around supermarkets with a Pringles top
in my pocket.
I know, I know, I should just bite the bullet and pay the asking price
but having struck lucky once....
Sounds like a job for 3D printer.
We've got (B's got) a 3D printer. If Penny can't find the right lid
maybe we can help. B printed a very nice soap dish for me,with lid,
for taking when going to the pool. Also we have keyring tabs for the
dog's collar with out phone numbers on. And tabs for our keys.
Min
2019-11-03 22:17:29 UTC
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Post by Vicky Ayech
Also we have keyring tabs for the
dog's collar with out phone numbers on.
Don't you like the dog?
--
Min
Vicky Ayech
2019-11-03 22:40:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 14:17:29 -0800 (PST), Min
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
Also we have keyring tabs for the
dog's collar with out phone numbers on.
Don't you like the dog?
Typo :)
out = our
Min
2019-11-04 02:38:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 14:17:29 -0800 (PST), Min
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
Also we have keyring tabs for the
dog's collar with out phone numbers on.
Don't you like the dog?
Typo :)
out = our
I knew that, but it make me laugh!
--
Min
Mike
2019-11-04 08:20:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 14:17:29 -0800 (PST), Min
Post by Min
Post by Vicky Ayech
Also we have keyring tabs for the
dog's collar with out phone numbers on.
Don't you like the dog?
Typo :)
out = our
I knew that, but it make me laugh!
Mere doggerel really.
--
Toodle Pip
Nick Odell
2019-11-07 12:08:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 02 Nov 2019 22:27:29 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Nick Odell
What I'm looking for is an ordinary domestic product which has a
plastic cap like a Pringles or a Bisto gravy granules tub. The
external diameter of a Pringles top is exactly the internal diameter I
am looking for so anything that a Pringles top would get stuck in
would work - and yes, I do go around supermarkets with a Pringles top
in my pocket.
I know, I know, I should just bite the bullet and pay the asking price
but having struck lucky once....
Sounds like a job for 3D printer.
We've got (B's got) a 3D printer. If Penny can't find the right lid
maybe we can help. B printed a very nice soap dish for me,with lid,
for taking when going to the pool. Also we have keyring tabs for the
dog's collar with out phone numbers on. And tabs for our keys.
That's a good suggestion of Paul's and lovely of you to offer but the
whole idea is to find something intended to be used for something
else. If I have to resort to having something made I might as well buy
the proper one and where's the fun in that?

Nick
Mike
2019-11-07 16:30:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
On Sat, 02 Nov 2019 22:27:29 +0000, Vicky Ayech
Post by Vicky Ayech
Post by Paul Herber
Post by Nick Odell
What I'm looking for is an ordinary domestic product which has a
plastic cap like a Pringles or a Bisto gravy granules tub. The
external diameter of a Pringles top is exactly the internal diameter I
am looking for so anything that a Pringles top would get stuck in
would work - and yes, I do go around supermarkets with a Pringles top
in my pocket.
I know, I know, I should just bite the bullet and pay the asking price
but having struck lucky once....
Sounds like a job for 3D printer.
We've got (B's got) a 3D printer. If Penny can't find the right lid
maybe we can help. B printed a very nice soap dish for me,with lid,
for taking when going to the pool. Also we have keyring tabs for the
dog's collar with out phone numbers on. And tabs for our keys.
That's a good suggestion of Paul's and lovely of you to offer but the
whole idea is to find something intended to be used for something
else. If I have to resort to having something made I might as well buy
the proper one and where's the fun in that?
Nick
Way back in the early sixties, I came across a ‘Mad’ magazine containing an
article about repurposing tools; a screwdriver could be filed to a flat
taper and sharpened to make a chisel,
And there was something about cutting grooves into a chisel to make a
file....
--
Toodle Pip
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