Discussion:
spoiler Friday 28/9/18
Add Reply
Vicky Ayech
2018-09-28 20:49:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
s
p
o
i
l
e
r
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
Shula! "The good grace to see his draft"? He offered to be the one to
nuggering well take the blame. I didn't hear her tell Lizzie that. And
Snappy qualifies for a halo, more St Snappy than St Shula, for helping
jump-to-conclusions and be nuggering unpleasant Lizzie with advice
about her dealer son.

Hannah is trying to snare Tom. Chad is a ruse to make Tom value her
more. Hannah thinks Bridge Farm worth moving in on as they seem to
have money. Tom should show more loyalty to helen's friend, Emma, and
shut Hannah up when she sneers at her.
spoiler 2/10/18v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v


There was a spoiler on fb because the podcast from 2/10 was sent out
to people by mistake on email 2 days ago so those in the fb group knew
it was a custodial sentence. The spoiler said David drove Lizzie to
visit Freddy.
Chris McMillan
2018-09-29 12:26:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
s
p
o
i
l
e
r
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
Hannah is trying to snare Tom. Chad is a ruse to make Tom value her
more.
Who’s Chad? I heard the epi - or I dozed off?

Sincerely Chris
Mike
2018-09-29 12:39:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
s
p
o
i
l
e
r
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
Hannah is trying to snare Tom. Chad is a ruse to make Tom value her
more.
Who’s Chad? I heard the epi - or I dozed off?
Sincerely Chris
That’ll be the one hanging in the corner.
--
Toodle Pip
Serena Blanchflower
2018-09-29 13:43:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
s
p
o
i
l
e
r
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
Hannah is trying to snare Tom. Chad is a ruse to make Tom value her
more.
Who’s Chad? I heard the epi - or I dozed off?
He's the chap Hannah was meant to have a date with, the other night. It
was after this was cancelled that she propositioned Tom. Yesterday, she
was planning another date with Chad - I have heard it suggested
elsewhere that she's using him as a fluffer, to get Tom interested.
--
Best wishes, Serena
I have deja vu and amnesia at once, I've forgotten this before! (anon)
Robin Stevens
2018-09-29 20:27:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
s
p
o
i
l
e
r
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
Hannah is trying to snare Tom. Chad is a ruse to make Tom value her
more.
Who’s Chad? I heard the epi - or I dozed off?
He's the chap Hannah was meant to have a date with, the other night. It
was after this was cancelled that she propositioned Tom. Yesterday, she
was planning another date with Chad - I have heard it suggested
elsewhere that she's using him as a fluffer, to get Tom interested.
Wot, no Chad?

Does she need to do much to get Tom interested? He was asking her out when
she first moved in.
Mike
2018-09-30 07:38:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Robin Stevens
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
s
p
o
i
l
e
r
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
Hannah is trying to snare Tom. Chad is a ruse to make Tom value her
more.
Who’s Chad? I heard the epi - or I dozed off?
He's the chap Hannah was meant to have a date with, the other night. It
was after this was cancelled that she propositioned Tom. Yesterday, she
was planning another date with Chad - I have heard it suggested
elsewhere that she's using him as a fluffer, to get Tom interested.
Wot, no Chad?
Does she need to do much to get Tom interested? He was asking her out when
she first moved in.
Sounds like he may well need fresh Duracells....
--
Toodle Pip
p***@never.here
2018-09-30 09:03:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 29 Sep 2018 20:27:36 +0000 (UTC), Robin Stevens
Post by Robin Stevens
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Vicky Ayech
s
p
o
i
l
e
r
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
Hannah is trying to snare Tom. Chad is a ruse to make Tom value her
more.
Who’s Chad? I heard the epi - or I dozed off?
He's the chap Hannah was meant to have a date with, the other night. It
was after this was cancelled that she propositioned Tom. Yesterday, she
was planning another date with Chad - I have heard it suggested
elsewhere that she's using him as a fluffer, to get Tom interested.
Wot, no Chad?
No, not many, if any punch cards used these days <g>
Post by Robin Stevens
Does she need to do much to get Tom interested? He was asking her out when
she first moved in.
--
Pete
Jenny M Benson
2018-10-01 14:46:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by p***@never.here
No, not many, if any punch cards used these days <g>
They are by lots of machine knitters!
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
Peter Withey
2018-10-01 15:24:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 1 Oct 2018 15:46:12 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
No, not many, if any punch cards used these days <g>
They are by lots of machine knitters!
Something new I've learnt today. I was thinking of their use as
computer input. Thanks.
--
Pete
Mike
2018-10-01 15:32:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Withey
On Mon, 1 Oct 2018 15:46:12 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
No, not many, if any punch cards used these days <g>
They are by lots of machine knitters!
Something new I've learnt today. I was thinking of their use as
computer input. Thanks.
Used in weaving looms eons ago too.
--
Toodle Pip
Mike
2018-10-01 15:35:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Peter Withey
On Mon, 1 Oct 2018 15:46:12 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
No, not many, if any punch cards used these days <g>
They are by lots of machine knitters!
Something new I've learnt today. I was thinking of their use as
computer input. Thanks.
Used in weaving looms eons ago too.
Did I ever tell Umra about being employed as a pirn stripper back in the
late sixties? Nothing to do with being a fluffer though.
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2018-10-01 17:11:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 01 Oct 2018 15:32:55 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Peter Withey
On Mon, 1 Oct 2018 15:46:12 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
No, not many, if any punch cards used these days <g>
They are by lots of machine knitters!
Something new I've learnt today. I was thinking of their use as
computer input. Thanks.
Used in weaving looms eons ago too.
Still used on Jacquard looms I think - also on steam organs (for which new
'books' are still made) and player pianos - there are pianos which cut new
rolls when played..
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2018-10-01 17:55:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Peter Withey
On Mon, 1 Oct 2018 15:46:12 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
No, not many, if any punch cards used these days <g>
They are by lots of machine knitters!
Something new I've learnt today. I was thinking of their use as
computer input. Thanks.
Used in weaving looms eons ago too.
Still used on Jacquard looms I think - also on steam organs (for which new
'books' are still made) and player pianos - there are pianos which cut new
rolls when played..
I think they are Pianolas and there are Piano Players too.
--
Toodle Pip
Jim Easterbrook
2018-10-01 21:22:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Still used on Jacquard looms I think - also on steam organs (for which
new 'books' are still made) and player pianos - there are pianos which
cut new rolls when played..
I think they are Pianolas and there are Piano Players too.
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
a player piano that includes violins.
https://flic.kr/p/28czowW
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
Penny
2018-10-01 22:30:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 1 Oct 2018 21:22:49 GMT, Jim Easterbrook <***@jim-easterbrook.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Still used on Jacquard looms I think - also on steam organs (for which
new 'books' are still made) and player pianos - there are pianos which
cut new rolls when played..
I think they are Pianolas and there are Piano Players too.
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
a player piano that includes violins.
https://flic.kr/p/28czowW
There used to be a great mechanical music museum in a redundant chapel in
Brentford (or there abouts). Visiting piano players came from around the
world and recorded piano rolls there from time to time (I was never there
for a recording but saw the posters).

Another collection, mostly pianolas, player pianos and polyphons was held
in an isolated pub (called the Holly Bush, IIRC) in Derbyshire. Anyone know
if that's still there?
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Mike
2018-10-02 07:53:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Still used on Jacquard looms I think - also on steam organs (for which
new 'books' are still made) and player pianos - there are pianos which
cut new rolls when played..
I think they are Pianolas and there are Piano Players too.
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
a player piano that includes violins.
https://flic.kr/p/28czowW
There used to be a great mechanical music museum in a redundant chapel in
Brentford (or there abouts). Visiting piano players came from around the
world and recorded piano rolls there from time to time (I was never there
for a recording but saw the posters).
Another collection, mostly pianolas, player pianos and polyphons was held
in an isolated pub (called the Holly Bush, IIRC) in Derbyshire. Anyone know
if that's still there?
The McToodles have been to summat similar near Looe; public transport does
not really touch the spot so a fair walkies up and down hills was involved.
--
Toodle Pip
Penny
2018-10-02 09:10:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 02 Oct 2018 07:53:48 GMT, Mike <***@ntlworld.com> scrawled
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
a player piano that includes violins.
https://flic.kr/p/28czowW
There used to be a great mechanical music museum in a redundant chapel in
Brentford (or there abouts). Visiting piano players came from around the
world and recorded piano rolls there from time to time (I was never there
for a recording but saw the posters).
Another collection, mostly pianolas, player pianos and polyphons was held
in an isolated pub (called the Holly Bush, IIRC) in Derbyshire. Anyone know
if that's still there?
The McToodles have been to summat similar near Looe; public transport does
not really touch the spot so a fair walkies up and down hills was involved.
We visited one in Devon or Cornwall during a wet week on holiday. The only
thing I remember about it was learning the Brentford one had closed.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2018-10-02 09:43:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
a player piano that includes violins.
https://flic.kr/p/28czowW
There used to be a great mechanical music museum in a redundant chapel in
Brentford (or there abouts). Visiting piano players came from around the
world and recorded piano rolls there from time to time (I was never there
for a recording but saw the posters).
Another collection, mostly pianolas, player pianos and polyphons was held
in an isolated pub (called the Holly Bush, IIRC) in Derbyshire. Anyone know
if that's still there?
The McToodles have been to summat similar near Looe; public transport does
not really touch the spot so a fair walkies up and down hills was involved.
We visited one in Devon or Cornwall during a wet week on holiday. The only
thing I remember about it was learning the Brentford one had closed.
The Looe one was owned by Paul someone.
Penny
2018-10-02 11:46:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 02 Oct 2018 09:43:55 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
a player piano that includes violins.
https://flic.kr/p/28czowW
There used to be a great mechanical music museum in a redundant chapel in
Brentford (or there abouts). Visiting piano players came from around the
world and recorded piano rolls there from time to time (I was never there
for a recording but saw the posters).
Another collection, mostly pianolas, player pianos and polyphons was held
in an isolated pub (called the Holly Bush, IIRC) in Derbyshire. Anyone know
if that's still there?
The McToodles have been to summat similar near Looe; public transport does
not really touch the spot so a fair walkies up and down hills was involved.
We visited one in Devon or Cornwall during a wet week on holiday. The only
thing I remember about it was learning the Brentford one had closed.
The Looe one was owned by Paul someone.
Paul Corin had one near Liskeard - he closed it at the end of 2012
"I have closed my Museum in Cornwall , Magnificent Music Machines as there
are now just too many Tourist Attraction in Cornwall as compared with when
we opened in 1967. The Wurlitzer Organ is to be retained for a new venture
using the Museum building. I will continue to do Player Piano Restoration
doing only the Player action, any piano action work needing doing will be
done by the finest Piano firm in the Plymouth area."

His website no longer functions.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris McMillan
2018-10-02 18:15:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On Tue, 02 Oct 2018 09:43:55 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
a player piano that includes violins.
https://flic.kr/p/28czowW
There used to be a great mechanical music museum in a redundant chapel in
Brentford (or there abouts). Visiting piano players came from around the
world and recorded piano rolls there from time to time (I was never there
for a recording but saw the posters).
Another collection, mostly pianolas, player pianos and polyphons was held
in an isolated pub (called the Holly Bush, IIRC) in Derbyshire. Anyone know
if that's still there?
The McToodles have been to summat similar near Looe; public transport does
not really touch the spot so a fair walkies up and down hills was involved.
We visited one in Devon or Cornwall during a wet week on holiday. The only
thing I remember about it was learning the Brentford one had closed.
The Looe one was owned by Paul someone.
Paul Corin had one near Liskeard - he closed it at the end of 2012
"I have closed my Museum in Cornwall , Magnificent Music Machines as there
are now just too many Tourist Attraction in Cornwall as compared with when
we opened in 1967. The Wurlitzer Organ is to be retained for a new venture
using the Museum building. I will continue to do Player Piano Restoration
doing only the Player action, any piano action work needing doing will be
done by the finest Piano firm in the Plymouth area."
His website no longer functions.
Thanks Penny! (Wish people would take down their sites!)

Sincerely Chris
Penny
2018-10-02 22:25:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 02 Oct 2018 18:15:44 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Penny
On Tue, 02 Oct 2018 09:43:55 GMT, Chris McMillan
Paul Corin had one near Liskeard - he closed it at the end of 2012
"I have closed my Museum in Cornwall , Magnificent Music Machines as there
are now just too many Tourist Attraction in Cornwall as compared with when
we opened in 1967. The Wurlitzer Organ is to be retained for a new venture
using the Museum building. I will continue to do Player Piano Restoration
doing only the Player action, any piano action work needing doing will be
done by the finest Piano firm in the Plymouth area."
His website no longer functions.
Thanks Penny! (Wish people would take down their sites!)
Well I suppose he has but if you move the site or just let it lapse the
domain name tends to hang around - though why anyone else would want to buy
paulcorinmusic.co.uk is anyone's guess...
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-10-02 10:47:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
[]
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
There used to be a great mechanical music museum in a redundant chapel in
Brentford (or there abouts). Visiting piano players came from around the
[]
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Another collection, mostly pianolas, player pianos and polyphons was held
in an isolated pub (called the Holly Bush, IIRC) in Derbyshire. Anyone know
[]
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
The McToodles have been to summat similar near Looe; public transport does
[]
Post by Penny
We visited one in Devon or Cornwall during a wet week on holiday. The only
thing I remember about it was learning the Brentford one had closed.
Mechanical music collections I have been to:

The Bowes Museum, in Barnard Castle (county Durham) had a music room
which contained a few cranked instruments (among other unusual
instruments). Not worth a visit on its own, probably, but if you're
there anyway ... it's a fascinating museum, of the old-fashioned
bit-of-everything kind. [I say "had" as I haven't been there for forty
years or so; I have no reason to believe it isn't still there. The
museum itself certainly is. Strange place - an unexpected
French-chateau-style building in the middle of Durham/Yorkshire
countryside.]

I remember a pleasant day spent (on a family holiday in Norfolk) at
https://www.thursford.com/steam-museum/#mechanical-organs - culminating
in a demonstration on a "Mighty Wurlitzer". (Which when we were there
some decades ago, was distributed about the seating area - as he played,
different panels in the walls about you opened - you were more or less
inside it. That may or may not still be the case.)

Then there is the late lamented Finchcocks - now sadly no more. That
wasn't really a mechanical so much as a keyboard instruments collection,
though it did have some mechanicals. But you could touch and examine all
the exhibits - even play them if you were competent. The culmination for
me was always the spirited - if not always accurate! - rendition of the
Turkish Rondo on a "Turkish piano" (the sort of instrument it was
written for - piano with gimmicks) by Richard Burnett:
(stick with it beyond the
first verse!).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Does my Bradshaw look big in this?
Penny
2018-10-02 11:55:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 2 Oct 2018 11:47:33 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I remember a pleasant day spent (on a family holiday in Norfolk) at
https://www.thursford.com/steam-museum/#mechanical-organs - culminating
in a demonstration on a "Mighty Wurlitzer". (Which when we were there
some decades ago, was distributed about the seating area - as he played,
different panels in the walls about you opened - you were more or less
inside it. That may or may not still be the case.)
I loved that place! A big shed full of fairground organs which played in
turn and the vertiginous Venetian Gondola Switchback Ride which the
children enjoyed but we (particularly the husgod) did not.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Chris J Dixon
2018-10-02 18:43:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
The Bowes Museum, in Barnard Castle (county Durham) had a music room
which contained a few cranked instruments (among other unusual
instruments). Not worth a visit on its own, probably, but if you're
there anyway ... it's a fascinating museum, of the old-fashioned
bit-of-everything kind.
And if you are there, don't miss the mechanical swan.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-10-02 18:57:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
The Bowes Museum, in Barnard Castle (county Durham) had a music room
which contained a few cranked instruments (among other unusual
instruments). Not worth a visit on its own, probably, but if you're
there anyway ... it's a fascinating museum, of the old-fashioned
bit-of-everything kind.
And if you are there, don't miss the mechanical swan.
Chris
Most definitely. And the front doors to the museum - which apparently
weigh several tons each, but can be moved by hand.

(I was at the school next door to the museum for seven years or so.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Old soldiers never die - only young ones
Chris J Dixon
2018-10-02 19:28:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
The Bowes Museum, in Barnard Castle (county Durham) had a music room
which contained a few cranked instruments (among other unusual
instruments). Not worth a visit on its own, probably, but if you're
there anyway ... it's a fascinating museum, of the old-fashioned
bit-of-everything kind.
And if you are there, don't miss the mechanical swan.
Most definitely. And the front doors to the museum - which apparently
weigh several tons each, but can be moved by hand.
Which reminds me that when we visited Castle Drogo, we went up to
the scaffold viewing platform which, though a little scary, was
most interesting, and allowed us to look down upon the building
work.

We then did the house tour, which was quite short, due to the
building works, followed by a guided architectural tour where we
saw a few more of the rooms, and the mechanism for the working
portcullis, which relied upon chains and sprockets reminiscent of
Heath Robinson.

There was also a fascinating exhibition at Compton Verney "The
Marvellous Mechanical Museum" (sadly just closed)

<http://www.comptonverney.org.uk/thing-to-do/marvellous-mechanical-museum-june-2018/>

It is some years since I last visited, but in Northleach there is
http://www.mechanicalmusic.co.uk/

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Penny
2018-10-02 22:26:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 02 Oct 2018 19:43:47 +0100, Chris J Dixon <***@cdixon.me.uk>
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Chris J Dixon
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
The Bowes Museum, in Barnard Castle (county Durham) had a music room
which contained a few cranked instruments (among other unusual
instruments). Not worth a visit on its own, probably, but if you're
there anyway ... it's a fascinating museum, of the old-fashioned
bit-of-everything kind.
And if you are there, don't miss the mechanical swan.
I've seen a video of that, it does look marvelous :)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sally Thompson
2018-10-02 18:59:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
[]
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
There used to be a great mechanical music museum in a redundant chapel in
Brentford (or there abouts). Visiting piano players came from around the
[]
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Another collection, mostly pianolas, player pianos and polyphons was held
in an isolated pub (called the Holly Bush, IIRC) in Derbyshire. Anyone know
[]
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
The McToodles have been to summat similar near Looe; public transport does
[]
Post by Penny
We visited one in Devon or Cornwall during a wet week on holiday. The only
thing I remember about it was learning the Brentford one had closed.
<snip>
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Then there is the late lamented Finchcocks - now sadly no more. That
wasn't really a mechanical so much as a keyboard instruments collection,
though it did have some mechanicals. But you could touch and examine all
the exhibits - even play them if you were competent. The culmination for
me was always the spirited - if not always accurate! - rendition of the
Turkish Rondo on a "Turkish piano" (the sort of instrument it was
http://youtu.be/ZetRIKHu0kA (stick with it beyond the
first verse!).
My OH and I used to do an annual craft fair at Finchcocks, and Richard
Burnett would play some of the instruments at intervals. I was once
privileged to turn the pages for him and someone else when they played a
duet, and needed a volunteer who could read music. A great experience!
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Penny
2018-10-02 22:22:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 2 Oct 2018 18:59:03 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
My OH and I used to do an annual craft fair at Finchcocks, and Richard
Burnett would play some of the instruments at intervals. I was once
privileged to turn the pages for him and someone else when they played a
duet, and needed a volunteer who could read music. A great experience!
Ooh, what were you selling? I was impressed by that craft fair and attended
several times.
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
Sally Thompson
2018-10-03 10:13:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On 2 Oct 2018 18:59:03 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
My OH and I used to do an annual craft fair at Finchcocks, and Richard
Burnett would play some of the instruments at intervals. I was once
privileged to turn the pages for him and someone else when they played a
duet, and needed a volunteer who could read music. A great experience!
Ooh, what were you selling? I was impressed by that craft fair and attended
several times.
He used to make hand-made lampshades with real pressed grasses and leaves
(not flowers). I think this might work:

<http://s230.photobucket.com/user/sallycatlover/library/Lampshades?sort=2&page=1>
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Sally Thompson
2018-10-03 10:15:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
On 2 Oct 2018 18:59:03 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
My OH and I used to do an annual craft fair at Finchcocks, and Richard
Burnett would play some of the instruments at intervals. I was once
privileged to turn the pages for him and someone else when they played a
duet, and needed a volunteer who could read music. A great experience!
Ooh, what were you selling? I was impressed by that craft fair and attended
several times.
He used to make hand-made lampshades with real pressed grasses and leaves
<http://s230.photobucket.com/user/sallycatlover/library/Lampshades?sort=2&page=1>
Or this might be better:
<http://s230.photobucket.com/user/sallycatlover/library/Lampshades>
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Penny
2018-10-03 14:40:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 3 Oct 2018 10:15:36 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
On 2 Oct 2018 18:59:03 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
My OH and I used to do an annual craft fair at Finchcocks, and Richard
Burnett would play some of the instruments at intervals. I was once
privileged to turn the pages for him and someone else when they played a
duet, and needed a volunteer who could read music. A great experience!
Ooh, what were you selling? I was impressed by that craft fair and attended
several times.
He used to make hand-made lampshades with real pressed grasses and leaves
<http://s230.photobucket.com/user/sallycatlover/library/Lampshades?sort=2&page=1>
<http://s230.photobucket.com/user/sallycatlover/library/Lampshades>
Lovely - particularly the grasses :)
--
Penny
Annoyed by The Archers since 1959
BrritSki
2018-10-03 14:53:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On 3 Oct 2018 10:15:36 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
On 2 Oct 2018 18:59:03 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
My OH and I used to do an annual craft fair at Finchcocks, and Richard
Burnett would play some of the instruments at intervals. I was once
privileged to turn the pages for him and someone else when they played a
duet, and needed a volunteer who could read music. A great experience!
Ooh, what were you selling? I was impressed by that craft fair and attended
several times.
He used to make hand-made lampshades with real pressed grasses and leaves
<http://s230.photobucket.com/user/sallycatlover/library/Lampshades?sort=2&page=1>
<http://s230.photobucket.com/user/sallycatlover/library/Lampshades>
Lovely - particularly the grasses :)
SNAP !
BrritSki
2018-10-03 14:51:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Penny
On 2 Oct 2018 18:59:03 GMT, Sally Thompson
Post by Sally Thompson
My OH and I used to do an annual craft fair at Finchcocks, and Richard
Burnett would play some of the instruments at intervals. I was once
privileged to turn the pages for him and someone else when they played a
duet, and needed a volunteer who could read music. A great experience!
Ooh, what were you selling? I was impressed by that craft fair and attended
several times.
He used to make hand-made lampshades with real pressed grasses and leaves
<http://s230.photobucket.com/user/sallycatlover/library/Lampshades?sort=2&page=1>
Wow, they are lovely, especially the grasses...
Serena Blanchflower
2018-10-02 19:10:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
in the dust...
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
[]
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
There used to be a great mechanical music museum in a redundant chapel in
Brentford (or there abouts). Visiting piano players came from around the
[]
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Another collection, mostly pianolas, player pianos and polyphons was held
in an isolated pub (called the Holly Bush, IIRC) in Derbyshire. Anyone know
[]
Post by Penny
Post by Mike
The McToodles have been to summat similar near Looe; public transport does
[]
Post by Penny
We visited one in Devon or Cornwall during a wet week on holiday. The only
thing I remember about it was learning the Brentford one had closed.
<snip list>

There also is, or maybe was[1], a Mechanical Music Museum and Doll
Collection, in Chichester which I remember as being rather fun.


[1] Their website seems to have disappeared, although it's still listed
on various sites listing local attractions.
--
Best wishes, Serena
To keep a lamp burning, we have to keep putting oil in it (Mother Theresa)
Fred
2018-10-03 08:05:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The Bowes Museum, in Barnard Castle (county Durham) it's a fascinating museum, of the old-fashioned
bit-of-everything kind.
The first house to be built in England to metric measurements.
The family who built it had lived in France for a long time and wanted a "chateau".
Time your visit so you can see The Swan automaton.

Fred
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-10-03 10:46:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Fred
The Bowes Museum, in Barnard Castle (county Durham) it's a
fascinating museum, of the old-fashioned
bit-of-everything kind.
The first house to be built in England to metric measurements.
Really! I didn't know that. (Mind you, "house" isn't quite it ...
[you can just see my old
school at 1:14])
Post by Fred
The family who built it had lived in France for a long time and wanted a "chateau".
Time your visit so you can see The Swan automaton.
Fred

--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Veni Vidi Visa [I came, I saw, I did a little shopping] - Mik from S+AS Limited
(***@saslimited.demon.co.uk), 1998
Chris McMillan
2018-10-02 09:43:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Still used on Jacquard looms I think - also on steam organs (for which
new 'books' are still made) and player pianos - there are pianos which
cut new rolls when played..
I think they are Pianolas and there are Piano Players too.
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
a player piano that includes violins.
https://flic.kr/p/28czowW
There used to be a great mechanical music museum in a redundant chapel in
Brentford (or there abouts). Visiting piano players came from around the
world and recorded piano rolls there from time to time (I was never there
for a recording but saw the posters).
Another collection, mostly pianolas, player pianos and polyphons was held
in an isolated pub (called the Holly Bush, IIRC) in Derbyshire. Anyone know
if that's still there?
The McToodles have been to summat similar near Looe; public transport does
not really touch the spot so a fair walkies up and down hills was involved.
looks like from extensive searches it’s no longer there. But I did find a
Saydisc recording

Sincerely Chris
Chris McMillan
2018-10-02 10:08:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Still used on Jacquard looms I think - also on steam organs (for which
new 'books' are still made) and player pianos - there are pianos which
cut new rolls when played..
I think they are Pianolas and there are Piano Players too.
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
a player piano that includes violins.
https://flic.kr/p/28czowW
There used to be a great mechanical music museum in a redundant chapel in
Brentford (or there abouts). Visiting piano players came from around the
world and recorded piano rolls there from time to time (I was never there
for a recording but saw the posters).
Another collection, mostly pianolas, player pianos and polyphons was held
in an isolated pub (called the Holly Bush, IIRC) in Derbyshire. Anyone know
if that's still there?
The McToodles have been to summat similar near Looe; public transport does
not really touch the spot so a fair walkies up and down hills was involved.
looks like from extensive searches it’s no longer there. But I did find a
Saydisc recording
Sincerely Chris
Take back what I said. Earlier this wasn’t showing up.
https://www.chycor.co.uk/tourism/cata/members/25member/

Sincerely Chris
BrritSki
2018-10-02 11:02:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Still used on Jacquard looms I think - also on steam organs (for which
new 'books' are still made) and player pianos - there are pianos which
cut new rolls when played..
I think they are Pianolas and there are Piano Players too.
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
a player piano that includes violins.
https://flic.kr/p/28czowW
There used to be a great mechanical music museum in a redundant chapel in
Brentford (or there abouts). Visiting piano players came from around the
world and recorded piano rolls there from time to time (I was never there
for a recording but saw the posters).
Another collection, mostly pianolas, player pianos and polyphons was held
in an isolated pub (called the Holly Bush, IIRC) in Derbyshire. Anyone know
if that's still there?
The McToodles have been to summat similar near Looe; public transport does
not really touch the spot so a fair walkies up and down hills was involved.
Pianola rolls in the Loo are not very effective ime.
It's the 'oles moi lover.
carolet
2018-10-03 18:02:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
scrawled in the dust...
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Still used on Jacquard looms I think - also on steam organs (for which
new 'books' are still made) and player pianos - there are pianos which
cut new rolls when played..
I think they are Pianolas and there are Piano Players too.
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
a player piano that includes violins.
https://flic.kr/p/28czowW
There used to be a great mechanical music museum in a redundant chapel in
Brentford (or there abouts). Visiting piano players came from around the
world and recorded piano rolls there from time to time (I was never there
for a recording but saw the posters).
Another collection, mostly pianolas, player pianos and polyphons was held
in an isolated pub (called the Holly Bush, IIRC) in Derbyshire. Anyone know
if that's still there?
There's this one in Northleach, Gloucestershire -
http://www.mechanicalmusic.co.uk/
(it seems to have grabbed the obvious website for this sort of museum).

I can't vouch for what's there, but I drove past it today and thought of
this thread.
--
CaroleT
Fenny
2018-10-02 17:40:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 1 Oct 2018 21:22:49 GMT, Jim Easterbrook
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Still used on Jacquard looms I think - also on steam organs (for which
new 'books' are still made) and player pianos - there are pianos which
cut new rolls when played..
I think they are Pianolas and there are Piano Players too.
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
a player piano that includes violins.
https://flic.kr/p/28czowW
Swerve alert - I watched a thing on C5 last night about a chap who is
walking Britain's "Lost" railways. He did the Woodhead line from
Sheffield to Mancy and called in the local cinema in Penistone. They
have an old organ and we got to see the workings. It has actual
cymbals and horns and all kinds of stuff to make the amazing noises
that used to accompay silent films. Well worth a watch.

http://www.channel5.com/show/walking-britains-lost-railways/
--
Fenny
Chris McMillan
2018-10-02 18:17:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On 1 Oct 2018 21:22:49 GMT, Jim Easterbrook
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Still used on Jacquard looms I think - also on steam organs (for which
new 'books' are still made) and player pianos - there are pianos which
cut new rolls when played..
I think they are Pianolas and there are Piano Players too.
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
a player piano that includes violins.
https://flic.kr/p/28czowW
Swerve alert - I watched a thing on C5 last night about a chap who is
walking Britain's "Lost" railways. He did the Woodhead line from
Sheffield to Mancy and called in the local cinema in Penistone. They
have an old organ and we got to see the workings. It has actual
cymbals and horns and all kinds of stuff to make the amazing noises
that used to accompay silent films. Well worth a watch.
http://www.channel5.com/show/walking-britains-lost-railways/
We are watching it too.

Sincerely Chris
Chris J Dixon
2018-10-02 19:31:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Fenny
Swerve alert - I watched a thing on C5 last night about a chap who is
walking Britain's "Lost" railways. He did the Woodhead line from
Sheffield to Mancy and called in the local cinema in Penistone. They
have an old organ and we got to see the workings. It has actual
cymbals and horns and all kinds of stuff to make the amazing noises
that used to accompay silent films. Well worth a watch.
http://www.channel5.com/show/walking-britains-lost-railways/
We are watching it too.
A magnificent instrument!

The last time I was on Penistone station, I had just travelled
from Manchester one snowy night. IIRC it was after the end of
regular passenger services, but this train ran because the roads
were closed.

Chris
--
Chris J Dixon Nottingham
'48/33 M B+ G++ A L(-) I S-- CH0(--)(p) Ar- T+ H0 ?Q
***@cdixon.me.uk
Plant amazing Acers.
Mike
2018-10-02 21:22:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Penny
On 1 Oct 2018 21:22:49 GMT, Jim Easterbrook
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Still used on Jacquard looms I think - also on steam organs (for which
new 'books' are still made) and player pianos - there are pianos which
cut new rolls when played..
I think they are Pianolas and there are Piano Players too.
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
a player piano that includes violins.
https://flic.kr/p/28czowW
Swerve alert - I watched a thing on C5 last night about a chap who is
walking Britain's "Lost" railways. He did the Woodhead line from
Sheffield to Mancy and called in the local cinema in Penistone. They
have an old organ and we got to see the workings. It has actual
cymbals and horns and all kinds of stuff to make the amazing noises
that used to accompay silent films. Well worth a watch.
http://www.channel5.com/show/walking-britains-lost-railways/
Yes the Toodleses saw it; it was a Compton organ.
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2018-10-04 08:49:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
On 1 Oct 2018 21:22:49 GMT, Jim Easterbrook
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Mike
Post by Penny
Still used on Jacquard looms I think - also on steam organs (for which
new 'books' are still made) and player pianos - there are pianos which
cut new rolls when played..
I think they are Pianolas and there are Piano Players too.
Next time I go to the Deutsches Museum (in Munich) I must time my visit
to be able to see the demonstration of mechanical instruments. They have
a player piano that includes violins.
https://flic.kr/p/28czowW
Swerve alert - I watched a thing on C5 last night about a chap who is
walking Britain's "Lost" railways. He did the Woodhead line from
Sheffield to Mancy and called in the local cinema in Penistone. They
have an old organ and we got to see the workings. It has actual
cymbals and horns and all kinds of stuff to make the amazing noises
that used to accompay silent films. Well worth a watch.
http://www.channel5.com/show/walking-britains-lost-railways/
Yes the Toodleses saw it; it was a Compton organ.
I no nuffin’. :).

Sincerely Chris

BrritSki
2018-10-01 19:40:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Peter Withey
On Mon, 1 Oct 2018 15:46:12 +0100, Jenny M Benson
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
No, not many, if any punch cards used these days <g>
They are by lots of machine knitters!
Something new I've learnt today. I was thinking of their use as
computer input. Thanks.
Used in weaving looms eons ago too.
And for programming Babbage's Engines by Ada Lovelace, which, via her
descendant Linda, brings us back to fluffers...
Jim Easterbrook
2018-10-01 15:43:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
No, not many, if any punch cards used these days <g>
They are by lots of machine knitters!
My mum used to have a card controlled knitting machine. Amongst its many
controls was one which the manual (and an additional book) totally failed
to explain adequately. I worked out it was inverting the effect of
alternate card cells in a quincunxial pattern. I then punched a card to
exploit this effect and generate a Hilbert curve pattern. I still have
the jersey mum made for me with it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hilbert_curve
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
LFS
2018-10-01 16:18:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
No, not many, if any punch cards used these days <g>
They are by lots of machine knitters!
My mum used to have a card controlled knitting machine. Amongst its many
controls was one which the manual (and an additional book) totally failed
to explain adequately. I worked out it was inverting the effect of
alternate card cells in a quincunxial pattern. I then punched a card to
exploit this effect and generate a Hilbert curve pattern. I still have
the jersey mum made for me with it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hilbert_curve
Since I didn't understand any of that - although I am very impressed -
I'd quite like to see a picture of the jersey.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Nick Odell
2018-10-01 18:01:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Jim Easterbrook
Post by Jenny M Benson
Post by p***@never.here
No, not many, if any punch cards used these days <g>
They are by lots of machine knitters!
My mum used to have a card controlled knitting machine. Amongst its many
controls was one which the manual (and an additional book) totally failed
to explain adequately. I worked out it was inverting the effect of
alternate card cells in a quincunxial pattern. I then punched a card to
exploit this effect and generate a Hilbert curve pattern. I still have
the jersey mum made for me with it.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hilbert_curve
Since I didn't understand any of that - although I am very impressed -
I'd quite like to see a picture of the jersey.
I think it's just another sideways swipe at the pointy-haired boss.

Nick
Jenny M Benson
2018-10-01 19:05:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
Since I didn't understand any of that - although I am very impressed -
I'd quite like to see a picture of the jersey.
Oy, you, Laura! What are you doing taking words right out of my mouth?

That is exactly what I was about to say!
--
Jenny M Benson
http://jennygenes.blogspot.co.uk/
LFS
2018-10-02 11:45:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
Since I didn't understand any of that - although I am very impressed -
I'd quite like to see a picture of the jersey.
Oy, you, Laura!  What are you doing taking words right out of my mouth?
That is exactly what I was about to say!
<grin> But shall we get an answer?
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Jim Easterbrook
2018-10-02 12:03:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by LFS
Since I didn't understand any of that - although I am very impressed -
I'd quite like to see a picture of the jersey.
Oy, you, Laura!  What are you doing taking words right out of my mouth?
That is exactly what I was about to say!
<grin> But shall we get an answer?
No.
--
Jim <http://www.jim-easterbrook.me.uk/>
1959/1985? M B+ G+ A L- I- S- P-- CH0(p) Ar++ T+ H0 Q--- Sh0
steveski
2018-10-01 16:10:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 30 Sep 2018 10:03:28 +0100, pete wrote:

[]
Post by p***@never.here
No, not many, if any punch cards used these days <g>
I dropped a box of punch cards once - oh, joy :-(
--
Steveski
Nick Odell
2018-10-01 18:02:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steveski
[]
Post by p***@never.here
No, not many, if any punch cards used these days <g>
I dropped a box of punch cards once - oh, joy :-(
Be honest though: isn't it the sort of thing you only do once?

Nick
John Ashby
2018-10-01 20:57:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Nick Odell
Post by steveski
[]
Post by p***@never.here
No, not many, if any punch cards used these days <g>
I dropped a box of punch cards once - oh, joy :-(
Be honest though: isn't it the sort of thing you only do once?
Nick
No, but on the subsequent occasions you use the 8 rightmost indexing
columns.

john
Chris McMillan
2018-09-30 17:54:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
s
p
o
i
l
e
r
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
Hannah is trying to snare Tom. Chad is a ruse to make Tom value her
more.
Who’s Chad? I heard the epi - or I dozed off?
He's the chap Hannah was meant to have a date with, the other night. It
was after this was cancelled that she propositioned Tom. Yesterday, she
was planning another date with Chad - I have heard it suggested
elsewhere that she's using him as a fluffer, to get Tom interested.
Ah, I misheard the name. Thought it was Chas. (As in short for Charles)

Sincerely Chris
Vicky Ayech
2018-09-29 17:24:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 29 Sep 2018 12:26:19 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
s
p
o
i
l
e
r
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
Hannah is trying to snare Tom. Chad is a ruse to make Tom value her
more.
Who’s Chad? I heard the epi - or I dozed off?
Sincerely Chris
Tom was asking to spend the evening but Hannah had a date with Chad,
the person who stood her up when Tom filled in last time.
Mike
2018-09-29 19:32:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 29 Sep 2018 12:26:19 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
s
p
o
i
l
e
r
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
Hannah is trying to snare Tom. Chad is a ruse to make Tom value her
more.
Who’s Chad? I heard the epi - or I dozed off?
Sincerely Chris
Tom was asking to spend the evening but Hannah had a date with Chad,
the person who stood her up when Tom filled in last time.
A good euphemism at any rate!
--
Toodle Pip
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-09-29 21:24:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by Vicky Ayech
On Sat, 29 Sep 2018 12:26:19 GMT, Chris McMillan
Post by Chris McMillan
Post by Vicky Ayech
s
p
o
i
l
e
r
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
Hannah is trying to snare Tom. Chad is a ruse to make Tom value her
more.
Who’s Chad? I heard the epi - or I dozed off?
Sincerely Chris
Tom was asking to spend the evening but Hannah had a date with Chad,
the person who stood her up when Tom filled in last time.
A good euphemism at any rate!
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only know
as someone in a certain industry who - well, let's say a lady wouldn't
normally have a use for.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I don't have an agree that our language torture is a quality add
- soldiersailor on Gransnet, 2018-3-8
Sid Nuncius
2018-09-30 18:06:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only know
as someone in a certain industry who - well, let's say a lady wouldn't
normally have a use for.
Another ancient and noble craft which is dying out as a result of
pharmacological advances, I understand.

The re-training courses at the local Job Centre might be interesting.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-09-30 20:25:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only
Oops - just rereading that, I realise it could most definitely be
misinterpreted! I meant, Serena said *Hannah* was using Chad as one.
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
know as someone in a certain industry who - well, let's say a lady
wouldn't normally have a use for.
Another ancient and noble craft which is dying out as a result of
pharmacological advances, I understand.
Hmm. AIUI (I've not tried them), the blue pills cause something that
cannot be - er - raised and lowered at will, which might be required in
that industry.
Post by Sid Nuncius
The re-training courses at the local Job Centre might be interesting.
LOL!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Santa's elves are just a bunch of subordinate Clauses.
Serena Blanchflower
2018-10-01 11:22:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only
Oops - just rereading that, I realise it could most definitely be
misinterpreted! I meant, Serena said *Hannah* was using Chad as one.
<splutter>!
--
Best wishes, Serena
To be astonished is one of the surest ways of not growing old too
quickly. (Colette)
steveski
2018-09-30 20:43:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only know
as someone in a certain industry who - well, let's say a lady wouldn't
normally have a use for.
Another ancient and noble craft which is dying out as a result of
pharmacological advances, I understand.
The re-training courses at the local Job Centre might be interesting.
:-)) Splutter!
--
Steveski
Sid Nuncius
2018-10-01 07:42:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by steveski
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only know
as someone in a certain industry who - well, let's say a lady wouldn't
normally have a use for.
Another ancient and noble craft which is dying out as a result of
pharmacological advances, I understand.
The re-training courses at the local Job Centre might be interesting.
:-)) Splutter!
I think that probably happened more on the original training course.
--
Sid (Make sure Matron is away when you reply)
Kate B
2018-10-01 08:53:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only know
as someone in a certain industry who - well, let's say a lady wouldn't
normally have a use for.
Another ancient and noble craft which is dying out as a result of
pharmacological advances, I understand.
The re-training courses at the local Job Centre might be interesting.
:-)) Splutter!
I think that probably happened more on the original training course.
It's not often I find myself whooshed, but 'fluffer' isn't a word I've
ever associated with anything even mildly risqué. I must have led a very
sheltered life. I blame the nuns.
--
Kate B
London
SODAM
2018-10-01 09:13:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only know
as someone in a certain industry who - well, let's say a lady wouldn't
normally have a use for.
Another ancient and noble craft which is dying out as a result of
pharmacological advances, I understand.
The re-training courses at the local Job Centre might be interesting.
:-)) Splutter!
I think that probably happened more on the original training course.
It's not often I find myself whooshed, but 'fluffer' isn't a word I've
ever associated with anything even mildly risqué. I must have led a very
sheltered life. I blame the nuns.
Me too! The only context in which I’ve heard the word was on a wonderful
documentary series about the Underground in London, about six years ago.
The fluffers cleaned the rails of all the lint that fell off passengers’
clothing, because it would become a fire hazard. It tended to be drawn into
the tunnels and pile up.

I was fascinated to learn that the composition of the fluff varied from
station to station. In e.g. Kensington, the fluff was mostly composed of
natural fibres such as wool, silk, linen and cotton, and was therefore more
combustible. In poorer areas the fluff was mostly from manmade fibres.
--
SODAM
The thinking umrat’s choice for editor
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-10-01 09:24:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In message
Post by SODAM
Post by Kate B
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only know
as someone in a certain industry who - well, let's say a lady wouldn't
normally have a use for.
Another ancient and noble craft which is dying out as a result of
pharmacological advances, I understand.
The re-training courses at the local Job Centre might be interesting.
:-)) Splutter!
I think that probably happened more on the original training course.
It's not often I find myself whooshed, but 'fluffer' isn't a word I've
ever associated with anything even mildly risqué. I must have led a very
sheltered life. I blame the nuns.
In the pornographic film (and video) industry, a "fluffer" was/is a
person who assisted the male performers to retain, er, condition, by the
time they get to the fifth take.

I meant to ask earlier: when Serena said she thought H* was using Chad
as a fluffer, what _did_ she/you mean? Obviously not the meaning I know,
but not the one below either.
Post by SODAM
Me too! The only context in which I’ve heard the word was on a wonderful
documentary series about the Underground in London, about six years ago.
The fluffers cleaned the rails of all the lint that fell off passengers’
clothing, because it would become a fire hazard. It tended to be drawn into
the tunnels and pile up.
I was fascinated to learn that the composition of the fluff varied from
station to station. In e.g. Kensington, the fluff was mostly composed of
natural fibres such as wool, silk, linen and cotton, and was therefore more
combustible. In poorer areas the fluff was mostly from manmade fibres.
That _is_ interesting.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

sometimes the best way to face the music is dance.
- Andrew Collins, in RT 2017/2/11-17
Kate B
2018-10-01 09:45:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In message
Post by SODAM
Post by Kate B
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only know
as someone in a certain industry who - well, let's say a lady wouldn't
normally have a use for.
Another ancient and noble craft which is dying out as a result of
pharmacological advances, I understand.
The re-training courses at the local Job Centre might be interesting.
:-)) Splutter!
I think that probably happened more on the original training course.
It's not often I find myself whooshed, but 'fluffer' isn't a word I've
ever associated with anything even mildly risqué. I must have led a very
sheltered life. I blame the nuns.
In the pornographic film (and video) industry, a "fluffer" was/is a
person who assisted the male performers to retain, er, condition, by the
time they get to the fifth take.
Good lord, JPeg, the things you know. I'm not going to ask how.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I meant to ask earlier: when Serena said she thought H* was using Chad
as a fluffer, what _did_ she/you mean? Obviously not the meaning I know,
but not the one below either.
Post by SODAM
Me too! The only context in which I’ve heard the word was on a wonderful
documentary series about the Underground in London, about six years ago.
The fluffers cleaned the rails of all the lint that fell off passengers’
clothing, because it would become a fire hazard. It tended to be drawn into
the tunnels and pile up.
I was fascinated to learn that the composition of the fluff varied from
station to station. In e.g. Kensington, the fluff was mostly composed of
natural fibres such as wool, silk, linen and cotton, and was therefore more
combustible. In poorer areas the fluff was mostly from manmade fibres.
That _is_ interesting.
--
Kate B
London
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-10-01 10:16:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In the pornographic film (and video) industry, a "fluffer" was/is a
person who assisted the male performers to retain, er, condition, by
the time they get to the fifth take.
(Not that one got the impression they ever do that many takes:
production values aren't usually high. But YKWIM.)
Post by Kate B
Good lord, JPeg, the things you know. I'm not going to ask how.
[]
I'm relieved to say that I wasn't the onlyrat who was familiar with that
use, judging by the (some hilarious!) followups earlier in the thread. I
don't know how I knew it: perhaps from some TV documentary? (I remember
one in which that chap with the black hair and spectacles - who does odd
documentaries - investigated that industry. Ah yes, Theroux - Paul I
think. Might have been that one.) No, I haven't worked therein!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

And every day in Britain, 33 properties are sold for around that price [a
million pounds or so]. - Jane Rackham, RT 2015/4/11-17
Serena Blanchflower
2018-10-01 11:31:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In the pornographic film (and video) industry, a "fluffer" was/is a
person who assisted the male performers to retain, er, condition, by
the  time they get to the fifth take.
production values aren't usually high. But YKWIM.)
Post by Kate B
Good lord, JPeg, the things you know. I'm not going to ask how.
[]
I'm relieved to say that I wasn't the onlyrat who was familiar with that
use, judging by the (some hilarious!) followups earlier in the thread. I
don't know how I knew it: perhaps from some TV documentary? (I remember
one in which that chap with the black hair and spectacles - who does odd
documentaries - investigated that industry. Ah yes, Theroux - Paul I
think. Might have been that one.) No, I haven't worked therein!
I think I learned it from umra...
--
Best wishes, Serena
A dame that knows the ropes isn't likely to get tied up. (Mae West)
Sally Thompson
2018-10-01 12:34:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In the pornographic film (and video) industry, a "fluffer" was/is a
person who assisted the male performers to retain, er, condition, by
the  time they get to the fifth take.
production values aren't usually high. But YKWIM.)
Post by Kate B
Good lord, JPeg, the things you know. I'm not going to ask how.
[]
I'm relieved to say that I wasn't the onlyrat who was familiar with that
use, judging by the (some hilarious!) followups earlier in the thread. I
don't know how I knew it: perhaps from some TV documentary? (I remember
one in which that chap with the black hair and spectacles - who does odd
documentaries - investigated that industry. Ah yes, Theroux - Paul I
think. Might have been that one.) No, I haven't worked therein!
I think I learned it from umra...
So did I, about three hours ago:-)
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
Serena Blanchflower
2018-10-01 12:45:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In the pornographic film (and video) industry, a "fluffer" was/is a
person who assisted the male performers to retain, er, condition, by
the  time they get to the fifth take.
production values aren't usually high. But YKWIM.)
Post by Kate B
Good lord, JPeg, the things you know. I'm not going to ask how.
[]
I'm relieved to say that I wasn't the onlyrat who was familiar with that
use, judging by the (some hilarious!) followups earlier in the thread. I
don't know how I knew it: perhaps from some TV documentary? (I remember
one in which that chap with the black hair and spectacles - who does odd
documentaries - investigated that industry. Ah yes, Theroux - Paul I
think. Might have been that one.) No, I haven't worked therein!
I think I learned it from umra...
So did I, about three hours ago:-)
<g>
--
Best wishes, Serena
If the person you are talking to doesn't appear to be listening, be
patient. It may simply be that he has a small piece of fluff in his ear.
(Winnie the Pooh)
Mike
2018-10-01 14:56:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sally Thompson
Post by Serena Blanchflower
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In the pornographic film (and video) industry, a "fluffer" was/is a
person who assisted the male performers to retain, er, condition, by
the  time they get to the fifth take.
production values aren't usually high. But YKWIM.)
Post by Kate B
Good lord, JPeg, the things you know. I'm not going to ask how.
[]
I'm relieved to say that I wasn't the onlyrat who was familiar with that
use, judging by the (some hilarious!) followups earlier in the thread. I
don't know how I knew it: perhaps from some TV documentary? (I remember
one in which that chap with the black hair and spectacles - who does odd
documentaries - investigated that industry. Ah yes, Theroux - Paul I
think. Might have been that one.) No, I haven't worked therein!
I think I learned it from umra...
So did I, about three hours ago:-)
Yes, from Umra, a while back now.
--
Toodle Pip
vk
2018-10-01 12:57:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In the pornographic film (and video) industry, a "fluffer" was/is a
person who assisted the male performers to retain, er, condition, by
the  time they get to the fifth take.
production values aren't usually high. But YKWIM.)
Post by Kate B
Good lord, JPeg, the things you know. I'm not going to ask how.
[]
I'm relieved to say that I wasn't the onlyrat who was familiar with that
use, judging by the (some hilarious!) followups earlier in the thread. I
don't know how I knew it: perhaps from some TV documentary? (I remember
one in which that chap with the black hair and spectacles - who does odd
documentaries - investigated that industry. Ah yes, Theroux - Paul I
think. Might have been that one.) No, I haven't worked therein!
Louis Theroux.
Mike
2018-10-01 14:52:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by Kate B
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In the pornographic film (and video) industry, a "fluffer" was/is a
person who assisted the male performers to retain, er, condition, by
the time they get to the fifth take.
production values aren't usually high. But YKWIM.)
Post by Kate B
Good lord, JPeg, the things you know. I'm not going to ask how.
[]
I'm relieved to say that I wasn't the onlyrat who was familiar with that
use, judging by the (some hilarious!) followups earlier in the thread. I
don't know how I knew it: perhaps from some TV documentary? (I remember
one in which that chap with the black hair and spectacles - who does odd
documentaries - investigated that industry. Ah yes, Theroux - Paul I
think. Might have been that one.) No, I haven't worked therein!
There are probably many jpegs around dealing with the subject;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Serena Blanchflower
2018-10-01 11:30:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
In message
Post by Kate B
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only know
as someone in a certain industry who - well, let's say a lady wouldn't
normally have a use for.
Another ancient and noble craft which is dying out as a result of
pharmacological advances, I understand.
The re-training courses at the local Job Centre might be interesting.
:-)) Splutter!
I think that probably happened more on the original training course.
It's not often I find myself whooshed, but 'fluffer' isn't a word I've
ever associated with anything even mildly risqué. I must have led a very
sheltered life. I blame the nuns.
In the pornographic film (and video) industry, a "fluffer" was/is a
person who assisted the male performers to retain, er, condition, by the
time they get to the fifth take.
I meant to ask earlier: when Serena said she thought H* was using Chad
as a fluffer, what _did_ she/you mean? Obviously not the meaning I know,
but not the one below either.
Pretty much the meaning you know. I think she was using Chad as a way
of both piquing and maintaining Tom's sexual interest in her, although
using jealousy rather than anything more direct. Mind you, I think it's
Bridge Farm that she's interested in, more than Tom himself.
--
Best wishes, Serena
If all goes well, this year's drama will be next year's anecdote
(Humphrey Littleton)
Mike
2018-10-01 14:48:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Post by Kate B
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only know
as someone in a certain industry who - well, let's say a lady wouldn't
normally have a use for.
Another ancient and noble craft which is dying out as a result of
pharmacological advances, I understand.
The re-training courses at the local Job Centre might be interesting.
:-)) Splutter!
I think that probably happened more on the original training course.
It's not often I find myself whooshed, but 'fluffer' isn't a word I've
ever associated with anything even mildly risqué. I must have led a very
sheltered life. I blame the nuns.
Me too! The only context in which I’ve heard the word was on a wonderful
documentary series about the Underground in London, about six years ago.
The fluffers cleaned the rails of all the lint that fell off passengers’
clothing, because it would become a fire hazard. It tended to be drawn into
the tunnels and pile up.
I was fascinated to learn that the composition of the fluff varied from
station to station. In e.g. Kensington, the fluff was mostly composed of
natural fibres such as wool, silk, linen and cotton, and was therefore more
combustible. In poorer areas the fluff was mostly from manmade fibres.
We once spent a long weekend recording a Church of England conference in
Swannick, Derbyshire; there were a number of contributors including Sidney
Carter, writer of the song about the sewers of London in which he explained
how the aroma varied in different regions of the city. Sidney explained
that the Covent Garden area was particularly potent with the aroma of
flowers. Sidney became a good friend to us and liked to sit next to us for
meals as he felt ‘a little out of place’ amongst the high ups of the world
of clergy ;-)
--
Toodle Pip
Chris McMillan
2018-10-01 17:42:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Kate B
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only know
as someone in a certain industry who - well, let's say a lady wouldn't
normally have a use for.
Another ancient and noble craft which is dying out as a result of
pharmacological advances, I understand.
The re-training courses at the local Job Centre might be interesting.
:-)) Splutter!
I think that probably happened more on the original training course.
It's not often I find myself whooshed, but 'fluffer' isn't a word I've
ever associated with anything even mildly risqué. I must have led a very
sheltered life. I blame the nuns.
Me too! The only context in which I’ve heard the word was on a wonderful
documentary series about the Underground in London, about six years ago.
The fluffers cleaned the rails of all the lint that fell off passengers’
clothing, because it would become a fire hazard. It tended to be drawn into
the tunnels and pile up.
I was fascinated to learn that the composition of the fluff varied from
station to station. In e.g. Kensington, the fluff was mostly composed of
natural fibres such as wool, silk, linen and cotton, and was therefore more
combustible. In poorer areas the fluff was mostly from manmade fibres.
We once spent a long weekend recording a Church of England conference in
Swannick, Derbyshire; there were a number of contributors including Sidney
Carter, writer of the song about the sewers of London in which he explained
how the aroma varied in different regions of the city. Sidney explained
that the Covent Garden area was particularly potent with the aroma of
flowers. Sidney became a good friend to us and liked to sit next to us for
meals as he felt ‘a little out of place’ amongst the high ups of the world
of clergy ;-)
Sydney Carter. “Lord of the Dance” chap

Sincerely Chris
Nick Odell
2018-10-01 18:21:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mike
Post by SODAM
Post by Kate B
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only know
as someone in a certain industry who - well, let's say a lady wouldn't
normally have a use for.
Another ancient and noble craft which is dying out as a result of
pharmacological advances, I understand.
The re-training courses at the local Job Centre might be interesting.
:-)) Splutter!
I think that probably happened more on the original training course.
It's not often I find myself whooshed, but 'fluffer' isn't a word I've
ever associated with anything even mildly risqué. I must have led a very
sheltered life. I blame the nuns.
Me too! The only context in which I’ve heard the word was on a wonderful
documentary series about the Underground in London, about six years ago.
The fluffers cleaned the rails of all the lint that fell off passengers’
clothing, because it would become a fire hazard. It tended to be drawn into
the tunnels and pile up.
I was fascinated to learn that the composition of the fluff varied from
station to station. In e.g. Kensington, the fluff was mostly composed of
natural fibres such as wool, silk, linen and cotton, and was therefore more
combustible. In poorer areas the fluff was mostly from manmade fibres.
We once spent a long weekend recording a Church of England conference in
Swannick, Derbyshire; there were a number of contributors including Sidney
Carter, writer of the song about the sewers of London in which he explained
how the aroma varied in different regions of the city. Sidney explained
that the Covent Garden area was particularly potent with the aroma of
flowers. Sidney became a good friend to us and liked to sit next to us for
meals as he felt ‘a little out of place’ amongst the high ups of the world
of clergy ;-)
I knew Sidney Carter very slightly a long time ago. I went round to see
him at his basement flat in a scruffy, run down, impoverished corner of
London called Notting Hill - yes, it was that long ago. I don't know
what time I got there but I was living in Hockley, near Southend-on-Sea
so I would have got up about eightish, caught the train in to Liverpool
Street and taken the tube the rest of the way. To say he had a somewhat
bohemian lifestyle might be an understatement because when he answered
the door he was still in his pajamas.[1] After he had dressed, we went
around the corner to a cafe for breakfast - though the other customers
were quite definitely eating lunch. I found him to be a very nice, very
quiet, unassuming man who, as I think you've guessed, after only a brief
meeting, left a lasting impression on me.

Nick
[1]Nowadays that description might fit me for the same reasons.
John Ashby
2018-10-01 21:02:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 01/10/2018 19:21, Nick Odell wrote:
[A small rewrite]
Post by Nick Odell
I knew Sidney Carter very slightly a long time ago. I went round to see
him at his basement flat in a scruffy, run down, impoverished corner of
London called Notting Hill - yes, it was that long ago. I don't know
what time I got there but I was living in Hockley, near Southend-on-Sea
so I would have got up about eightish, caught the train in to Liverpool
Street and taken the tube the rest of the way. To say he had a somewhat
bohemian lifestyle might be an understatement because he opened
the door in his pajamas.[1] After he had dressed, we went
around the corner to a cafe for breakfast - though the other customers
were quite definitely eating lunch. I found him to be a very nice, very
quiet, unassuming man who, as I think you've guessed, after only a brief
meeting, left a lasting impression on me.
Nick
[1]What a funny place to have a door.
john
Mike
2018-10-01 14:49:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by SODAM
Post by Kate B
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only know
as someone in a certain industry who - well, let's say a lady wouldn't
normally have a use for.
Another ancient and noble craft which is dying out as a result of
pharmacological advances, I understand.
The re-training courses at the local Job Centre might be interesting.
:-)) Splutter!
I think that probably happened more on the original training course.
It's not often I find myself whooshed, but 'fluffer' isn't a word I've
ever associated with anything even mildly risqué. I must have led a very
sheltered life. I blame the nuns.
Me too! The only context in which I’ve heard the word was on a wonderful
documentary series about the Underground in London, about six years ago.
The fluffers cleaned the rails of all the lint that fell off passengers’
clothing, because it would become a fire hazard. It tended to be drawn into
the tunnels and pile up.
I was fascinated to learn that the composition of the fluff varied from
station to station. In e.g. Kensington, the fluff was mostly composed of
natural fibres such as wool, silk, linen and cotton, and was therefore more
combustible. In poorer areas the fluff was mostly from manmade fibres.
‘Not everybody knows that.’
--
Toodle Pip
Sally Thompson
2018-10-01 10:33:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kate B
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by steveski
Post by Sid Nuncius
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Well, Serena did say she was using Chad as a fluffer, which I only know
as someone in a certain industry who - well, let's say a lady wouldn't
normally have a use for.
Another ancient and noble craft which is dying out as a result of
pharmacological advances, I understand.
The re-training courses at the local Job Centre might be interesting.
:-)) Splutter!
I think that probably happened more on the original training course.
It's not often I find myself whooshed, but 'fluffer' isn't a word I've
ever associated with anything even mildly risqué. I must have led a very
sheltered life. I blame the nuns.
Nor me, Kate, though I've had a good guess.
--
Sally in Shropshire, UK
BrritSki
2018-09-29 19:51:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Vicky Ayech
...
the person who stood her up when Tom filled in last time.
I think that might be a description of Kavanaugh and Mark Judge...
Nick Odell
2018-09-30 10:00:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BrritSki
Post by Vicky Ayech
...
the person who stood her up when Tom filled in last time.
I think that might be a description of Kavanaugh and Mark Judge...
There's an uneasy symmetry between

Judge Kavanaugh and Mark Judge

that's almost palindromic

Nick
Loading...