Discussion:
Paradise Lost
(too old to reply)
the Omrud
2018-03-24 16:41:13 UTC
Permalink
For those who haven't listened yet, I offer a condensed version:

God: "I say, Satan, you are evil".
Satan: "Oooh, I am evil".
FIN
--
David
Mike
2018-03-24 16:47:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
God: "I say, Satan, you are evil".
Satan: "Oooh, I am evil".
FIN
I liked Willy Rushton’s condensed WF Godot:

‘Has he come yet?’
‘No’
‘Oh’
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-03-24 17:40:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by the Omrud
God: "I say, Satan, you are evil".
Satan: "Oooh, I am evil".
FIN
Or (I think it was) Olsen's summary of the history of the universe:
Bang. Crumple.
Post by Mike
‘Has he come yet?’
‘No’
‘Oh’
My brother was in Godot for the school play. We particularly liked these
three lines from the script:

[one character:] "Shall we go?"
[another character:] "Yes, let's go."
[Stage direction:] They do not move.

"They do not move" became a family meme between the two of us.

I think that's the one school play where I left at the interval and did
not return. I was not alone ...
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

… too popular actually to be any good. - Alison Graham in Radio Times 2-8
February 2013
John Ashby
2018-03-24 18:39:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by the Omrud
God: "I say, Satan, you are evil".
Satan: "Oooh, I am evil".
FIN
Bang. Crumple.
Post by Mike
‘Has he come yet?’
‘No’
‘Oh’
My brother was in Godot for the school play. We particularly liked these
[one character:] "Shall we go?"
[another character:] "Yes, let's go."
[Stage direction:] They do not move.
"They do not move" became a family meme between the two of us.
I think that's the one school play where I left at the interval and did
not return. I was not alone ...
Was it Bernard Levin who summarised Godot as "Nothing happens. The
there's an interval, after which nothing happens again."?

john
Nick Odell
2018-03-24 19:23:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Ashby
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
Post by the Omrud
God: "I say, Satan, you are evil".
Satan: "Oooh, I am evil".
FIN
Bang. Crumple.
Post by Mike
‘Has he come yet?’
‘No’
‘Oh’
My brother was in Godot for the school play. We particularly liked
[one character:] "Shall we go?"
[another character:] "Yes, let's go."
[Stage direction:] They do not move.
"They do not move" became a family meme between the two of us.
I think that's the one school play where I left at the interval and
did not return. I was not alone ...
Was it Bernard Levin who summarised Godot as "Nothing happens. The
there's an interval, after which nothing happens again."?
Probably not, I'm afraid.

According to Peter Hall, who probably kept all the cuttings, Bernard
Levin called it a remarkable piece of twaddle. ("Mr Samuel Beckett (an
Irishman who used to be Joyce's secretary and who writes in French, a
combination which should make anybody smell a rat) has produced a really
remarkable piece of twaddle." to be precise.)

https://www.theguardian.com/stage/2003/jan/04/theatre.beckettat100

The article IMO is well worth a read.

I miss Bernard Levin.

Nick
the Omrud
2018-03-25 10:27:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
I miss Bernard Levin.
This must have made a significant impact on me; I still think of it
from time to time, despite never having seen again it since the
broadcast (until now).


--
David
Nick Odell
2018-03-26 03:54:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
I miss Bernard Levin.
This must have made a significant impact on me;  I still think of it
from time to time, despite never having seen again it since the
broadcast (until now).
http://youtu.be/vEJz6p5Rndk
<grin>

N.
Jenny M Benson
2018-03-26 09:44:26 UTC
Permalink
This must have made a significant impact on me;  I still think of it
from time to time, despite never having seen again it since the
broadcast (until now).
A bit of tv from way, way back which I still think of from time to time
is the Christmas edition of some sort of magazine programme which used
to be aired in the afternoons in the late '60s (or possibly very early
70s.) It was presented by Judith Chalmers, or someone similar, and the
regular contibutors included quite worthy and serious people: I'm sure
Peregrine Worsthorne was one of them, and maybe Bernard Levin.

In this particular show they played party games, such as the one where
an orange is passed from person to person under the chin, no hands. It
was just so surprising and funny to see those people being silly!
--
Jenny M Benson
Mike
2018-03-26 09:46:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
This must have made a significant impact on me;  I still think of it
from time to time, despite never having seen again it since the
broadcast (until now).
A bit of tv from way, way back which I still think of from time to time
is the Christmas edition of some sort of magazine programme which used
to be aired in the afternoons in the late '60s (or possibly very early
70s.) It was presented by Judith Chalmers, or someone similar, and the
regular contibutors included quite worthy and serious people: I'm sure
Peregrine Worsthorne was one of them, and maybe Bernard Levin.
In this particular show they played party games, such as the one where
an orange is passed from person to person under the chin, no hands. It
was just so surprising and funny to see those people being silly!
My Dad used to say “Even the Queen has to go to the toilet.”
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2018-03-26 10:27:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
This must have made a significant impact on me;  I still think of it
from time to time, despite never having seen again it since the
broadcast (until now).
A bit of tv from way, way back which I still think of from time to time
is the Christmas edition of some sort of magazine programme which used
to be aired in the afternoons in the late '60s (or possibly very early
70s.) It was presented by Judith Chalmers, or someone similar, and the
regular contibutors included quite worthy and serious people: I'm sure
Peregrine Worsthorne was one of them, and maybe Bernard Levin.
In this particular show they played party games, such as the one where
an orange is passed from person to person under the chin, no hands. It
was just so surprising and funny to see those people being silly!
My Dad used to say “Even the Queen has to go to the toilet.”
No, she goes to the lavatory I'm sure.
Btms
2018-03-26 12:15:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
This must have made a significant impact on me;  I still think of it
from time to time, despite never having seen again it since the
broadcast (until now).
A bit of tv from way, way back which I still think of from time to time
is the Christmas edition of some sort of magazine programme which used
to be aired in the afternoons in the late '60s (or possibly very early
70s.) It was presented by Judith Chalmers, or someone similar, and the
regular contibutors included quite worthy and serious people: I'm sure
Peregrine Worsthorne was one of them, and maybe Bernard Levin.
In this particular show they played party games, such as the one where
an orange is passed from person to person under the chin, no hands. It
was just so surprising and funny to see those people being silly!
My Dad used to say “Even the Queen has to go to the toilet.”
No, she goes to the lavatory I'm sure.
Is she accompanied by the duty Privy Councillor?
--
BTMS - Equine Advisor Extraordinaire.
Mike
2018-03-26 12:23:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Btms
Post by BrritSki
Post by Mike
Post by Jenny M Benson
This must have made a significant impact on me;  I still think of it
from time to time, despite never having seen again it since the
broadcast (until now).
A bit of tv from way, way back which I still think of from time to time
is the Christmas edition of some sort of magazine programme which used
to be aired in the afternoons in the late '60s (or possibly very early
70s.) It was presented by Judith Chalmers, or someone similar, and the
regular contibutors included quite worthy and serious people: I'm sure
Peregrine Worsthorne was one of them, and maybe Bernard Levin.
In this particular show they played party games, such as the one where
an orange is passed from person to person under the chin, no hands. It
was just so surprising and funny to see those people being silly!
My Dad used to say “Even the Queen has to go to the toilet.”
No, she goes to the lavatory I'm sure.
Is she accompanied by the duty Privy Councillor?
Doe a motion have to be passed in Parliament first?
--
Toodle Pip
BrritSki
2018-03-26 12:26:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Btms
Post by BrritSki
Post by Mike
My Dad used to say “Even the Queen has to go to the toilet.”
No, she goes to the lavatory I'm sure.
Is she accompanied by the duty Privy Councillor?
Yes, seated on a footstool.
Penny
2018-03-24 22:08:25 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 24 Mar 2018 18:39:43 +0000, John Ashby <***@yahoo.com>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Was it Bernard Levin who summarised Godot as "Nothing happens. The
there's an interval, after which nothing happens again."?
Sounds like my review of Joseph Heller's "Something Happened" - nothing
did. Although I should admit I failed to read to the end.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sid Nuncius
2018-03-25 07:05:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Was it Bernard Levin who summarised Godot as "Nothing happens. The
there's an interval, after which nothing happens again."?
Sounds like my review of Joseph Heller's "Something Happened" - nothing
did. Although I should admit I failed to read to the end.
<languid wave> His second novel was rubbish.[1]

[1]I know - but give me a break, eh?
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
BrritSki
2018-03-25 07:16:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Was it Bernard Levin who summarised Godot as "Nothing happens. The
there's an interval, after which nothing happens again."?
Sounds like my review of Joseph Heller's "Something Happened" - nothing
did. Although I should admit I failed to read to the end.
<languid wave>  His second novel was rubbish.[1]
[1]I know - but give me a break, eh?
If we gave you a break it would be because you deserved it, but if you
had one it would no longer be deserved. Capisce ?
Sid Nuncius
2018-03-25 07:23:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Was it Bernard Levin who summarised Godot as "Nothing happens. The
there's an interval, after which nothing happens again."?
Sounds like my review of Joseph Heller's "Something Happened" - nothing
did. Although I should admit I failed to read to the end.
<languid wave>  His second novel was rubbish.[1]
[1]I know - but give me a break, eh?
If we gave you a break it would be because you deserved it, but if you
had one it would no longer be deserved. Capisce ?
Yes, Godfather. I meant no disrespect.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
krw
2018-03-26 14:11:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by John Ashby
Was it Bernard Levin who summarised Godot as "Nothing happens. The
there's an interval, after which nothing happens again."?
Sounds like my review of Joseph Heller's "Something Happened" - nothing
did. Although I should admit I failed to read to the end.
I never did find out who the 22 people were who got caught.
--
Kosmo Richard W
www.travelswmw.whitnet.uk
https://tinyurl.com/KRWpics
Penny
2018-03-24 22:02:48 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 24 Mar 2018 17:40:54 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by the Omrud
God: "I say, Satan, you are evil".
Satan: "Oooh, I am evil".
FIN
My brother was in Godot for the school play. We particularly liked these
[one character:] "Shall we go?"
[another character:] "Yes, let's go."
[Stage direction:] They do not move.
"They do not move" became a family meme between the two of us.
I think that's the one school play where I left at the interval and did
not return. I was not alone ...
Rather my reaction to Paradise Lost, although of the bit I did hear, my
money was on Satan.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-03-25 00:42:49 UTC
Permalink
In message <***@4ax.com>, Penny
<***@labyrinth.freeuk.com> writes:
[]
Post by Penny
Rather my reaction to Paradise Lost, although of the bit I did hear, my
money was on Satan.
From an old book of schoolboy howlers I used to have:

"Milton wrote 'Paradise Lost'. Then his wife died, and he wrote
'Paradise Regained'."

[Sorry if it wasn't Milton. It's some decades since I had the book, and
I've never seen or read the play or whatever it is.]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Anybody can garble quotations like that -- even with the Bible... Er... "And he
went and hanged himself (Matthew 27:5). Go, and do thou likewise (Luke 10:37)."
Sid Nuncius
2018-03-25 07:22:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Mike
‘Has he come yet?’
‘No’
‘Oh’
My brother was in Godot for the school play. We particularly liked these
[one character:] "Shall we go?"
[another character:] "Yes, let's go."
[Stage direction:] They do not move.
"They do not move" became a family meme between the two of us.
I think that's the one school play where I left at the interval and did
not return. I was not alone ...
AIAOU in having seen a production of Godot that I actually thought was
really good? Bleak, but good. I had to look it up; Googling revealed
that it was when in '1971 Peter O’Toole, Donal McCann, Niall Toibin and
Frank Middlemass are Waiting for Godot, a production that for the length
of its run “makes Nottingham Playhouse the theatrical capital of
England,” says Sunday Times critic Harold Hobson.'

I was only 17 but I still remember that O'Toole and McCann were
brilliant and utterly riveting. The opening of the second half where
they discover a leaf on the tree in mime is still with me, as is the
exchange above when they do not move. (And the business with the hats
was genuinely very funny.) It had a profound effect on me as two people
utterly stuck in a mindset which from the outside looks so easy to break
out of and just leave to get on with life, but they simply can't do it.
I've never forgotten it.

I'm not sure I'd want to sit through it again, mind you - and certainly
not as a school production. And not long after that I saw an amateur
production of Endgame; all I remember about it is two people in dustbins
and being profoundly bored throughout. Perhaps I was just lucky with
that one production.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Rosalind Mitchell
2018-03-25 10:01:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
I'm not sure I'd want to sit through it again, mind you - and certainly
not as a school production. And not long after that I saw an amateur
production of Endgame; all I remember about it is two people in dustbins
and being profoundly bored throughout. Perhaps I was just lucky with
that one production.
Endgame turned up in one of my OU courses. This was in the days when
OU made its own programmes and they were shown on proper TV, and they
filmed a production with Norman Beaton, Stephen Rea, Kate Binchy and -
blast from the past here - Charlie Drake. I rather enjoyed it. I read
somewhere it's the most watched OU programme ever but I don't think
its on YouTube.

Rotaa
Mike
2018-03-25 10:23:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Sid Nuncius
I'm not sure I'd want to sit through it again, mind you - and certainly
not as a school production. And not long after that I saw an amateur
production of Endgame; all I remember about it is two people in dustbins
and being profoundly bored throughout. Perhaps I was just lucky with
that one production.
Endgame turned up in one of my OU courses. This was in the days when
OU made its own programmes and they were shown on proper TV, and they
filmed a production with Norman Beaton, Stephen Rea, Kate Binchy and -
blast from the past here - Charlie Drake. I rather enjoyed it. I read
somewhere it's the most watched OU programme ever but I don't think
its on YouTube.
Rotaa
“My boomerang won’t come back!”
“Your Boomerang won’t come back?”
“My Boomerang won’t come back!.....”
--
Toodle Pip
Sid Nuncius
2018-03-25 10:30:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Endgame turned up in one of my OU courses.
I would be really interested to know what you made of it. I could sort
of see some point, but found the whole thing tedious beyond words. To
be fair, that may have been the production, featuring not very good
actors in a tatty community hall somewhere, but I've never felt the
inclination to go back to it.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
the Omrud
2018-03-25 10:34:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rosalind Mitchell
Post by Sid Nuncius
I'm not sure I'd want to sit through it again, mind you - and certainly
not as a school production. And not long after that I saw an amateur
production of Endgame; all I remember about it is two people in dustbins
and being profoundly bored throughout. Perhaps I was just lucky with
that one production.
Endgame turned up in one of my OU courses. This was in the days when
OU made its own programmes and they were shown on proper TV, and they
filmed a production with Norman Beaton, Stephen Rea, Kate Binchy and -
blast from the past here - Charlie Drake. I rather enjoyed it. I read
somewhere it's the most watched OU programme ever but I don't think
its on YouTube.
Stehen Rea is utterly mesmerising, although I've never seen him on the
stage.

I saw Charlie Drake in The Caretaker at the Royal Exchange in 1983,
along with local lad Lord Percy/Captain Darling.
--
David
Fenny
2018-03-25 10:09:15 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 25 Mar 2018 08:22:09 +0100, Sid Nuncius
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
‘Has he come yet?’
‘No’
‘Oh’
My brother was in Godot for the school play. We particularly liked these
[one character:] "Shall we go?"
[another character:] "Yes, let's go."
[Stage direction:] They do not move.
"They do not move" became a family meme between the two of us.
I think that's the one school play where I left at the interval and did
not return. I was not alone ...
AIAOU in having seen a production of Godot that I actually thought was
really good? Bleak, but good. I had to look it up; Googling revealed
that it was when in '1971 Peter O’Toole, Donal McCann, Niall Toibin and
Frank Middlemass are Waiting for Godot, a production that for the length
of its run “makes Nottingham Playhouse the theatrical capital of
England,” says Sunday Times critic Harold Hobson.'
I was only 17 but I still remember that O'Toole and McCann were
brilliant and utterly riveting. The opening of the second half where
they discover a leaf on the tree in mime is still with me, as is the
exchange above when they do not move. (And the business with the hats
was genuinely very funny.) It had a profound effect on me as two people
utterly stuck in a mindset which from the outside looks so easy to break
out of and just leave to get on with life, but they simply can't do it.
I've never forgotten it.
I'm not sure I'd want to sit through it again, mind you - and certainly
not as a school production. And not long after that I saw an amateur
production of Endgame; all I remember about it is two people in dustbins
and being profoundly bored throughout. Perhaps I was just lucky with
that one production.
I saw the version with Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellan, Simon Callow and
someone else I forget. As I'd pay to watch Pat and Ian sit motionless
for 2 hours saying nothing, the performance was a bonus!
--
Fenny
the Omrud
2018-03-25 10:31:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
AIAOU in having seen a production of Godot that I actually thought was
really good?  Bleak, but good.  I had to look it up; Googling revealed
that it was when in '1971 Peter O’Toole, Donal McCann, Niall Toibin and
Frank Middlemass are Waiting for Godot, a production that for the length
of its run “makes Nottingham Playhouse the theatrical capital of
England,” says Sunday Times critic Harold Hobson.'
You are not alone. Mine is Max Wall and Trevor Peacock at the Royal
Exchange Theatre in 1980.
--
David
the Omrud
2018-03-24 16:53:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
God: "I say, Satan, you are evil".
Satan: "Oooh, I am evil".
FIN
I was rather bemused to discover that Satan did not have the voice of
Andy Hamilton.
--
David
Clive Arthur
2018-03-24 19:26:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
God: "I say, Satan, you are evil".
Satan: "Oooh, I am evil".
FIN
Paradise Lost is a great excuse for not being able to play monopoly.

Cheers
--
Clive
Loading...